Author Topic: Astronaut Resistance Training  (Read 853 times)

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Online Harry Black

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Re: Astronaut Resistance Training
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2019, 07:40:43 PM »
It looks legit to me. I’m confident it is real. As to why they designed it this way and not some other way, I have no idea, but I’m sure a lot of research and testing was involved. The astronauts do cardio training also.

And even with all the cardio and resistance training, astronauts lose a lot of bone and muscle mass, so much so that when they return to Earth after an extended period in space, they can neither walk nor stand. Microgravity is absolute hell on the human body. Just one more reason I’m planning on remaining on the planet.
Oh Im sure the research dictated this approach to a seemingly simpler one!
Im just hoping to learn why. Especially why they arent bracing against an immobile surface!

I’m just guessing that it really doesn’t matter whether one surface remains immobile or not. What matters is the amount of resistance, which I’m sure can be adjusted for the strength of the individual.
My point was that a shifting surface provides less resistance. For them to actively make the bracing surface so mobile, there must be reason since they are sacrificing some resistance.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Astronaut Resistance Training
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2019, 10:20:51 PM »
It looks legit to me. I’m confident it is real. As to why they designed it this way and not some other way, I have no idea, but I’m sure a lot of research and testing was involved. The astronauts do cardio training also.

And even with all the cardio and resistance training, astronauts lose a lot of bone and muscle mass, so much so that when they return to Earth after an extended period in space, they can neither walk nor stand. Microgravity is absolute hell on the human body. Just one more reason I’m planning on remaining on the planet.
Oh Im sure the research dictated this approach to a seemingly simpler one!
Im just hoping to learn why. Especially why they arent bracing against an immobile surface!

I’m just guessing that it really doesn’t matter whether one surface remains immobile or not. What matters is the amount of resistance, which I’m sure can be adjusted for the strength of the individual.
My point was that a shifting surface provides less resistance. For them to actively make the bracing surface so mobile, there must be reason since they are sacrificing some resistance.

I really don’t think the shifting surface does provide less resistance. Here on Earth it’s easier to have one surface resting on the floor. But when the resistance is supplied by a band or hydraulic arm (in space, weights are useless) that band or arm supplies all the resistance, and bolting one surface to the “floor” (or wall or ceiling) of the space station would not change the amount of resistance at all.

Think of using a stretchy band to provide resistance as you pull your hands apart. Now walk over to a wall and use the same band keeping one hand against the wall. The difficulty does not change.
Daniel
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Online Harry Black

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Re: Astronaut Resistance Training
« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2019, 07:37:49 AM »
But the difficulty does actually change, because I can recruit more muscles to achieve the goal by bracing against the wall. This is something I actually did with bands while trying to make resistance training more difficult without access to weights.

 

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