Author Topic: Dog food and heart disease  (Read 356 times)

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Online bachfiend

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Re: Dog food and heart disease
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2019, 06:27:17 AM »
Loren Cordain (who also is a proponent of the ‘Paleolithic Diet,’ and has written books promoting it) has written a paper giving the range of plant-based foods/animal-based foods in hunter-gatherer societies.  The range is wide:

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/71/3/682/4729121

Loren Cordain is the founder of the Paleo movement. The Paleo Diet is his trademarked diet plan.

https://thepaleodiet.com/dr-loren-cordain/

Quote
Most (73%) of the worldwide hunter-gatherer societies derived >50% (≥56–65% of energy) of their subsistence from animal foods, whereas only 14% of these societies derived >50% (≥56–65% of energy) of their subsistence from gathered plant foods.

You claimed that hunter-gatherer societies got their calories mostly from animal-based foods.

55-65% isn’t ‘mostly,’ and I have doubts about the numbers.

You’re telling a story to fit your ideological biases.  You’re claiming that the current epidemic of obesity, diabetes and chronic heart disease over the past few decades is due to something that happened around 12,000 years ago (the development of agriculture) and something that happened around 500 years (processed grains and sugars), whereas the obvious reason is that humans are becoming increasingly sedentary, and have increasing access to cheap, readily available, calorie dense fast foods, which are heavily advertised.

Humans can readily evolve to consume new foods, as shown by the development of lactose tolerance for milk products.  And humans evolved to be able to eat a lot of carbohydrates.  The salivary glands secrete amylase to get a head start in digesting starches, so carbohydrates for humans are natural.  The salivary glands don’t secrete lipase, trypsin or pepsin for your fat and protein, illustrating the relative importance of the macronutrients.
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Online CarbShark

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Re: Dog food and heart disease
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2019, 12:17:13 PM »


55-65% isn’t ‘mostly,’




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and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Online bachfiend

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Re: Dog food and heart disease
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2019, 02:57:12 PM »


55-65% isn’t ‘mostly,’




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Since you haven’t bothered making any sensible comment in reply, I’ll amplify what I’m saying.  Just because someone somewhere somewhen consumed in the diet a certain percentage of animal-based food resulting in certain percentages of macronutrients (fat, protein and carbohydrates), that doesn’t mean evolution adapted humans to thrive best on that particular diet.

Firstly, there’s no single diet enjoyed by humans generally over time.  There’s a great range of different diets consumed in various regions.

And secondly, evolution doesn’t do long term survival.  It’s only concerned with the short term and reproductive success.  It doesn’t care about the health of humans in their 60s, 70s, 80s...

Just because a particular hunter-gatherer society was consuming a particular diet sometime, it doesn’t mean that evolution adapted humans to do best long term on that diet.  Evolution only adapted humans to use that particular diet for better or worse.

To know whether a particular diet is ‘best’ regarding life expectancy and health, you need (to repeat myself for the umpteenth time) long term observational studies over years and decades.  Which you don’t have for your diet.

And I’ll repeat myself again.  I don’t think that there’s a single ‘best’ diet.  There are many perfectly acceptable diets.

The risk factors for chronic diseases are being overweight or obese, being sedentary, consuming excessive sugars, and if overweight or obese consuming a high glycaemic diet.

Macronutrient proportions aren’t a risk factor save for high glycaemic diets in the overweight or obese, but you shouldn’t be overweight or obese, so that ‘risk’ factor shouldn’t apply.

A perfectly acceptable diet for a particular person is the one that makes attaining and maintaining a healthy body weight and body fat percentage, and there are many that do so.

The current epidemic of obesity isn’t due to changes in diet 12,000 years ago, or 500 years ago, but due to the increasing sedentary lifestyle and ready availability of cheap calorie dense foods which are heavily marketed in the past few decades.

And that even applies to our dogs.  Many dogs aren’t given enough exercise by their owners.  And too many treats.  So obesity is becoming a problem in dogs too.
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