Author Topic: The future of compact smartphones  (Read 1732 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline daniel1948

  • Hasn't
  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 7518
  • Cat Lovers Against the Bomb
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #30 on: October 26, 2018, 02:17:14 PM »
...though voice dictation is getting good enough that their use may be much more limited than they are now.

I disagree.  I think that most people would rather be silent and type rather than speak.  People now-a-days would rather text each other than call each other, even when calling would be far easier.  For mixed/augmented reality keyboards, we will need something as an input device that is discrete, like something you could use on the bus without waving your hands around or talking, similar to how smart phones work now.

Voice recognition has improved a lot, but you still need a keyboard to correct the mistakes.
Daniel
----------------
"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline brilligtove

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 6485
  • Ignorance can be cured. Stupidity, you deal with.
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #31 on: October 26, 2018, 08:59:54 PM »
I did not say "keyboards will be eliminated". Just that the need will be reduced. Today I see people dictate texts to the phone, check the dictation, and then send.  For many people under many circumstances this is considerably faster than attempting to type the information in in first place. For example this message was composed using voice to text on my iPad. I did have to make a few corrections – and a keyboard is more useful than an on screen keyboard for that – but overall it was faster than I can type, and by a wide margin. It is important to note that the way that we write and the way that we speak are drastically different. The deliberative action of writing is slow and meticulous. Speech is a jumbled mass of ideas produced unconsciously and with very little effort. The capacity to dictate clearly to a machine - or to a person – is distinct from the capacity to have a conversation. People today are training in this skill by talking to their phones while texting.
evidence trumps experience | performance over perfection | responsibility – authority = scapegoat | emotions motivate; data doesn't

Offline CarbShark

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9638
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #32 on: October 27, 2018, 12:53:46 AM »
I did have to make a few corrections – and a keyboard is more useful than an on screen keyboard for that

Not if you know the trick for the on screen keyboard that lets you move the cursor around like a mouse/ trackpad


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline John Albert

  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 5192
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #33 on: October 27, 2018, 04:42:53 PM »
I thought 10 years ago by now we'd be living in the era of dockable smart phones. That is your work computer, our home computer, and your phone are the same device. You put your phone into a dock on your desk and it's hooked up to your monitors, keyboard, network, etc. End of day you undock it. It's now your mobile. Get home, dock it at home, and it's your home computer.

Didn't happen.


Instead we have cloud data and universal logins. I'm not a fan, especially with how it always seems to turn out to be less secure than expected, and there's no reason trust what someone says about their own breaches because they're incentivized to downplay it.

Though I like to keep my media files on one computer at home and play it from the rest, including the phone.

Dockable phones do exist. They're just not common, and may never be. The customer they target likely already has a laptop and/or desktop, so the dockphone is competing with better kit that does the job already. A long time ago I outlined a design for a complete laptop/tablet/phone convertable, where the phone plugs in to the laptop base and acts as an active trackpad. I think if Apple made this to work with iPhones and iPads or Macbooks it might happen, but no one else has the right kind of customer base to make it work.

My phone is a LG V30, and I use Airdroid to wirelessly and securely connect to my computer. I've found it to be an excellent solution.

I recently augmented my phone with a 400 GB MicroSD card, which is loaded with music for off-the-grid listening during travel. I also have a foldable Bluetooth keyboard for when I need to do a lot of typing on the go. 

Offline brilligtove

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 6485
  • Ignorance can be cured. Stupidity, you deal with.
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #34 on: October 27, 2018, 10:43:30 PM »
I did have to make a few corrections – and a keyboard is more useful than an on screen keyboard for that

Not if you know the trick for the on screen keyboard that lets you move the cursor around like a mouse/ trackpad


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I have had an iPad Pro since it was released 3y ago. I know that trick, and use it. A physical keyboard - and tapping the screen as needed - is significantly faster to use for normal editing.
evidence trumps experience | performance over perfection | responsibility – authority = scapegoat | emotions motivate; data doesn't

Offline 2397

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2037
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #35 on: December 04, 2018, 06:30:49 AM »
Finally got me an iPhone SE, having switched vendors because the first one kept pushing back the date they were getting it in stock (none of my regular stores had it in stock). And those two stores don't have it listed anymore. 2 months later it randomly dies, and is so far unrestorable. It's unlikely I'll be able to have it replaced if it can't be fixed.

I was all set to use this for 6 years at least, same as I have my previous phone, because it has all the things I care about in a phone; it's a phone, it has Wi-Fi, it has plenty of storage space for podcasts, it fits in the custom pockets I've made and is otherwise just about small enough, and I can use the Apple EarPods with it.

Still can't find another smartphone that's smaller than Sony Xperia XZ1 Compact. Other than "The Jelly" which I can't buy from a vendor in this country, which makes it too much of a hassle to deal with if anything goes wrong.

Is there an Android equivalent of the Apple EarPods, or a list of which phones they work with (the microphone, the start/stop/skip and volume adjustment functions)? The shape/form also being an important part of it.

In case there's any doubt, this is not an advertisement for Apple, I hate what they've done with their product line. Phones, laptops, audio playback devices. All I can do is try to keep alive what they used to make.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2018, 06:52:03 AM by 2397 »

Offline brilligtove

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 6485
  • Ignorance can be cured. Stupidity, you deal with.
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #36 on: December 05, 2018, 06:57:43 PM »
https://www.androidcentral.com/airpods-android-seriously

You might get what you need out of the airpods.

I have used Anker headsets for years, quite happily.
evidence trumps experience | performance over perfection | responsibility – authority = scapegoat | emotions motivate; data doesn't

Offline 2397

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2037
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #37 on: December 06, 2018, 01:32:40 AM »
Maybe that's a separate thread, but I'm looking for the closest possible equivalent; non-in ear earphones that aren't the far more expensive and easy to lose/drop AirPods, with similar functionality for non-Apple phones.



Ideally 3.5mm, because looking at this thing that's not quite enough to work with, though that could be a matter of getting used to it. Otherwise doesn't look good from the initial reviews.

Here's one that's visually similar, but a 2 pack hints that they're too cheaply made, and some of the reviews support that.

On this one the buttons are not distinct enough.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 01:39:13 AM by 2397 »

Offline daniel1948

  • Hasn't
  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 7518
  • Cat Lovers Against the Bomb
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #38 on: December 06, 2018, 10:01:27 AM »
I did have to make a few corrections – and a keyboard is more useful than an on screen keyboard for that

Not if you know the trick for the on screen keyboard that lets you move the cursor around like a mouse/ trackpad

I never heard of such a trick before. Googled it and, hey, it works! Thank you for mentioning this. (I normally don't do much writing on the iPad. I use the desktop for writing. But here in Maui I just have the iPad. If I move here I'll probably ship my desktop over, but until then it seems extreme to buy a computer just for the four remaining months until I return home.)

For those who don't know the trick: place two fingers on the keyboard and move them around to move the cursor.
Daniel
----------------
"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline brilligtove

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 6485
  • Ignorance can be cured. Stupidity, you deal with.
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #39 on: December 06, 2018, 10:07:57 AM »
I use that all the time. A physical keyboard is still a lot faster for touch typing, but the cursor gesture makes a big difference. It is a bit buggy though.
evidence trumps experience | performance over perfection | responsibility – authority = scapegoat | emotions motivate; data doesn't

Offline CarbShark

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9638
Re: The future of compact smartphones
« Reply #40 on: December 06, 2018, 10:46:24 AM »
I use that all the time. A physical keyboard is still a lot faster for touch typing, but the cursor gesture makes a big difference. It is a bit buggy though.
On an iPhone it’s a little different. Press and hold firmly anywhere on the  keyboard and it turns into a trackpad


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.