Author Topic: Reading habits and diversity  (Read 2050 times)

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Offline Sawyer

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Re: Reading habits and diversity
« Reply #30 on: March 03, 2019, 11:03:24 PM »
What, we're no longer allowed to read books about *white* whales?  Reverse racism!


(I was going to use the Archer Bartleby the Scribner joke here but I already used that on another forum this week)

Offline fuzzyMarmot

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Re: Reading habits and diversity
« Reply #31 on: March 04, 2019, 12:35:23 AM »
What, we're no longer allowed to read books about *white* whales?  Reverse racism!


(I was going to use the Archer Bartleby the Scribner joke here but I already used that on another forum this week)

This deserves a standing ovation. Well done!

Offline Calinthalus

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Re: Reading habits and diversity
« Reply #32 on: June 10, 2019, 11:33:26 AM »
So, I'm halfway through this year and had some time on my hands here at work and decided to make a count of the gender/racial makeup of authors I've read.  At least two of the books I've read this year have multiple authors.  I listed those books by their top billing.



White Male   15
White Female   3
Black Female   5
Black Male      1
Black Transgender (they/them)   1
Unknown Female?   1


The last entry is a book I picked up on a lark.  The name of the author is most likely female but I can find no information on the author at all.  The main character of the book was female and the voice felt really authentic to me, but that doesn't really mean anything because how would I know.


Most of my 8 non-fiction so far were written by men.  The one exception being "The New Jim Crow" written by a black female.  The others were by a mixture of authors from primarily white and/or Jewish backgrounds.




I went out of my way to read black authors back in Feb.  Sort of a theme.  Other than that, I haven't been dedicated to my original concept.  I fell into a Sanderson trilogy I wasn't familiar with and had to read it.  Same with a Scalzi book I found on sale.

"I think computer viruses should count as life. Maybe it says something about human nature, that the only form of life we have created so far is purely destructive. Talk about creating life in our own image."
--Stephen Hawking

Offline fuzzyMarmot

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Re: Reading habits and diversity
« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2019, 01:57:19 AM »
Props to you for tracking this, Calinthalus. Reading diversely is so important. I've got a long way to go on this myself, but I'm working on it.

A recent great scientific/skeptical book by a female author is Good to Go by Christie Aschwanden. It is ostensibly about recent fads in athletic training, but it really just uses that subject as a vehicle for explaining the scientific method, the difference between science and pseudoscience, and how to be a good critical thinker.