Author Topic: Progressive lenses  (Read 534 times)

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Offline Captain Video

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Progressive lenses
« on: January 30, 2019, 02:08:29 PM »
So I guess I am getting to an age where I need glasses.  I have been using crappy reading glasses but they are not working for me.  When driving I can see the road, cars, and road signs clearly but cant read my speedometer.  Going back and forth with the readers and computer screens at work is giving me a headache.

I understand the concept of progressive lenses but they have several types with different fields of view and I am wondering if some of this is just marketing. Do I really need "Ultra HD with NeverGlare" which are very expensive?

these were the choices offered to me

https://www.americasbest.com/eyeglass-lenses/no-line-bifocals-progressives/

Can anyone with experience explain how much different these lenses actually are?
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Offline Tassie Dave

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2019, 02:23:37 PM »
I'm not a fan of progressive bifocal lenses. I've had them for 10 years and never felt 100% comfortable with them.

I complained last time I got new glasses and was assured the newer ones were better. After a month I think they are actually worse.

They do what they are supposed to. I can see to drive and do normal shit looking through the middle and top and read if I look through the bottom.

But occasionally what you are looking at is either on the line or in the wrong section and there are strange distortions as you move your head. Which can be disconcerting if you are doing something that requires concentrating.

Given I have paid close to $1000 for both pairs, I am not happy. I'd rather have 2 cheaper pairs. One for everyday wearing and a pair of reading glasses.

It could be a personal thing. My mum wore bifocals for 40 years and loved them. Though hers were the old type, with the visible line.

Offline DevoutCatalyst

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2019, 02:39:57 PM »
No bifocals here. I'm a candidate for them. My single strength glasses get pushed down the nose to cope or the glasses are removed if that doesn't help. When I go for a walk or a bike ride my vision is dazzling, that wasn't the case with progressive lenses. Some people get along well with them, worth a try.

It was my progressive lenses' distinct lack of sharpness often intruding into the field of vision that drove me crazy. My lenses were fussy, insistent, annoying.

If those images at the linked page are anything close to the truth, I'd want the high end lenses.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2019, 03:03:22 PM by DevoutCatalyst »

Offline Belgarath

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2019, 03:24:48 PM »
So I'm in the same boat as you Captain Video.  I can see perfectly fine at distance, but close up I can't see squat.

With Progressives, it's really important to get the measurements right and I will tell you that I don't use them all the time.

I still keep readers/single vision glasses around for when I'm just reading things (such as the computer, or a book) but wear and use the progressive lenses at all other times.  They work fine for glancing at my phone and reading it for a short time, but because I've worked with computers and read books my whole life, I apparently have a hard time adjusting to moving my head when reading rather than my eyes.

I have not been able to get progressives to work for me as well as readers/single vision lenses for those purposes, but reading close up I never really have been able to find a decent progressive that has a wide enough 'reading' area.

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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2019, 03:39:32 PM »
Been wearing bifocals for 55 years. "No-line bifocals" have a "sweet spot" in the center of the lens, you move your head more with those. "Lined bifocals" allow more eye motion but the horizontal line demarcs far and near vision. If a line will bother you avoid this type.

For computer work I use lenses that only have "near vision", and shift of bifocals when I'm driving or watching TV. I spend a lot of time on the computer so the added cost of extra glasses is worth it. I buy my extra glasses online. Nothing fancy about my computer glasses, except they have large lenses, to allow eye shift rather than head shift. (I use two 27" monitors.)
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline Friendly Angel

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2019, 04:33:21 PM »
My progressives work fine - although for long reading and screen time I do better with taking them off.
Amend and resubmit.

Offline Captain Video

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2019, 04:38:17 PM »
Hmm now I'm a little concerned

Judging by the comments so far I may need to deal with 2 pairs

The doctor kept asking me how far do you sit away from your screen and how big is it? Then got pissed when I said it was different all the time. I couldn't seem to explain how my job works.

This is what my computer rig often looks like and i'm constantly going from station to station or looking at studio monitors you don't see from various positions or worse a 7"screen over cameras shoulder.


I'm going to try a different doctor.

They say "this lens" is better then "that lens" and they do have a 30 day return policy but I wish they had a method where I could test the field of view before committing.

I need a set of these

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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2019, 04:59:00 PM »
I can’t answer your question, other than say all the ones in the link look horrid, but I can tell you my situation:

I was extremely nearsighted until I got cataract surgery. Now with intra-ocular lenses I am farsighted. I have five pairs of glasses:

1. Reading glasses. Just for reading. I can easily peer over the top to see things farther away.

2. Computer glasses. Unlike you, I sit at a regular desktop computer, and these are prescribed for my eyes at that distance.

3. Ultra-close glasses. These are for when I need to read teeny-tiny typeface or see a sliver to remove it. They stay in the bathroom.

4. Progressive glasses. No line, but they don’t have that horrid curved demarcation of the ones in your link. I wear these while cooking as I sometimes need to see up close for chopping veggies and sometimes farther away to find something in a cabinet.

5. Finally, I have a cheapo pair of cheaters that I take with me when I leave the house because I don’t want to risk losing the expensive ones. They’re adequate for reading labels in the store or reading my Kindle while waiting for an appointment. They’re not great and I would never use them for reading at home when I don’t need to, but they’re an acceptable compromise for a pair that if I lose them I won’t be too upset.

This system works for me, and is a great improvement over being nearsighted, when I needed glasses or contact lenses for outdoor activities. I can read the speedometer in my car without glasses, though it’s not as clear as I’d really like. I need to use the cheapo glasses to set a Google Maps destination on my phone if I’m out and about, but I can see the directions acceptably well without glasses.

I’d probably recommend for your situation the no-line progressive glasses that gradually change focal length from top to bottom, without those weird curved lines at the sides. You should be able to get those at any regular lens shop. Or maybe a pair of half glasses with a reading prescription that let you look over the top for things farther away.
Daniel
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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2019, 05:15:41 PM »
39dollarglasses.com is my go to for spare sets. Shopping around is always a good idea. Computer glasses don't need sun tinting and the like. I have four sets for indoor use so I don't have to remember where they are.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline Belgarath

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2019, 05:46:24 PM »
Oh yes, whatever you do, don't get the transition lenses.  They only work in DIRECT sunlight.  If you're in a car or anything like that, they don't dim at all.

I think you're definitely going to end up with at least two pairs. 

A decent pair of Progressives will do you well (they take a couple of weeks to get used to, fair warning) when you're moving around to different screens at different distances, those are going to be the best.

If you're sitting reading a computer screen, get a good pair of single vision reading glasses that you can carry with you.

I use the progressive lenses for flying because I have the same issue as you.  Some things are close some things are medium and some things are far away, I need to see all 3.  The progressives are the best compromise that I can find.  They don't do any one thing well, but they're about the best you're going to get for what you're doing.

Trust me, I feel your pain.  I hated having to get these dumb things 4 years ago, but I've finally gotten to where I can manage.

Also, much like Daniel1948, make sure you always ALWAYS carry around some cheaters.  These can be the el-cheapo drugstore cheaters, but you'll have them for an emergency when you forget or lose the good one.

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Offline Captain Video

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2019, 02:26:45 AM »
Thanks for all the great advice. I made an appointment for tomorrow.
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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2019, 06:54:17 AM »
I've worn progressive lens for a few decades and had no complaints.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2019, 09:28:53 AM »
Aren't progressive lenses the way you look at the world in which anyone you disagree with seems like a racist?  :downsrim:

Online Mr. Beagle

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2019, 10:04:21 AM »
My progressives work fine - although for long reading and screen time I do better with taking them off.

Exactly the same here. I've good luck with progressives for many years, but I still take them off for a lot of reading, especially when I am fatigued. One key is having an adaptable computer setup in order to get the angle of the sweet spot right. I've typically bought the best I could find, but I can't say if the extra cost is worth it.

There is a "break in" time with any new prescription, but typically your eyes and brain adjust. I remember a weird experiment where scientists rotated the eyes of salamanders 180 degrees, and they were able to adjust to that after awhile.

I had great success with "monovision" contact lenses for several years (a different prescription in each eye), but eventually the difference between the two prescriptions got too far apart and I could not adapt to that. An optometrist friend demonstrated to me that most people, including me, naturally use one eye for distance more than the other, so if you get that right, monovision tends to work better.
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Offline Belgarath

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Re: Progressive lenses
« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2019, 10:53:15 AM »
My progressives work fine - although for long reading and screen time I do better with taking them off.

Exactly the same here. I've good luck with progressives for many years, but I still take them off for a lot of reading, especially when I am fatigued. One key is having an adaptable computer setup in order to get the angle of the sweet spot right. I've typically bought the best I could find, but I can't say if the extra cost is worth it.

There is a "break in" time with any new prescription, but typically your eyes and brain adjust. I remember a weird experiment where scientists rotated the eyes of salamanders 180 degrees, and they were able to adjust to that after awhile.

I had great success with "monovision" contact lenses for several years (a different prescription in each eye), but eventually the difference between the two prescriptions got too far apart and I could not adapt to that. An optometrist friend demonstrated to me that most people, including me, naturally use one eye for distance more than the other, so if you get that right, monovision tends to work better.

I'm not allowed to have monovision contact lenses, completely disallowed by the FAA.  I can have multifocal, but I've tried probably 6 different brands with 6 different schemes of how to do it.  They all only do about 80% of what decent progressives do.
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