Author Topic: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?  (Read 2686 times)

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Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2019, 12:58:01 PM »
I eat a lot of cheese, but of course, like a few others on this forum, I have seen through the curtains about the deleterious nature of fat consumption.  Fat is fantastic fuel.

Large herbivores, btw, are the only significant method currently available for sequestering carbon.
Hmmm....

How so?  What about trees and other vegetation? Does it matter if they produce a bunch of methane?

As to the OP is there a reason that halloumi would be preferable to other cheeses especially other goat/sheep cheese?

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2019, 06:12:59 PM »
I eat a lot of cheese, but of course, like a few others on this forum, I have seen through the curtains about the deleterious nature of fat consumption.  Fat is fantastic fuel.

Large herbivores, btw, are the only significant method currently available for sequestering carbon.
Hmmm....

How so?  What about trees and other vegetation? Does it matter if they produce a bunch of methane?

As to the OP is there a reason that halloumi would be preferable to other cheeses especially other goat/sheep cheese?

Carbon is sequestered by bacteria living in the soil, deep rooting herbs and grasses feed them; that's basically the programme.  Trees store carbon in their woody bits, mostly, and it is released bin with fire or decay.  Carbon needs to be stored we'll under the surface.  Methane from enteric fermentation is basically a wash.  It is the feeding that raises the carbon footprint.  Billions of herbivores have been grazing for millions of years and have been very helpful keeping CO2 at sustainable levels.

Haloumi is an easy cheese to make one's self.  Incredibly tasty fried in olive oil or butter.  Cheap, too.  Thumbs up  for haloumi. 
"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline John Albert

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2019, 06:25:30 PM »
Large herbivores, btw, are the only significant method currently available for sequestering carbon.

Nonsense. Animals do not sequester carbon. We produce carbon dioxide during respiration and expel it into the atmosphere through our exhalations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_sequestration
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 06:28:57 PM by John Albert »

Offline CarbShark

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2019, 06:53:28 PM »
Large herbivores, btw, are the only significant method currently available for sequestering carbon.

Nonsense. Animals do not sequester carbon. We produce carbon dioxide during respiration and expel it into the atmosphere through our exhalations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_sequestration

Animals consume plants (mostly carbon) and excrete waste (mostly carbon) which gets broken down and absorbed in soil. Some is not sequestered and feeds new plants, but some is buried and/or washed to sea, where it forms sediment that can be effectively sequestered for millions of years (see coal). 


Carbon sequestration a positive aspect of beef cattle grazing grasslands — Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Quote
Research by R. Lal published in 2011 indicated if soil organic carbon in agricultural ecosystems and grasslands could be increased 10 percent globally during the 21st century, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide could be reduced by 100 parts per million.
“In addition to the potential for grazing to increase the capacity of soil carbon sequestration in certain cases, grazing beef cattle and other ruminants such as sheep and goats provide economic, societal and environmental value from available pasture and grassland resources,” Place said.

I think that's the process Moa was referring to. You're just looking at respiration.
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2019, 08:52:58 PM »
Large herbivores, btw, are the only significant method currently available for sequestering carbon.

Nonsense. Animals do not sequester carbon. We produce carbon dioxide during respiration and expel it into the atmosphere through our exhalations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_sequestration

Animals consume plants (mostly carbon) and excrete waste (mostly carbon) which gets broken down and absorbed in soil. Some is not sequestered and feeds new plants, but some is buried and/or washed to sea, where it forms sediment that can be effectively sequestered for millions of years (see coal). 


Carbon sequestration a positive aspect of beef cattle grazing grasslands — Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Quote
Research by R. Lal published in 2011 indicated if soil organic carbon in agricultural ecosystems and grasslands could be increased 10 percent globally during the 21st century, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide could be reduced by 100 parts per million.
“In addition to the potential for grazing to increase the capacity of soil carbon sequestration in certain cases, grazing beef cattle and other ruminants such as sheep and goats provide economic, societal and environmental value from available pasture and grassland resources,” Place said.

I think that's the process Moa was referring to. You're just looking at respiration.

You’ve set new lows for your ‘references.’  It’s nothing more than a press release.  I found the abstract for the paper by R Lal (2011) which lists the strategies as ‘adopt conservation tillage, cover cropping, manuring, agroforestry, biochar and other amendments’ and ‘adoption of no-till farming with mulch, use of cover crops, integrated nutrient management including biofertilisers, water conservation, and harvesting, and improving soil structure and tilth.’

It’s not just dealing with grazing.

And ‘could’ reduce atmospheric CO2 by 100 ppmv in the 21st century doesn’t mean ‘will.’  At current rates, atmospheric CO2 will increase by around 200 ppmv in the remainder of the century at least.
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Offline CarbShark

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2019, 10:27:48 PM »
  I found the abstract for the paper by R Lal (2011) ....


I don’t believe you found the abstract. If you had you’d post a link to it as any normal rational person would.


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and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2019, 11:17:10 PM »
  I found the abstract for the paper by R Lal (2011) ....


I don’t believe you found the abstract. If you had you’d post a link to it as any normal rational person would.


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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0306919210001454

As I’ve written before, I don’t know how to cite links on my iPad.  I have to laboriously type them out.

I’ve now provided a link. 

Apologise for your libel.
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Offline John Albert

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2019, 07:27:47 PM »
Animals consume plants (mostly carbon) and excrete waste (mostly carbon) which gets broken down and absorbed in soil. Some is not sequestered and feeds new plants, but some is buried and/or washed to sea, where it forms sediment that can be effectively sequestered for millions of years (see coal).

Nonsense. The vast majority of carbon excreted by animals is not 'sequestered.' It continues to circulate among the life cycles of plants and animals. That is not sequestration.


Animals consume plants (mostly carbon) and excrete waste (mostly carbon) which gets broken down and absorbed in soil. Some is not sequestered and feeds new plants, but some is buried and/or washed to sea, where it forms sediment that can be effectively sequestered for millions of years (see coal). 


Carbon sequestration a positive aspect of beef cattle grazing grasslands — Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Quote
Research by R. Lal published in 2011 indicated if soil organic carbon in agricultural ecosystems and grasslands could be increased 10 percent globally during the 21st century, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide could be reduced by 100 parts per million.
“In addition to the potential for grazing to increase the capacity of soil carbon sequestration in certain cases, grazing beef cattle and other ruminants such as sheep and goats provide economic, societal and environmental value from available pasture and grassland resources,” Place said.

I think that's the process Moa was referring to. You're just looking at respiration.

That's nonsense too. The grazing animals drop their feces in the pastures, which fertilizes the grasses that other grazing cattle eat. Thus, the organic carbon does not remain locked up or sequestered within the soil. It gets taken up by plants, which are then consumed by the livestock.

Meanwhile, the massive livestock populations are constantly removing oxygen from the atmosphere and replacing it with carbon dioxide.

Livestock do not sequester carbon.

You really ought to read the Wikipedia article about carbon sequestration, because you obviously don't understand what carbon sequestration is.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2019, 07:37:19 PM by John Albert »

Offline CarbShark

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2019, 07:41:46 PM »
  I found the abstract for the paper by R Lal (2011) ....


I don’t believe you found the abstract. If you had you’d post a link to it as any normal rational person would.


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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0306919210001454

As I’ve written before, I don’t know how to cite links on my iPad.  I have to laboriously type them out.

 

Still? It's 2019, man.

Go to the page you want to link to. Go to the address field. touch-and-hold the address. The select/select-all options should appear. Choose select all. From the options that appear select "Copy".

No go to your tapatalk page (or the Forum Webpage if that's what you're doing). Start one of your inane and repetitive posts. Touch-and-hold in the text where you want your link to appear. Select paste from the options that appear.

and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2019, 08:05:25 PM »
  I found the abstract for the paper by R Lal (2011) ....


I don’t believe you found the abstract. If you had you’d post a link to it as any normal rational person would.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0306919210001454

As I’ve written before, I don’t know how to cite links on my iPad.  I have to laboriously type them out.

 

Still? It's 2019, man.

Go to the page you want to link to. Go to the address field. touch-and-hold the address. The select/select-all options should appear. Choose select all. From the options that appear select "Copy".

No go to your tapatalk page (or the Forum Webpage if that's what you're doing). Start one of your inane and repetitive posts. Touch-and-hold in the text where you want your link to appear. Select paste from the options that appear.

I see.  I’ll keep a copy of this.  Apple is usually pretty intuitive.  This isn’t.  I’ll probably need to follow the directions several times before I’ve mastered it.

You still haven’t apologised for your libel.  If you think that a ‘normal rational person’ would have provided a link, then you’re stating that I’m not normal nor rational.

I chose not to provide a link, because I didn’t think it was necessary.  Your so-called reference was little more than a press release, with the paper by Lal only mentioned, giving the year of publication only (did you even try to find it and read it for yourself?). I didn’t provide a link, because you didn’t feel the need to provide a link to it either.

I used it as an illustration of your habit in providing references which actually don’t support what you’re claiming they say.
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Offline CarbShark

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2019, 08:17:06 PM »

You still haven’t apologised

Don’t hold your breath


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and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2019, 08:56:12 PM »

You still haven’t apologised

Don’t hold your breath


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I wasn’t ‘really’ expecting you to apologise.  I don’t regard your opinions of any value, as you probably do for me. I have little more than contempt for you.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #27 on: January 29, 2019, 07:43:33 PM »
Bachfiend: I ran your sig line, “Gebt ihr ihr ihr Buch zurück?” through Google Translate and it came out “Will you give her her book back?” I am mystified as to what this signifies as a sig line.
Daniel
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Offline lonely moa

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"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline 2397

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #29 on: January 30, 2019, 07:31:48 AM »
Makes sense. The more biomass, the more carbon.

What continues to not make sense to me is growing fuels to fight climate change. It's something we could've done if we never dug up fuels in the first place, but now we need ways of capturing carbon that don't end with releasing all of it again (in addition to the emissions from the energy used on the process).