Author Topic: Death of the calorie - The Economist article  (Read 1013 times)

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Offline Skepmic

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Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« on: May 10, 2019, 06:36:17 PM »
Even the most venerable of newsmagazines is not immune to giving diet-advice now. I can't post the whole thing since it's too long.

https://www.economist.com/news/2019/03/16/death-of-the-calorie

The best part is that the article ends with: "The author is Peter Wilson. He lost 13kg in four months thanks to what he learned researching this story."

Offline CarbShark

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2019, 07:37:32 PM »
Even the most venerable of newsmagazines is not immune to giving diet-advice now. I can't post the whole thing since it's too long.

https://www.economist.com/news/2019/03/16/death-of-the-calorie

Below is an non-paywalled link to the story, and a video summary.

But first, there is nothing wrong with "The Economist" giving diet advice. Economists don't just study the economy, and nutrition is an area their skills are especially well suited for (particularly the way it's studied today).

I have a few minor quibbles with this article but for the most part I'd say it's on target.





Death of the calorie | 1843


Quote
But calculating the exact calorific content of food is far harder than the confidently precise numbers displayed on food packets suggest. Two items of food with identical calorific values may be digested in very different ways. Each body processes calories differently. Even for a single individual, the time of day that you eat matters. The more we probe, the more we realise that tallying calories will do little to help us control our weight or even maintain a healthy diet: the beguiling simplicity of counting calories in and calories out is dangerously flawed.

« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 07:41:22 PM by CarbShark »
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Online jt512

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2019, 04:01:53 PM »
Even the most venerable of newsmagazines is not immune to giving diet-advice now. I can't post the whole thing since it's too long.

https://www.economist.com/news/2019/03/16/death-of-the-calorie

Below is an non-paywalled link to the story, and a video summary.

But first, there is nothing wrong with "The Economist" giving diet advice. Economists don't just study the economy, and nutrition is an area their skills are especially well suited for (particularly the way it's studied today).


Economists are as skilled at studying nutrition as nutritionists are at studying the economy.  Arguably, economists are as skilled at studying the economy as they are at studying nutrition.
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Online John Albert

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2019, 04:15:55 PM »
But first, there is nothing wrong with "The Economist" giving diet advice. Economists don't just study the economy, and nutrition is an area their skills are especially well suited for (particularly the way it's studied today).

But only when the economists say things that support the idea of LCHF diets. As opposed to, say, licensed dieticians who don't support LCHF diets.

Amiright?
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 11:43:39 PM by John Albert »

Offline Tassie Dave

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2019, 05:55:41 PM »
I was expecting this to be news that the US was joining the majority of us and, finally, adopting the kilojoule.

But no  ;)


Offline Skepmic

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2019, 06:43:15 PM »
Uh, you guys know that The Economist also employs non-economists, despite its name, right?

Anyway, I posted the article to show another instance of the fat fad and that even once august publications are not immune.

The author of this post lost 16 kg in three months eating plenty of carbohydrates (and not a whole lot fat).

Offline CarbShark

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Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2019, 07:32:27 PM »
That’s some fad. I started in 2010 and they were calling it a fad then.


Fads are supposed to be short-lived, no? 

Maybe, just maybe this reputable publication is living up to its reputation and providing good and accurate information to its readers.

Did you even read the article or are you dismissing it reflexively ?


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and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline fuzzyMarmot

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2019, 03:00:39 AM »
This article was also discussed under the episode 715 thread:

https://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,51071.0.html

Online daniel1948

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2019, 12:03:13 PM »
That’s some fad. I started in 2010 and they were calling it a fad then.

Fads are supposed to be short-lived, no? 

Not always. The apostle Paul started a fad 2,000 years ago that's still going strong (with modifications and schisms) today.
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Offline CarbShark

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2019, 12:28:58 PM »
That’s some fad. I started in 2010 and they were calling it a fad then.

Fads are supposed to be short-lived, no? 

Not always. The apostle Paul started a fad 2,000 years ago that's still going strong (with modifications and schisms) today.
Do you have your own special definition of the word fad.


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and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2019, 02:22:26 PM »
Even the most venerable of newsmagazines is not immune to giving diet-advice now. I can't post the whole thing since it's too long.

https://www.economist.com/news/2019/03/16/death-of-the-calorie

Below is an non-paywalled link to the story, and a video summary.

But first, there is nothing wrong with "The Economist" giving diet advice. Economists don't just study the economy, and nutrition is an area their skills are especially well suited for (particularly the way it's studied today).


Economists are as skilled at studying nutrition as nutritionists are at studying the economy.  Arguably, economists are as skilled at studying the economy as they are at studying nutrition.

"The Economist" is just the name of the magazine. They are not solely focused on economics, but also politics, science, culture, etc. It is usually a pretty high-quality magazine, even though they mess up sometimes.
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Offline CarbShark

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2019, 08:56:23 PM »
Even the most venerable of newsmagazines is not immune to giving diet-advice now. I can't post the whole thing since it's too long.

https://www.economist.com/news/2019/03/16/death-of-the-calorie

Below is an non-paywalled link to the story, and a video summary.

But first, there is nothing wrong with "The Economist" giving diet advice. Economists don't just study the economy, and nutrition is an area their skills are especially well suited for (particularly the way it's studied today).


Economists are as skilled at studying nutrition as nutritionists are at studying the economy.  Arguably, economists are as skilled at studying the economy as they are at studying nutrition.

"The Economist" is just the name of the magazine. They are not solely focused on economics, but also politics, science, culture, etc. It is usually a pretty high-quality magazine, even though they mess up sometimes.
This was not one of those times.


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and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Online jt512

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2019, 09:33:23 PM »
Even the most venerable of newsmagazines is not immune to giving diet-advice now. I can't post the whole thing since it's too long.

https://www.economist.com/news/2019/03/16/death-of-the-calorie

Below is an non-paywalled link to the story, and a video summary.

But first, there is nothing wrong with "The Economist" giving diet advice. Economists don't just study the economy, and nutrition is an area their skills are especially well suited for (particularly the way it's studied today).


Economists are as skilled at studying nutrition as nutritionists are at studying the economy.  Arguably, economists are as skilled at studying the economy as they are at studying nutrition.

"The Economist" is just the name of the magazine. They are not solely focused on economics, but also politics, science, culture, etc. It is usually a pretty high-quality magazine, even though they mess up sometimes.
This was not one of those times.


Are you kidding?  I wouldn't even count that article as a piece of journalism.  It's an embarrassment to the magazine.
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Offline lonely moa

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2019, 04:40:59 AM »
Another interview: https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/afternoons/audio/2018692774/death-of-the-calorie

He is selling a book, but the history is interesting.  If he is only half right, a calorie is not a calorie.  Mind you, this has been shown by any number of people far more qualified to say this than Mr Wilson.
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Offline Guillermo

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Re: Death of the calorie - The Economist article
« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2019, 10:06:37 AM »
The thing with calorie counting is that it works, and it works even if the facts of these articles about how a calorie is not a calorie are accurate. It works because your objective to weightless is not to have a precise count of calories but rather a significant reduction of calories intake from your calorie burnt. So, you'll want to reduce about 33% to 25% of your caloric intake, or 50% under supervision. If, you are underestimating the calorie, You will still lose weight, because you are still quite far from your 2000 or 2500 calorie maximum. And said calorie maximum is still an average based on your daily activities.

Regardless of whether the initial assumptions in the early 1900 about the calories are wrong or not. Thinking that Calories are irrelevant or useless in weight loss is absurd.
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