Author Topic: Spain closes coal mines, offers re-skilling for the miners to green industries  (Read 508 times)

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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Spain to close most coalmines in €250m transition deal

Agreement with unions includes early retirement for miners, re-skilling and environmental restoration

Spain is to shut down most of its coalmines by the end of the year after government and unions struck a deal that will mean €250m (£221m) will be invested in mining regions over the next decade.

Pedro Sánchez’s new leftwing administration has moved quickly on environmental policy, abolishing a controversial “sunshine tax” on the solar industry, and announcing the launch of Spain’s long-delayed national climate plan next month.

Unions hailed the mining deal – which covers Spain’s privately owned pits – as a model agreement. It mixes early retirement schemes for miners over 48, with environmental restoration work in pit communities and re-skilling schemes for cutting-edge green industries.

This is excellent news. IMO, this is the way it should be done. Concern is being taken for both the environment and for the employees going out of jobs. This shows that transition to a less polluting and less carbon-emitting economy doesn't have to drive regions to mass unemployment. Both employment and concern for the environment can be achieved.

Hopefully such a deal could be replicated elsewhere. I'm especially looking at Uncle Sam and the Middle Kingdom here...
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Offline arthwollipot

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Hopefully such a deal could be replicated elsewhere. I'm especially looking at Uncle Sam and the Middle Kingdom here...

And Australia.
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Offline Tassie Dave

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Hopefully such a deal could be replicated elsewhere. I'm especially looking at Uncle Sam and the Middle Kingdom here...

And Australia.

I do agree we need to cut back, but it is not going to be as easy here as in Spain. Coal mining is a huge industry 60,000 direct employees and multiple times that indirectly. Spain had been reducing for decades and only had a few thousand workers over the last few years, and a thousand by the time they finish.

We can move some of them sideways into other mining jobs, but as that is an industry that has already cut back thousands of workers since the mining boom ended, there is limited room there until the next boom cycle.

We certainly need to stop further development of new mining leases and cut back where we can. But I can't see Green industries taking up those 100s of thousands of workers that will need new work.

We are the worlds biggest coal exporter, so the slow down of the Australian coal industry will be decided by overseas countries' policies, as much as our own.

I live in a state that is almost 100% non-reliant on coal for power and other states are trying to lower their use, but it will be decades before we stop using it.

Offline bachfiend

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Hopefully such a deal could be replicated elsewhere. I'm especially looking at Uncle Sam and the Middle Kingdom here...

And Australia.

I do agree we need to cut back, but it is not going to be as easy here as in Spain. Coal mining is a huge industry 60,000 direct employees and multiple times that indirectly. Spain had been reducing for decades and only had a few thousand workers over the last few years, and a thousand by the time they finish.

We can move some of them sideways into other mining jobs, but as that is an industry that has already cut back thousands of workers since the mining boom ended, there is limited room there until the next boom cycle.

We certainly need to stop further development of new mining leases and cut back where we can. But I can't see Green industries taking up those 100s of thousands of workers that will need new work.

We are the worlds biggest coal exporter, so the slow down of the Australian coal industry will be decided by overseas countries' policies, as much as our own.

I live in a state that is almost 100% non-reliant on coal for power and other states are trying to lower their use, but it will be decades before we stop using it.

Well, a good start would be not commissioning new coal mines and building new coal power plants.  A better start would be getting rid of the global warming denialist coal-ition government this year.
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Offline Tassie Dave

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Hopefully such a deal could be replicated elsewhere. I'm especially looking at Uncle Sam and the Middle Kingdom here...

And Australia.

I do agree we need to cut back, but it is not going to be as easy here as in Spain. Coal mining is a huge industry 60,000 direct employees and multiple times that indirectly. Spain had been reducing for decades and only had a few thousand workers over the last few years, and a thousand by the time they finish.

We can move some of them sideways into other mining jobs, but as that is an industry that has already cut back thousands of workers since the mining boom ended, there is limited room there until the next boom cycle.

We certainly need to stop further development of new mining leases and cut back where we can. But I can't see Green industries taking up those 100s of thousands of workers that will need new work.

We are the worlds biggest coal exporter, so the slow down of the Australian coal industry will be decided by overseas countries' policies, as much as our own.

I live in a state that is almost 100% non-reliant on coal for power and other states are trying to lower their use, but it will be decades before we stop using it.

Well, a good start would be not commissioning new coal mines and building new coal power plants.  A better start would be getting rid of the global warming denialist coal-ition government this year.

All good strategies. I still think we are looking at a 20 to 30 year move to a coal free Australia.


Offline arthwollipot

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Hopefully such a deal could be replicated elsewhere. I'm especially looking at Uncle Sam and the Middle Kingdom here...

And Australia.

I do agree we need to cut back, but it is not going to be as easy here as in Spain. Coal mining is a huge industry 60,000 direct employees and multiple times that indirectly. Spain had been reducing for decades and only had a few thousand workers over the last few years, and a thousand by the time they finish.

We can move some of them sideways into other mining jobs, but as that is an industry that has already cut back thousands of workers since the mining boom ended, there is limited room there until the next boom cycle.

We certainly need to stop further development of new mining leases and cut back where we can. But I can't see Green industries taking up those 100s of thousands of workers that will need new work.

We are the worlds biggest coal exporter, so the slow down of the Australian coal industry will be decided by overseas countries' policies, as much as our own.

I live in a state that is almost 100% non-reliant on coal for power and other states are trying to lower their use, but it will be decades before we stop using it.

Well, a good start would be not commissioning new coal mines and building new coal power plants.  A better start would be getting rid of the global warming denialist coal-ition government this year.

All good strategies. I still think we are looking at a 20 to 30 year move to a coal free Australia.

I don't think it'll take that long (I'm an optimist), but I agree that it's likely to be a difficult process.
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