Author Topic: Auditory hallucinations  (Read 1013 times)

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Offline logical

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Auditory hallucinations
« on: October 05, 2018, 07:21:19 PM »
I did a search for "auditory hallucinations" on here and couldn't find anything. I have these auditory hallucinations a lot. Especially with inconsistent ambient sound or noises. Like a single fan is no problem, however if it's rain or 4 or 5 fans going at the same time like what's going on in my gaming rig, my head makes up these voices for the inconsistent ambient noise that my brain can't make sense of. I even hear music, people arguing, whole conversations going outside my window and no one is there.
And it gets worse if I lack any sleep. This is not very pleasant, sleep is some times impossible, the anxiety I get at times because I'm not sure if what I'm ignoring is real or not. Like some times when I'm tied and my belly growls, it sounds like someone is right be hind me saying something. I have a significant amount of hearing loss in my left ear, it makes it seem like it's coming from a single "something" I don't know hearing loss makes it worse.
My question is I guess... is this a prelude to something worse, or do I just have an amazing imagination?

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2018, 08:29:31 PM »
I did a search for "auditory hallucinations" on here and couldn't find anything. I have these auditory hallucinations a lot. Especially with inconsistent ambient sound or noises. Like a single fan is no problem, however if it's rain or 4 or 5 fans going at the same time like what's going on in my gaming rig, my head makes up these voices for the inconsistent ambient noise that my brain can't make sense of. I even hear music, people arguing, whole conversations going outside my window and no one is there.
And it gets worse if I lack any sleep. This is not very pleasant, sleep is some times impossible, the anxiety I get at times because I'm not sure if what I'm ignoring is real or not. Like some times when I'm tied and my belly growls, it sounds like someone is right be hind me saying something. I have a significant amount of hearing loss in my left ear, it makes it seem like it's coming from a single "something" I don't know hearing loss makes it worse.
My question is I guess... is this a prelude to something worse, or do I just have an amazing imagination?

Perhaps you ought to seek professional advice, if only to reassure you?

It’s common and normal to have hallucinations, including auditory hallucinations.  The brain doesn’t receive a perfect representation of what is happening in the outside reality.  It interprets, adds details, and creates them if it’s not receiving any input.  Particularly when tired.

But auditory hallucinations, particularly in the third person, are also a sign of psychosis (such as ones commenting on you).

Whom should you see?  Perhaps an audiologist, to get your hearing tested?  And a good patient family physician, who will find out the exact nature of the hallucinations (the bizarreness of hallucinations isn’t necessarily an indication of seriousness), and whether you need to be referred.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2018, 10:23:46 PM by bachfiend »
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Offline logical

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2018, 09:49:02 PM »
I've never had a voice call out my name, it's more of a incoherent talking and whatnot in the background. If a voice  called out my name from my like that I would seek help.  Hallucinations totally common, and this why I'm not really freaked out but, but hearing my room mate come home and then later I'm out in the kitchen and he actually comes home.

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2018, 01:42:31 PM »
It could be a form tinnitus.  I mostly get a squealing tone, but sometimes clicking and occasionally something akin to waves.

I rely on my Seimens hearing aids to manage it.  Kind of works most of the time.
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2018, 04:57:22 PM »
It could be a form tinnitus.  I mostly get a squealing tone, but sometimes clicking and occasionally something akin to waves.

I rely on my Seimens hearing aids to manage it.  Kind of works most of the time.

It could be a form of auditory pareidolia, the brain misinterpreting what it’s receiving, in this case tinnitus, but it sounds more like real auditory hallucinations, which is the brain creating something when there’s nothing there, which is actually very common - particularly when the person is tired and sleepy, and not necessarily a symptom of a psychosis.

The human is an incredible organ.  It’s amazing what convincing an illusion of the external reality it creates on the basis of the very limited information it receives from the external world.  Almost everyone has the illusion of a fully coloured three dimensional vision right out to the edge of the visual fields, despite the retina sending to the brain a fully coloured detailed view of the external world corresponding to an area of around the thumbnail held at arms length, the rest bing a monochromatic blur.
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2018, 02:34:58 AM »
It was pretty cool the first time I read dialog in a novel and I heard a hallucination of the character speaking.

(click to show/hide)

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2018, 03:59:18 PM »
It was pretty cool the first time I read dialog in a novel and I heard a hallucination of the character speaking.

(click to show/hide)

How old were you when that happened?  I’m fascinated by what expert readers experience when they read.  Expert readers don’t read every word in a text, not even close.  They take in the ‘gist’ of the text, its meaning, and construct the story happening.

But then again, all experiences are constructed in a person’s brain on the basis of very imperfect inputs from the external world, and that includes inputs from reading a text.  Your subconscious brain does most of the heavy lifting.  You might think that your conscious brain is fully in control, but you’d be wrong if you think that.
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2018, 02:54:17 PM »
How old were you when that happened?  I’m fascinated by what expert readers experience when they read.  Expert readers don’t read every word in a text, not even close.  They take in the ‘gist’ of the text, its meaning, and construct the story happening.

I believe I was 22, last year of University. I think it was more related to use of strong hallucinogen-psychedelics earlier that summer. BTW, the book was The Time Machine by H.G. Wells.

I'm guessing you mean "speed readers"? Indeed, I think people who read fast can only do so because they are not actually processing it on the same level. And that doesn't apply to imagination, but often seemingly minor technical details and puns in the writing. I have always had good reading comprehension, but not so much being able to vividly imagine what I am reading.

Reading for creative engagement (e.g. a novel) is totally different. Forgot about reading just slow enough to actually read and comprehend each word. It takes extra effort, especially after the introduction of a new scene/chapter, to actually construct the scene in your head. And of course, you also have to read dialog as slow as someone would say it and look for clues as to verbal tone.

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2018, 04:30:38 PM »
How old were you when that happened?  I’m fascinated by what expert readers experience when they read.  Expert readers don’t read every word in a text, not even close.  They take in the ‘gist’ of the text, its meaning, and construct the story happening.

I believe I was 22, last year of University. I think it was more related to use of strong hallucinogen-psychedelics earlier that summer. BTW, the book was The Time Machine by H.G. Wells.

I'm guessing you mean "speed readers"? Indeed, I think people who read fast can only do so because they are not actually processing it on the same level. And that doesn't apply to imagination, but often seemingly minor technical details and puns in the writing. I have always had good reading comprehension, but not so much being able to vividly imagine what I am reading.

Reading for creative engagement (e.g. a novel) is totally different. Forgot about reading just slow enough to actually read and comprehend each word. It takes extra effort, especially after the introduction of a new scene/chapter, to actually construct the scene in your head. And of course, you also have to read dialog as slow as someone would say it and look for clues as to verbal tone.

I’m an expert reader, but I’m not a speed reader.  I read a little faster than than a speaker of an audiobook reads the same book (and the speaker is reading the dialogue at the same speed that a person would be reading it (I’m currently doing both for Charlotte Link’s latest novel ‘die Suche’ - to keep up with my German), and when I read I form a visual image of what is being described.  The verbal tone is usually expressed by surrounding adverbs, not by the words in the dialogue, unless they’re very strong words.
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Online daniel1948

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2018, 10:53:24 PM »
I cannot think of any examples offhand where I've had an auditory hallucination while awake. But I've been awakened from sleep by what appeared to be a phone ringing when there was no possibility of an actual phone ringing. It's happened when my phone was turned off. And back in the days of landline phones I used to physically disconnect the wires from the wall to avoid unwanted nighttime calls, and I've been awakened by what I was certain was the phone ringing. I lived 3/4 of a mile from my nearest neighbor.

So I've had auditory hallucinations in my sleep. Or is that a separate phenomenon? Very convincing dream sounds.
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2018, 12:56:46 AM »
I cannot think of any examples offhand where I've had an auditory hallucination while awake. But I've been awakened from sleep by what appeared to be a phone ringing when there was no possibility of an actual phone ringing. It's happened when my phone was turned off. And back in the days of landline phones I used to physically disconnect the wires from the wall to avoid unwanted nighttime calls, and I've been awakened by what I was certain was the phone ringing. I lived 3/4 of a mile from my nearest neighbor.

So I've had auditory hallucinations in my sleep. Or is that a separate phenomenon? Very convincing dream sounds.

Perhaps you’re just having a dream in which you hear the phone ringing?
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Online daniel1948

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2018, 10:10:58 AM »
I cannot think of any examples offhand where I've had an auditory hallucination while awake. But I've been awakened from sleep by what appeared to be a phone ringing when there was no possibility of an actual phone ringing. It's happened when my phone was turned off. And back in the days of landline phones I used to physically disconnect the wires from the wall to avoid unwanted nighttime calls, and I've been awakened by what I was certain was the phone ringing. I lived 3/4 of a mile from my nearest neighbor.

So I've had auditory hallucinations in my sleep. Or is that a separate phenomenon? Very convincing dream sounds.

Perhaps you’re just having a dream in which you hear the phone ringing?

Yes, but very loud, and very convincingly realistic. So much so as to jar me awake and leave me feeling exactly as I do when I'm actually awakened by a very loud noise. Again, not sure whether to regard these as auditory hallucinations or just very realistic dreams.
Daniel
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Auditory hallucinations
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2018, 10:59:53 AM »
Yes, but very loud, and very convincingly realistic. So much so as to jar me awake and leave me feeling exactly as I do when I'm actually awakened by a very loud noise.

For me, when that does happen, it is most commonly vestibular: i.e. the feeling of falling, oriented like I am on laying on my back, and then I wake up right when I would hit the ground.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2018, 11:06:51 AM by stands2reason »