Author Topic: make hard boiled eggs, then forgot and left them overnight in the pota  (Read 3951 times)

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Offline CarbShark

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Throwing them out was a waste of food though, they were fine.

They probably were fine.

The question is if there was a 1 in 10,000 chance they were bad is that worth the risk?

Suppose it was 1 in 100, or 1 in 10

Not refrigerating them was a waste of food.

Throwing them out was the right call.


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Offline Captain Video

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You could have pickled the eggs.

Now I want some red pickled eggs and beets. Yum!
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I had a 100 year old egg at a Cantonese restaurant once.  It was interesting.

Amend and resubmit.

Offline superdave

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it's like 1.99 for a dozen eggs! 
its not a big deal to toss a few.
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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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You can buy hardboiled eggs in bags now, most supermarkets around here carry them. Expensive compared to raw eggs, but for some folks time is worth more than money.
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Offline Captain Video

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You can buy hardboiled eggs in bags now, most supermarkets around here carry them. Expensive compared to raw eggs, but for some folks time is worth more than money.

Don't use those for pickling though, they add a preservative that makes the egg absorb brine strangely. The whites end up rubbery with half the penetration.
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Online bachfiend

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Throwing them out was a waste of food though, they were fine.

They probably were fine.

The question is if there was a 1 in 10,000 chance they were bad is that worth the risk?

Suppose it was 1 in 100, or 1 in 10

Not refrigerating them was a waste of food.

Throwing them out was the right call.


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Why would an unshelled sterile hard boiled egg left in boiled sterile water overnight be unsafe, whereas an uncooked apple, with all numbers of bacteria, left in a fruit bowl on a kitchen top for several days be safe to eat raw?

Once the egg and the water are heated to 100 degrees Celsius they’re bacteria free.  They’ll only be contaminated with dangerous bacteria if they come from the air.  And if you live in such an environment, everything you eat will be potentially contaminated.
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Online The Latinist

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Why would an unshelled sterile hard boiled egg left in boiled sterile water overnight be unsafe, whereas an uncooked apple, with all numbers of bacteria, left in a fruit bowl on a kitchen top for several days be safe to eat raw?

Once the egg and the water are heated to 100 degrees Celsius they’re bacteria free.  They’ll only be contaminated with dangerous bacteria if they come from the air.  And if you live in such an environment, everything you eat will be potentially contaminated.

The egg is not necessarily heated to 100° C; indeed, most hard-boiled eggs reach an internal temperature significantly lower than that (I've seen 160° F given as the ideal temperature for the interior to reach, which is only about 70° C). At such a temperature a significant portion of bacteria will be killed, but not necessarily all bacteria. If allowed to sit in the 'danger zone' long enough, the small number of bacteria that remain may multiply rapidly.
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Offline Captain Video

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Throwing them out was a waste of food though, they were fine.

They probably were fine.

The question is if there was a 1 in 10,000 chance they were bad is that worth the risk?

Suppose it was 1 in 100, or 1 in 10

Not refrigerating them was a waste of food.

Throwing them out was the right call.


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Why would an unshelled sterile hard boiled egg left in boiled sterile water overnight be unsafe, whereas an uncooked apple, with all numbers of bacteria, left in a fruit bowl on a kitchen top for several days be safe to eat raw?

Once the egg and the water are heated to 100 degrees Celsius they’re bacteria free.  They’ll only be contaminated with dangerous bacteria if they come from the air.  And if you live in such an environment, everything you eat will be potentially contaminated.

Because after they were cooked they sat in the danger zone all night where it can grow bacteria.  If you cooked the apple the same rules would apply, the raw apple does not grow salmonella. 

this is just an article but it points to where the data came from.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/520934-how-long-can-hard-boiled-eggs-be-left-unrefrigerated/

Quote
Leaving hard-boiled eggs at room temperature for extended periods of time allows for dangerous bacteria, including salmonella, to grow at a rapid pace. FoodSafety.gov states that foodborne pathogens grow quickly between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, commonly known as the danger zone. Average room temperature ranges from 68 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit. Refrigerators store foods below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, slowing the rate of bacteria growth. If your refrigerator does not have a built-in temperature gauge, you can purchase an inexpensive refrigerator thermometer from a kitchen supply store.

Quote
Since hard-boiled eggs are cooked, you may believe they are safer than raw eggs. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, hard-boiled eggs are actually more susceptible to bacterial contamination because the cooking process damages a protective layer on the shell of the egg. Keep your hard-boiled eggs safe by refrigerating them immediately after cooking them, and eat them within one week.
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Offline CarbShark

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Why would an unshelled sterile hard boiled egg left in boiled sterile water overnight be unsafe, whereas an uncooked apple, with all numbers of bacteria, left in a fruit bowl on a kitchen top for several days be safe to eat raw?

You’re comparing apples to eggs.

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They’ll only be contaminated with dangerous bacteria if they come from the air.  And if you live in such an environment, everything you eat will be potentially contaminated.

That environment is a kitchen.


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Online bachfiend

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Why would an unshelled sterile hard boiled egg left in boiled sterile water overnight be unsafe, whereas an uncooked apple, with all numbers of bacteria, left in a fruit bowl on a kitchen top for several days be safe to eat raw?

Once the egg and the water are heated to 100 degrees Celsius they’re bacteria free.  They’ll only be contaminated with dangerous bacteria if they come from the air.  And if you live in such an environment, everything you eat will be potentially contaminated.

The egg is not necessarily heated to 100° C; indeed, most hard-boiled eggs reach an internal temperature significantly lower than that (I've seen 160° F given as the ideal temperature for the interior to reach, which is only about 70° C). At such a temperature a significant portion of bacteria will be killed, but not necessarily all bacteria. If allowed to sit in the 'danger zone' long enough, the small number of bacteria that remain may multiply rapidly.

70 degrees Celsius for several minutes will kill all bacteria of concern to humans.  Pasteurisation of milk is at lower temperatures for much shorter times, and it makes it safe to keep the milk at room temperature for hours.

Hard boiling eggs denatures permanently the proteins in the egg.  Why wouldn’t it denature permanently the proteins within bacteria?
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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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You can buy hardboiled eggs in bags now, most supermarkets around here carry them. Expensive compared to raw eggs, but for some folks time is worth more than money.

Don't use those for pickling though, they add a preservative that makes the egg absorb brine strangely. The whites end up rubbery with half the penetration.
I'm not a chef-wanna-be, so I buy that kind of thing. Probably why I'm still alive.  ;)
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Offline lonely moa

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I reckon I should have been dead, plenty of times... maybe I just have an iron gut but I have eaten plenty of hard boiled eggs, days old.  Mind you, I am careful when I crack them into the frying pan, to not get too much chicken shit in the mix.

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Also, the egg/apple comparison is different because of acid levels.  When doing home canning, the amount of time and pressure you have to use is directly set by the acidity of the item in question.  You have to get pole beans to a higher internal temperature than tomatoes, for instance.  You have to do pole beans under pressure if you want them done in the same time you can do tomatoes in a unpressurized bath.  Apples are considered a high acid food for canning purposes.  I've never heard of anyone canning eggs, but I would think they were low acid.


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Offline Ah.hell

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I reckon I should have been dead, plenty of times... maybe I just have an iron gut but I have eaten plenty of hard boiled eggs, days old.  Mind you, I am careful when I crack them into the frying pan, to not get too much chicken shit in the mix.
Granted, I'm no position to criticize this sort of thing but...

I was mildly amused that the structure of this paragraph had me picturing you frying a hard boiled egg.   

 

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