Author Topic: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.  (Read 438 times)

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Offline daniel1948

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EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« on: October 25, 2018, 04:41:31 PM »
Saw these in the store today for the first time, so I could not resist buying a bag. I have not tried them yet because it was time for lunch (not snack) when I got home from the store. $4 for a 5 oz bag. It claims that 1 oz of chips contains 4 grams of protein (equal to one egg white). Also 140 calories, 7 grams of fat, 120 mg of sodium, 16 grams of carbs. Ingredients: stone ground corn, sunflower and/or safflower oil, cricket protein blend (pea flour, cricket protein, chia seeds) and a bunch of seasonings.

And it was not until this moment, copying the ingredient list, that I realized I've been cheated, because there's more pea flour than cricket. So the claimed 4 gm/oz of protein is more pea than cricket.

The bag also claims that it takes 2,000 gallons of water to make one pound of beef, but only one gallon for a pound of crickets. And it warns that if you have an allergy to crustacean shellfish you might also be sensitive to crickets.

Later today I will try the chips and report back here.

The brand name is CHIRPS and the product description is "EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips." They got me with the huge "EAT BUGS" in capital letters occupying the entire top half of the front of the bag.
Daniel
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Online bachfiend

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2018, 04:50:49 PM »
Saw these in the store today for the first time, so I could not resist buying a bag. I have not tried them yet because it was time for lunch (not snack) when I got home from the store. $4 for a 5 oz bag. It claims that 1 oz of chips contains 4 grams of protein (equal to one egg white). Also 140 calories, 7 grams of fat, 120 mg of sodium, 16 grams of carbs. Ingredients: stone ground corn, sunflower and/or safflower oil, cricket protein blend (pea flour, cricket protein, chia seeds) and a bunch of seasonings.

And it was not until this moment, copying the ingredient list, that I realized I've been cheated, because there's more pea flour than cricket. So the claimed 4 gm/oz of protein is more pea than cricket.

The bag also claims that it takes 2,000 gallons of water to make one pound of beef, but only one gallon for a pound of crickets. And it warns that if you have an allergy to crustacean shellfish you might also be sensitive to crickets.

Later today I will try the chips and report back here.

The brand name is CHIRPS and the product description is "EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips." They got me with the huge "EAT BUGS" in capital letters occupying the entire top half of the front of the bag.

I wouldn’t eat them, being a vegetarian, but I can’t see much difference between eating lobsters and crickets.  They’re both arthropods.

What bemuses is the mixture of measurement systems.  Grams protein.  Ounce.  Gallons. Calories (with a small ‘c’, instead of Calories or kilocalories, or better still kilojoules).  When are Americans going to adopt a rational measurement system and go metric?

Offline SkeptiQueer

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2018, 04:54:47 PM »
Saw these in the store today for the first time, so I could not resist buying a bag. I have not tried them yet because it was time for lunch (not snack) when I got home from the store. $4 for a 5 oz bag. It claims that 1 oz of chips contains 4 grams of protein (equal to one egg white). Also 140 calories, 7 grams of fat, 120 mg of sodium, 16 grams of carbs. Ingredients: stone ground corn, sunflower and/or safflower oil, cricket protein blend (pea flour, cricket protein, chia seeds) and a bunch of seasonings.

And it was not until this moment, copying the ingredient list, that I realized I've been cheated, because there's more pea flour than cricket. So the claimed 4 gm/oz of protein is more pea than cricket.

The bag also claims that it takes 2,000 gallons of water to make one pound of beef, but only one gallon for a pound of crickets. And it warns that if you have an allergy to crustacean shellfish you might also be sensitive to crickets.

Later today I will try the chips and report back here.

The brand name is CHIRPS and the product description is "EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips." They got me with the huge "EAT BUGS" in capital letters occupying the entire top half of the front of the bag.

I wouldn’t eat them, being a vegetarian, but I can’t see much difference between eating lobsters and crickets.  They’re both arthropods.

What bemuses is the mixture of measurement systems.  Grams protein.  Ounce.  Gallons. Calories (with a small ‘c’, instead of Calories or kilocalories, or better still kilojoules).  When are Americans going to adopt a rational measurement system and go metric?

See I feel the opposite. I don't see a difference between a cricket and a mushroom, despite begin a pesudovegetarian. Mushrooms are just easier to catch. I would prefer that the cricket actually be a substantial portion of the content, instead of a gimmick.
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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2018, 06:09:41 PM »
[T]here's more pea flour than cricket.

You say that like it's a bad thing.
Nur dass ich nicht nur Katzen gemacht habe.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2018, 08:49:17 PM »
[T]here's more pea flour than cricket.

You say that like it's a bad thing.

I bought the chips because I thought, "Cool. Here's something I can buy right now in the store that's got a significant amount of bug protein in it!" But then it turns out that it probably has only a trace amount of bugs in it. I feel cheated. They are basically corn chips, and corn has protein, even though in the absence of a significant amount of lysine it's not a "complete" protein, still it adds to the 4 grams. But then it turns out that there's more pea flour than bugs, and there's also chia seeds, and since the crickets are combined in the ingredient list as "cricket protein blend" with the cricket listed after the pea flour, we cannot tell from the label if crickets constitute even one percent of the protein in the chips.

The rule that ingredients must be listed in order of quantity is so that we can tell at at glance which ingredients predominate. They have circumvented this by NOT listing cricket as a separate ingredient, but rather as a component of a compound ingredient. But I didn't realize this because I didn't have my regular reading glasses with me. Just my cheapo cheaters that are good enough when I'm out and about, but not good enough to read very small type. They tout BUGS and 4 g of protein per serving, then hide the fact in a confusing label that most of that protein is not bugs at all. Damn crooks! (For all the talk about how efficient bugs are in converting plant matter to protein, cricket powder is still extremely expensive.)

It is misleading advertising. I intend to write to them and ask if they'll tell me how much cricket is actually in the chips. When HALF of the front of the bag is taken up entirely with the two words EAT BUGS in huge capital letters, then damnitall! I want more than a grain of bug in the product!

As promised, my taste evaluation: The chips are very good.
Daniel
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2018, 10:01:20 PM »
I saw something similar, except with whey protein. Had a texture like potato, except it was 12g protein, 3g carb per serving.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2018, 10:15:37 AM »
My email to the company bounced back undeliverable. Clicking on the Facebook icon got me to "Page does not exist." It appears that you can order products from their web page but there's no way to contact them. No phone number, and the email does not work.

The chips are good. Since I never buy chips I don't know how the price compares to other chips.

The web site says there's one cricket per chip, but I strongly suspect that's false because the chips are small. What I suspect is that each chip has as much protein as one cricket, but 99% of that protein comes from peas, corn, and chia seeds. I like the idea of cricket chips as a novelty, but I now suspect these are fraudulent.

Next step: Ask the people at the grocery store for information. I also posted a question on Amazon since they sell these things also.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Online bachfiend

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2018, 03:48:45 PM »
My email to the company bounced back undeliverable. Clicking on the Facebook icon got me to "Page does not exist." It appears that you can order products from their web page but there's no way to contact them. No phone number, and the email does not work.

The chips are good. Since I never buy chips I don't know how the price compares to other chips.

The web site says there's one cricket per chip, but I strongly suspect that's false because the chips are small. What I suspect is that each chip has as much protein as one cricket, but 99% of that protein comes from peas, corn, and chia seeds. I like the idea of cricket chips as a novelty, but I now suspect these are fraudulent.

Next step: Ask the people at the grocery store for information. I also posted a question on Amazon since they sell these things also.

Whenever I fly Emirates I have their carrot juice, which is delicious. I’ve looked for carrot juice in Australia, and have found a produced marketed as ‘mainly carrot juice’, but according to the list of ingredients, it’s mainly tomato juice (and tastes like it’s mainly tomato juice too).  With little carrot juice.

I agree the name of a product should reflect its main ingredient (I’m not certain how that would apply to your ‘tofu pudding’, which is now a staple item in my diet).

Offline SkeptiQueer

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2018, 04:10:10 PM »
My email to the company bounced back undeliverable. Clicking on the Facebook icon got me to "Page does not exist." It appears that you can order products from their web page but there's no way to contact them. No phone number, and the email does not work.

The chips are good. Since I never buy chips I don't know how the price compares to other chips.

The web site says there's one cricket per chip, but I strongly suspect that's false because the chips are small. What I suspect is that each chip has as much protein as one cricket, but 99% of that protein comes from peas, corn, and chia seeds. I like the idea of cricket chips as a novelty, but I now suspect these are fraudulent.

Next step: Ask the people at the grocery store for information. I also posted a question on Amazon since they sell these things also.

Whenever I fly Emirates I have their carrot juice, which is delicious. I’ve looked for carrot juice in Australia, and have found a produced marketed as ‘mainly carrot juice’, but according to the list of ingredients, it’s mainly tomato juice (and tastes like it’s mainly tomato juice too).  With little carrot juice.

I agree the name of a product should reflect its main ingredient (I’m not certain how that would apply to your ‘tofu pudding’, which is now a staple item in my diet).

I'm all for it. Give me a shelf of BEAN LIQUID and NUT JUICE in the non-dairy section instead of almond milk and soy milk.
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Online bachfiend

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2018, 07:21:35 PM »
My email to the company bounced back undeliverable. Clicking on the Facebook icon got me to "Page does not exist." It appears that you can order products from their web page but there's no way to contact them. No phone number, and the email does not work.

The chips are good. Since I never buy chips I don't know how the price compares to other chips.

The web site says there's one cricket per chip, but I strongly suspect that's false because the chips are small. What I suspect is that each chip has as much protein as one cricket, but 99% of that protein comes from peas, corn, and chia seeds. I like the idea of cricket chips as a novelty, but I now suspect these are fraudulent.

Next step: Ask the people at the grocery store for information. I also posted a question on Amazon since they sell these things also.

Whenever I fly Emirates I have their carrot juice, which is delicious. I’ve looked for carrot juice in Australia, and have found a produced marketed as ‘mainly carrot juice’, but according to the list of ingredients, it’s mainly tomato juice (and tastes like it’s mainly tomato juice too).  With little carrot juice.

I agree the name of a product should reflect its main ingredient (I’m not certain how that would apply to your ‘tofu pudding’, which is now a staple item in my diet).

I'm all for it. Give me a shelf of BEAN LIQUID and NUT JUICE in the non-dairy section instead of almond milk and soy milk.

I’m not so opposed to using the terms ‘almond milk’ or ‘soy milk’ since the products are being used as milk - I don’t use the products nowadays, but I did use them previously.  They do give coffee an interesting taste different to that with bovine milk.  And they do contain the ingredients claimed.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2018, 07:24:55 PM »
My email to the company bounced back undeliverable. Clicking on the Facebook icon got me to "Page does not exist." It appears that you can order products from their web page but there's no way to contact them. No phone number, and the email does not work.

The chips are good. Since I never buy chips I don't know how the price compares to other chips.

The web site says there's one cricket per chip, but I strongly suspect that's false because the chips are small. What I suspect is that each chip has as much protein as one cricket, but 99% of that protein comes from peas, corn, and chia seeds. I like the idea of cricket chips as a novelty, but I now suspect these are fraudulent.

Next step: Ask the people at the grocery store for information. I also posted a question on Amazon since they sell these things also.

Whenever I fly Emirates I have their carrot juice, which is delicious. I’ve looked for carrot juice in Australia, and have found a produced marketed as ‘mainly carrot juice’, but according to the list of ingredients, it’s mainly tomato juice (and tastes like it’s mainly tomato juice too).  With little carrot juice.

I agree the name of a product should reflect its main ingredient (I’m not certain how that would apply to your ‘tofu pudding’, which is now a staple item in my diet).

We can get 100% carrot juice here. And in Mexico at the mercados you can generally find a stall that sells it freshly squeezed. You can also buy a machine that will make it. But be warned: It takes a LOT of carrots to make a glass of juice, and you're left with the healthiest part in the form of dry pulp.

The tofu pudding may not be "mostly" tofu, but at least tofu is a major ingredient. If I were marketing it, I'd sell it as Chocolate Banana-Tofu pudding. If I'm just giving away the recipe I do not feel dishonest calling it tofu pudding.

I'm all for it. Give me a shelf of BEAN LIQUID and NUT JUICE in the non-dairy section instead of almond milk and soy milk.

Calling these products "milks" is a bit odd. But there is some rationale to it, since they are commonly used as milk substitutes. And both almond milk and soy milk name their primary ingredient in the name. Cricket chips, if my supposition is correct, give primary place in the name to what might be the smallest ingredient in the product. And they intentionally construct the label in such a way as to conceal that fact.
Daniel
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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2018, 08:15:21 PM »
My email to the company bounced back undeliverable. Clicking on the Facebook icon got me to "Page does not exist." It appears that you can order products from their web page but there's no way to contact them. No phone number, and the email does not work.

The chips are good. Since I never buy chips I don't know how the price compares to other chips.

The web site says there's one cricket per chip, but I strongly suspect that's false because the chips are small. What I suspect is that each chip has as much protein as one cricket, but 99% of that protein comes from peas, corn, and chia seeds. I like the idea of cricket chips as a novelty, but I now suspect these are fraudulent.

Next step: Ask the people at the grocery store for information. I also posted a question on Amazon since they sell these things also.

Whenever I fly Emirates I have their carrot juice, which is delicious. I’ve looked for carrot juice in Australia, and have found a produced marketed as ‘mainly carrot juice’, but according to the list of ingredients, it’s mainly tomato juice (and tastes like it’s mainly tomato juice too).  With little carrot juice.

I agree the name of a product should reflect its main ingredient (I’m not certain how that would apply to your ‘tofu pudding’, which is now a staple item in my diet).

We can get 100% carrot juice here. And in Mexico at the mercados you can generally find a stall that sells it freshly squeezed. You can also buy a machine that will make it. But be warned: It takes a LOT of carrots to make a glass of juice, and you're left with the healthiest part in the form of dry pulp.

The tofu pudding may not be "mostly" tofu, but at least tofu is a major ingredient. If I were marketing it, I'd sell it as Chocolate Banana-Tofu pudding. If I'm just giving away the recipe I do not feel dishonest calling it tofu pudding.

I'm all for it. Give me a shelf of BEAN LIQUID and NUT JUICE in the non-dairy section instead of almond milk and soy milk.

Calling these products "milks" is a bit odd. But there is some rationale to it, since they are commonly used as milk substitutes. And both almond milk and soy milk name their primary ingredient in the name. Cricket chips, if my supposition is correct, give primary place in the name to what might be the smallest ingredient in the product. And they intentionally construct the label in such a way as to conceal that fact.

I make my own carrot juice in a blender, which retains the pulp but heavily dilutes the taste, so I add a little pepper to increase the flavour.  I’ve thought about buying a juicer, and adding the pulp to my vegetable casserole, so as to gain all the benefits of whole carrots, but I probably won’t bother.

‘Chocolate-Banana-Tufu pudding’ probably wouldn’t market well.  With my variation of your recipe, the predominant taste seems to be the 40 grams of 90% chocolate instead of the 250 grams of tofu or 300 grams of banana.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2018, 09:53:41 AM »
My email to the company bounced back undeliverable. Clicking on the Facebook icon got me to "Page does not exist." It appears that you can order products from their web page but there's no way to contact them. No phone number, and the email does not work.

The chips are good. Since I never buy chips I don't know how the price compares to other chips.

The web site says there's one cricket per chip, but I strongly suspect that's false because the chips are small. What I suspect is that each chip has as much protein as one cricket, but 99% of that protein comes from peas, corn, and chia seeds. I like the idea of cricket chips as a novelty, but I now suspect these are fraudulent.

Next step: Ask the people at the grocery store for information. I also posted a question on Amazon since they sell these things also.

Whenever I fly Emirates I have their carrot juice, which is delicious. I’ve looked for carrot juice in Australia, and have found a produced marketed as ‘mainly carrot juice’, but according to the list of ingredients, it’s mainly tomato juice (and tastes like it’s mainly tomato juice too).  With little carrot juice.

I agree the name of a product should reflect its main ingredient (I’m not certain how that would apply to your ‘tofu pudding’, which is now a staple item in my diet).

We can get 100% carrot juice here. And in Mexico at the mercados you can generally find a stall that sells it freshly squeezed. You can also buy a machine that will make it. But be warned: It takes a LOT of carrots to make a glass of juice, and you're left with the healthiest part in the form of dry pulp.

The tofu pudding may not be "mostly" tofu, but at least tofu is a major ingredient. If I were marketing it, I'd sell it as Chocolate Banana-Tofu pudding. If I'm just giving away the recipe I do not feel dishonest calling it tofu pudding.

I'm all for it. Give me a shelf of BEAN LIQUID and NUT JUICE in the non-dairy section instead of almond milk and soy milk.

Calling these products "milks" is a bit odd. But there is some rationale to it, since they are commonly used as milk substitutes. And both almond milk and soy milk name their primary ingredient in the name. Cricket chips, if my supposition is correct, give primary place in the name to what might be the smallest ingredient in the product. And they intentionally construct the label in such a way as to conceal that fact.

I make my own carrot juice in a blender, which retains the pulp but heavily dilutes the taste, so I add a little pepper to increase the flavour.  I’ve thought about buying a juicer, and adding the pulp to my vegetable casserole, so as to gain all the benefits of whole carrots, but I probably won’t bother.

‘Chocolate-Banana-Tufu pudding’ probably wouldn’t market well.  With my variation of your recipe, the predominant taste seems to be the 40 grams of 90% chocolate instead of the 250 grams of tofu or 300 grams of banana.

The grocery store nearest me has a whole "natural foods" section which seems to do quite well. Label the pudding "organic" and "non-GMO" and say that the chocolate is Fair Trade and it would probably do quite well. But I'm not going to try. At my age I'm not looking to start a business. And I imagine that figuring out how to make it in bulk and package it with a good shelf life without losing the flavor would not be easy. Not to mention the legal issues that might arise from operating a business that uses a published recipe from a cookbook. I'm pretty sure the woman from whom I got the recipe got it from a cookbook.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
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Online bachfiend

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2018, 10:07:36 PM »
I eventually bought a juicer, and it’s brilliant.  1 kg of carrots yields 570 g of carrot juice, and it’s delicious, tasting exactly like the carrot juice Emirates serves on their flights.  And the pulp I add to my vegetable casserole as a filler, in which it tastes quite OK.

Hopefully I won’t turn orange from carotenaemia?
« Last Edit: November 06, 2018, 10:11:38 PM by bachfiend »

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Re: EAT BUGS barbecue cricket chips.
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2018, 10:20:31 PM »
I eventually bought a juicer, and it’s brilliant.  1 kg of carrots yields 570 g of carrot juice, and it’s delicious, tasting exactly like the carrot juice Emirates serves on their flights.  And the pulp I add to my vegetable casserole as a filler, in which it tastes quite OK.

Hopefully I won’t turn orange from carotenaemia?
Jesus. For one terrible second I thought this post was going to be about putting crickets in the juicer.
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