Author Topic: Episode #730  (Read 1724 times)

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Offline brilligtove

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Re: Episode #730
« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2019, 07:22:18 PM »
Forgotten Superheroes of Science News Items: The Bystander Effect, Drones on Titan, Simulating the Universe Your Questions and E-mails: Lactic Acid, Climate Change Science or Fiction

I found it entertaining that Steve's idea of a grossly insufficient summary of lactic acid was a segment I had to listen to twice while doing nothing else just to follow it - not really retain much, just follow along.
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Episode #730
« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2019, 08:00:22 PM »
I already knew that oxidizing a glucose molecule in a mitochondrion gives you several times more energy than anaerobically converting it. I didn't know that the anaerobic byproducts could eventually be converted back or oxidized for their remaining energy.

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Episode #730
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2019, 01:33:57 PM »
I already knew that oxidizing a glucose molecule in a mitochondrion gives you several times more energy than anaerobically converting it. I didn't know that the anaerobic byproducts could eventually be converted back or oxidized for their remaining energy.

Well, it’s not several times more energy, it’s around 15 times more.  Did you think the pyruvate (which is converted into lactate) is excreted, instead of being further metabolised when oxygen becomes available? The supply of oxygen (which is a function of the blood supply) is the rate limiting step in aerobic respiration.  If the blood supply to the exercising skeletal muscle (and hence the oxygen supply) isn’t adequate for the level of exertion, then the glycogen stores are incompletely ‘burned’ until more oxygen is supplied and the burning completed.
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Episode #730
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2019, 03:44:58 PM »
I already knew that oxidizing a glucose molecule in a mitochondrion gives you several times more energy than anaerobically converting it. I didn't know that the anaerobic byproducts could eventually be converted back or oxidized for their remaining energy.

Well, it’s not several times more energy, it’s around 15 times more.  Did you think the pyruvate (which is converted into lactate) is excreted, instead of being further metabolised when oxygen becomes available? The supply of oxygen (which is a function of the blood supply) is the rate limiting step in aerobic respiration.  If the blood supply to the exercising skeletal muscle (and hence the oxygen supply) isn’t adequate for the level of exertion, then the glycogen stores are incompletely ‘burned’ until more oxygen is supplied and the burning completed.

Duh. Steve explained all that.

Online arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #730
« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2019, 08:34:31 PM »
I already knew that oxidizing a glucose molecule in a mitochondrion gives you several times more energy than anaerobically converting it. I didn't know that the anaerobic byproducts could eventually be converted back or oxidized for their remaining energy.

Well, it’s not several times more energy, it’s around 15 times more.  Did you think the pyruvate (which is converted into lactate) is excreted, instead of being further metabolised when oxygen becomes available? The supply of oxygen (which is a function of the blood supply) is the rate limiting step in aerobic respiration.  If the blood supply to the exercising skeletal muscle (and hence the oxygen supply) isn’t adequate for the level of exertion, then the glycogen stores are incompletely ‘burned’ until more oxygen is supplied and the burning completed.

Duh. Steve explained all that.

Did you miss the part where bachfiend doesn't listen to the show?
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Episode #730
« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2019, 10:54:00 PM »
I already knew that oxidizing a glucose molecule in a mitochondrion gives you several times more energy than anaerobically converting it. I didn't know that the anaerobic byproducts could eventually be converted back or oxidized for their remaining energy.

Well, it’s not several times more energy, it’s around 15 times more.  Did you think the pyruvate (which is converted into lactate) is excreted, instead of being further metabolised when oxygen becomes available? The supply of oxygen (which is a function of the blood supply) is the rate limiting step in aerobic respiration.  If the blood supply to the exercising skeletal muscle (and hence the oxygen supply) isn’t adequate for the level of exertion, then the glycogen stores are incompletely ‘burned’ until more oxygen is supplied and the burning completed.

Duh. Steve explained all that.

Did you miss the part where bachfiend doesn't listen to the show?

Yes, but I did listen to this part of the show.  I don’t listen to all of the show, and not every week.  And I don’t miss it.  And ‘several times’ isn’t the same as ‘15 times’ (although the ‘15 times’ is an estimate - it should be 19 times, but there’s some leakage of protons in the mitochondria causing some loss of energy).
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