Author Topic: music you learned to like  (Read 1338 times)

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Offline superdave

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music you learned to like
« on: January 15, 2019, 11:35:54 AM »
Is there any songs or bands now that you like that you wouldn't have enjoyed earlier in your life?

I definitely appreciate some of the heavier metal bands now that would have hurt my ears earlier.  But it took time and practice and slowly progressing up the metal ladder to get there.
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Offline Captain Video

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2019, 05:11:26 PM »
Exotica Music. Martin Denny, Les Baxter, stuff like that.

Something I would have considered elevator music as a kid and now really enjoy. The weirder the better. Fake jungle noises, the works.

Tiki culture is having a bit of a resurgence here in Atlanta right now with several new options aside from Trader Vics.

Some people dont know what I am talking about so here are examples.



« Last Edit: January 15, 2019, 05:22:15 PM by Captain Video »
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2019, 07:19:43 PM »
When I was younger I didn’t like anything later than Beethoven. Then I went through a period when my cut-off was Mozart. Somewhere along the way I began enjoying R&B, reggae, Spanish coplas, etc. But I still call those enjoyable, while the best of Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, etc., is sublime. I’ll tap my toes to Love Potion Number 9, but a Bach fugue sends me into ecstasy.

So I’ve learned to enjoy some music I didn’t before. But my first love in music remains my favorite by many miles.
Daniel
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Offline superdave

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2019, 08:06:34 PM »



Yeah me in the 8th grade would never believe that this would be one of my favorite all time songs.
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Offline Captain Video

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2019, 08:39:17 PM »



Yeah me in the 8th grade would never believe that this would be one of my favorite all time songs.

What did you like in 8th grade? Or better yet early 20s  It will give perspective on the switch to metal. 
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Offline superdave

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2019, 09:30:14 AM »
My first favorite bands were Live and Hootie and Blowfish. But I distinctly remember thinking the song Shine by Collective Soul was this heavy crunching riff, which I laugh at now when hear the song.

One factor was that this was pre napster and radio was still the only way to hear new music unless you had a lot of money and were adventurous at the record shop. 

(I remember spending an hour downloading a single song Opeth on a 56k modem, totally worth it)
I disavow anyone in the movement involved in any illegal,unethical, sexist, or racist behavior. However, I don't have the energy or time to investigate each person and case, and a lack of individual disavowals for each incident should not be construed as condoning such behavior.

Offline seamas

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2019, 11:23:37 AM »
as a teenager I had a strong dislike of punk and any funk that came close to sounding like disco.
I college I learned to appreciate some punk, and relaxed my stance on disco.

I was also not a big fan of jazz, and came to have a tremendous appreciation for it in my 20s and 30s.
I was often very baffled by Bob Dylan when I was younger, but tried to appreciate him, but it didn't take until I was in my mid 30s, and then spent about six-eight years listening to almost nothing but Dylan.
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Offline moj

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2019, 01:39:25 PM »
I kinda went the other way. I took a long journey from metal to pop. I first really got into music as an angry teen, got into metal and punk. Picked up a guitar and got into classical but still mostly metal/punk. I just liked fast and aggressive music. I learned Paganini on guitar to become a better guitarist. I got into music school at 16 but as my dad put it, “I’m not going to spend money we don’t have just so you can get arrested in anther town faraway”…

Soon after leaving my parents’ house and going out on my own mellowed a bit. I got into more indie and jam bands. I never toured with phish(I did see a bunch of dead shows, before and after Jerry died) or anything like that but loved the contrast of improvisation when compared to say watching metallica play the songs exactly as recorded. For years went to as many live shows as I could.

Another thing that helped that transition was playing in bands. Back then(and probably still now) guitarist saturated the local music scene so I started playing congo’s in a werido indie band just to jam with friends. Seeing practice get broken up by just jamming sometimes was so much fun and helped broaden what I was enjoying about music.

Soon after that everything really opened up. I still don’t like a lot of country but can find something I like in most types of music. These days it’s mostly alt/ indie to pop and vigorous classical but will still come back to funk/jam bands/eltric swing or metal when the mood hits.

 I started leaning the piano a few months ago and really enjoying it. I wish I could quit my job and play all the time but am really busy and lucky to practice a few times a week. My hope is to one day get good enough at keyboards to jam with friends again. My dream is to have a large home studio with almost every kind of instrument to have at the ready to learn or bring in others who can play and just jam. But why I got out of music or any of the creative fields decades ago was how hard it is to make money in any of the creative fields. At the time it felt like being a sellout, maybe it was. Giving up the dream for a stable decent paying day job. It was hard at the time but totally the right call for me. Got sick of being really poor. All my friends where artist or musicians and everyone struggling. So many young people want to be writers, artist, musicians… so few will ever be able to do it for a living.

TL DR
I dig music a lot, most types, want to jam sometime!


Offline superdave

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2019, 02:46:40 PM »
I dig music a lot, most types, want to jam sometime!

Open invite to any forum members who want to jam
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Online Calinthalus

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2019, 04:12:32 PM »
Hated country music with a passion growing up.  Still hate most any country played on the radio.  However, alt-country (or Americana or whatever) is one of my day-to-day listens.  Learned to really appreciate Waylon and Willie and Loretta.  Seriously roll with modern stars like Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell, Amanda Shires and the like...just can't stand most pop-country.


I somehow got there via Neil Young whom I have always secretly dug (even while rocking a Slayer T-shirt in high school).
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2019, 06:22:23 PM »
Hated country music with a passion growing up.  Still hate most any country played on the radio.  However, alt-country (or Americana or whatever) is one of my day-to-day listens.  Learned to really appreciate Waylon and Willie and Loretta.  Seriously roll with modern stars like Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell, Amanda Shires and the like...just can't stand most pop-country.


I somehow got there via Neil Young whom I have always secretly dug (even while rocking a Slayer T-shirt in high school).

When I was working on the dairy farm, mostly driving a tractor all day long, I had an AM transistor radio. (I wonder if folks today even know what those were!) I was too far from town to pick up FM, and the least horrible thing on AM was the country station. “Tears in my beer” music. “I was drunk the day my dog got out of prison” music. I did like Freddy Fender, though.

Speaking of country music, here’s an apocryphal Willie Nelson quote: “I don’t know why people were so upset at Lance Armstrong for winning all those bicycle races on drugs. When I was on drugs I couldn’t even find my bicycle.
Daniel
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Online Calinthalus

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2019, 06:28:55 PM »
Nah, you were drunk when your Mom got out of prison.






Sorry, it's a quote from a great David Allan Coe song that makes fun of country lyrics.
Quote
Well, a friend of mine named Steve Goodman wrote that song
And he told me it was the perfect country & western song
I wrote him back a letter and I told him it was not the perfect country & western song
Because he hadn't said anything at all about mama
Or trains, or trucks, or prison, or getting' drunk
Well, he sat down and wrote another verse to the song and he sent it to me
And after reading it I realized that my friend had written the perfect country & western song
And I felt obliged to include it on this album
The last verse goes like this here


Well, I was drunk the day my mom got out of prison
And I went to pick her up in the rain
But before I could get to the station in my pickup truck
She got run over by a damned old train
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2019, 09:11:17 AM »
Nah, you were drunk when your Mom got out of prison.


Sorry, it's a quote from a great David Allan Coe song that makes fun of country lyrics.
Quote
Well, a friend of mine named Steve Goodman wrote that song
And he told me it was the perfect country & western song
I wrote him back a letter and I told him it was not the perfect country & western song
Because he hadn't said anything at all about mama
Or trains, or trucks, or prison, or getting' drunk
Well, he sat down and wrote another verse to the song and he sent it to me
And after reading it I realized that my friend had written the perfect country & western song
And I felt obliged to include it on this album
The last verse goes like this here


Well, I was drunk the day my mom got out of prison
And I went to pick her up in the rain
But before I could get to the station in my pickup truck
She got run over by a damned old train

Coe has his version, I have mine. ;D
Daniel
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-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline superdave

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2019, 09:44:20 AM »
I guess I should add jazz and the beatles to this list though they both went from totally hate to, I can enjoy the better stuff but it's still mostly meh. 
I disavow anyone in the movement involved in any illegal,unethical, sexist, or racist behavior. However, I don't have the energy or time to investigate each person and case, and a lack of individual disavowals for each incident should not be construed as condoning such behavior.

Offline Captain Video

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2019, 11:22:24 AM »
I hated country up until I got a job at a redneck bar. The company pulled a bait and switch, hired me at one location then sent me to the Honky tonk . Every 3rd song had to be country. The first few weeks I was lost and just hated playing the music.  The manager heard rumors that I wanted to quit and confronted me asking me to make a decision as he felt I would be good for the bar.  I Lied and told him I was still interested (I was actually interested in one of the entertainers and had not got a new job yet.)

I decided that since I was going to quit in a few days/weeks I would cut loose and not worry about getting fired. I made fun of the rednecks and music on the mic using language I never would have gotten away with at other bars, I was brutal, I thought for sure I would get fired but a miraculous thing happened. The rednecks loved it and sales went up.  Who would have guessed.  The manager spent time with me in the booth teaching me what country music was good to play until I learned to like it. It was probably the most defining moment in my DJ career, A legend was born.  Over the years the place slowly evolved away from the country music but my asshole style of commentary was maintained. I never did get the original girl I was interested in.

I guess I should add jazz and the beatles to this list though they both went from totally hate to, I can enjoy the better stuff but it's still mostly meh. 

I learned to appreciate (smooth) jazz when first playing weddings. Later I got into some of the more classic forms. Its such a big category.

For most of my life music was a tool, What I like personally and what I think is a good tool may often be two different things.
“Don't explain computers to laymen. Simpler to explain sex to a virgin.”
― Robert A. Heinlein, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress

 

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