Author Topic: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.  (Read 2201 times)

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Offline Captain Video

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #90 on: July 10, 2019, 07:17:58 PM »
sure, its my own pop up hot dog stand, I call it Smoke out Dog and prepare every ingredient by hand with care I even provide Beyond sausage for the vegans but you are not welcome with that attitude.

Im guessing you should not eat anywhere where a chef prepares food for you because if you think McDonalds is bad the cream butter sugar and salt provided by a top chef in a high end restaurant puts them to shame.

That depends on the chef and the restaurant.

And I never said I thought McDonald's is bad. They've reformed some of their practices and become more transparent about their nutritional information since the controversy I referred to in my post.

well your still not invited  >:D

Harry, Carb, and Bachfiend all get free dogs on me if they choose to visit.
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Offline John Albert

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #91 on: July 10, 2019, 07:21:12 PM »
sure, its my own pop up hot dog stand, I call it Smoke out Dog and prepare every ingredient by hand with care I even provide Beyond sausage for the vegans but you are not welcome with that attitude.

Im guessing you should not eat anywhere where a chef prepares food for you because if you think McDonalds is bad the cream butter sugar and salt provided by a top chef in a high end restaurant puts them to shame.

That depends on the chef and the restaurant.

And I never said I thought McDonald's is bad. They've reformed some of their practices and become more transparent about their nutritional information since the controversy I referred to in my post.

well your still not invited  >:D

Harry, Carb, and Bachfiend all get free dogs on me if they choose to visit.

Fine with me. I don't much care for "pop-ups" anyway. 

Online CarbShark

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #92 on: July 10, 2019, 07:23:20 PM »
Its because simple is not the same as easy.
So it’s simple but so difficult that 3/4 of the population can’t do it (while for some reason until the 70s more than 90% of the population could do it)


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I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline John Albert

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #93 on: July 10, 2019, 07:26:03 PM »
Its because simple is not the same as easy.

So it’s simple but so difficult that 3/4 of the population can’t do it (while for some reason until the 70s more than 90% of the population could do it)

I think almost anybody could do it if they really try, but there are lots of economic and cultural factors in play. Some people are habituated to living off quick, cheap junk food because they don't really know any better. As far as they're concerned, it's all they can afford in terms of time and money.

And then there's the negative influence of all the woo-woo nonsense, which subverts confidence in the medical community and distracts people from a clinical understanding of nutrition.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2019, 07:30:05 PM by John Albert »

Offline Captain Video

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #94 on: July 10, 2019, 07:31:42 PM »
sure, its my own pop up hot dog stand, I call it Smoke out Dog and prepare every ingredient by hand with care I even provide Beyond sausage for the vegans but you are not welcome with that attitude.

Im guessing you should not eat anywhere where a chef prepares food for you because if you think McDonalds is bad the cream butter sugar and salt provided by a top chef in a high end restaurant puts them to shame.

That depends on the chef and the restaurant.

And I never said I thought McDonald's is bad. They've reformed some of their practices and become more transparent about their nutritional information since the controversy I referred to in my post.

well your still not invited  >:D

Harry, Carb, and Bachfiend all get free dogs on me if they choose to visit.

Fine with me. I don't much care for "pop-ups" anyway. 

Many of the great restaurants in this town started out that way, you are missing out, your loss I guess.

I will say that if you are concerned about food safety it is always my number one concern above taste but the two tend to go hand in hand. I find that most pop ups also have this attitude, its usually a chef who cant quite afford their own restaurant and food safety is important, if you cant get that right early on you will not succeed with a brick and mortar.

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Offline John Albert

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #95 on: July 10, 2019, 07:36:49 PM »
I don't know which town you're talking about, but where I live they mostly seem to be about gimmicky bullshit. Maybe I'm biased by a few bad experiences.

I have to admit there was one "pop up" I quite enjoyed: a local café did a Halloween themed pop-up called "Taco Hell," with original re-interpretations of Taco Bell offerings, and they had Rick Bayless taking orders in a Devil costume. That was a lot of fun.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #96 on: July 10, 2019, 08:00:37 PM »
It’s amazing that it’s so simple. I wonder why three quarters of the population, across all education and income levels, were never able to figure that out.

You must be really smart and they must all be really stupid.

Why did such a large portion of the population smoke until quite recently? It wasn't for lack of knowledge about the hazards. 150 years ago (more or less) Mark Twain wrote that he knew cigars would probably take ten years off his life, but that he didn't consider that decade worth living without cigars. Some people would rather eat the food they like, in excess, than be healthy.

Maybe I'm smarter than a lot of people because I'm smart enough to listen to the people who've studied the subject. Or maybe health is just not something they care about. But as Harry pointed out, eating in moderation is hard when you live among abundance.

As for restaurants and chefs, I can no longer eat in restaurants because the typical restaurant meal has more than my daily allowance of sodium. A few decades ago I could not eat in restaurants because they had no vegetarian options. Now nearly every restaurant has vegetarian options, but I have not yet found one that offers low-sodium options. Fortunately for me, I learned to cook for myself when restaurants had no vegetarian options, and that serves me well now that they have no low-sodium options.

As for sidewalk food stands, I used to patronize them all the time when I lived in Mexico. Obviously, not the taco stands, but I ate at the fruit stands all the time. Some have pre-sliced fruit in a glass case. Never eat at those! Some have whole fruit and slice it while you watch, and wash their hands, cutting board, and knife with purified water before cutting each fruit. Those are the ones I ate at. Oh, and when you buy fresh sliced fruit from a fruit stand in Mexico, they will put chili powder on it unless you specifically ask them not to. "Sin chile" means "without chili." I like chili, in moderation, but not on fruit.
Daniel
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Offline Captain Video

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #97 on: July 10, 2019, 08:22:04 PM »
It’s amazing that it’s so simple. I wonder why three quarters of the population, across all education and income levels, were never able to figure that out.

You must be really smart and they must all be really stupid.

Why did such a large portion of the population smoke until quite recently? It wasn't for lack of knowledge about the hazards. 150 years ago (more or less) Mark Twain wrote that he knew cigars would probably take ten years off his life, but that he didn't consider that decade worth living without cigars. Some people would rather eat the food they like, in excess, than be healthy.

Maybe I'm smarter than a lot of people because I'm smart enough to listen to the people who've studied the subject. Or maybe health is just not something they care about. But as Harry pointed out, eating in moderation is hard when you live among abundance.

As for restaurants and chefs, I can no longer eat in restaurants because the typical restaurant meal has more than my daily allowance of sodium. A few decades ago I could not eat in restaurants because they had no vegetarian options. Now nearly every restaurant has vegetarian options, but I have not yet found one that offers low-sodium options. Fortunately for me, I learned to cook for myself when restaurants had no vegetarian options, and that serves me well now that they have no low-sodium options.

As for sidewalk food stands, I used to patronize them all the time when I lived in Mexico. Obviously, not the taco stands, but I ate at the fruit stands all the time. Some have pre-sliced fruit in a glass case. Never eat at those! Some have whole fruit and slice it while you watch, and wash their hands, cutting board, and knife with purified water before cutting each fruit. Those are the ones I ate at. Oh, and when you buy fresh sliced fruit from a fruit stand in Mexico, they will put chili powder on it unless you specifically ask them not to. "Sin chile" means "without chili." I like chili, in moderation, but not on fruit.

There are subtle differences between  a "Pop-Up" and a street vendor which is what you are describing.  A pop-up is usually attached to another restaurant or bar. Most of the pop-ups Im familiar with started by making food for a bar that does not have a regular kitchen or they took over the existing bar kitchen.   One of the best BBQ joints in Atlanta started that way. Sometimes its an existing restaurant that temporarily changes theme as John described.

When I get my food truck/trailer I will stop calling it a Pop-up.

Don't get me wrong, I love street food too.  Check out "street food" on netflix, The series follows the lives of some amazing chefs in other countries famous for street food.
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Online CarbShark

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #98 on: July 10, 2019, 08:41:13 PM »
It’s amazing that it’s so simple. I wonder why three quarters of the population, across all education and income levels, were never able to figure that out.

You must be really smart and they must all be really stupid.

Why did such a large portion of the population smoke until quite recently? It wasn't for lack of knowledge about the hazards. 150 years ago (more or less) Mark Twain wrote that he knew cigars would probably take ten years off his life, but that he didn't consider that decade worth living without cigars. Some people would rather eat the food they like, in excess, than be healthy.

Maybe I'm smarter than a lot of people because I'm smart enough to listen to the people who've studied the subject. Or maybe health is just not something they care about. But as Harry pointed out, eating in moderation is hard when you live among abundance.

Some of the biggest studies of nutrition and health have been done on health care professionals. Doctors and nurses.  Their rates of overweight and obesity are virtually as high as general population. I think health is something most of them care about and I'm sure most probably listen to people who've studied the subject at least as much as you.

In the U.S. the obesity epidemic spiked beginning in the mid-seventies. Are you under the impression that the middle class in the US did not have abundant food from the 40s through the 70s and then suddenly food was plentiful?

Quote
As for restaurants and chefs, I can no longer eat in restaurants because the typical restaurant meal has more than my daily allowance of sodium. A few decades ago I could not eat in restaurants because they had no vegetarian options. Now nearly every restaurant has vegetarian options, but I have not yet found one that offers low-sodium options. Fortunately for me, I learned to cook for myself when restaurants had no vegetarian options, and that serves me well now that they have no low-sodium options.

Unless you have an issue with high blood pressure, sodium is no longer considered a nutrient of concern.
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #99 on: July 10, 2019, 09:24:05 PM »
After the quake that levelled Christchurch,  it became the city of pop-up shops and cafes.  Those old shipping containers worked well.
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Online bachfiend

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #100 on: July 10, 2019, 09:26:10 PM »
It’s amazing that it’s so simple. I wonder why three quarters of the population, across all education and income levels, were never able to figure that out.

You must be really smart and they must all be really stupid.

Why did such a large portion of the population smoke until quite recently? It wasn't for lack of knowledge about the hazards. 150 years ago (more or less) Mark Twain wrote that he knew cigars would probably take ten years off his life, but that he didn't consider that decade worth living without cigars. Some people would rather eat the food they like, in excess, than be healthy.

Maybe I'm smarter than a lot of people because I'm smart enough to listen to the people who've studied the subject. Or maybe health is just not something they care about. But as Harry pointed out, eating in moderation is hard when you live among abundance.

Some of the biggest studies of nutrition and health have been done on health care professionals. Doctors and nurses.  Their rates of overweight and obesity are virtually as high as general population. I think health is something most of them care about and I'm sure most probably listen to people who've studied the subject at least as much as you.

In the U.S. the obesity epidemic spiked beginning in the mid-seventies. Are you under the impression that the middle class in the US did not have abundant food from the 40s through the 70s and then suddenly food was plentiful?

Quote
As for restaurants and chefs, I can no longer eat in restaurants because the typical restaurant meal has more than my daily allowance of sodium. A few decades ago I could not eat in restaurants because they had no vegetarian options. Now nearly every restaurant has vegetarian options, but I have not yet found one that offers low-sodium options. Fortunately for me, I learned to cook for myself when restaurants had no vegetarian options, and that serves me well now that they have no low-sodium options.

Unless you have an issue with high blood pressure, sodium is no longer considered a nutrient of concern.

Evidence that ‘sodium is no longer considered a nutrient of concern’ unless you have an issue with high blood pressure?

It’s not just an abundance of food that has caused the current epidemic of obesity.  It’s multifactorial.  There’s also the heavy marketing of fast foods.  There’s the increasingly sedentary lifestyles.  There’s the perceived increase in stress.  There’s time imbalances.  Some people such as doctors don’t have the time to look after themselves.  Other people have too much time, and fill in the time with eating.  Eating anytime anywhere is nowadays socially accepted.
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Offline Shibboleth

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #101 on: July 11, 2019, 01:03:58 PM »
Yes I do believe that food is far easier to get your hands on today than in the past.






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Offline lonely moa

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #102 on: July 11, 2019, 04:24:17 PM »
Cool... now what about a graph of medical expenses over the same time period?
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #103 on: July 11, 2019, 05:13:27 PM »
There are subtle differences between  a "Pop-Up" and a street vendor which is what you are describing.  A pop-up is usually attached to another restaurant or bar. Most of the pop-ups Im familiar with started by making food for a bar that does not have a regular kitchen or they took over the existing bar kitchen.   One of the best BBQ joints in Atlanta started that way. Sometimes its an existing restaurant that temporarily changes theme as John described...

Okay. I was under the impression that your operation was out on the street. Or is a "pop-up" on the street but associated with another establishment? In any case, being out of doors, we both agree, does not mean the food is unsafe. It's great that you are offering a vegetarian alternative. I don't like fake meat because it tastes too much like meat, which I don't like. But I am unlikely ever to be in your neck of the woods anyway, so it's a moot point.

When I first arrived in Mexico I was given two very silly pieces of advice (by North Americans): Don't eat street food because it's not sanitary, and don't drink drinks with ice, because the ice is made from tap water, which in Mexico is not potable. In fact, I never got sick from eating street food, though I always followed the rule of buying only from stands where everything was being washed constantly. And Mexicans know perfectly well that their tap water is not for drinking, and they use ice made from filtered water. I did get sick twice during my 4 1/2 years there: Once after eating movie-theater popcorn (probably made with bad oil) and once after a chocolate binge which was a simple matter of eating an idiotic quantity.


Unless you have an issue with high blood pressure, sodium is no longer considered a nutrient of concern.

I have high blood pressure. It's under control with medicine, regular cardio, and by limiting my sodium intake. I'll take my cardiologist's recommendation over any random internet poster. Twice I inadvertently ate too much salt, and both times were followed by scary-high blood-pressure incidents.
Daniel
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Online bachfiend

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Re: Why is food such a damn blind spot for so many.
« Reply #104 on: July 11, 2019, 07:37:53 PM »
There are subtle differences between  a "Pop-Up" and a street vendor which is what you are describing.  A pop-up is usually attached to another restaurant or bar. Most of the pop-ups Im familiar with started by making food for a bar that does not have a regular kitchen or they took over the existing bar kitchen.   One of the best BBQ joints in Atlanta started that way. Sometimes its an existing restaurant that temporarily changes theme as John described...

Okay. I was under the impression that your operation was out on the street. Or is a "pop-up" on the street but associated with another establishment? In any case, being out of doors, we both agree, does not mean the food is unsafe. It's great that you are offering a vegetarian alternative. I don't like fake meat because it tastes too much like meat, which I don't like. But I am unlikely ever to be in your neck of the woods anyway, so it's a moot point.

When I first arrived in Mexico I was given two very silly pieces of advice (by North Americans): Don't eat street food because it's not sanitary, and don't drink drinks with ice, because the ice is made from tap water, which in Mexico is not potable. In fact, I never got sick from eating street food, though I always followed the rule of buying only from stands where everything was being washed constantly. And Mexicans know perfectly well that their tap water is not for drinking, and they use ice made from filtered water. I did get sick twice during my 4 1/2 years there: Once after eating movie-theater popcorn (probably made with bad oil) and once after a chocolate binge which was a simple matter of eating an idiotic quantity.


Unless you have an issue with high blood pressure, sodium is no longer considered a nutrient of concern.

I have high blood pressure. It's under control with medicine, regular cardio, and by limiting my sodium intake. I'll take my cardiologist's recommendation over any random internet poster. Twice I inadvertently ate too much salt, and both times were followed by scary-high blood-pressure incidents.

Even if you don’t ‘have an issue with high blood pressure,’ it’s still necessary to consider sodium as ‘a nutrient of concern.’  The average blood pressure in developed countries might not be the normal (healthy) blood pressure.  In communities without free access to sodium chloride, their average blood pressures are much lower than ours, and they appear to do well without adding salt to their food.

The trouble is that salt just tastes too good (along with sugar, fat and protein).  In natural diets, they aren’t consumed in large amounts, because they’re difficult to obtain.  So evolution causes the drive to obtain them to be high to ensure that the minimum necessary is consumed.
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