Author Topic: Episode #736  (Read 2340 times)

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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #30 on: August 20, 2019, 11:20:57 AM »
The pathological case (for mechanical typewriters) is a word that consists of adjacent presses. Other keyboard designs minimize vertical finger movement, keeping common letters on the home keys. I noticed Colemak has about half of letters in the same place as QWERTY. What system/OS do you use this keyboard on? I tried Dvorak once when I was using Linux early on (a decade ago). Otherwise, it is was too much work to reconfigure keyboards.

The longest word you can type with your left hand on QWERTY is "stewardesses". It also happens to have a lot of adjacent presses. Are there pathological words for the other keyboard layouts?

Online brilligtove

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #31 on: August 20, 2019, 12:54:12 PM »
The pathological case (for mechanical typewriters) is a word that consists of adjacent presses. Other keyboard designs minimize vertical finger movement, keeping common letters on the home keys. I noticed Colemak has about half of letters in the same place as QWERTY. What system/OS do you use this keyboard on? I tried Dvorak once when I was using Linux early on (a decade ago). Otherwise, it is was too much work to reconfigure keyboards.

The longest word you can type with your left hand on QWERTY is "stewardesses". It also happens to have a lot of adjacent presses. Are there pathological words for the other keyboard layouts?

I don't know about the pathological cases for Colemak or other layouts. One of the reasons I like Colemak is that a lot of letters are where you expect. The worst was the S. I've been touch-typing on this layout for about 2 years and I still mess that one up.

On my iPad I use an external bluetooth keyboard. That allows me to choose my layout as Colemak. I can't get a soft-keyboard in that layout AFAIK. On Android I've set it to Colemak. The soft-keyboard is in that format too. On Windows and MacOS I think I just went into the keyboard settings and chose it.
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Offline DevoutCatalyst

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #32 on: August 20, 2019, 01:26:20 PM »
I found I needed a switchable Dvorak hardware keyboard to use Romaji input for typing Japanese in Windows -- the IME wants QWERTY. I don't recommend Dvorak or any other scam alternative. The benefits just aren't enough. I never touch typed QWERTY and am hesitant to learn it now.

Offline Zec

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #33 on: August 21, 2019, 03:50:42 PM »
A totally unrelated curiosity.
why is it “the skeptics’ guide to the universe”? shouldn’t the apostrophe precede the “s”? skeptic’s?
Sorry for the probably dumb question, english is my second language.

Online brilligtove

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #34 on: August 21, 2019, 03:53:34 PM »
I found I needed a switchable Dvorak hardware keyboard to use Romaji input for typing Japanese in Windows -- the IME wants QWERTY. I don't recommend Dvorak or any other scam alternative. The benefits just aren't enough. I never touch typed QWERTY and am hesitant to learn it now.

Scam? Based on what? Your lack of touch typing skills?
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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #35 on: August 21, 2019, 04:04:05 PM »
A totally unrelated curiosity.
why is it “the skeptics’ guide to the universe”? shouldn’t the apostrophe precede the “s”? skeptic’s?
Sorry for the probably dumb question, english is my second language.

The apostrophe after the s at the end of "skeptics" in this case mean that it is the guide from multiple skeptics. Had it been before the s, it would say that it is the guide from one single skeptic. So to put the apostrophe after the s makes sense, given that the podcast has more than one contributor.

Which is your primary language btw?
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Offline DevoutCatalyst

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #36 on: August 21, 2019, 05:08:41 PM »
I found I needed a switchable Dvorak hardware keyboard to use Romaji input for typing Japanese in Windows -- the IME wants QWERTY. I don't recommend Dvorak or any other scam alternative. The benefits just aren't enough. I never touch typed QWERTY and am hesitant to learn it now.

Scam? Based on what? Your lack of touch typing skills?

Are there any good studies demonstrating more than a modest superiority in the real world for any of the alternative keyboard layouts? I acknowledge there likely are modest benefits but feel Dvorak was misrepresented a couple decades back (when I took it up) as being vastly superior and to me that was a scam. Switching to another keyboard layout hasn't happened for the vast majority of QWERTY typists and I don't see that changing.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2019, 06:17:26 PM by DevoutCatalyst »

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #37 on: August 21, 2019, 05:56:30 PM »
A totally unrelated curiosity.
why is it “the skeptics’ guide to the universe”? shouldn’t the apostrophe precede the “s”? skeptic’s?
Sorry for the probably dumb question, english is my second language.

The apostrophe after the s at the end of "skeptics" in this case mean that it is the guide from multiple skeptics. Had it been before the s, it would say that it is the guide from one single skeptic. So to put the apostrophe after the s makes sense, given that the podcast has more than one contributor.

Which is your primary language btw?

There was (perhaps there still is) a suggestion in linguists that the possessive apostrophe should be eliminated from English.  German manages to do without the apostrophe for the occasions the possessive ‘s’ is used (eg die Werke Wagners).  Getting rid of the possessive  apostrophe would get rid of plural CD’s, DVD’s and the greengrocers’ plural apple’s.  I’ve seen ‘apre’s ski’ too.

I suppose apostrophes would be retained to indicate omitted letters.  Punctuation should indicate differences in pronunciation.  ‘He won’t’ and ‘his wont’ have I think slightly different pronunciations of ‘won’t/wont.’
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #38 on: August 21, 2019, 06:09:39 PM »
A totally unrelated curiosity.
why is it “the skeptics’ guide to the universe”? shouldn’t the apostrophe precede the “s”? skeptic’s?
Sorry for the probably dumb question, english is my second language.

Skeptic's is singular: belonging to one skeptic.  Skeptics' is plural: belonging to more than one skeptic.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #39 on: August 21, 2019, 06:43:53 PM »
A totally unrelated curiosity.
why is it “the skeptics’ guide to the universe”? shouldn’t the apostrophe precede the “s”? skeptic’s?
Sorry for the probably dumb question, english is my second language.

Skeptic's is singular: belonging to one skeptic.  Skeptics' is plural: belonging to more than one skeptic.

And “women’s” and “children’s” are singular too?

The English language is sometimes peculiar.  The exception (in this case, the apostrophe before the ‘s’ means it’s singular) proves the rule, which actually means that because a rule has exceptions, that there’s a general rule which applies in most cases.
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #40 on: August 21, 2019, 07:02:57 PM »
A totally unrelated curiosity.
why is it “the skeptics’ guide to the universe”? shouldn’t the apostrophe precede the “s”? skeptic’s?
Sorry for the probably dumb question, english is my second language.

Skeptic's is singular: belonging to one skeptic.  Skeptics' is plural: belonging to more than one skeptic.

And “women’s” and “children’s” are singular too?

I don’t believe I said either of those things.

The rule is actually quite simple: the possessive of nouns is regularly formed by adding apostrophe and s, unless the noun is a plural ending in s, in which case the s after the apostrophe is omitted.

dog —> dog’s
dogs —> dogs’

man —> man’s
men —> men’s

hero —> hero’s
heroes —> heroes’

John —> John’s
Johns —> Johns’

James —> James’s
Jameses —> Jameses’
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #41 on: August 21, 2019, 07:12:41 PM »
A totally unrelated curiosity.
why is it “the skeptics’ guide to the universe”? shouldn’t the apostrophe precede the “s”? skeptic’s?
Sorry for the probably dumb question, english is my second language.

Skeptic's is singular: belonging to one skeptic.  Skeptics' is plural: belonging to more than one skeptic.

And “women’s” and “children’s” are singular too?

I don’t believe I said either of those things.

The rule is actually quite simple: the possessive of nouns is regularly formed by adding apostrophe and s, unless the noun is a plural ending in s, in which case the s after the apostrophe is omitted.

dog —> dog’s
dogs —> dogs’

man —> man’s
men —> men’s

hero —> hero’s
heroes —> heroes’

John —> John’s
Johns —> Johns’

James —> James’s
Jameses —> Jameses’

No, of course you didn’t.  It was a joke.  As I noted, the English language is sometimes peculiar, despite being most of the time simple and straightforward.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #42 on: August 21, 2019, 09:07:50 PM »
... German manages to do without the apostrophe for the occasions the possessive ‘s’ is used (eg die Werke Wagners).

I find it amusing that the most ponderous and difficult of all the European languages should be cited as an example of how another language does something better than English.

Mark Twain quipped that a reasonably intelligent person could learn French in 30 weeks, English in 30 months, or German in 30 years.
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #43 on: August 21, 2019, 09:32:53 PM »
... German manages to do without the apostrophe for the occasions the possessive ‘s’ is used (eg die Werke Wagners).

I find it amusing that the most ponderous and difficult of all the European languages should be cited as an example of how another language does something better than English.

Mark Twain quipped that a reasonably intelligent person could learn French in 30 weeks, English in 30 months, or German in 30 years.

No, Russian is the most difficult of all the European languages.  For a start there’s the 6 instead of 4 cases as in German.  And the Cyrillic alphabet, which takes some getting used to.  And if some cyrillic letters are put into italics, the form changes completely.

Actually, Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian might be more difficult since they’re not PIE languages like Russian, German and English.

Personally, I find German an elegant and expressive language, unlike French, Italian, and English.  Last Sunday, I heard part of a modern opera in English.  Before turning it off in disgust, I thought that it would sound better in another language, any language.

BTW.  I think Mark Twain claimed that a reasonably intelligent person would take 30 weeks to learn English and 30 months to learn French.  It’s in ‘die schreckliche deutsche Sprache,’ a speech he gave in German in Germany.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #736
« Reply #44 on: August 22, 2019, 11:26:27 AM »
BTW.  I think Mark Twain claimed that a reasonably intelligent person would take 30 weeks to learn English and 30 months to learn French.  It’s in ‘die schreckliche deutsche Sprache,’ a speech he gave in German in Germany.

He might have turned that around in the book where I encountered it.

I would never listen to an opera in any language other than the original. With translation available, of course. Nothing can ever really be translated. All you get is an approximation.
Daniel
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