Author Topic: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)  (Read 5490 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline moj

  • beer snob
  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 10164
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #45 on: September 12, 2018, 02:47:41 PM »
My wife loves Buffalo wings or anything with the buffalo flavor. Not my jam at all, just taste like vinegar with a slight kick. I would 1000 times over prefer a garlic or jerk, pretty much anything that doesn't predominantly taste like vinegar. Most places around here that will do wings offer a variety of types but in the circle of people I eat with a lot, they almost all prefer buffalo style. I wonder if vinegary things are like cilantro and some taste it differently?

Offline mindme

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 8876
    • http://www.yrad.com/cs
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #46 on: September 12, 2018, 02:51:31 PM »
That Korean Pizza is a joke right? Like eating Tide Pods? That can't be real.

It's parody but shockingly close to the truth.
"Because the world needs more Mark Crislip."

Conspiracy Skeptic Podcast
Korean Podcast
Michael Goudeau, Vegas Comedy Entertainer Available for Trade Shows

Offline random poet

  • That's bullshit!
  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2129
  • On n'a jamais le temps, le temps nous a.
    • I have a LJ
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #47 on: September 12, 2018, 03:10:44 PM »
That Korean Pizza is a joke right? Like eating Tide Pods? That can't be real.

It's parody but shockingly close to the truth.
It really went off the rails when he cooked it in the microwave.
Aujourd'hui j'ai vu un facteur joyeux.

Offline arthwollipot

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9449
  • Observer of Phenomena
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #48 on: September 12, 2018, 06:14:00 PM »
I can't get on board with calling a pizza a "pie". It's not a pie. A pie has height, and it has a pastry crust on top. If it has height, but no pastry crust on top, then it's a tart. Chicago-style pizza could therefore be considered a tart, but a regular pizza needs to be more or less flat. It is cooked on a flat pan, not in a pie tin.

This is my opinion, of course - see my recent apology for seeming to proscribe language usage based on my personal opinions. A pizza is flat, with no crust on top - I make an exception for Chicago-style - and is therefore not a pie.
Self-described nerd. Pronouns: He/Him.

Offline random poet

  • That's bullshit!
  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2129
  • On n'a jamais le temps, le temps nous a.
    • I have a LJ
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #49 on: September 12, 2018, 06:25:10 PM »
I can't get on board with calling a pizza a "pie". It's not a pie. A pie has height, and it has a pastry crust on top. If it has height, but no pastry crust on top, then it's a tart. Chicago-style pizza could therefore be considered a tart, but a regular pizza needs to be more or less flat. It is cooked on a flat pan, not in a pie tin.

This is my opinion, of course - see my recent apology for seeming to proscribe language usage based on my personal opinions. A pizza is flat, with no crust on top - I make an exception for Chicago-style - and is therefore not a pie.
What about a key-lime pie, or a lemon pie, or any of the other types of pie with no upper crust? Are they tarts?

What if you just do a kind of a dough lattice as an upper crust, covering less surface? Is there a percentage of coverage that is required before you can call your lattice-covered cherry pie a pie?

What about a Tarte Tatin? They have no height, no rim of crust.

(Tart is synonymous with pie. It's just the French word for pie. No other language that I'm aware of makes the distinction that you cite above.)
Aujourd'hui j'ai vu un facteur joyeux.

Offline arthwollipot

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9449
  • Observer of Phenomena
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #50 on: September 12, 2018, 06:45:24 PM »
I can't get on board with calling a pizza a "pie". It's not a pie. A pie has height, and it has a pastry crust on top. If it has height, but no pastry crust on top, then it's a tart. Chicago-style pizza could therefore be considered a tart, but a regular pizza needs to be more or less flat. It is cooked on a flat pan, not in a pie tin.

This is my opinion, of course - see my recent apology for seeming to proscribe language usage based on my personal opinions. A pizza is flat, with no crust on top - I make an exception for Chicago-style - and is therefore not a pie.
What about a key-lime pie, or a lemon pie, or any of the other types of pie with no upper crust? Are they tarts?

Yes.

What if you just do a kind of a dough lattice as an upper crust, covering less surface? Is there a percentage of coverage that is required before you can call your lattice-covered cherry pie a pie?

Crust on top means pie. Doesn't matter if there are gaps in the crust. It's a pie.

What about a Tarte Tatin? They have no height, no rim of crust.

I had no idea what that was, so I had to look it up. A tarte tatin is clearly a fruit pizza.

(Tart is synonymous with pie. It's just the French word for pie. No other language that I'm aware of makes the distinction that you cite above.)

Right, but I'm specifically talking about English. More specifically, Australian English. Even more specifically, the Australian English vernacular that I use. I repeat for clarity - I'm not trying to suggest that my usage is the only valid usage. I often seem to come across that way, but I don't intend to.
Self-described nerd. Pronouns: He/Him.

Offline Captain Video

  • Superhero of the Silver Screen
  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 3737
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #51 on: September 12, 2018, 06:51:22 PM »
I can't get on board with calling a pizza a "pie". It's not a pie. A pie has height, and it has a pastry crust on top. If it has height, but no pastry crust on top, then it's a tart. Chicago-style pizza could therefore be considered a tart, but a regular pizza needs to be more or less flat. It is cooked on a flat pan, not in a pie tin.

This is my opinion, of course - see my recent apology for seeming to proscribe language usage based on my personal opinions. A pizza is flat, with no crust on top - I make an exception for Chicago-style - and is therefore not a pie.
What about a key-lime pie, or a lemon pie, or any of the other types of pie with no upper crust? Are they tarts?

What if you just do a kind of a dough lattice as an upper crust, covering less surface? Is there a percentage of coverage that is required before you can call your lattice-covered cherry pie a pie?

What about a Tarte Tatin? They have no height, no rim of crust.

(Tart is synonymous with pie. It's just the French word for pie. No other language that I'm aware of makes the distinction that you cite above.)

Pie = crust with stuff on top and does not need a top crust.  I emphasise crust as that bread stuff cooked on the conveyor belt is unable to achieve one. You cant do this on a "flat pan" either, it needs to cook right on the stone.

Although I do like the idea of calling it a Chicago pizza Tart, that works for me even if it does still qualify as a "pie"  >:D

I like Arthwollipots food descriptions.

Offline random poet

  • That's bullshit!
  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2129
  • On n'a jamais le temps, le temps nous a.
    • I have a LJ
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #52 on: September 12, 2018, 06:55:42 PM »
I can't get on board with calling a pizza a "pie". It's not a pie. A pie has height, and it has a pastry crust on top. If it has height, but no pastry crust on top, then it's a tart. Chicago-style pizza could therefore be considered a tart, but a regular pizza needs to be more or less flat. It is cooked on a flat pan, not in a pie tin.

This is my opinion, of course - see my recent apology for seeming to proscribe language usage based on my personal opinions. A pizza is flat, with no crust on top - I make an exception for Chicago-style - and is therefore not a pie.
What about a key-lime pie, or a lemon pie, or any of the other types of pie with no upper crust? Are they tarts?

Yes.

What if you just do a kind of a dough lattice as an upper crust, covering less surface? Is there a percentage of coverage that is required before you can call your lattice-covered cherry pie a pie?

Crust on top means pie. Doesn't matter if there are gaps in the crust. It's a pie.

What about a Tarte Tatin? They have no height, no rim of crust.

I had no idea what that was, so I had to look it up. A tarte tatin is clearly a fruit pizza.

(Tart is synonymous with pie. It's just the French word for pie. No other language that I'm aware of makes the distinction that you cite above.)

Right, but I'm specifically talking about English. More specifically, Australian English. Even more specifically, the Australian English vernacular that I use. I repeat for clarity - I'm not trying to suggest that my usage is the only valid usage. I often seem to come across that way, but I don't intend to.
Fine, but you still haven't answered the only important question in that lot.

It was:
"Is there a percentage of coverage that is required before you can call your lattice-covered cherry pie a pie?"
Or any pie at all. What if it had one single, 1 inch wide, line of crust across the top?
Aujourd'hui j'ai vu un facteur joyeux.

Offline Redamare

  • Deleted
  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *
  • Posts: 4206
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #53 on: September 12, 2018, 06:56:24 PM »
It's true. Some pies basically never have a top crust (pumpkin, pecan, chocolate silk), but even the more traditional ones like apple, cherry, and blueberry I frequently see without it.
"redamare has kicked this thread's ass" -champagnej

Certainty is the enemy of wisdom.

--RED-uh-MAR-ay--

Offline arthwollipot

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9449
  • Observer of Phenomena
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #54 on: September 12, 2018, 07:33:45 PM »
I can't get on board with calling a pizza a "pie". It's not a pie. A pie has height, and it has a pastry crust on top. If it has height, but no pastry crust on top, then it's a tart. Chicago-style pizza could therefore be considered a tart, but a regular pizza needs to be more or less flat. It is cooked on a flat pan, not in a pie tin.

This is my opinion, of course - see my recent apology for seeming to proscribe language usage based on my personal opinions. A pizza is flat, with no crust on top - I make an exception for Chicago-style - and is therefore not a pie.
What about a key-lime pie, or a lemon pie, or any of the other types of pie with no upper crust? Are they tarts?

Yes.

What if you just do a kind of a dough lattice as an upper crust, covering less surface? Is there a percentage of coverage that is required before you can call your lattice-covered cherry pie a pie?

Crust on top means pie. Doesn't matter if there are gaps in the crust. It's a pie.

What about a Tarte Tatin? They have no height, no rim of crust.

I had no idea what that was, so I had to look it up. A tarte tatin is clearly a fruit pizza.

(Tart is synonymous with pie. It's just the French word for pie. No other language that I'm aware of makes the distinction that you cite above.)

Right, but I'm specifically talking about English. More specifically, Australian English. Even more specifically, the Australian English vernacular that I use. I repeat for clarity - I'm not trying to suggest that my usage is the only valid usage. I often seem to come across that way, but I don't intend to.
Fine, but you still haven't answered the only important question in that lot.

It was:
"Is there a percentage of coverage that is required before you can call your lattice-covered cherry pie a pie?"
Or any pie at all. What if it had one single, 1 inch wide, line of crust across the top?

Yes, probably. But I don't usually encounter very many lattice-topped pies in my regular day-to-day. This is what I default to when I think of a pie:


Self-described nerd. Pronouns: He/Him.

Offline wastrel

  • Great poster... or greatest poster?
  • Technical Administrator
  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • *****
  • Posts: 13602
  • Science: A cold-hearted bitch with a 14" strap-on
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #55 on: September 12, 2018, 07:34:41 PM »
Are meat pies good?  Whenever I hear about them, I think they must be good, but have never encountered one in the wild.

Offline Redamare

  • Deleted
  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *
  • Posts: 4206
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #56 on: September 12, 2018, 07:36:44 PM »
Heard good things about pork pies in London.

Pot pies are okay, think meat and veggie stew in a pie crust. They're cheap in the frozen section and usually come in chicken, turkey, and beef flavor.
"redamare has kicked this thread's ass" -champagnej

Certainty is the enemy of wisdom.

--RED-uh-MAR-ay--

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 5138
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #57 on: September 12, 2018, 07:38:21 PM »
Lemon meringue pie.

"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline Redamare

  • Deleted
  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *
  • Posts: 4206
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #58 on: September 12, 2018, 07:39:09 PM »
Another fine example of my point.
"redamare has kicked this thread's ass" -champagnej

Certainty is the enemy of wisdom.

--RED-uh-MAR-ay--

Offline arthwollipot

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9449
  • Observer of Phenomena
Re: What's wrong with those pizzas? (Images)
« Reply #59 on: September 12, 2018, 07:49:08 PM »
Are meat pies good?  Whenever I hear about them, I think they must be good, but have never encountered one in the wild.

They vary greatly in quality. The cheaper ones tend to have bits of fat and gristle that make them less than pleasant. The good ones are to die for. They're the traditional fare at footy matches. Make sure you have them with sauce.
Self-described nerd. Pronouns: He/Him.

 

personate-rain
personate-rain