Author Topic: Episode #706  (Read 2543 times)

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Online Ah.hell

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #30 on: January 22, 2019, 09:22:34 AM »
Has anyone used this one?

How do you tell the difference between a brown bear and a black bear?  Climb a tree.  A black bear will climb up after you and brown bear will knock the tree down.   :downsrim:

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #31 on: January 22, 2019, 09:39:46 AM »
Brown bears are also those subspecies of Ursus arctus that inhabit Northern Europe and Asia.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #32 on: January 22, 2019, 10:04:43 AM »
I have seen the brown bears of Katmai, Alaska. And I have seen the grizzlies of North America in southeastern British Columbia. They’re the same bear. There could be minor differences, but effectively they are the same. They even behave the same.

Has anyone used this one?

How do you tell the difference between a brown bear and a black bear?  Climb a tree.  A black bear will climb up after you and brown bear will knock the tree down.   :downsrim:

And you can tell their scat apart as well: Black bear scat has berries; grizzlies bear scat has empty cans of pepper spray. :downsrim:

Here’s what the National Park Service (nps.gov) says:

Quote
What is the difference between brown bears and grizzly bears?

All grizzly bears are brown bears, but not all brown bears are grizzly bears. The bears you are watching on the cams are brown bears. Grizzly bears and brown bears are the same species (Ursus arctos), but grizzly bears are currently considered to be a separate subspecies (U. a. horribilis). Due to a few morphological differences, Kodiak bears are also considered to be a distinct subspecies of brown bear (U. a. middendorfii), but are very similar to Katmai’s brown bears in diet and habits.

Even though grizzlies are considered to be a subspecies of brown bear, the difference between a grizzly bear and a brown bear is fairly arbitrary. In North America, brown bears are generally considered to be those of the species that have access to coastal food resources like salmon. Grizzly bears live further inland and typically do not have access to marine-derived food resources.

Besides habitat and diet, there are physical and (arguably) temperamental differences between brown and grizzly bears. Large male brown bears in Katmai can routinely weigh over 1000 pounds (454 kg) in the fall. In contrast, grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park weigh far less on average. There have been no documented cases of grizzly bears weighing over 900 pounds (408 kg) in Yellowstone. Additionally, grizzly bears seem to react to humans at greater distances than brown bears.

Effectively the same bear, as near as makes no difference. Black bears, OTOH, are very different. As well as are the handful of other bear species around the world.
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Offline brilligtove

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #33 on: January 22, 2019, 10:08:19 AM »
I didn't know any of that about brown/grizzly bears. Neat.

http://www.bearsmart.com/about-bears/north-americas-bears/

Quote
There are three types of bears (or species) in North America. The most common is the American black bear (Ursus americanus). Unfortunately named, the black bear can be various shades of black, white and brown.

...

The grizzly or brown bear (Ursus arctos), is found in British Columbia, Alberta, the Yukon and Northwest territories as well as in the states of Wyoming, Montana, Idaho and Washington. Coastal versions of this species are often called brown or Kodiak bears, while the smaller inland variety is often called the “grizzly” bear on account of its “grizzled” appearance. All are members of the same species, though some biologists suggest that the brown bears on Kodiak Island have been isolated long enough to be considered a separate subspecies (Ursus arctos middendorffi).

...

The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) retains more of its original habitat than any other remaining large carnivore.

« Last Edit: January 22, 2019, 10:10:34 AM by brilligtove »
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Offline fuzzyMarmot

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #34 on: January 22, 2019, 10:40:30 PM »
One of the most profound wildlife viewing experiences I've ever had was watching a grizzly bear feed on a black bear carcass. From a very long way away, through binoculars.

Offline Tassie Dave

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2019, 12:30:52 AM »
Effectively the same bear, as near as makes no difference. Black bears, OTOH, are very different. As well as are the handful of other bear species around the world.

We only have 2 types. Koala bears and Drop bears  ;D   ;)

Online bachfiend

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2019, 03:47:31 AM »
Effectively the same bear, as near as makes no difference. Black bears, OTOH, are very different. As well as are the handful of other bear species around the world.

We only have 2 types. Koala bears and Drop bears  ;D   ;)

Well, for the American readers, the koala isn’t a bear.  It’s a marsupial, which is almost continuously stoned due to its diet of eucalyptus leaves (or at least it spends most of its day asleep).  And the drop bear is a mythical carnivorous koala which attacks unwary passersby by dropping out of trees on them.
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Offline Billzbub

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2019, 10:11:28 AM »
Effectively the same bear, as near as makes no difference. Black bears, OTOH, are very different. As well as are the handful of other bear species around the world.

We only have 2 types. Koala bears and Drop bears  ;D   ;)

Well, for the American readers, the koala isn’t a bear.  It’s a marsupial, which is almost continuously stoned due to its diet of eucalyptus leaves (or at least it spends most of its day asleep).  And the drop bear is a mythical carnivorous koala which attacks unwary passersby by dropping out of trees on them.

I can no longer think of Koalas without thinking of John Oliver and Russell Crowe:  https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/may/08/russell-crowe-names-koala-chlamydia-ward-after-john-oliver
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Online 2397

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2019, 10:31:24 AM »
I preferred John Oliver on his old podcast, but maybe I should catch up on LWTs.

Offline Billzbub

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2019, 12:37:27 PM »
I preferred John Oliver on his old podcast, but maybe I should catch up on LWTs.

The season I just linked to was amazing.  The most recent season wasn't as good.  I feel like maybe he got his budget cut or maybe the lawyers finally put a noose around his neck because previous seasons were bold, hilarious, and over-the-top but his most recent season was just kind of average.
Quote from: Steven Novella
gleefully altering one’s beliefs to accommodate new information should be a badge of honor

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #40 on: January 23, 2019, 08:24:10 PM »
Mythical?
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Online bachfiend

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #41 on: January 23, 2019, 09:23:25 PM »
Mythical?

I apologise for calling drop bears ‘mythical.’  They must be real:

https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/mammals/drop-bear/

I like the part about spreading Vegemite behind the ears as a remedy.  It will give me an opportunity of getting rid of my sole remaining jar of the foul stuff I’ve had in the back of the pantry for the past 27 years.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #42 on: January 23, 2019, 10:08:22 PM »
Mythical?

I apologise for calling drop bears ‘mythical.’  They must be real:

https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/mammals/drop-bear/

I like the part about spreading Vegemite behind the ears as a remedy.  It will give me an opportunity of getting rid of my sole remaining jar of the foul stuff I’ve had in the back of the pantry for the past 27 years.

From the link:

Quote
There is no evidence to suggest that any such repellents work.

;D
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Online bachfiend

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #43 on: January 23, 2019, 10:14:26 PM »
Mythical?

I apologise for calling drop bears ‘mythical.’  They must be real:

https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/mammals/drop-bear/

I like the part about spreading Vegemite behind the ears as a remedy.  It will give me an opportunity of getting rid of my sole remaining jar of the foul stuff I’ve had in the back of the pantry for the past 27 years.

From the link:

Quote
There is no evidence to suggest that any such repellents work.

;D

Of course it works.  I went for a walk in the local bush this morning after smearing Vegemite behind my ears, and not a single drop bear attacked me.

You can’t believe everything you read on the Internet.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #706
« Reply #44 on: January 24, 2019, 09:39:35 AM »
;D
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