Author Topic: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....  (Read 4857 times)

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Offline lonely moa

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #30 on: February 06, 2019, 12:43:18 PM »
I discovered today that we are out of beef liver.  Damn... I had 10 kgs from last year's home kills.  Might have to buy some from the butcher; always a first time for everything.

Made too much pate.  Liver is natures superfood.

My dog doesn’t think much of liver.  She loves chicken hearts and chicken gizzards, but the times I offered her chicken liver, she refused it.

Liver isn’t ‘natures (sic) superfood.’  Too much of it results in hypervitaminosis A, which has resulted in the demise of several polar explorers, including making Douglas Mawson extremely sick, as a result of eating their huskies’ livers.

I prefer to get my vitamin A as beta-carotene in carrots.  The only complication of excessive consumption of carrots is carotenaemia (which results in an orange complexion) - which I’m in danger of, consuming around 500 g a day (I love carrot juice).

It would be close to impossible to overdose on vitamine A eating beef liver... polar bear liver, maybe. Consider yourself lucky. A quarter of the worlds population cannot convert beta carotene to vitamin a.

My dogs love liver.
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Online bachfiend

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2019, 03:31:43 PM »
I discovered today that we are out of beef liver.  Damn... I had 10 kgs from last year's home kills.  Might have to buy some from the butcher; always a first time for everything.

Made too much pate.  Liver is natures superfood.

My dog doesn’t think much of liver.  She loves chicken hearts and chicken gizzards, but the times I offered her chicken liver, she refused it.

Liver isn’t ‘natures (sic) superfood.’  Too much of it results in hypervitaminosis A, which has resulted in the demise of several polar explorers, including making Douglas Mawson extremely sick, as a result of eating their huskies’ livers.

I prefer to get my vitamin A as beta-carotene in carrots.  The only complication of excessive consumption of carrots is carotenaemia (which results in an orange complexion) - which I’m in danger of, consuming around 500 g a day (I love carrot juice).

It would be close to impossible to overdose on vitamine A eating beef liver... polar bear liver, maybe. Consider yourself lucky. A quarter of the worlds population cannot convert beta carotene to vitamin a.

My dogs love liver.

The polar explorers in the Antarctic didn’t die of vitamin A toxicity due to eating polar bear liver (there’s no polar bears in the Antarctic, obviously), but from eating dog livers.

Vitamin A is concentrated in the liver of all species.  It’s not true that ‘it would be close to impossible to overdose on Vitamine (sic) A eating beef liver.’  Pate contains a high concentration of vitamin A, and it’s recommended that it shouldn’t be eaten more than weekly:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamins-and-minerals/vitamin-a/

I can’t find anything confirming your claim that a quarter of the world’s population can’t convert beta-carotene to vitamin A.  The main problem seems to be that they’re not getting enough.  Absorption of beta-carotene is variable, and nowhere close to 100%.  25% seems to be a reasonable upper estimate.  Recommended daily intake includes the variable absorption and the maintenance of adequate vitamin A levels in the blood.

It’s impossible to get vitamin A toxicity overdosing on beta-carotene.
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Offline seamas

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #32 on: February 06, 2019, 03:33:29 PM »
I see no real reason for McDonald's to use anything other than beef, especially since they are advertising their burgers as such --the last thing a company that big wants is to have it's MAIN product be shown to be fraudulent.
That said, in the USA the ONLY  certification as to the quality / type of the meat is that it is USDA inspected. In other words, not much info there.

When one goes to a supermarket your grown beef will be labeled as to the grade of the beef (which is determined by the marbling) and the cut: chuck, sirloin, etc as well as the fat/lean ratio. You might even get the breed of the steer.
No such standard in McDonalds, as I suspect they are sourcing their meat from several hundred places.

I suspect their beef is mostly chuck and round mixed with the notorious pink slime. I would suspect that it isn't very fatty, as they probably see the costs of dealing with extra fat/grease as something best avoided.
I doubt they will use much organ meat, as those can be highly favorful, and they are shooting for a fairly bland product.

I suspect the "quality" of their beef isn't superb, but on par with  their competition.

This reminds me of the claims that Budweiser uses cheap ingredients. I knew a brewer who managed to get his hands on some of the Barley Budweiser uses and was thoroughly impressed. The company's claim to use the finest ingredients seems to be valid. Their recipe on the other hand is designed to make something bland and watery.

Offline DevoutCatalyst

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #33 on: February 06, 2019, 03:33:33 PM »
It’s impossible to get vitamin A toxicity overdosing on beta-carotene.
True. People will comment on your orange skin, though. Don't ask how I know.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2019, 04:44:20 PM »
For a brief time, probably in my early 30’s, I got into the habit of eating a lot of carrots. A VERY lot of them. My doctor commented on my orange skin, asked me about my diet, and then advised me to eat fewer carrots, which I did. I still eat carrots, which I like, but no longer in the quantity I did during that brief phase.
Daniel
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Offline CarbShark

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2019, 04:51:49 PM »
I see no real reason for McDonald's to use anything other than beef, especially since they are advertising their burgers as such --the last thing a company that big wants is to have it's MAIN product be shown to be fraudulent.

That said, in the USA the ONLY  certification as to the quality / type of the meat is that it is USDA inspected. In other words, not much info there.

When one goes to a supermarket your grown beef will be labeled as to the grade of the beef (which is determined by the marbling) and the cut: chuck, sirloin, etc as well as the fat/lean ratio. You might even get the breed of the steer.
No such standard in McDonalds, as I suspect they are sourcing their meat from several hundred places.

The grades are also based on the quality of the carcass, beyond marbling.

Grades are not based on the cut. The grade inspection is done on the whole carcass, not individual cuts. 

Quote
I suspect their beef is mostly chuck and round mixed with the notorious pink slime. I would suspect that it isn't very fatty, as they probably see the costs of dealing with extra fat/grease as something best avoided.

They say in their advertising they use quality cuts, and avoid the low quality cuts. They also use 80% lean. They stopped using pink slime years ago.

(They have just recently announced they are no longer freezing the patties).

Quote
I doubt they will use much organ meat, as those can be highly favorful, and they are shooting for a fairly bland product.

They are not using organ meat. I suspect they once did, but can't document that.

Quote
I suspect the "quality" of their beef isn't superb, but on par with  their competition.

I suspect it's a bit higher than the competition because they claim to use the better cuts of meat in their burgers.
 
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline Ah.hell

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #36 on: February 06, 2019, 05:14:59 PM »
For a brief time, probably in my early 30’s, I got into the habit of eating a lot of carrots. A VERY lot of them. My doctor commented on my orange skin, asked me about my diet, and then advised me to eat fewer carrots, which I did. I still eat carrots, which I like, but no longer in the quantity I did during that brief phase.
My sister his a nurse, she had a couple bring in there orange toddler.  For some reason they'd decided there was no such thing as too much carrot juice. 

Offline daniel1948

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #37 on: February 06, 2019, 06:47:24 PM »
For a brief time, probably in my early 30’s, I got into the habit of eating a lot of carrots. A VERY lot of them. My doctor commented on my orange skin, asked me about my diet, and then advised me to eat fewer carrots, which I did. I still eat carrots, which I like, but no longer in the quantity I did during that brief phase.
My sister his a nurse, she had a couple bring in there orange toddler.  For some reason they'd decided there was no such thing as too much carrot juice. 

I love carrot juice. When I was in Mexico I’d stop at mercados along the way on my daily walks for carrot juice, which was fresh-squeezed right there. Yummy. They had all sorts of other juices, but carrot was my favorite by a long ways.
Daniel
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Online bachfiend

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #38 on: February 06, 2019, 06:50:07 PM »
It’s impossible to get vitamin A toxicity overdosing on beta-carotene.
True. People will comment on your orange skin, though. Don't ask how I know.

It seems as though the only effects of excessive carrot consumption are an orange coloration and increased lung cancer if you’re a smoker or ex-smoker.  It’s otherwise pretty benign, and easily treated by cutting back on the carrot consumption.  Beta-carotene, being water soluble, is easily excreted, unlike vitamin A which is fat soluble.

I consume around 500 g of carrots a day, because I love carrot juice (I also eat the left over pith too), and I haven’t noticed an orange colour yet.  If it happens?  I reckon it won’t worry me.  People don’t seem to worry all that much about their physical appearances.
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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #39 on: February 06, 2019, 06:55:28 PM »
For a brief time, probably in my early 30’s, I got into the habit of eating a lot of carrots. A VERY lot of them. My doctor commented on my orange skin, asked me about my diet, and then advised me to eat fewer carrots, which I did. I still eat carrots, which I like, but no longer in the quantity I did during that brief phase.
My sister his a nurse, she had a couple bring in there orange toddler.  For some reason they'd decided there was no such thing as too much carrot juice. 

I love carrot juice. When I was in Mexico I’d stop at mercados along the way on my daily walks for carrot juice, which was fresh-squeezed right there. Yummy. They had all sorts of other juices, but carrot was my favorite by a long ways.

I bought a juicer solely to make carrot juice.  I add some of the leftover carrot pith to your ‘tofu pudding’ to make a spread which I use on bread and rice cakes (actually they’re more like flat biscuits).
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Offline DevoutCatalyst

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #40 on: February 06, 2019, 07:05:04 PM »
It’s impossible to get vitamin A toxicity overdosing on beta-carotene.
True. People will comment on your orange skin, though. Don't ask how I know.

It seems as though the only effects of excessive carrot consumption are an orange coloration and increased lung cancer if you’re a smoker or ex-smoker.  It’s otherwise pretty benign, and easily treated by cutting back on the carrot consumption.  Beta-carotene, being water soluble, is easily excreted, unlike vitamin A which is fat soluble.

I consume around 500 g of carrots a day, because I love carrot juice (I also eat the left over pith too), and I haven’t noticed an orange colour yet.  If it happens?  I reckon it won’t worry me.  People don’t seem to worry all that much about their physical appearances.

I didn't mind it, people did comment. It wasn't from carrots, it was from eating sweet potatoes as a staple. Which I still do. But a number of years ago I found I preferred the yellow and white fleshed sweet potato varieties for everyday consumption and my orange skin disappeared. The soles of my feet were comically orange previously. Never smoked, so no worries there.

Offline lonely moa

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #41 on: February 06, 2019, 07:45:15 PM »
I discovered today that we are out of beef liver.  Damn... I had 10 kgs from last year's home kills.  Might have to buy some from the butcher; always a first time for everything.

Made too much pate.  Liver is natures superfood.

My dog doesn’t think much of liver.  She loves chicken hearts and chicken gizzards, but the times I offered her chicken liver, she refused it.

Liver isn’t ‘natures (sic) superfood.’  Too much of it results in hypervitaminosis A, which has resulted in the demise of several polar explorers, including making Douglas Mawson extremely sick, as a result of eating their huskies’ livers.

I prefer to get my vitamin A as beta-carotene in carrots.  The only complication of excessive consumption of carrots is carotenaemia (which results in an orange complexion) - which I’m in danger of, consuming around 500 g a day (I love carrot juice).

It would be close to impossible to overdose on vitamine A eating beef liver... polar bear liver, maybe. Consider yourself lucky. A quarter of the worlds population cannot convert beta carotene to vitamin a.

My dogs love liver.

The polar explorers in the Antarctic didn’t die of vitamin A toxicity due to eating polar bear liver (there’s no polar bears in the Antarctic, obviously), but from eating dog livers.

Vitamin A is concentrated in the liver of all species.  It’s not true that ‘it would be close to impossible to overdose on Vitamine (sic) A eating beef liver.’  Pate contains a high concentration of vitamin A, and it’s recommended that it shouldn’t be eaten more than weekly:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamins-and-minerals/vitamin-a/

I can’t find anything confirming your claim that a quarter of the world’s population can’t convert beta-carotene to vitamin A.  The main problem seems to be that they’re not getting enough.  Absorption of beta-carotene is variable, and nowhere close to 100%.  25% seems to be a reasonable upper estimate.  Recommended daily intake includes the variable absorption and the maintenance of adequate vitamin A levels in the blood.

It’s impossible to get vitamin A toxicity overdosing on beta-carotene.

One would need to eat 300 gms o0f beef liver every day for an extended period of time to develop vitamin A toxicity.

I saw this

Quote
People that carry the T allele in either of two identified coding SNPs in the BCMO1 gene have roughly a 32% lower ability to convert beta carotene into retinol. Those with T alleles in both SNPs have about a 69% lowered ability to convert beta carotene into retinol and an increased plasma beta carotene concentration due to the lowered conversion. [Reference]

For a full primer on what a SNP is and how to use them, see my article here.

If you have your 23andMe data, you can look up the following SNPs. T is the risk allele for both.

rs12934922 and rs7501331

And, beyond those variations, there are several SNPs outside the coding region of the gene, known as “promoter SNPs” which further impact how much of the BCO1 enzyme your body makes. [Reference] The exact function of these SNPs isn’t known, but the G allele of rs11645428 and A allele of rs6420424 are known to further reduce conversion each by about 50%.

So, with compounding SNPs, it seems that at least a portion of the population is at risk for poor beta-carotene conversion.

https://david-krantz.com/your-genes-vitamin-a-bco1-retinol-vegan/?utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.co.nz%2F

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Online bachfiend

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #42 on: February 06, 2019, 09:03:01 PM »
I discovered today that we are out of beef liver.  Damn... I had 10 kgs from last year's home kills.  Might have to buy some from the butcher; always a first time for everything.

Made too much pate.  Liver is natures superfood.

My dog doesn’t think much of liver.  She loves chicken hearts and chicken gizzards, but the times I offered her chicken liver, she refused it.

Liver isn’t ‘natures (sic) superfood.’  Too much of it results in hypervitaminosis A, which has resulted in the demise of several polar explorers, including making Douglas Mawson extremely sick, as a result of eating their huskies’ livers.

I prefer to get my vitamin A as beta-carotene in carrots.  The only complication of excessive consumption of carrots is carotenaemia (which results in an orange complexion) - which I’m in danger of, consuming around 500 g a day (I love carrot juice).

It would be close to impossible to overdose on vitamine A eating beef liver... polar bear liver, maybe. Consider yourself lucky. A quarter of the worlds population cannot convert beta carotene to vitamin a.

My dogs love liver.

The polar explorers in the Antarctic didn’t die of vitamin A toxicity due to eating polar bear liver (there’s no polar bears in the Antarctic, obviously), but from eating dog livers.

Vitamin A is concentrated in the liver of all species.  It’s not true that ‘it would be close to impossible to overdose on Vitamine (sic) A eating beef liver.’  Pate contains a high concentration of vitamin A, and it’s recommended that it shouldn’t be eaten more than weekly:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamins-and-minerals/vitamin-a/

I can’t find anything confirming your claim that a quarter of the world’s population can’t convert beta-carotene to vitamin A.  The main problem seems to be that they’re not getting enough.  Absorption of beta-carotene is variable, and nowhere close to 100%.  25% seems to be a reasonable upper estimate.  Recommended daily intake includes the variable absorption and the maintenance of adequate vitamin A levels in the blood.

It’s impossible to get vitamin A toxicity overdosing on beta-carotene.

One would need to eat 300 gms o0f beef liver every day for an extended period of time to develop vitamin A toxicity.

I saw this

Quote
People that carry the T allele in either of two identified coding SNPs in the BCMO1 gene have roughly a 32% lower ability to convert beta carotene into retinol. Those with T alleles in both SNPs have about a 69% lowered ability to convert beta carotene into retinol and an increased plasma beta carotene concentration due to the lowered conversion. [Reference]

For a full primer on what a SNP is and how to use them, see my article here.

If you have your 23andMe data, you can look up the following SNPs. T is the risk allele for both.

rs12934922 and rs7501331

And, beyond those variations, there are several SNPs outside the coding region of the gene, known as “promoter SNPs” which further impact how much of the BCO1 enzyme your body makes. [Reference] The exact function of these SNPs isn’t known, but the G allele of rs11645428 and A allele of rs6420424 are known to further reduce conversion each by about 50%.

So, with compounding SNPs, it seems that at least a portion of the population is at risk for poor beta-carotene conversion.

https://david-krantz.com/your-genes-vitamin-a-bco1-retinol-vegan/?utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.co.nz%2F

Your link doesn’t show that a quarter of the world’s population is unable to convert beta-carotene to vitamin A.  There are genetic variants (of what frequency?) resulting in reduced ability to convert beta-carotene to vitamin A by as much as 69%, meaning that all a person with this particular genetic variation needs to do is to consume more beta-carotene (by eating more carrots).

300 g of beef liver per day would provide around 20,000 IU of vitamin A per day, which is borderline for chronic toxicity in an adult male (and doesn’t include other sources of vitamin A).  300 g of liver would be less than 7 cm cubed (the density of liver is greater than water since I’ve noticed that it sinks in formolin), which isn’t much.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2019, 09:33:58 PM by bachfiend »
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #43 on: February 06, 2019, 09:16:49 PM »
For a brief time, probably in my early 30’s, I got into the habit of eating a lot of carrots. A VERY lot of them. My doctor commented on my orange skin, asked me about my diet, and then advised me to eat fewer carrots, which I did. I still eat carrots, which I like, but no longer in the quantity I did during that brief phase.
My sister his a nurse, she had a couple bring in there orange toddler.  For some reason they'd decided there was no such thing as too much carrot juice. 

I love carrot juice. When I was in Mexico I’d stop at mercados along the way on my daily walks for carrot juice, which was fresh-squeezed right there. Yummy. They had all sorts of other juices, but carrot was my favorite by a long ways.

I bought a juicer solely to make carrot juice.  I add some of the leftover carrot pith to your ‘tofu pudding’ to make a spread which I use on bread and rice cakes (actually they’re more like flat biscuits).

I’m a chocoholic, but chocolate pudding on bread does not sound very appealing to me. Maybe because the bread dilutes the chocolate.  :D
Daniel
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Online bachfiend

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Re: The meat in McDonald's burgers can barely be called "beef"....
« Reply #44 on: February 06, 2019, 09:26:38 PM »
For a brief time, probably in my early 30’s, I got into the habit of eating a lot of carrots. A VERY lot of them. My doctor commented on my orange skin, asked me about my diet, and then advised me to eat fewer carrots, which I did. I still eat carrots, which I like, but no longer in the quantity I did during that brief phase.
My sister his a nurse, she had a couple bring in there orange toddler.  For some reason they'd decided there was no such thing as too much carrot juice. 

I love carrot juice. When I was in Mexico I’d stop at mercados along the way on my daily walks for carrot juice, which was fresh-squeezed right there. Yummy. They had all sorts of other juices, but carrot was my favorite by a long ways.

I bought a juicer solely to make carrot juice.  I add some of the leftover carrot pith to your ‘tofu pudding’ to make a spread which I use on bread and rice cakes (actually they’re more like flat biscuits).

I’m a chocoholic, but chocolate pudding on bread does not sound very appealing to me. Maybe because the bread dilutes the chocolate.  :D

You’ve never had ‘Nutella?’  My version is a healthier alternative.  I could use Marmite as a spread, but it’s too high in salt.
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