Author Topic: 10 trillion FPS camera  (Read 472 times)

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Offline drproximo

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10 trillion FPS camera
« on: March 31, 2019, 12:46:04 AM »
https://phys.org/news/2018-10-world-fastest-camera-trillion.html

I saw something about this in my Facebook feed, and when I did a Google search I found this article from last October. I did a search on this forum to see if anyone else has posted it but didn't find anything. I'd be surprised if this hasn't been discussed on the show yet, it's cool as hell, and it would give them the chance to say "femtosecond".
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Re: 10 trillion FPS camera
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2019, 03:11:29 AM »

Offline Beef Wellington

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Re: 10 trillion FPS camera
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2019, 09:21:07 PM »
I like this one from 2011-

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Re: 10 trillion FPS camera
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2019, 09:26:36 PM »
I haven't read the paper on this new one, but from what I recall, it wasn't really capturing that many frames per second.  It was sending the same laser burst over and over again and each time, taking a super fast and precisely timed frame as it progressed.  Then they stitched them all together to create the illusion of capturing the entire path of one burst of laser light.  This new one may be doing the same, and either way it's impressive as hell, but I thought it bared pointing it out.

Online 2397

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Re: 10 trillion FPS camera
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2019, 04:58:41 AM »
That's what I remember as well, it was a composite.

Here they're talking about a different sort of composite. They do the light first and then take hours to overlay something that's photographed separately. It's not clear to me what it is that happens in real time.

Offline Shibboleth

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Re: 10 trillion FPS camera
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2019, 05:14:33 PM »
Very cool. Now they can catch the speed of my fists on camera.
common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

Offline Captain Video

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Re: 10 trillion FPS camera
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2019, 08:15:22 PM »
I worked with a phantom once

https://www.phantomhighspeed.com/

We had fun smashing things for camera including a bullet through a watermelon.

There is lots of video on the site. Same camera they used in Jackass 3.

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Offline gmalivuk

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Re: 10 trillion FPS camera
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2019, 08:24:17 PM »
I haven't read the paper on this new one, but from what I recall, it wasn't really capturing that many frames per second.  It was sending the same laser burst over and over again and each time, taking a super fast and precisely timed frame as it progressed.  Then they stitched them all together to create the illusion of capturing the entire path of one burst of laser light.  This new one may be doing the same, and either way it's impressive as hell, but I thought it bared pointing it out.
The new one is explicitly not doing the same thing as (previously) "current" techniques
Quote
Using current imaging techniques, measurements taken with ultrashort laser pulses must be repeated many times, which is appropriate for some types of inert samples, but impossible for other more fragile ones. For example, laser-engraved glass can tolerate only a single laser pulse, leaving less than a picosecond to capture the results. In such a case, the imaging technique must be able to capture the entire process in real time.
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