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Online CarbShark

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Ketogenic diets and cancer
« on: August 27, 2019, 11:11:40 PM »
This is a topic that's important enough to me that I think it merits its own thread.

Based on the idea that cancer cells rely primarily and in some cases exclusively on glucose for energy (the Warburg effect) the idea of using carbohydrate restriction to fight cancer along with traditional methods (chemo; radiation; surgery) has gotten a lot of traction lately and shown significant promise.

But, there have not been enough studies to clearly show its effectiveness (or lack thereof) but there is very little or no evidence that it causes harm.

I have two close friends who have cancer now, one of them has known me since before I was a LCHF dieter, back when I was obese.

So I'm going to share this with him. He's fairly skeptical, and may dismiss it out of hand, but I would feel terrible if I did nothing, and then better studies start showing a beneficial effect while his cancer progresses. (He's doing chemo and after some progress his tumors have started growing again).
 
So here's what I found in a couple hours on pub med. I've read all the abstracts and will read the full text of as many as I can in the days to come.



EDIT: No new links here, just a quotes from a few of the articles.



ketogenic diet and cancer - PubMed - NCBI


Front Cell Dev Biol. 2019; 7: 80.
Published online 2019 May 15. doi: 10.3389/fcell.2019.00080
PMCID: PMC6530249
PMID: 31157222
Editorial: The Warburg Effect Regulation Under Siege: the Intertwined Pathways in Health and Disease
Concetta Bubici1,* and Salvatore Papa2,*

Quote
As the implications of the Warburg effect in health and disease continue to emerge, we are entering into a renaissance period for metabolism research. Since the Warburg's original observation, we have learnt a lot about the effect of signal transduction on metabolic pathways and how cells rapidly reprogram their metabolism although much remains to be discovered.


Editorial: The Warburg Effect Regulation Under Siege: the Intertwined Pathways in Health and Disease




Rationale, Feasibility and Acceptability of Ketogenic Diet for Cancer Treatment



 J Cancer Prev. 2017 Sep; 22(3): 127–134.
Published online 2017 Sep 30. doi: 10.15430/JCP.2017.22.3.127
PMCID: PMC5624453
PMID: 29018777
Rationale, Feasibility and Acceptability of Ketogenic Diet for Cancer Treatment
Hae-Yun Chung1 and Yoo Kyoung Park2

Quote
From this review, we found further evidence that ketogenic diet in cancer patients is safe and feasible as an adjuvant therapy. As described above, we could conclude that in order to see any significant progression or improvement by ketogenic diet, at least 3 to 4 weeks of ketogenic diet is required. Additionally, we suggest that not only body composition but also biomarker or measures for tumor size or tumor metabolism assessment is essential. We also conclude that the acceptability for ketone diet may be better in some cancer type (better in glioblastoma than gastric cancer).



Ketogenic Diet and Other Dietary Intervention Strategies in the Treatment of Cancer. - PubMed - NCBI


Ketogenic Diet and Other Dietary Intervention Strategies in the Treatment of Cancer
Author(s): Matteo Vergati, Eriseld Krasniqi, Girolamo D. Monte, Silvia Riondino, Doriana Vallone, Fiorella Guadagni, Patrizia Ferroni*, Mario Roselli.
Journal Name: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Volume 24 , Issue 12 , 2017

DOI : 10.2174/0929867324666170116122915

Quote
The rationale of KD is valid both because it lowers carbohydrate uptake possibly leading to cancer cell starvation and apoptosis and, at the same time, increases the levels of ketone bodies available for energy production in normal cells but not in cancer cells which have an allegedly downregulated oxidative phosphorylation.


Ketogenic diet in the treatment of cancer – Where do we stand? - ScienceDirect

Molecular Metabolism
Review
Ketogenic diet in the treatment of cancer – Where do we stand?

Author links open overlay panelDaniela D.WeberSepidehAminzadeh-GohariJuliaTulipanLucaCatalanoRené G.FeichtingerBarbaraKofler

Quote
The ketogenic diet probably creates an unfavorable metabolic environment for cancer cells and thus can be regarded as a promising adjuvant as a patient-specific multifactorial therapy. The majority of preclinical and several clinical studies argue for the use of the ketogenic diet in combination with standard therapies based on its potential to enhance the antitumor effects of classic chemo- and radiotherapy, its overall good safety and tolerability and increase in quality of life. However, to further elucidate the mechanisms of the ketogenic diet as a therapy and evaluate its application in clinical practice, more molecular studies as well as uniformly controlled clinical trials are needed.


A Ketogenic Diet Is Acceptable in Women with Ovarian and Endometrial Cancer and Has No Adverse Effects on Blood Lipids: a Randomized, Controlled Tr... - PubMed - NCBI

A Ketogenic Diet Is Acceptable in Women with Ovarian and Endometrial Cancer and Has No Adverse Effects on Blood Lipids: a Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Cohen CW1, Fontaine KR2, Arend RC3,4, Gower BA1.

Quote
Abstract
Ketogenic diets (KDs) are emerging as effective therapies for several chronic diseases, including cancer. However, concerns regarding safety and adherence may prevent clinicians from prescribing KDs. We hypothesized that a KD does not negatively affect blood lipid profile compared to a lower-fat diet in ovarian and endometrial cancer patients, and that KD subjects would demonstrate acceptable adherence. Subjects were randomized to either a KD (70% fat, 25% protein, 5% carbohydrate), or the American Cancer Society diet (ACS; high-fiber and lower-fat). Blood lipids and ketones were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of the assigned intervention. Adherence measures included urinary ketones in the KD and 4 days' diet records. Diet records were also examined to identify general patterns of consumption. Differences between the diets on blood lipids and dietary intake were assessed with Analysis of covariance and independent t-tests. Correlation analyses were used to estimate associations between dietary intake and serum analytes. At 12 weeks, there were no significant differences between diet groups in blood lipids, after adjusting for baseline values and weight loss. Adherence among KD subjects ranged from 57% to 80%. These findings suggest that KDs may be a safe and achievable component of treatment for some cancer patients.



Wilhelm Brünings' forgotten contribution to the metabolic treatment of cancer utilizing hypoglycemia and a very low carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet


Quote
First clinical pilot studies on the KD and cancer have been conducted,7,10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and several others are planned or currently running.15, 16, 17 These studies are based on mainly three rationales.18 First, KDs have been shown to be capable of slowing down tumor growth in many, although not all, animal models.18,19 Second, the replacement of carbohydrates with fat that is characteristic for a KD is supposed to account for the increased fat oxidation rates in cancer patients that are due to tumor-induced insulin resistance, in this way possibly protecting against skeletal muscle loss.20, 21, 22 Third, KDs are expected to sensitize tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy, principally opening up a very broad range of applications as complementary cancer treatments. This at least partly relates to their ability to impair tumor cell glycolysis, reducing ATP levels and the ability to utilize substrates of glycolytic metabolism for protection against reactive oxygen species.23, 24, 25


The emerging role of ketogenic diets in cancer treatment. - PubMed - NCBI


Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2019 Mar;22(2):129-134. doi: 10.1097/MCO.0000000000000540.
The emerging role of ketogenic diets in cancer treatment.
Klement RJ1.
Author information
Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Leopoldina Hospital Schweinfurt, Schweinfurt, Germany.
Quote
Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW:
Altered glucose metabolism in cancer cells is an almost ubiquitous observation, yet hardly exploited therapeutically. However, ketogenic diets have gained growing attention in recent years as a nontoxic broad-spectrum approach to target this major metabolic difference between normal and cancer cells. Although much research still needs to be done, new knowledge has been gained about the optimal utilization of ketogenic diets for cancer treatment that this review aims to summarize.
RECENT FINDINGS:
Although most preclinical studies indicate a therapeutic potential for ketogenic diets in cancer treatment, it is now becoming clear that not all tumors might respond positively. Early clinical trials have investigated ketogenic diets as a monotherapy and - while showing the safety of the approach even in advanced cancer patients - largely failed to prove survival prolonging effects. However, it gradually became clear that the greatest potential for ketogenic diets is as adjuvant treatments combined with pro-oxidative or targeted therapies initiated in early stages of the disease. Beneficial effects on body composition and quality of life have also been found.
SUMMARY:
Ketogenic diets against cancer are worth further exploration, both in the laboratory and clinically. Patients wishing to undertake a ketogenic diet during therapy should receive dietary counselling to avoid common mistakes and optimize compliance. Future research should focus more on important clinical endpoints.


Pros and Cons of Dietary Strategies Popular Among Cancer Patients | Cancer Network

Quote
More recently, however, preclinical research suggests that the potential mechanism of ketosis on cancer cells does not rely solely on the Warburg effect. The spectrum of altered growth, metabolism, and signaling metabolites incurred by ketosis may result in a cancer cell–specific induction of oxidative stress, thereby potentiating the effect of chemotherapy and radiation.[34,35] Additionally, ketogenic diets may have a protein-sparing effect that preserves lean body mass in the setting of cancer cachexia.[36] In animal models, ketogenic diets decrease the initiation, progression, and metastasis of cancer.[37]

Evidence in human clinical trials is limited to cases and small open-label studies, typically as salvage therapies, which confirm the feasibility and safety of ketogenic diets. These studies suggest that ketogenic diets are safe, and do not negatively impact quality of life. They are, however, difficult to adhere to, and many patients do not reach desired levels of ketones in the urine.[35,38-41] The bottom line is that ketogenic diets may have utility in certain individuals, especially in combination with other conventional therapies, but there is currently no reliable way to predict which patients might respond. They are exceedingly difficult to implement without professional dietary counseling. Moreover, poorly implemented ketogenic diets incur risk for micronutrient deficiency; are very high in saturated fat; are typically low in fiber; may include processed foods; and may exclude entire food groups, such as fruits, legumes, and many vegetables, which have been shown to be beneficial for cancer prevention and mortality (See Figure).

Dietary fat: From foe to friend? | Science



Nutritional Targeting of Cancer Cell Metabolism in Obesity



Investigating the Ketogenic Diet As Treatment for Primary Aggressive Brain Cancer: Challenges and Lessons Learned

Quote
There are both in vitro and in vivo animal studies to suggest that KD has the potential to augment the treatments currently available for patients with aggressive gliomas. The value of KD to treat humans with these malignancies has yet to be proven in clinical trials. There is currently a lack of standard KD protocols so that comparison of different trials is difficult. Rigorous diet management and objective measures of ketosis are required to fairly evaluate the effectiveness of the KD as therapy for aggressive gliomas.

Ketogenic diet in cancer therapy

Quote
In conclusion, clinical application of KDs as an adjuvant therapy for cancer patients first requires that the KD be evaluated for its anti-tumor effect for each single type/genetic subtype of cancer in a preclinical setting, as the safety and efficacy of the KD strongly depend on the tumor entity and its genotype. Based on the results of rigorous preclinical and clinical studies performed thus far, the KD would appear to be a promising and powerful option for adjuvant therapy for a range of cancers. Cancer-specific recommendations await the findings of randomized controlled clinical trials.


Efficacy of Metabolically Supported Chemotherapy Combined with Ketogenic Diet, Hyperthermia, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Stage IV Triple-Nega... - PubMed - NCBI



Efficacy of Metabolically Supported Chemotherapy Combined with Ketogenic Diet, Hyperthermia, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Stage IV Triple-Negative Breast Cancer



Alternative Ketogenic Diet with Coconut Milk in a Case with Underlying Colorectal Cancer. - PubMed - NCBI



Article on ketogenic dietary regimes for cancer highly misleading. - PubMed - NCBI



Consuming a Ketogenic Diet while Receiving Radiation and Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Lung and Pancreatic Cancer: The University of Iowa Experience of Two Phase I Clinical Trials



A Nutritional Perspective of Ketogenic Diet in Cancer: A Narrative Review. - PubMed - NCBI



Ketogenic Diets and Cancer: Emerging Evidence


Quote
Data from case reports and trials suggest KD use is safe and tolerable for patients with cancer. Although it would be ideal to conduct a larger trial using a randomized therapeutic approach, the current emphasis on drug-based trials is a formidable obstacle. Other major obstacles are patient initiative and adherence. For now, investigators must work with anecdotal data. Examination of gene expression patterns in mitochondria and mutations in ketolytic and glycolytic enzymes may prove useful in selecting potentially responsive patients. Combining this dietary approach with standard chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic options may help improve tumor response, and further research is desperately needed.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 07:19:36 PM by CarbShark »
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

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Offline wastrel

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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2019, 11:35:24 PM »
Fuck this.  You have now really, really crossed a line IMO.

Fuck this.

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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2019, 11:49:46 PM »
I think your sceptical friend would have reason for being sceptical. 

By the time a cancer becomes apparent, it’s already around 75% along its course from initiation to death.  For breast cancer, for example, for a tumour 1 cm in diameter (about the smallest palpable tumour), it takes around 30 doublings from a single initial cancer cell.  And it takes around another 10 doublings to reach a volume equivalent to a tumour size of 10 cms, which is likely to be fatal.

In these 40 doublings, representing numerous cell divisions, multiple mutations will occur resulting in many metabolic defects, including a reliance on glucose for tumour metabolism.

But tumours when they’re apparent aren’t a single type of cell.  There will be many different clones of tumour cells, with differing patterns of mutations and different metabolic requirements.  All that a ketogenic diet might do is to select the tumour cells that are not as sensitive, which might be a minority of the tumour cells.  It might increase the length of survival without affecting the outcome.

It would certainly be more useful to prevent the cancer from developing.  There’s some suggestion that fasting might be of benefit.  It upregulates ubiquitin, a protein concerned with apoptosis (programmed cell death), which acts to remove damaged cells, possibly including pre-cancerous cells, maybe.

On reflection, a ketogenic diet might be worth trying, perhaps.
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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2019, 11:53:14 PM »
Fuck this.  You have now really, really crossed a line IMO.

Fuck this.

Don’t be reticent about expressing your opinion.  How do you really feel?

Agreed.  CarbShark has crossed a line in recommending medical treatment, despite having no medical expertise (something he does regularly with his dietary proselytising).
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 12:47:34 AM by bachfiend »
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Online CarbShark

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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2019, 11:55:11 PM »
Sharing information is not giving medical advice.


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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2019, 12:16:19 AM »
Sharing information is not giving medical advice.


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‘Sharing information’ (particularly when it’s selected ones for your proselytised diet) is giving medical advice.

Also, the people writing articles dealing with ketogenic diets in cancer aren’t exactly disinterested.  They already have an interest in the efficacy of diet.

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Online CarbShark

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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2019, 01:23:55 AM »
Maybe you should read some of the articles before making judgements.


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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2019, 01:40:04 AM »
Maybe you should read some of the articles before making judgements.


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And maybe you ought to put on your sceptical hat before doing one of your infamous block dump of selected articles written by biased authors:

https://www.mdanderson.org/publications/cancerwise/the-keto-diet-and-cancer--what-patients-should-know.h00-159223356.html
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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2019, 03:28:15 AM »
'A couple of hours on pub med'? How many of those articles have you properly vetted?

Obviously anyone considering any intervention for their cancer treatment should discuss it with their oncologist whose opinion will be informed not only by access to the research but experience in interpretting it and treating patients as well as personal knowledge of your own situation.

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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2019, 09:21:02 AM »
Hell a few seconds on Google puts the lies above to rest.

I know CarbShark is as bad as an evangelical when it comes to his food beliefs.  They are just as crazy as believing the world is flat.

But with the above spew of bullshit, he's gone to a new level of being a danger to people.  He's now the equivalent of Stanislaw Burzynski.

If you're not familiar with Dr. Burzynski, he's the guy that gets desperately ill people to come to Texas to be injected with animal piss to cure their cancer.

CarbShark is now inviting desperately ill people to stop their glucose intake, which will do nothing but harm to them.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/in-depth/cancer-causes/art-20044714

Quote
Myth: People with cancer shouldn't eat sugar, since it can cause cancer to grow faster.

Fact: Sugar doesn't make cancer grow faster. All cells, including cancer cells, depend on blood sugar (glucose) for energy. But giving more sugar to cancer cells doesn't speed their growth. Likewise, depriving cancer cells of sugar doesn't slow their growth.

This misconception may be based in part on a misunderstanding of positron emission tomography (PET) scans, which use a small amount of radioactive tracer — typically a form of glucose. All tissues in your body absorb some of this tracer, but tissues that are using more energy — including cancer cells — absorb greater amounts. For this reason, some people have concluded that cancer cells grow faster on sugar. But this isn't true.

However, there is some evidence that consuming large amounts of sugar is associated with an increased risk of certain cancers, including esophageal cancer. It can also lead to weight gain and increase the risk of obesity and diabetes, which may increase the risk of cancer.

Here's further evidence against CarbShark's self selected and cherry picked list above.  Lets ask an oncologist whether or not keto can cure cancer:


https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/ketogenic-diets-for-cancer-hype-versus-science/

Now, if BurzynskiCarbShark even takes the time to read the two articles above, he will cherry pick those two and come up with further proof of his bullshit beliefs.

I've been on this forum since 2007.  This is the most irresponsible bullshit I've ever seen posted here and CarbShark should be ashamed of himself for advocating the equivalent of anti-vax crap here.

« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 09:26:21 AM by Belgarath »
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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2019, 09:28:10 AM »
'A couple of hours on pub med'? How many of those articles have you properly vetted?


We can translate this to say 'a couple of hours on pubmed cherry picking articles about glucose and cancer, none of which say what I want them to say'

That's basically how Carbzynski does his 'research'  He's basically about 1/4 step above Jenny McCarthy and her google university.
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Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2019, 10:46:31 AM »
Hell a few seconds on Google puts the lies above to rest.

I know CarbShark is as bad as an evangelical when it comes to his food beliefs.  They are just as crazy as believing the world is flat.


But with the above spew of bullshit, he's gone to a new level of being a danger to people.  He's now the equivalent of Stanislaw Burzynski.

That argument is called a smear you can’t argue the merits of what I’m discussing so you just lump it in with you favorite villain.

Quote
If you're not familiar with Dr. Burzynski, he's the guy that gets desperately ill people to come to Texas to be injected with animal piss to cure their cancer.

Very familiar with him. He also has no peer reviewed support for his recommendations, is the only one promoting them, rejects all science that disagrees with his positions, and, worst of all, encourages his patients to reject all oncological treatment options in favor of his.

I’m doing none of that.
Quote
CarbShark is now inviting desperately ill people to stop their glucose intake, which will do nothing but harm to them.
What harm?
Quote

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/in-depth/cancer-causes/art-20044714

Quote
Myth: People with cancer shouldn't eat sugar, since it can cause cancer to grow faster.

Fact: Sugar doesn't make cancer grow faster. All cells, including cancer cells, depend on blood sugar (glucose) for energy. But giving more sugar to cancer cells doesn't speed their growth. Likewise, depriving cancer cells of sugar doesn't slow their growth.

This misconception may be based in part on a misunderstanding of positron emission tomography (PET) scans, which use a small amount of radioactive tracer — typically a form of glucose. All tissues in your body absorb some of this tracer, but tissues that are using more energy — including cancer cells — absorb greater amounts. For this reason, some people have concluded that cancer cells grow faster on sugar. But this isn't true.

However, there is some evidence that consuming large amounts of sugar is associated with an increased risk of certain cancers, including esophageal cancer. It can also lead to weight gain and increase the risk of obesity and diabetes, which may increase the risk of cancer.

That position is more conservative than the mainstream and he’s got a couple facts wrong. The theory is based on the Warburg effect that goes back decades before PET scans.

And, yes, all cells in the body can burn glucose and do burn glucose if other fuels are not readily available, if glucose is low and ketones are present many cells will burn ketones instead of glucose. Further, cells can be insulin sensitive, meaning they put out insulin receptors to take in more glucose. Cancer cells are highly insulin sensitive and put out more insulin receptors than most normal cells.  The hypothesis is that with high blood glucose levels cancer cells have an unlimited supply of energy. Lower glucose levels limit the supply.
Quote
Here's further evidence against CarbShark's self selected and cherry picked list above.  Lets ask an oncologist whether or not keto can cure cancer:


https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/ketogenic-diets-for-cancer-hype-versus-science/

Now, if BurzynskiCarbShark even takes the time to read the two articles
 


I read them both, of course. Did you read any of the articles I linked to?

I am not arguing, and none of the papers cited are arguing, that keto is better than or should be used instead of standard therapies.

It is being investigated as a complimentary therapy.

Quote
I've been on this forum since 2007.  This is the most irresponsible bullshit I've ever seen posted here and CarbShark should be ashamed of himself for advocating the equivalent of anti-vax crap here.

Again you can’t argue against the merits of the claim so you lump it in with you favorite villain. Bull shit.

And if you think I’m cherry-picking that shows first you haven’t read any of the articles or even just the abstracts, and it implies that there are far more articles on PubMed that dispute or contradict the claim.

There are not, but go ahead and look for yourself.



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« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 11:02:17 AM by CarbShark »
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Online CarbShark

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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2019, 10:48:54 AM »
'A couple of hours on pub med'? How many of those articles have you properly vetted?


We can translate this to say 'a couple of hours on pubmed cherry picking articles about glucose and cancer, none of which say what I want them to say'


Bullshit. Cherry picking implies there are far more articles and studies that contradict the hypothesis.

There aren’t and you have no basis for claiming there are.


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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #13 on: August 28, 2019, 02:56:19 PM »
On another point, I strongly discourage ANYONE from giving unsolicited advice to any person with a serious illness.
People in that situation are dealing with quackery left and right and they are utterly exhausted in fending off every intellectually arrogant kook they know who just HAS to say something because they know this one weird trick will up their chances of survival.
Dont add to that pressure. Dont make them dread speaking to you. Just be there. If you know them well enough, maybe ask them how they are getting along with their doctor? Ask what kind of treatment they are getting MAYBE?
Dont be the asshole that gives them advice other than "Listen to your doctor" or "I hear this doctor is very well regarded, heres his number."
And if you do recommend someone, dont hound them about it.

Even if you are a doctor, you arent THEIR doctor (actually, no MD really needs me to say that)

You are not their saviour.

If they die, it has nothing to do with you for better or worse.

Leave sick people alone.

But the kind of person who needs to hear this will ignore it because they overestimate their own intelligence and feel the need to flex it at people.

Online CarbShark

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Re: Ketogenic diets and cancer
« Reply #14 on: August 28, 2019, 03:11:25 PM »
On another point, I strongly discourage ANYONE from giving unsolicited advice to any person with a serious illness.
People in that situation are dealing with quackery left and right and they are utterly exhausted in fending off every intellectually arrogant kook they know who just HAS to say something because they know this one weird trick will up their chances of survival.
Dont add to that pressure. Dont make them dread speaking to you. Just be there. If you know them well enough, maybe ask them how they are getting along with their doctor? Ask what kind of treatment they are getting MAYBE?
Dont be the asshole that gives them advice other than "Listen to your doctor" or "I hear this doctor is very well regarded, heres his number."
And if you do recommend someone, dont hound them about it.

Even if you are a doctor, you arent THEIR doctor (actually, no MD really needs me to say that)

You are not their saviour.

If they die, it has nothing to do with you for better or worse.

Leave sick people alone.

But the kind of person who needs to hear this will ignore it because they overestimate their own intelligence and feel the need to flex it at people.


I don't disagree with any of that (except maybe that last line). 

Sharing information is not giving advice.

Were I to have this conversation with either of my friends battling cancer it would be along the lines of:

"One promising area for treating cancer is using a strict keto diet to lower blood sugar, and give cancer cells less fuel. Using Keto together with the regular treatments (radiation; chemo; surgery; etc.) is being studied right now and the results so far are promising but nothing conclusive. Here's all the information I have on it (including some information about your specific cancer), maybe it's something to talk to your doctor about."


and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

 

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