Author Topic: Food intolerance/allergy test in the UK  (Read 178 times)

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Offline approx.purified

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Food intolerance/allergy test in the UK
« on: July 17, 2019, 06:31:15 PM »
My wife thinks she might have an intolerance to certain foods. I doubt the NHS will be of much help unless it was very serious/life threatening.

Today she sent me a link to site offering such tests and the opening paragraph was...

Quote
Using applied Kinesiology (Muscle Testing). Kinesiology is the preferred method of intolerance testing in some of the most prestigious clinics in Europe and covers 100’s of substances from food, chemicals, E numbers, cosmetic and environmental chemicals, parasites, vitamin, and mineral deficiency testing.

I replied to her that merely the phrase "applied Kinesiology" was a big red flag to me along with a link to a sceptical website explaining AK which was enough to put her off them.

I'm wondering if anyone ones of a proper, reputable and scientific way to get tested for food intolerances in the UK.  The likes of Groupon and Wowcher are full of promotions for such tests but I can't say I'd trust any of them to be scientifically valid. 

Offline Tatyana

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Re: Food intolerance/allergy test in the UK
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2019, 06:23:18 AM »
Jeebus Christ, of course the NHS does allergy testing.

Go to her GP and ask for a 'Rast' test and tell them what she thinks she is allergic to, or at least a total IgE.

If it is gluten, then it is a coeliac screen or TTG - tissue transglutimase (and total IgA)

This is your starting point. It will be negative if she hasn't had any of the offending foods within two weeks to three months as there will not be any anti-bodies.

Most NHS labs do 1000s of these tests each month, 1000s upon 1000s because everyone has a food intolerance now. They also do skin sensitivity/skin prick testing, but this will require a specialist appointment.

There is a HUGE demand for immunologists and a negative test doesn't mean she doesn't have a sensitivity reaction or another issue, so getting to the bottom of it could take ages.

Immunology is ridiculousously complicated, and while we can test for things, sometimes there isn't any good reason to test.

For example, my IgE is always elevated, and the consultant in my lab asked if I want to see what it is (again as I have had specific Antibodies done before), but as my allergies are environmental/hay fever, there isn't any benefit in knowing I am allergic to Timothy Grass or a specific pollen, it won't change the management of my allergies.

The reality of the situation is that if it is a food intolerance, she could figure out what foods are giving her issues by doing trial elimination, which is probably what would be recommended if she saw a specialist.

Kinesiology is rubbish.

« Last Edit: July 18, 2019, 06:26:00 AM by Tatyana »

Offline Tatyana

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Offline approx.purified

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Re: Food intolerance/allergy test in the UK
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2019, 03:22:14 PM »
Jeebus Christ, of course the NHS does allergy testing.

Jeebus I'm not that stupid. We just thought that the way the NHS are the GP would recommend the food elimination method.  I'd spoken to a friend whose wife has similar issues and had issues getting tested and went private.

Otherwise thank you for your advice.

Offline Tatyana

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Re: Food intolerance/allergy test in the UK
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2019, 07:04:29 AM »
Sorry about that, it is just the constant US coverage that the NHS is barely modern and always scarce is annoying.

Unfortunately, it does depend on the GP, the lab pathology training for medics is difficult as it is quite complex and continually evolving, and immunology is one of the most difficult disciplines.

If you go in with some knowledge and ask for specific tests, you will have better outcomes or be put on the NICE guidelines pathway, which for food intolerance looks like it is about keeping a food diary and elimination diet

https://www.evidence.nhs.uk/search?q=food+intolerance&sp=on