Author Topic: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?  (Read 2679 times)

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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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When it comes to eating, in recent months or so, I have really reduced my meat consumption. In particular red meat. It's not at zero, and it probably won't get there at this point at least, but at least it's something. I do this both for health and environmental/climate reasons, as well as for ethical reasons.

One meat replacement that is very popular here is halloumi, a cheese from Cyprus, from the milk of sheep and goats. I read somewhere that Swedish people are among the most halloumi-eating people in the world, and it might well be true. Go to a hamburger place here, and their vegetarian option is often halloumi.

However, I wonder if halloumi is very good, or at least better than meat. From an ethical point, sure. It is less unethical to take milk from the animals than to kill them. But from environmental/climate and health perspectives? Sure, from health, it is a salty cheese, so no extra salt needed I guess. But fact remains that halloumi comes from red meat animals, who contribute to climate change in a negative way.

So from the perspectives of health and the environment/climate, is halloumi an improvement or not? What do you think? Should it be preferred over meat, or is it a toss-up?
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Offline CarbShark

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Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2019, 11:15:03 AM »
The only red-meat animals that contribute significantly to climate change are humans.  Don’t eat them.


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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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The only red-meat animals that contribute significantly to climate change are humans.  Don’t eat them.


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That's rather narrow-minded.


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Online Ah.hell

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However, I wonder if halloumi is very good, or at least better than meat. From an ethical point, sure. It is less unethical to take milk from the animals than to kill them. But from environmental/climate and health perspectives?
Even this is debatable and depends.  Beef cattle humanely raised on a pasture and never having come into contact with a feed lot could easily be less ethically problematic that a dairy animal depending on the lifestyle of said dairy animal.   Though, I'm unaware of sheep and goats being treating nearly as badly as swine or cattle can be. 

Offline Captain Video

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Thats one of the cheeses they serve at greek restaurants, fried at the table with flaming brandy and yell OPA! yum. If I absolutely had to give up steak that dish would be a fair substitute but not enough to make me want to give up steak.
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Online daniel1948

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I’ve never had halloumi. I never heard of it until now. But generally cheese is very high in fat, making it unhealthy if eaten in large amounts. And you say this one is very salty, so that’s another mark against it. From an environmental pov, milk has a smaller environmental footprint than red meat, other things being equal. From an ethical pov, dairy animals are killed after they’be passed their prime production age, and the calves or kids are killed, except for the few kept as breeders or milkers.

Cheese tastes good, and I eat it. I would not see it as a meat substitute. Eggs are a good meat substitute if you are not bothered by the conditions under which the chickens live, and the fact that egg layers also are killed after they pass prime production age. Otherwise beans combined with whole grains are the best non-animal protein source. Healthiest, lowest environmental impact, and no slaughter of animals is involved. There are many different kinds of beans and they are delicious. I think I’ll make some for lunch.
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Offline bachfiend

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I’ve never had halloumi. I never heard of it until now. But generally cheese is very high in fat, making it unhealthy if eaten in large amounts. And you say this one is very salty, so that’s another mark against it. From an environmental pov, milk has a smaller environmental footprint than red meat, other things being equal. From an ethical pov, dairy animals are killed after they’be passed their prime production age, and the calves or kids are killed, except for the few kept as breeders or milkers.

Cheese tastes good, and I eat it. I would not see it as a meat substitute. Eggs are a good meat substitute if you are not bothered by the conditions under which the chickens live, and the fact that egg layers also are killed after they pass prime production age. Otherwise beans combined with whole grains are the best non-animal protein source. Healthiest, lowest environmental impact, and no slaughter of animals is involved. There are many different kinds of beans and they are delicious. I think I’ll make some for lunch.

Eggs have the fig leaf of being able to buy free range ones (whether the hens are happier is another matter).  Almost half the chicks are killed almost immediately after hatching owing to the honourable profession of chicken sexing (males are useless for egg laying).  I feed my dog chicken hearts and chicken gizzards, which she loves, so she’s eating stuff that would otherwise be discarded.  It’s somewhat surprising how easy it is to buy plenty of chicken hearts in supermarkets.  People must be eating a lot of chicken (I haven’t had any since I went ovolacto-vegetarian over 40 years ago).
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Offline arthwollipot

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I’ve never had halloumi. I never heard of it until now. But generally cheese is very high in fat, making it unhealthy if eaten in large amounts. And you say this one is very salty, so that’s another mark against it. From an environmental pov, milk has a smaller environmental footprint than red meat, other things being equal. From an ethical pov, dairy animals are killed after they’be passed their prime production age, and the calves or kids are killed, except for the few kept as breeders or milkers.

Cheese tastes good, and I eat it. I would not see it as a meat substitute. Eggs are a good meat substitute if you are not bothered by the conditions under which the chickens live, and the fact that egg layers also are killed after they pass prime production age. Otherwise beans combined with whole grains are the best non-animal protein source. Healthiest, lowest environmental impact, and no slaughter of animals is involved. There are many different kinds of beans and they are delicious. I think I’ll make some for lunch.

Halloumi's great. It's usually served lightly fried in olive oil. If you like cheese, then I think you ought to get yourself some just for the experience. The squeakiness puts some people off, but for a proper cheese lover like you and me, that's part of its appeal.
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Offline John Albert

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Thats one of the cheeses they serve at greek restaurants, fried at the table with flaming brandy and yell OPA! yum. If I absolutely had to give up steak that dish would be a fair substitute but not enough to make me want to give up steak.

I've only had flaming saganaki in the Chicago area, and I think the stuff they use is usually kasseri.

I don't think I've ever tried halloumi.

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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If you like cheese, especially if you like Greek cheeses like feta and mozzarella, you should definitely give halloumi a try!
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Online daniel1948

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2019, 04:03:05 PM »
I’ve never had halloumi. I never heard of it until now. But generally cheese is very high in fat, making it unhealthy if eaten in large amounts. And you say this one is very salty, so that’s another mark against it. From an environmental pov, milk has a smaller environmental footprint than red meat, other things being equal. From an ethical pov, dairy animals are killed after they’be passed their prime production age, and the calves or kids are killed, except for the few kept as breeders or milkers.

Cheese tastes good, and I eat it. I would not see it as a meat substitute. Eggs are a good meat substitute if you are not bothered by the conditions under which the chickens live, and the fact that egg layers also are killed after they pass prime production age. Otherwise beans combined with whole grains are the best non-animal protein source. Healthiest, lowest environmental impact, and no slaughter of animals is involved. There are many different kinds of beans and they are delicious. I think I’ll make some for lunch.

Eggs have the fig leaf of being able to buy free range ones (whether the hens are happier is another matter).  Almost half the chicks are killed almost immediately after hatching owing to the honourable profession of chicken sexing (males are useless for egg laying).  I feed my dog chicken hearts and chicken gizzards, which she loves, so she’s eating stuff that would otherwise be discarded.  It’s somewhat surprising how easy it is to buy plenty of chicken hearts in supermarkets.  People must be eating a lot of chicken (I haven’t had any since I went ovolacto-vegetarian over 40 years ago).

Another podcast said that there are more chickens in the world than all other vertebrates put together, or some such amazing statistic, I don’t remember exactly. The point was that people eat a shit-ton of chicken. I eat eggs occasionally, not very many.
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Online daniel1948

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2019, 04:07:34 PM »
I’ve never had halloumi. I never heard of it until now. But generally cheese is very high in fat, making it unhealthy if eaten in large amounts. And you say this one is very salty, so that’s another mark against it. From an environmental pov, milk has a smaller environmental footprint than red meat, other things being equal. From an ethical pov, dairy animals are killed after they’be passed their prime production age, and the calves or kids are killed, except for the few kept as breeders or milkers.

Cheese tastes good, and I eat it. I would not see it as a meat substitute. Eggs are a good meat substitute if you are not bothered by the conditions under which the chickens live, and the fact that egg layers also are killed after they pass prime production age. Otherwise beans combined with whole grains are the best non-animal protein source. Healthiest, lowest environmental impact, and no slaughter of animals is involved. There are many different kinds of beans and they are delicious. I think I’ll make some for lunch.

Halloumi's great. It's usually served lightly fried in olive oil. If you like cheese, then I think you ought to get yourself some just for the experience. The squeakiness puts some people off, but for a proper cheese lover like you and me, that's part of its appeal.

I like cheese, but I would not call myself a cheese lover. I like the hard cheeses. I’ll eat cottage cheese (non-fat) occasionally. It’s a healthy food that I don’t like enough for it to tempt me into overeating. I cannot stand smelly cheeses. I never buy mozzarella because if I’m going to have cheese, because there are others I like more.

It would surprise me if I could get halloumi here.
Daniel
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Offline John Albert

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2019, 07:14:39 PM »
If you like cheese, especially if you like Greek cheeses like feta and mozzarella, you should definitely give halloumi a try!

I will certainly do that.

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2019, 12:28:08 PM »
I eat a lot of cheese, but of course, like a few others on this forum, I have seen through the curtains about the deleterious nature of fat consumption.  Fat is fantastic fuel.

Large herbivores, btw, are the only significant method currently available for sequestering carbon.
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Offline 2397

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Re: Is halloumi preferable to meat when it comes to health and climate change?
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2019, 12:51:13 PM »
Including ents.