Author Topic: An atheist is advised to end a relationship with his religious partner.  (Read 2694 times)

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Offline John Albert

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Christmas is celebrated in Japan in a similar way as Valentine's Day in the US. Sweethearts exchange gifts and go out on dates together.

Offline arthwollipot

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Christmas is celebrated in Japan in a similar way as Valentine's Day in the US. Sweethearts exchange gifts and go out on dates together.

And eat KFC.
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Offline superdave

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there's no right answer here.  Religious differences certainly make a relationship difficult but whether they should be the end depends very highly on the individuals and the nature of their relationship.
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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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In many places, formerly religious holidays have been secularised. They are observed by basically the entire country regardless of religious affiliation. I'm an atheist, but I still have time off around Christmas, which is still called Christmas and not Yule or Solstice. Even people in the Muslim and Jewish communities have that time off, because it's a national public holiday.

Pretty much what I was wanting to say. :)

"Christmas" is a local variation. It is called "Jul" (i.e Yule) here, for instance.

And Christmas since a few decades is widely celebrated in Japan as well. Not for religious reasons, as there are very few Christians in Japan. Just a cultural influence that spread.

There's actually a very strong Christian tradition in Japan, stemming from when the Portuguese started messing in their wars in the 16th Century.

Not sure if I would call it strong. Around 1% of the Japanese identify as Christians.  For periods, Christians were persecuted in Japan.

Modern-day celebration of Christmas in Japan, from what I understand, is an American cultural import. Or if you will, "cultural appropriation"...
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Offline John Albert

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It's a consequence of the US occupation following WWII, so I don't know if "cultural appropriation" is the appropriate term.

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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It's a consequence of the US occupation following WWII, so I don't know if "cultural appropriation" is the appropriate term.

It doesn't seem like that.

My first link was a bit vague, but I wouldn't consider the American military occupation of Japan, which ended almost 70 years ago, to be "the last few decades".

Quote
Christmas has only been widely celebrated in Japan for the last few decades. It's still not seen as a religious holiday or celebration as there aren't many Christians in Japan. Now several customs that came to Japan from the USA such as sending and receiving Christmas Cards and Presents are popular.

Another link I found:

Quote
Christianity was introduced in Japan by Jesuit and Franciscan missionaries in the 16th century. During early years of Christianity in Japan many Christians were arrested, tortured and killed. In the 17th century the churches began to grow again and in the 20th Century many missionaries came back to Japan to start Christianity and its celebration. Thus Christmas celebration in Japan began in the early 20th century. For many years only people who believed in Christianity celebrated Christmas but today Christmas is a universally observed festival.

Here is a timeline for Christmas in Japan. Christmas really took off after the war, and KFC became a thing in the 1970s, so it's an evolving tradition (like it is in the West as well).



I will visit that country some day! :)
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Offline John Albert

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Wow, thanks for that! You learn something new every day.

I'd long believed the Japanese celebration of Christmas to be cultural artifact left behind after the occupation, like baseball.

It turns out I was wrong about baseball too.

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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there's no right answer here.  Religious differences certainly make a relationship difficult but whether they should be the end depends very highly on the individuals and the nature of their relationship.

I agree. It depends on how tolerant of differences the parties are. I would certainly not consider it a dealbreaker if a potential partner was religious, at least not religious in an extreme way. I would however not enter into a relationship in which I was at some point expected to convert to some religion.
"I’m a member of no party. I have no ideology. I’m a rationalist. I do what I can in the international struggle between science and reason and the barbarism, superstition and stupidity that’s all around us." - Christopher Hitchens

Offline arthwollipot

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Wow, thanks for that! You learn something new every day.

I'd long believed the Japanese celebration of Christmas to be cultural artifact left behind after the occupation, like baseball.

It turns out I was wrong about baseball too.

Yeah, for my part I had assumed that Christian traditions were held from much earlier than that, when Christian daimyos were fighting against the Buddhists for cultural and military supremacy. I guess we all have much to learn.
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Offline bachfiend

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It's a consequence of the US occupation following WWII, so I don't know if "cultural appropriation" is the appropriate term.

It doesn't seem like that.

My first link was a bit vague, but I wouldn't consider the American military occupation of Japan, which ended almost 70 years ago, to be "the last few decades".

Quote
Christmas has only been widely celebrated in Japan for the last few decades. It's still not seen as a religious holiday or celebration as there aren't many Christians in Japan. Now several customs that came to Japan from the USA such as sending and receiving Christmas Cards and Presents are popular.

Another link I found:

Quote
Christianity was introduced in Japan by Jesuit and Franciscan missionaries in the 16th century. During early years of Christianity in Japan many Christians were arrested, tortured and killed. In the 17th century the churches began to grow again and in the 20th Century many missionaries came back to Japan to start Christianity and its celebration. Thus Christmas celebration in Japan began in the early 20th century. For many years only people who believed in Christianity celebrated Christmas but today Christmas is a universally observed festival.

Here is a timeline for Christmas in Japan. Christmas really took off after the war, and KFC became a thing in the 1970s, so it's an evolving tradition (like it is in the West as well).



I will visit that country some day! :)

I won’t.  Besides the fact that I’ve more or less blacklisted Japan because of their whaling, which I regard as a crime against humanity, I think foreign travel to be conspicuous consumption rather than an effort to experience different cultures.  If you’re travelling on your own it’s impossible to immerse yourself in the different culture more than very superficially.  And if you’re travelling in a tour group, the culture you’re being exposed to is the culture of the tour group.

A better way of understanding different cultures is to read the accounts of people who have made the effort to immerse themselves in the culture.
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Online 2397

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I agree to some extent, but at the risk of whataboutism, I'm guessing that the list of countries you could possibly visit is quite short if the whaling issue alone can blacklist a country.

Offline bachfiend

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I agree to some extent, but at the risk of whataboutism, I'm guessing that the list of countries you could possibly visit is quite short if the whaling issue alone can blacklist a country.

Not really.  There’s more countries than I could ever visit which don’t engage in whaling.  And I don’t travel for travel’s sake.
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Online The Latinist

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I agree to some extent, but at the risk of whataboutism, I'm guessing that the list of countries you could possibly visit is quite short if the whaling issue alone can blacklist a country.

I only know of three major countries that currently engage in whaling, aside from aboriginal subsistence whaling.
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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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I've been to two of the whaling nations (Iceland, Norway).

I agree that whaling is bad, but I think most if not all countries have their share of dirty laundry, admittedly some more than others.

Keep in mind that Japan, unlike Germany, has from what I understand never really owed up to its crimes during World War 2. I consider that to be really, really bad.
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Online 2397

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I agree to some extent, but at the risk of whataboutism, I'm guessing that the list of countries you could possibly visit is quite short if the whaling issue alone can blacklist a country.

Not really.  There’s more countries than I could ever visit which don’t engage in whaling.  And I don’t travel for travel’s sake.

Right, but I meant issues other than whaling that governments allow for, fund, or fail to prevent, that you could equally apply responsibility to the entire country for.

Which I wouldn't necessarily argue against, but I struggle to think of a country that is clean in that sense. Iceland is usually my go to as a country that is less involved in the horrors of humanity, they're less concerned about the needs of the financial elite, and they're one of very few countries that are even considering stopping adults from mutilating male infants. But of course they do whaling.