Author Topic: What biome supports the least amount of life?  (Read 371 times)

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Offline daniel1948

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Re: What biome supports the least amount of life?
« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2019, 10:33:57 AM »
Microbes have been found at 10km altitude.

From the tone of the article, it sounds like there's more life at 10km than on mountain summits. ;D But seriously, are those microbes actually living up there (in the high atmosphere) or are they just blown up there by wind to die of starvation?
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: What biome supports the least amount of life?
« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2019, 01:47:23 PM »
If you pry the surface layer up on the Bonneville Salt Flats you might find a film of green algae. Very little else out there.
I know someone who lost an eyeball on the Bonneville Salt Flats. Crashed his bike going 200+ mph.

Is that a place people go to whip their vehicles? How "flat" is it?

Offline 2397

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Re: What biome supports the least amount of life?
« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2019, 01:58:38 PM »

Is that a place people go to whip their vehicles? How "flat" is it?

Apparently not as flat as it used to be.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/utah-bonneville-salt-flats-racing-debate-rages-over-its-future-2019-10-05/

Quote
Specifically, Sullivan blames the Bureau of Land Management, which oversees the salt flats for the federal government. More than 50 years ago, the BLM made deals with mining companies that use the land to get potash, a fertilizer. The process requires separating out the salt from the potash. But the racing association said the leases don't require companies to put the leftover salt back.

The racing association said the top layer of salt was once four feet thick, and is now in most places down to 1 inch. The Bureau of Land Management acknowledges a 7% decrease of the "crust package" over the last decade and a half – but Kevin Oliver, the Utah West manager for the BLM, said that Sullivan is exaggerating the damage done to the flats.

Brenda Bowen, a scientist who's been studying the salt flats, said that the amount of salt in the landscape has decreased over the past 30 years. The racing community said much of that lost salt sits just a thousand feet from the track, remnants of the mining – and they want $50 million to put it back.

"When I first came out here, you never saw any bumps. It was flat as a billiard table," said Louise Noeth. Noeth is a long-time automotive journalist who's now the spokesperson for Save the Salt, a nonprofit that wants the speedway replenished. She is also a former racer, which makes her mission personal.

"America was built on hopes and dreams, and they're killing the dreams," Noeth said through tears. "These are ordinary people doin' extraordinary things."

Bowen, the scientist, said it's a combination of factors that has led to less salt on the track. That includes the mining – but it also includes changes in environmental conditions and land use, including the racing.

CBS News reached out to the mining company Intrepid Potash. The company declined to be interviewed but said it is returning hundreds of thousands of tons of salt each year.

The racing association said it's not enough – and that they believe that any effect the racers are having on the salt is negligible in comparison. But Bowen has a different answer.

"I would say leave it alone for a few years," she said. "Don't come out here. Don't drive on it when it's wet, give it a minute, and let's see where it gets to."

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: What biome supports the least amount of life?
« Reply #18 on: October 14, 2019, 08:00:29 PM »
Microbes have been found at 10km altitude.

From the tone of the article, it sounds like there's more life at 10km than on mountain summits. ;D But seriously, are those microbes actually living up there (in the high atmosphere) or are they just blown up there by wind to die of starvation?

My understanding - and I've heard and read this from a number of sources and that article was just the first one I found - that it's their biome and they spend all their time up there.

I like to say that live has colonised every conceivable environment on the planet and quite a few inconceivable ones.
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Offline arthwollipot

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Offline Shibboleth

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Re: What biome supports the least amount of life?
« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2019, 12:47:48 PM »
Microbes have been found at 10km altitude.

From the tone of the article, it sounds like there's more life at 10km than on mountain summits. ;D But seriously, are those microbes actually living up there (in the high atmosphere) or are they just blown up there by wind to die of starvation?

My understanding - and I've heard and read this from a number of sources and that article was just the first one I found - that it's their biome and they spend all their time up there.

I like to say that live has colonised every conceivable environment on the planet and quite a few inconceivable ones.

How do they keep from being constantly frozen?
common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: What biome supports the least amount of life?
« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2019, 05:33:20 PM »
Microbes have been found at 10km altitude.

From the tone of the article, it sounds like there's more life at 10km than on mountain summits. ;D But seriously, are those microbes actually living up there (in the high atmosphere) or are they just blown up there by wind to die of starvation?

My understanding - and I've heard and read this from a number of sources and that article was just the first one I found - that it's their biome and they spend all their time up there.

I like to say that live has colonised every conceivable environment on the planet and quite a few inconceivable ones.

How do they keep from being constantly frozen?

I don't know.
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Agatha: If that's what you think, then you're DOING IT WRONG!

 

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