Author Topic: The right to compete?  (Read 2395 times)

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Offline RGU

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Re: The right to compete?
« Reply #45 on: December 20, 2018, 10:23:20 PM »
You think I've got a whole business plan worked out? I expressed a general opinion. You don't have to jump down my throat about it.
First, I didn't jump down your throat. You made a statement and didn't provide a reason as to why or explain what you thought would happen good or bad. I asked questions about your opinion, that I suppose is based on feels and nothing else considering your response.?
Quote
See, this is what we non-sporty people are subjected to every fucking day of our lives.
WTF?
Do not pretend your response to this has anything to do with sports or "being sporty".
You know you are not attacked on a daily basis for not being able to kick a ball as well as someone else or because you don't know the difference between a touchdown and a home run.
You were asked to support an opinion, nothing else.

*If you are actually attacked daily, you need to get the fuck away from the people you surround yourself with.

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: The right to compete?
« Reply #46 on: December 20, 2018, 10:27:24 PM »
You think I've got a whole business plan worked out? I expressed a general opinion. You don't have to jump down my throat about it.
First, I didn't jump down your throat. You made a statement and didn't provide a reason as to why or explain what you thought would happen good or bad. I asked questions about your opinion, that I suppose is based on feels and nothing else considering your response.?
Quote
See, this is what we non-sporty people are subjected to every fucking day of our lives.
WTF?
Do not pretend your response to this has anything to do with sports or "being sporty".
You know you are not attacked on a daily basis for not being able to kick a ball as well as someone else or because you don't know the difference between a touchdown and a home run.
You were asked to support an opinion, nothing else.

*If you are actually attacked daily, you need to get the fuck away from the people you surround yourself with.

I just got through explaining that I was attacked on a daily basis all throughout my school years because I couldn't kick a ball. Do you think I was lying about that experience?
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Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiarii?

Offline Mr. Beagle

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Re: The right to compete?
« Reply #47 on: December 21, 2018, 10:14:13 AM »
My best school sports experience was with an elementary school Little League baseball coach for my son's team who sat the parents down at the beginning of the season and said "If we don't lose half of our games then I am doing something wrong. At this age, the key is to encourage positive participation and gentle coaching so the kids both learn and have fun. If you don't like that philosophy, find another team for your kid."

I ran into the guy by chance recently, 35 years later and thanked him for that approach.
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Offline seamas

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Re: The right to compete?
« Reply #48 on: December 21, 2018, 10:52:25 AM »
I was relentlessly and continuously verbally bullied throughout high school because I wasn't good at sport.

Same here.
I understand my experience to be anecdotal and excuse me for extending that thought to yours.

Offline haudace

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Re: The right to compete?
« Reply #49 on: December 31, 2018, 10:27:02 AM »
Its sad how people bully others... It's so easy to leave people alone but someone always has to try something.


Now on topic of this thread, I am curious how transgenders fare in the military... Everyone in the service is subject to fitness requirements and undergo frequent tests plus training. OECD countries may be liberal about these issues, I suspect they are not so wishy washy around fitness of military members. They may have found the answers to the hard questions being asked in this thread.

Online stands2reason

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Re: The right to compete?
« Reply #50 on: December 31, 2018, 11:06:32 AM »
I tend to see most sex-related differences, so much hashed over in societal conversation, as overlapping normal curves on sex-related characteristics for XX and XY people (not to mention the other combinations). While the adult XX height curve has a mean of less than the XY adult height curve, there is still huge overlap, meaning millions of women are taller than millions of men. You can even take that logic to breast size. There is considerable overlap of the size curves, but for some reason, we make a big deal about this as being a male-female thing.

I think it is an indication of our gendered thinking that it is even considered a solution.  Sports should be segmented strictly by size class instead of gender. That might include weight, height, and/or body fat percentile depending on the sport. This means the gender representation in different size classes would likely be different, but everyone has the same opportunity to play with others of same build.

I believe the choice as presented is "make society fair and if that makes sports less fair sometimes, so be it" as directly opposed to "make sports fair, and if that makes society less fair sometimes, so be it".

Here's the problem with using the word "fair" in sports: whether or not you have the opportunity to succeed at any given sport is basically the genetic lottery (actually, it's the genetic lottery based on your parent's income and school district where you live, but biology probably also has an effect). Just look at all the nonsense over HRT in trans-male athletes: it is OK for a cis-women to naturally have genetic variation that basically gives them endocrine levels closer to that of a male, but it is not OK to do the same thing synthetically.

This means superstition—somehow, "natural" variation doesn't count. Maybe it is some kind of eugenic agnosticism where we don't want to admit that we are basically rewarding athletes for having superior genes (only superior in a limited sense, but still). Allowing someone to make millions a year just because they have the right genes for it is the kind of thing everyone says that don't support.

If we actually wanted to make sports fair, we would make hormone therapy (including HGF or whatever) mandatory so that every participant has the same body type, at least as much as that can be artificially controlled.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2018, 11:08:52 AM by stands2reason »

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: The right to compete?
« Reply #51 on: January 07, 2019, 01:36:56 AM »
This doesn't mirror my experience exactly, but it does show how an aversion to sport and fitness can come about.

https://theovertake.com/~beta/how-school-pe-lessons-can-cause-a-lifelong-aversion-to-exercise/
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Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiarii?

 

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