Author Topic: Episode #698  (Read 1111 times)

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Online bachfiend

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Re: Episode #698
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2018, 09:23:48 PM »
I've mentioned this before, but since they brought up the subject again: Yes, astronauts are special folks. They take extreme risks for science and adventure. "Sitting on top of a bomb..." etc. They take this extreme risk a few times in their career and receive justifiable applause and recognition for their sacrifices.

But another group of people take far greater risks on a daily basis, to save lives, and receive little or no adulation or recognition for their sacrifices: Fire fighters. They go into burning buildings, risking death by structural collapse and other hazards, to save the people trapped inside. I admire astronauts. I admire firefighters far more.

The cultural figure who had the greatest influence on my development was probably Martin Luther King, Jr. I was in my early teens when he rose to prominence in the civil rights movement and his philosophy of nonviolence and his eloquent calls for social justice have stuck with me all my life.

I don't think any fictional character has influenced me because they're not real. But there are fictional characters who I like as characters. None of them are in any version of Star Trek. The fictional character I'd want at the helm of a space ship I was on when peril is imminent would be Arthur Dent, because he'd just press the button to engage the Infinite Improbability Drive. Hey, if we have a fictional character at the helm, then by definition we're in a fictional ship. And I'd much rather be on the Starship Heart of Gold than on the Enterprise.

Firefighters do judge the risk.  They won’t go into a burning building to rescue someone if there’s a fair chance they won’t be able to return.  They’re not only risking their own lives, they’re also risking the lives of other firefighters who’d feel obliged to go in to rescue them and the trapped person(s).

Astronauts are only risking their own lives, unless the rocket malfunctions and it lands on a populated area (very unlikely).  And even it did happen, the astronauts wouldn’t have any control over where the rocket landed.

The real heroes are the pilots who steer their disabled aircraft away from populated areas instead of immediately ejecting to save themselves, often losing their lives doing it.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #698
« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2018, 10:50:07 AM »
I've mentioned this before, but since they brought up the subject again: Yes, astronauts are special folks. They take extreme risks for science and adventure. "Sitting on top of a bomb..." etc. They take this extreme risk a few times in their career and receive justifiable applause and recognition for their sacrifices.

But another group of people take far greater risks on a daily basis, to save lives, and receive little or no adulation or recognition for their sacrifices: Fire fighters. They go into burning buildings, risking death by structural collapse and other hazards, to save the people trapped inside. I admire astronauts. I admire firefighters far more.

The cultural figure who had the greatest influence on my development was probably Martin Luther King, Jr. I was in my early teens when he rose to prominence in the civil rights movement and his philosophy of nonviolence and his eloquent calls for social justice have stuck with me all my life.

I don't think any fictional character has influenced me because they're not real. But there are fictional characters who I like as characters. None of them are in any version of Star Trek. The fictional character I'd want at the helm of a space ship I was on when peril is imminent would be Arthur Dent, because he'd just press the button to engage the Infinite Improbability Drive. Hey, if we have a fictional character at the helm, then by definition we're in a fictional ship. And I'd much rather be on the Starship Heart of Gold than on the Enterprise.

Firefighters do judge the risk.  They won’t go into a burning building to rescue someone if there’s a fair chance they won’t be able to return.  They’re not only risking their own lives, they’re also risking the lives of other firefighters who’d feel obliged to go in to rescue them and the trapped person(s).

Astronauts are only risking their own lives, unless the rocket malfunctions and it lands on a populated area (very unlikely).  And even it did happen, the astronauts wouldn’t have any control over where the rocket landed.

The real heroes are the pilots who steer their disabled aircraft away from populated areas instead of immediately ejecting to save themselves, often losing their lives doing it.

I draw a distinction between people who take risks for adventure, sometimes with benefits in the form of scientific knowledge, and people who take risks to save the lives of others. The pilot who takes his plane away from a populated area before ejecting, at the risk of his own life, is truly a hero. As is the firefighter. Astronauts deserve our respect, but to a much lesser degree, IMO.
Daniel
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Offline seamas

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Re: Episode #698
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2018, 03:27:34 PM »

But another group of people take far greater risks on a daily basis, to save lives, and receive little or no adulation or recognition for their sacrifices: Fire fighters. They go into burning buildings, risking death by structural collapse and other hazards, to save the people trapped inside.

Little or no adulation???

Not around here. Damn.
First responders are treated like greek gods.

Offline stands2reason

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Re: Episode #698
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2018, 08:57:46 AM »
Make it sew!


Online Ron Obvious

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Re: Episode #698
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2018, 11:30:49 AM »
Thank you Steven for mentioning the television show Jonathan Creek. I don't know how this show had never come to my attention before, but we just watched the first series and we're thoroughly enjoying it.

Thanks again!

Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Episode #698
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2018, 12:46:29 PM »

But another group of people take far greater risks on a daily basis, to save lives, and receive little or no adulation or recognition for their sacrifices: Fire fighters. They go into burning buildings, risking death by structural collapse and other hazards, to save the people trapped inside.

Little or no adulation???

Not around here. Damn.
First responders are treated like greek gods.
I agree with Seamas, there's practically nobody in society that gets more adulation and recognition than fire fighters.  Despite the reality that they mostly just sit around waiting for fires.  Fun fact, the US has a lot less fires these days than we used.  Mostly do to better fire codes and greater awareness of the risks among the regular folks. 

https://www.vox.com/2014/10/30/7079547/fire-firefighter-decline-medical

Offline stands2reason

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Re: Episode #698
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2018, 11:39:39 AM »

But another group of people take far greater risks on a daily basis, to save lives, and receive little or no adulation or recognition for their sacrifices: Fire fighters. They go into burning buildings, risking death by structural collapse and other hazards, to save the people trapped inside.

Little or no adulation???

Not around here. Damn.
First responders are treated like greek gods.
I agree with Seamas, there's practically nobody in society that gets more adulation and recognition than fire fighters.  Despite the reality that they mostly just sit around waiting for fires.  Fun fact, the US has a lot less fires these days than we used.  Mostly do to better fire codes and greater awareness of the risks among the regular folks. 

https://www.vox.com/2014/10/30/7079547/fire-firefighter-decline-medical

One time, I was riding with someone. They didn't realize their brakes were stuck and overheating, and the vehicle caught fire. Literally ever other time I have seen a fire truck, it was a fire department providing paramedic/EMS service.

 

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