Author Topic: Episode #728  (Read 2651 times)

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Offline lucek

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #30 on: June 25, 2019, 06:23:46 PM »
Why the hell is everyone calling dogs ‘doggos’ all of a sudden and can they please just stop now?
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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #31 on: June 25, 2019, 06:54:17 PM »
Why the hell is everyone calling dogs ‘doggos’ all of a sudden and can they please just stop now?
Language evolves. Even terms for doge.

Used to be called bit.

In Norwegian, all dogs are bitches (bikkjer).

Offline azinyk

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2019, 02:27:46 AM »
Contrary to Steve's assumption in episode #728, "Atoms for Peace" is not a mistranslation:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atoms_for_Peace

It's one of the major speeches by an American president, probably as significant as JFK's "we choose to go to the moon" or Reagan's "tear down this wall".  At least as pivotal as GWB's "smoke 'em out of their holes".

Offline gebobs

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2019, 11:56:39 AM »
Maybe I misheard or misunderstood. If not, how does Cara go through 35 years of life not knowing when summer (or any season) starts? :-)

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2019, 12:35:44 PM »
Because she's a Texan who lives in California, and barely knows what snow is.

Offline fuzzyMarmot

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #35 on: June 26, 2019, 05:08:56 PM »
Contrary to Steve's assumption in episode #728, "Atoms for Peace" is not a mistranslation:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atoms_for_Peace

It's one of the major speeches by an American president, probably as significant as JFK's "we choose to go to the moon" or Reagan's "tear down this wall".  At least as pivotal as GWB's "smoke 'em out of their holes".

I was really surprised by this, too. It seems that Steve and the rogues were unaware of one of the most famous speeches in history.

Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #36 on: June 26, 2019, 05:35:58 PM »
Maybe I misheard or misunderstood. If not, how does Cara go through 35 years of life not knowing when summer (or any season) starts? :-)

When does it start?

It all seems a rather arbitrary demarkation to me. And this is reflected by the various definitions of when seasons begin and end. The dates of seasons varies by country and the number of seasons also varies by country and culture.

Some countries used fixed dates to define the seasons. Of course those dates are not the same around the world (putting aside the obvious difference between northern and southern hemispheres). Some use 1st of a set month (like in Australia), while others use the equinoxes and solstices as starting dates (more common in northern hemisphere nations). Some use religious dates (e.g. Ireland).

Then there are places that use weather conditions (e.g. some Scandinavian countries) to determine when a season has commenced. Which means seasons for them vary in length from year to year.

In the various Australian indigenous cultures there are many variants on seasonal calendars and the number of seasons is variable and typically there are many more seasons defined than the four we are familiar with. Some have been documented by the CSIRO:
https://www.csiro.au/en/Research/Environment/Land-management/Indigenous/Indigenous-calendars/About-the-calendars

These have been developed by observations of a people spanning tens of thousands of years.

I haven't heard this discussion on the podcast, I must have fallen asleep during that bit.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2019, 05:42:31 PM by Alex Simmons »

Online bachfiend

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #37 on: June 26, 2019, 05:45:56 PM »
Maybe I misheard or misunderstood. If not, how does Cara go through 35 years of life not knowing when summer (or any season) starts? :-)

When does it start?

It all seems a rather arbitrary demarkation to me. And this is reflected by the various definitions of when seasons begin and end. The dates of seasons varies by country and the number of seasons also varies by country and culture.

Some countries used fixed dates to define the seasons. Of course those dates are not the same around the world (putting aside the obvious difference between northern and southern hemispheres). Some use 1st of a set month (like in Australia), while others use the equinoxes and solstices as starting dates (more common in northern hemisphere nations). Some use religious dates (e.g. Ireland).

Then there are places that use weather conditions (e.g. some Scandinavian countries) to determine when a season has commenced. Which means seasons for them vary in length from year to year.

I haven't heard this discussion on the podcast, I must have fallen asleep during that bit.

And there’s also the joke that in some places, summer is in August.  Or to be more accurate, on August 15.

Logically, the seasons should be defined according to the solstices and the equinoxes.  Summer is the 3 month period centered on the summer solstice.  And so on.

Our calendar is a solar calendar.  So our seasons should also be defined according to the apparent position of the sun in the sky produced by the axial tilt of the Earth.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #38 on: June 26, 2019, 05:52:51 PM »
Maybe I misheard or misunderstood. If not, how does Cara go through 35 years of life not knowing when summer (or any season) starts? :-)

When does it start?

It all seems a rather arbitrary demarkation to me. And this is reflected by the various definitions of when seasons begin and end. The dates of seasons varies by country and the number of seasons also varies by country and culture.

Some countries used fixed dates to define the seasons. Of course those dates are not the same around the world (putting aside the obvious difference between northern and southern hemispheres). Some use 1st of a set month (like in Australia), while others use the equinoxes and solstices as starting dates (more common in northern hemisphere nations). Some use religious dates (e.g. Ireland).

Then there are places that use weather conditions (e.g. some Scandinavian countries) to determine when a season has commenced. Which means seasons for them vary in length from year to year.

In the various Australian indigenous cultures there are many variants on seasonal calendars and the number of seasons is variable and typically there are many more seasons defined than the four we are familiar with. Some have been documented by the CSIRO:
https://www.csiro.au/en/Research/Environment/Land-management/Indigenous/Indigenous-calendars/About-the-calendars

These have been developed by observations of a people spanning tens of thousands of years.

I haven't heard this discussion on the podcast, I must have fallen asleep during that bit.

When I lived in North Dakota I advocated for a special calendar for our state, because the seasons as defined by the calendar did not jibe at all with the actual weather.
Daniel
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Online bachfiend

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #39 on: June 26, 2019, 06:06:03 PM »
Maybe I misheard or misunderstood. If not, how does Cara go through 35 years of life not knowing when summer (or any season) starts? :-)

When does it start?

It all seems a rather arbitrary demarkation to me. And this is reflected by the various definitions of when seasons begin and end. The dates of seasons varies by country and the number of seasons also varies by country and culture.

Some countries used fixed dates to define the seasons. Of course those dates are not the same around the world (putting aside the obvious difference between northern and southern hemispheres). Some use 1st of a set month (like in Australia), while others use the equinoxes and solstices as starting dates (more common in northern hemisphere nations). Some use religious dates (e.g. Ireland).

Then there are places that use weather conditions (e.g. some Scandinavian countries) to determine when a season has commenced. Which means seasons for them vary in length from year to year.

In the various Australian indigenous cultures there are many variants on seasonal calendars and the number of seasons is variable and typically there are many more seasons defined than the four we are familiar with. Some have been documented by the CSIRO:
https://www.csiro.au/en/Research/Environment/Land-management/Indigenous/Indigenous-calendars/About-the-calendars

These have been developed by observations of a people spanning tens of thousands of years.

I haven't heard this discussion on the podcast, I must have fallen asleep during that bit.

When I lived in North Dakota I advocated for a special calendar for our state, because the seasons as defined by the calendar did not jibe at all with the actual weather.

I think it was North Dakota that was the target of the joke.

Of course, weather has nothing to do with seasons.  When I was in school, I initially thought that winter was defined as being cold and wet, and summer as hot and dry, but that’s only characteristic of the Mediterranean climate which I am used to in Perth, Australia.
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Online brilligtove

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #40 on: June 26, 2019, 06:19:45 PM »
Something like half the world population - people in the tropics and nearby - have a wet season and a dry season. Days are 12h ±about 20min all year, so there's no reason to care about the temperate 4 seasons.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #41 on: June 26, 2019, 09:03:49 PM »
My mother used to visit Nicaragua regularly. Nicaragua has two seasons: The hot season, and the hotter season. And when I was in school in Queretaro, Mexico, a classmate came to school wearing sweatpants and sweatshirt on a day that was in the upper 70's. When I asked her about it, she said that where she comes from (coastal Oaxaca) it never gets that cold.

Before this year, I'd never been in Maui between late March and September. I'm going into my first summer here and interested to see what it's like. I expect to run my A/C a lot (my new solar should be switched on by the end of this week if the contractor keeps his word) and walk the 4 minutes to the beach frequently to go in the water. In a month it'll be just about as warm as bath water. In January when I jump out of the canoe I can only stay in the water for a few minutes. It's brisk and refreshing after a hard paddle. Now it's so warm that I don't want to get back into the canoe.
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Online bachfiend

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #42 on: June 26, 2019, 09:41:06 PM »
Something like half the world population - people in the tropics and nearby - have a wet season and a dry season. Days are 12h ±about 20min all year, so there's no reason to care about the temperate 4 seasons.

That’s another good reason for mitigating global warming.  Having the tropics becoming intolerably hot, and causing half of the global population to be forced to migrate from regions where there are no ‘four seasons’ to where there are (which is probably where most of the readers of this forum live) would be a considerable shock.
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Offline Tassie Dave

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #43 on: June 27, 2019, 03:01:49 AM »
Maybe I misheard or misunderstood. If not, how does Cara go through 35 years of life not knowing when summer (or any season) starts? :-)

When does it start?

It all seems a rather arbitrary demarkation to me. And this is reflected by the various definitions of when seasons begin and end. The dates of seasons varies by country and the number of seasons also varies by country and culture.

Some countries used fixed dates to define the seasons. Of course those dates are not the same around the world (putting aside the obvious difference between northern and southern hemispheres). Some use 1st of a set month (like in Australia), while others use the equinoxes and solstices as starting dates (more common in northern hemisphere nations). Some use religious dates (e.g. Ireland).

Then there are places that use weather conditions (e.g. some Scandinavian countries) to determine when a season has commenced. Which means seasons for them vary in length from year to year.

In the various Australian indigenous cultures there are many variants on seasonal calendars and the number of seasons is variable and typically there are many more seasons defined than the four we are familiar with. Some have been documented by the CSIRO:
https://www.csiro.au/en/Research/Environment/Land-management/Indigenous/Indigenous-calendars/About-the-calendars

These have been developed by observations of a people spanning tens of thousands of years.

I haven't heard this discussion on the podcast, I must have fallen asleep during that bit.

I use the Winter Solstice (Yule) as the start of winter. Which was June 22nd this year. That is usually the start of the snow season. Though we have had several significant falls in May and early June.

Tassie unlike most of the northern states gets four distinct seasons. Sometimes in the one day (as the joke goes)  ;)

Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Episode #728
« Reply #44 on: June 27, 2019, 03:57:13 AM »
Logically, the seasons should be defined according to the solstices and the equinoxes.  Summer is the 3 month period centered on the summer solstice.  And so on.

I don't see what is particularly logical about that over say some other arbitrary date, especially considering environmental conditions lag the date period either side of the equinoxes and solstices you suggest.

As an example, where I live this method would class the hottest and wettest period of the year as being Autumn.

I don't think this is one of those things which needs a universal standard. Rather societies, cultures and environments around the world are highly variable and each uses seasonal definitions valid for them.

 

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