Author Topic: Eid Mubarak  (Read 595 times)

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Offline Tatyana

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Eid Mubarak
« on: June 04, 2019, 02:17:36 PM »
It is Eid-al-Fitr!

Eid Mubarak to all our Muslim brothers and sisters.

Offline Harry Black

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2019, 02:46:33 PM »
Oh yeah!
I think this is the first year in a long time I havent had any muslim friends or co-workers around me for the holiday so I totally forgot!

Good call Tatyana!

Offline 2397

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2019, 10:00:01 PM »
Do ex-Muslims, people surrounded by Islamic culture, have Eid like people in former Christian theocracies, or heavily Christian secular nations, have Christmas and Easter?

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2019, 10:10:05 AM »
Do ex-Muslims, people surrounded by Islamic culture, have Eid like people in former Christian theocracies, or heavily Christian secular nations, have Christmas and Easter?

I suppose that really varies.
"I appear as a skeptic, who believes that doubt is the great engine, the great fuel, of all inquiry, all discovery, and all innovation" - Christopher Hitchens

Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2019, 10:34:09 AM »
Based on my experience with nominally christians and atheists in largely or formerly christian cultures, ex-muslims almost certainly celebrate muslim holidays.  Why wouldn't you, holidays are fun and build community.  Sure, ex-catholics rarely observe lent but they pretty much always hunt for easter eggs.  I'd expect the same of Ex-Muslims.  I'm sure they don't observe Ramadan, Except for Eid at the end. 

And because I always like to mention this, pretty much every Muslim I've known observed Ramadan by quitting alcohol for a month.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2019, 10:37:26 AM by Ah.hell »

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2019, 11:19:21 AM »
Quite a few people of Iranian background who live in the West don't really consider themselves Muslims, and celebrate old Iranian holidays, for example Nowruz, the Iranian new year's eve, but not Islamic holidays, because they associate Islam with the Iranian regime. Nowruz is celebrated by other Iranian peoples as well, for example Kurds. Of course, this does not apply to all Iranians.

I once had a female colleague of Bangladeshi background. She didn't wear a veil, didn't fast, drank alcohol, and even celebrated Christmas, and I think she also celebrated Eid. Her commitment to Islam in real life seemed to boil down to not eating pork. To clarify, she did self-identify as a Muslim.

So it really depends.
"I appear as a skeptic, who believes that doubt is the great engine, the great fuel, of all inquiry, all discovery, and all innovation" - Christopher Hitchens

Offline Friendly Angel

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2019, 01:09:21 PM »
I like to experience bits of culture from around the world to the extent that the people are willing to share them with me.

But I can't get behind public ritualistic animal slaughter.

Amend and resubmit.

Online John Albert

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2019, 04:21:12 PM »
Last Friday evening I wandered into a Turkish restaurant, as it happened, right before sundown. I was on my way to an art show and happened to be dining alone. 

The waitress asked me, "are you fasting?" To which I replied, "um, no..." and then the realization hit me. Every year Ramadan comes about a week and a half earlier, and since I'm not Muslim it seems that I never know it's even happening until it's almost over.

As I was perusing the menu, a big crowd of several extended families showed up for iftar at the same time. The owner came to my table and politely asked if I would mind moving to a smaller table so they could accommodate all the newly arrived patrons. I cheerfully complied. It was really nice seeing all these people together with the children and grandparents, out dining together. Although it took a little longer than usual, the meal was delicious.

Anyway, I hope you all had a happy and blessed Eid.

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2019, 11:34:15 AM »
A question about the English language: Can you really say "bless" or "blessed" if you don't believe in a god who do the blessing? At least in my language the word "bless" has a very clear religious connotation.

I could without problems wish someone a happy Eid, but a blessed one, that feels like a rather religious thing to do.
"I appear as a skeptic, who believes that doubt is the great engine, the great fuel, of all inquiry, all discovery, and all innovation" - Christopher Hitchens

Online John Albert

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2019, 11:39:59 AM »
I don't believe in gods. It's just a conventional thing to say.

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2019, 11:41:20 AM »
Ok, linguistic/cultural difference then I guess. After all, you guys even want to be "blessed" after sneezing. :P ;)
« Last Edit: June 06, 2019, 11:48:58 AM by Quetzalcoatl »
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Offline Awatsjr

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2019, 12:05:44 PM »
I take “blessed” to mean someone was singled out for something good like their kids being decent, buying a bigger house or getting a great deal on a washer/dryer combo. Because that’s what Yahweh focuses on.

We are sooooo blessed! Thanks Yahweh, we will recommend you to all our friends! 4.5 stars.

Offline 2397

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2019, 12:20:36 PM »
It's an abjuration spell. When someone sneezes, you say "bless you" to give them a higher saving throw against a devil's charm.

Offline Friendly Angel

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #13 on: June 06, 2019, 01:48:15 PM »
I don't believe in gods. It's just a conventional thing to say.

I never say it - because it has such a strong religious connotation.
Amend and resubmit.

Online John Albert

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Re: Eid Mubarak
« Reply #14 on: June 06, 2019, 04:21:09 PM »
Meh.

I also use expressions like "oh my god" and "goddamnit" and "Christ on a crutch," so I figure if I can invoke religious language to express surprise or aggravation, it's not hypocritical to use it to say something nice. Sometimes I'll even say "bless you" when somebody sneezes. Does that make me a bad atheist?