Author Topic: The future of compact smartphones  (Read 1709 times)

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Offline brilligtove

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2018, 10:46:53 PM »
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Online daniel1948

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2018, 11:02:06 AM »
https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2018/10/23/17989274/thalmic-labs-north-ar-glasses-focals-amazon-startup

AR or mixed reality eyewear is coming. I can hardly wait!

Google Maps was the application that finally got me to buy my (first and only) smartphone. No regrets. I won't buy Focals yet, but getting navigation instructions without looking at a screen could be the application that some day gets me to buy these, or something like them. I don't always have my phone with me, and I would not expect to wear these all the time. But I could see putting them on when I needed directions. Assuming they become affordable while I'm still ambulatory.
Daniel
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2018, 03:37:50 PM »
Google Maps was the application that finally got me to buy my (first and only) smartphone. No regrets.


Online daniel1948

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2018, 06:02:40 PM »
Google Maps was the application that finally got me to buy my (first and only) smartphone. No regrets.



I wasn't using a printout. I was letting my phone direct me. Voice prompts with supporting visuals. Since nothing's perfect, I suppose sometimes it will give me bad directions. But if I tried to find my way on my own, or follow a printed map while driving, I'd get lost, or worse, far more often. The cartoon is funny, but rather far-fetched.

FWIW, my old Garmin Nuvi always got me where I wanted to be, but occasionally it had a brain fart and sent me on a detour loop before bringing me back to the right road, and in one spot it always wanted me to take the longer route. It did the job, but the Google Maps app is better.
Daniel
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Offline brilligtove

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2018, 10:22:40 AM »
Last weekend Google Maps took me off the highway at a particular exit, with an immediate U turn and then back on the highway. I trusted it because there was construction in the area, and the off/on manoeuvre could have sidestepped a significant delay. There was no delay, however. The construction had caused a massive tailback the day before, but when I was driving it was all clear.

What I found amusing was that this glitch in the algorithm caused a continuous stream of cars to follow the same path I did. Off the highway, 2 blocks north, U turn, back on highway. I found it amusing to see how many people trusted the machine over what we could see ahead of us. I expect their reasoning was like mine: I've ignored these directions before and hit problems that I couldn't see from my vantage point. What's the use of overwatch if you're not going to take the information into account?
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Offline John Albert

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2018, 03:47:16 PM »
It feels like there's this unnatural expectation that everyone wants to follow the same trend.  I disliked the 2005-ish trend toward ever-shrinking phones, and applaud the current trend toward larger ones.  But I reckon there should be a market for both, shouldn't there?

I share your preference for the larger-screened devices, and agree that the manufacturers ought to be able to produce a variety of phones to suit different needs.

The main problem appears to be the way digital devices are marketed, with a focus on hype and trendiness. Through clever and manipulative advertising, they've shaped a fashion-driven market where phones are status symbols and most consumers desire the kind of device that they think everybody else seems to want.


Online daniel1948

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2018, 04:15:18 PM »
Last weekend Google Maps took me off the highway at a particular exit, with an immediate U turn and then back on the highway. I trusted it because there was construction in the area, and the off/on manoeuvre could have sidestepped a significant delay. There was no delay, however. The construction had caused a massive tailback the day before, but when I was driving it was all clear.

What I found amusing was that this glitch in the algorithm caused a continuous stream of cars to follow the same path I did. Off the highway, 2 blocks north, U turn, back on highway. I found it amusing to see how many people trusted the machine over what we could see ahead of us. I expect their reasoning was like mine: I've ignored these directions before and hit problems that I couldn't see from my vantage point. What's the use of overwatch if you're not going to take the information into account?

The question is: Do you get misdirected more often when following Google Maps or when navigating on your own with printed maps? In my case, there's no contest: Google will beat me by a long shot. It sounds like your experience was due to Google's being aware of an issue that has since disappeared. My old Garmin Nuvi took me on those occasional wacky detours every single time in the same spot. In one place it took me off the highway, into a marina, through some very narrow one-way streets, and then back onto the same highway. Next time I went by there it wanted me to take the same turn-off. There were other places like that. Also, when there is a fork in the road, and it wants me to take the road that continues the same route number or street name, it does not show the fork. Google maps shows me that sort of stuff. And the maps in my Garmin are years out of date. Google does not rely on maps loaded into my device years ago.
Daniel
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Online arthwollipot

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2018, 06:41:30 PM »
The interesting part of all this is that I have almost never been led astray by Google Maps, Apple Maps, or Waze. Apart from, maybe, two instances, they've all been perfectly reliable. For me. In the places I've driven. I may just be lucky.
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Offline mindme

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #23 on: October 26, 2018, 08:14:39 AM »
I thought 10 years ago by now we'd be living in the era of dockable smart phones. That is your work computer, your home computer, and your phone are the same device. You put your phone into a dock on your desk and it's hooked up to your monitors, keyboard, network, etc. End of day you undock it. It's now your mobile. Get home, dock it at home, and it's your home computer.

Didn't happen.
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Offline 2397

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2018, 08:23:00 AM »
I thought 10 years ago by now we'd be living in the era of dockable smart phones. That is your work computer, our home computer, and your phone are the same device. You put your phone into a dock on your desk and it's hooked up to your monitors, keyboard, network, etc. End of day you undock it. It's now your mobile. Get home, dock it at home, and it's your home computer.

Didn't happen.


Instead we have cloud data and universal logins. I'm not a fan, especially with how it always seems to turn out to be less secure than expected, and there's no reason trust what someone says about their own breaches because they're incentivized to downplay it.

Though I like to keep my media files on one computer at home and play it from the rest, including the phone.

Online daniel1948

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #25 on: October 26, 2018, 09:08:39 AM »
I never use one service to log in to another. But I do keep a lot of files in the cloud so that I can access them while traveling.

I thought 10 years ago by now we'd be living in the era of dockable smart phones. That is your work computer, your home computer, and your phone are the same device. You put your phone into a dock on your desk and it's hooked up to your monitors, keyboard, network, etc. End of day you undock it. It's now your mobile. Get home, dock it at home, and it's your home computer.

Didn't happen.

I think this vision falls afoul of the fact that with a laptop you have the whole computer with you. The above scenario requires you to have a dock, monitor, and keyboard everywhere you want to use them. Walk from your office to the conference room, you have your computer. Go on an airplane, you have your computer. Laptops are a more flexible solution than docking smartphones, and the people like me who don't want a laptop don't need a docking smartphone.
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Offline brilligtove

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #26 on: October 26, 2018, 11:32:41 AM »
I thought 10 years ago by now we'd be living in the era of dockable smart phones. That is your work computer, our home computer, and your phone are the same device. You put your phone into a dock on your desk and it's hooked up to your monitors, keyboard, network, etc. End of day you undock it. It's now your mobile. Get home, dock it at home, and it's your home computer.

Didn't happen.


Instead we have cloud data and universal logins. I'm not a fan, especially with how it always seems to turn out to be less secure than expected, and there's no reason trust what someone says about their own breaches because they're incentivized to downplay it.

Though I like to keep my media files on one computer at home and play it from the rest, including the phone.

Dockable phones do exist. They're just not common, and may never be. The customer they target likely already has a laptop and/or desktop, so the dockphone is competing with better kit that does the job already. A long time ago I outlined a design for a complete laptop/tablet/phone convertable, where the phone plugs in to the laptop base and acts as an active trackpad. I think if Apple made this to work with iPhones and iPads or Macbooks it might happen, but no one else has the right kind of customer base to make it work.

My guess is that immersive augmented reality (now being relabeled "mixed reality") will break the barriers between product categories, and will eliminate what we call 'hybrid' laptop/tablets. Once you are wearing an environment-aware display all the time tablets and phones become redundant. A brick made of battery, memory, and radios is all you need in your pocket. Really good compact keyboards will still be a thing, though voice dictation is getting good enough that their use may be much more limited than they are now.
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Online CarbShark

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #27 on: October 26, 2018, 11:36:14 AM »
I thought 10 years ago by now we'd be living in the era of dockable smart phones. That is your work computer, your home computer, and your phone are the same device. You put your phone into a dock on your desk and it's hooked up to your monitors, keyboard, network, etc. End of day you undock it. It's now your mobile. Get home, dock it at home, and it's your home computer.

Didn't happen.
Something different is happening. Instead your devices are syncing over the cloud so everything you need is at home at work in your car and in your pocket. No docking needed.


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Offline stands2reason

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #28 on: October 26, 2018, 12:21:48 PM »
The customer they target likely already has a laptop and/or desktop, so the dockphone is competing with better kit that does the job already.

Good point: it is basically the limit of current engineering to fit desktop hardware into a laptop. The last thing I want is a "desktop" that stutters when you use the CPU for a while—no fans so CPU can only run at full speed in bursts without thermal overload.

I thought the Windows tablets with (low-power) laptop-class CPUs already meet this standard. Though, the extra hardware means a larger device.

BTW: I'm still using the Galaxy S5 I bought used a year ago. Well, actually I have a pair of them, but...

I had an iPhone 4 and also have a 6. (never used as a regular phone) The 4 was about as a small as a touchscreen could be without being a royal pain, and that was just using it for listening to audio. I don't see how anyone could the 6 screen too large.


Offline Billzbub

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Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #29 on: October 26, 2018, 12:46:59 PM »
...though voice dictation is getting good enough that their use may be much more limited than they are now.

I disagree.  I think that most people would rather be silent and type rather than speak.  People now-a-days would rather text each other than call each other, even when calling would be far easier.  For mixed/augmented reality keyboards, we will need something as an input device that is discrete, like something you could use on the bus without waving your hands around or talking, similar to how smart phones work now.
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