Author Topic: Tiny house craz/regrets?  (Read 831 times)

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Offline Soldier of FORTRAN

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Re: Tiny house craz/regrets?
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2019, 02:44:11 PM »
Also, kids living past 5.

But I meant it as a distribution model.  ~Back in the day~, iirc, there were way more cases of settlers joining the Indians than Indians joining the settlers.  These days, though?  Modern medicine (esp. dentistry), modern transit, internet, imported food everywhere, etc.?  This shit's worth keeping around.  We just need a much more efficient model. 

How can we do that without letting failure kill billions or propping up an 'Elysium' scenario?
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Offline skepticahjumma

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Re: Tiny house craz/regrets?
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2019, 08:02:12 AM »
The tiny homes make me think of Henry DavidThoreau’s cabin on Walden Pond.

I love the idea of tiny houses as a way of increasing the amount of affordable housing in an urban area. I love the idea of living with more simplicity. But I am curious if there are external costs that add up? For example, if I lived in a tiny house, I probably wouldn’t have space for a sewing machine, a crockpot, exercise equipment, etc. Am I spending more time/energy/resources to access clothing/food/exercise? I suspect so, unless I am quite mindful. Do people in tiny houses buy more disposable stuff? Can they store one child’s clothes until a younger child grows into them?

Tiny homes also seem to me to be not accessible to many folks with disabilities. Certainly can’t maneuver a wheelchair in one of those things, or so it seems. If you never invite a disabled guest, I guess that’s okay.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Tiny house craz/regrets?
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2019, 10:34:40 AM »
The tiny homes make me think of Henry DavidThoreau’s cabin on Walden Pond.

I love the idea of tiny houses as a way of increasing the amount of affordable housing in an urban area. I love the idea of living with more simplicity. But I am curious if there are external costs that add up? For example, if I lived in a tiny house, I probably wouldn’t have space for a sewing machine, a crockpot, exercise equipment, etc. Am I spending more time/energy/resources to access clothing/food/exercise? I suspect so, unless I am quite mindful. Do people in tiny houses buy more disposable stuff? Can they store one child’s clothes until a younger child grows into them?

Tiny homes also seem to me to be not accessible to many folks with disabilities. Certainly can’t maneuver a wheelchair in one of those things, or so it seems. If you never invite a disabled guest, I guess that’s okay.

Very good points! A few of them, such as the sewing machine and exercise equipment, could be addressed with more availability of common resources, such as a community sewing room with machines for all to use, and free health clubs. Maybe even community dining rooms, like a restaurant but staffed by community members in turn so the only cost, after construction, is the cost of the food you consume, which is cheaper due to bulk purchases, though each individual would have less choice.

But a larger house allows a person or family to do things someone in a tiny house cannot.
Daniel
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Tiny house craz/regrets?
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2019, 09:53:39 PM »
The tiny homes make me think of Henry DavidThoreau’s cabin on Walden Pond.

I love the idea of tiny houses as a way of increasing the amount of affordable housing in an urban area. I love the idea of living with more simplicity. But I am curious if there are external costs that add up? For example, if I lived in a tiny house, I probably wouldn’t have space for a sewing machine, a crockpot, exercise equipment, etc. Am I spending more time/energy/resources to access clothing/food/exercise? I suspect so, unless I am quite mindful. Do people in tiny houses buy more disposable stuff? Can they store one child’s clothes until a younger child grows into them?

Tiny homes also seem to me to be not accessible to many folks with disabilities. Certainly can’t maneuver a wheelchair in one of those things, or so it seems. If you never invite a disabled guest, I guess that’s okay.

Very good points! A few of them, such as the sewing machine and exercise equipment, could be addressed with more availability of common resources, such as a community sewing room with machines for all to use, and free health clubs. Maybe even community dining rooms, like a restaurant but staffed by community members in turn so the only cost, after construction, is the cost of the food you consume, which is cheaper due to bulk purchases, though each individual would have less choice.

But a larger house allows a person or family to do things someone in a tiny house cannot.

Many, many years ago I read an article in ‘the Australian Financial Review’ in which the journalist wrote that it wasn’t necessary to have a kitchen (you can eat all your meals in restaurants) or a laundry (you can take all your washing to a laundrette), both of which would make smaller houses possible.

I can’t imagine doing without a kitchen or a laundry.  I have a small kitchen, and I do all my cooking in a microwave.  A lot of the bench space is taken up with a juicer, which I don’t bother putting away, since I use it daily making my daily carrot juice.  I have a laundry, which I use infrequently (this morning i did my monthly wash, so most of the month it’s not used).  But both save time.  I don’t have to bother travelling to restaurants or laundrettes, and wait while my meals are prepared or my washing goes through the machines.
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Offline Tassie Dave

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Re: Tiny house craz/regrets?
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2019, 02:00:02 AM »
Many, many years ago I read an article in ‘the Australian Financial Review’ in which the journalist wrote that it wasn’t necessary to have a kitchen (you can eat all your meals in restaurants) or a laundry (you can take all your washing to a laundrette), both of which would make smaller houses possible.

I can’t imagine doing without a kitchen or a laundry.  I have a small kitchen, and I do all my cooking in a microwave.  A lot of the bench space is taken up with a juicer, which I don’t bother putting away, since I use it daily making my daily carrot juice.  I have a laundry, which I use infrequently (this morning i did my monthly wash, so most of the month it’s not used).  But both save time.  I don’t have to bother travelling to restaurants or laundrettes, and wait while my meals are prepared or my washing goes through the machines.

Unless you are going to go Maccas 0r Kentucky Fried Rat or similar, that's going to be an expensive lifestyle  ??? Plus I like to cook my own meals. I get exactly what I want in every meal  8)

At least with my own laundry, it's no problem if I forget about it and get the washing out a day or 2 later, or leave towels in the dryer for a week.

Offline mindme

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Re: Tiny house craz/regrets?
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2019, 08:34:30 AM »
Lots of places, like Asia, it can be as cheap to eat out as in. Especially for a single person or a small family. But I can't see that being a viable way to offset housing costs in a Western nation.

In Canada, new builds over a certain amount (about $400K) get taxed. That's a big disincentive for a lot of buyers. While there are places in Canada you could build a very nice detached home for under $400K, there's about zero chance of doing that in the Greater Toronto Area. That means a condo. Closer you get to the downtown core, more expensive the condo is going to be. So to keep under the $400K price point, they have to keep building the units smaller and smaller. It's quite amazing the difference between condos, apartments, and even townhomes built in the 70s and 80s as compared to units today. A huge luxury of space as compared to super tiny bedrooms and living rooms. The 1+1 condo is kind of a joke. It means 1 bedroom (living room/kitchen/bathroom) plus an extra room that's not quite a bedroom. Usually the gimmick is the +1 is a small office or den. These days they tend to be either something walk in closet sized or just a kind of nook off the living room.
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Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Tiny house craz/regrets?
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2019, 09:21:42 AM »
There is a similar but much smaller movement in apartments, when I was up in Seattle there were a few buildings that went up that were tiny apartments with shared facilities like kitchens and what not. Apparently they got in through some loop hole in the building code.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Tiny house craz/regrets?
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2019, 09:48:17 AM »
The tiny homes make me think of Henry DavidThoreau’s cabin on Walden Pond.

I love the idea of tiny houses as a way of increasing the amount of affordable housing in an urban area. I love the idea of living with more simplicity. But I am curious if there are external costs that add up? For example, if I lived in a tiny house, I probably wouldn’t have space for a sewing machine, a crockpot, exercise equipment, etc. Am I spending more time/energy/resources to access clothing/food/exercise? I suspect so, unless I am quite mindful. Do people in tiny houses buy more disposable stuff? Can they store one child’s clothes until a younger child grows into them?

Tiny homes also seem to me to be not accessible to many folks with disabilities. Certainly can’t maneuver a wheelchair in one of those things, or so it seems. If you never invite a disabled guest, I guess that’s okay.

Very good points! A few of them, such as the sewing machine and exercise equipment, could be addressed with more availability of common resources, such as a community sewing room with machines for all to use, and free health clubs. Maybe even community dining rooms, like a restaurant but staffed by community members in turn so the only cost, after construction, is the cost of the food you consume, which is cheaper due to bulk purchases, though each individual would have less choice.

But a larger house allows a person or family to do things someone in a tiny house cannot.

Many, many years ago I read an article in ‘the Australian Financial Review’ in which the journalist wrote that it wasn’t necessary to have a kitchen (you can eat all your meals in restaurants) or a laundry (you can take all your washing to a laundrette), both of which would make smaller houses possible.

I can’t imagine doing without a kitchen or a laundry.  I have a small kitchen, and I do all my cooking in a microwave.  A lot of the bench space is taken up with a juicer, which I don’t bother putting away, since I use it daily making my daily carrot juice.  I have a laundry, which I use infrequently (this morning i did my monthly wash, so most of the month it’s not used).  But both save time.  I don’t have to bother travelling to restaurants or laundrettes, and wait while my meals are prepared or my washing goes through the machines.

A kitchen is a necessity for me as well. I need far more salad and veggies than I can get if I don’t have a kitchen. I used a laundromat for years before I could afford a washing machine. (I didn’t always have money. My first washing machine was a used wringer washer I bought used for $15 or $25 or something like that, and it was wonderful to not have to go to the laundromat.) But these are luxuries that not everybody can afford, and until the economy collapses under the weight of ten or twenty billion people and the whole country or the whole world burns to the ground amid the riots and wars, a lot of folks are going to need less expensive housing. Communal dining rooms (as opposed to restaurants) while probably unacceptable to Americans, would be a more economical solution. And with a buffet model rather than a sit-and-be-served model, there’s no waiting for your food to be cooked. Again, I’m not talking about a nice system, I’m talking about a way to make housing much cheaper.

I love carrot juice. I drank a lot of it when I lived in Mexico. I quit making it when I came home because you’re throwing away so much nutrition, unless you save the pulp to use in other things, which I didn’t do.
Daniel
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