Author Topic: music you learned to like  (Read 1171 times)

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Offline daniel1948

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2019, 07:06:59 PM »
I like very early Dixieland jazz. I do not like the stuff that sounds like a washing machine with a bad bearing. That old jazz is polyphonic, in some ways a lot like baroque.
Daniel
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Offline DevoutCatalyst

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2019, 11:45:39 PM »
Back in the 1970s my partner and I would visit a Thai grocery store in Chicago. Occasionally I would pick up some music cassettes. I know almost exactly zero Thai but grew over time to enjoy Thai country music (Luk thung), especially the singer Waiphot Phetsuphan. I don't expect anyone here to warm to this stuff but I can listen to it for hours. This music transports me back to long drives in my Honda Civic singing along (phonetically as best able) the Waiphot song below (and others). I like the phrasing, the sounds not found in English, the unlikely musical backdrop which sure as hell ain't Nashville. A love song and beloved song,



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luk_thung


Offline moj

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2019, 09:16:34 AM »
I like very early Dixieland jazz. I do not like the stuff that sounds like a washing machine with a bad bearing. That old jazz is polyphonic, in some ways a lot like baroque.

Same, I've also grown to really like blue grass. Its way more technical and jamy than I had ever given it credit for.


Offline Calinthalus

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2019, 10:05:52 AM »
I like very early Dixieland jazz. I do not like the stuff that sounds like a washing machine with a bad bearing. That old jazz is polyphonic, in some ways a lot like baroque.

Same, I've also grown to really like blue grass. Its way more technical and jamy than I had ever given it credit for.


The Goat Rodeo sessions is a great album from those guys.
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Offline Captain Video

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2019, 10:20:26 AM »
When speaking of New Orleans Jazz I prefer Brass bands and 2nd lines over the Dixieland. I didn't like it as a kid, love it now.  Zydeco is pretty cool too (which I think is the "washing machine" music Daniel is referring too, not sure).

I hate it when a restaurant claims to have a New Orleans Jazz band then you show up you find out there are no horns WTF!

Other forms of jazz are fun and I like most of them.

If you want string bands I have to go with the Mummers which is similar to dixieland but I grew up with them as a kid so I have always liked that stuff.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: music you learned to like
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2019, 08:51:43 PM »
.... Zydeco is pretty cool too (which I think is the "washing machine" music Daniel is referring too, not sure).

No. Zydeco isn’t bad at all. I was referring to some modern jazz (but “modern” quite a long time ago ;D ) where a saxophone really does imitate the obnoxious squeaking that a bad bearing can make.
Daniel
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