Author Topic: Episode #748  (Read 605 times)

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Offline Steven Novella

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Episode #748
« on: November 09, 2019, 12:54:44 PM »
5-10 Years: Growing Livers; News Items: Bacterial Colonies, Does Music Make You Smarter, Measles and Immunity, Bill Maher Anti-Vaxxer; Who's That Noisy; Science or Fiction
Steven Novella
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2019, 01:50:02 PM »


(click to show/hide)
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 12:55:01 AM by stands2reason »

Offline mddawson

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2019, 07:07:14 PM »
Steve, Kara was correct about the 'John Adams' series where they showed a doctor using pus from a smallpox patient to vaccinate Adam's children although the scene itself was not accurate. From: https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/56155

"The smallpox inoculation of Abigail and the children is meanwhile much manipulated for the sake of drama.  They did not undergo the ordeal in isolation, but with relatives in Boston; the virus was not taken from the gory pustules of the dying, as the program so graphically depicts, but from those less severely afflicted, in hopes that inoculation would produce as mild a reaction as possible; the inoculation is also shifted back some days to make it coincide more neatly with the climax of the independence debate in Philadelphia."

Here is the scene in question:
« Last Edit: November 09, 2019, 08:14:58 PM by mddawson »
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2019, 08:00:56 PM »
Steve, Kara was correct about the 'John Adams' series where they showed a doctor using puss from a smallpox patient to vaccinate Adam's children although the scene itself was not accurate. From: https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/56155

"The smallpox inoculation of Abigail and the children is meanwhile much manipulated for the sake of drama.  They did not undergo the ordeal in isolation, but with relatives in Boston; the virus was not taken from the gory pustules of the dying, as the program so graphically depicts, but from those less severely afflicted, in hopes that inoculation would produce as mild a reaction as possible; the inoculation is also shifted back some days to make it coincide more neatly with the climax of the independence debate in Philadelphia."

Here is the scene in question:

Oops, would the doctor using ‘puss’ to inoculate a patient also be considered to be using ‘purr-ulent’ exudate?

Ah, good, corrected.  Reminds of the time as a student when I wrote in a patient’s medical notes about the patient previously having ‘whopping’ cough.  My registrar laughed at it.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 01:01:56 AM by bachfiend »
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2019, 03:29:39 PM »


Grid storage is a good use-case of hydrogen fuel-cell. Particularly, there aren't portability concerns. However, a closed-loop system that recycles water and electrolyte like this hasn't actually been developed yet, AFAIK.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 03:32:01 PM by stands2reason »

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2019, 10:20:41 PM »
A decade ago I was driving an electric car. The little garden-pest-green Zap Xebra. Those of us driving electric (a few old RAV4-EVs, a few Xebras, a lot of home-brew EVs) knew that H2 was a boondoggle. It's a carrier, not a source of energy, and the fuel cells have a short lifetime. There's no infrastructure to transport it. It's corrosive in pipelines. It's a bad deal all around, and was (and is) promoted because it's a way to keep using fossil fuels. Specifically, the H2 in use today is made by reformatting natural gas. You're better off burning the natural gas in engines converted for the purpose. The LP gas for my stove and furnace back in North Dakota was delivered by a truck that ran on the stuff.

If the rogues were advocating H2 a decade ago, they were on the wrong side of the evidence.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2019, 10:32:09 PM »
Some three decades ago I drove from my home in rural North Dakota down to Kansas City, MO. I had directions to my destination but I took a wrong turn and found myself in a part of town with no businesses open in the evening. I drove and drove until I finally reached a gas station where I bought a city map and asked the attendant to help me find the place I was looking for. I was lucky that I'd been driving generally in the right direction. But unless you have a navigator a map isn't much help. You have to find a safe place to stop, then you have to figure out where you are on the map, and what direction you're facing, before you can figure out where you have to go.

GPS was a wonderful invention. I got a GPS when I moved to Spokane and I never got lost again. I finally got my first (and current) smartphone in order to have GPS in a smaller, lighter package, so I would not have to carry the heavy, bulky Garmin, with its out-of-date maps, when I travelled. Google Maps is always up to date. I love GPS. Now my car has its own GPS.

Living without GPS made travel much harder.
Daniel
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2019, 10:38:01 PM »
The rogues' over-enthusiasm about stem-cell technology is right in line with their over-enthusiasm about technology in general. They expect technology to solve every problem. I blame it on the Star-Trek Syndrome: The belief held by many trekkies that if you can think of something, technology will accomplish it. The corollary to this is that every new scientific discovery leads to wild predictions of things that will come of it, many of which are impossible, and most of which never come to pass.

I got SoF right! Always worth crowing about, since it happens so seldom.
Daniel
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Offline Tassie Dave

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2019, 02:27:10 AM »
I got SoF right! Always worth crowing about, since it happens so seldom.

Even guessing, statistically you should be getting it right approx. every 3 to 4 weeks.

Even Bob, who is going to get his 4th Wooden Spoon in a row in SoF, is averaging above 50%  ;)

Offline GodSlayer

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2019, 02:54:37 AM »
The rogues' over-enthusiasm about stem-cell technology is right in line with their over-enthusiasm about technology in general. They expect technology to solve every problem. I blame it on the Star-Trek Syndrome: The belief held by many trekkies that if you can think of something, technology will accomplish it.

it might just be a bit of the 'look, kids, science is neat and cool, be excited!' part of the sci-skep movement agenda.
what else are they versed in and supposed to voice positivity and excitement about? phat beats? sick rhymes? promising honest intelligent politicians? groundbreaking educational programs? I suppose there's probably a new sci-fantasy movie to fawn over, or something dumb/'adorable' a child they know has done recently, but beyond that... it's just naysayer party-pooper miserable skeptic territory. the podcast could get pretty dreary if they remain there the whole time.
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Offline 2397

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2019, 03:36:14 AM »
Having watched a lot of Star Trek recently, they still fail to use existing technology to solve their problems, fairly regularly.

They let political ideology get in the way of saving doomed worlds. Starfleet seems to be such a tiny institution, compared to the size of their combined worlds and the resources at their disposal. The United Federation of Planets could probably accomplish a lot more than they do, if they weren't set on maintaining the status quo, to the point where they ignore and fail to respond to existential threats.

Offline brilligtove

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2019, 08:17:06 AM »
Having watched a lot of Star Trek recently, they still fail to use existing technology to solve their problems, fairly regularly.

They let political ideology get in the way of saving doomed worlds. Starfleet seems to be such a tiny institution, compared to the size of their combined worlds and the resources at their disposal. The United Federation of Planets could probably accomplish a lot more than they do, if they weren't set on maintaining the status quo, to the point where they ignore and fail to respond to existential threats.

Honestly, that might be the most realistic thing about Star Trek. Governments act slowly, spastically, and irrationally. Really effective governments that can act quickly and decisively are fine in a homogeneous and authoritarian system. In any system that puts the worth of the individual above the worth of the state - or even on par with the state - the government will be a tangled mess.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2019, 09:07:17 AM »
I got SoF right! Always worth crowing about, since it happens so seldom.

Even guessing, statistically you should be getting it right approx. every 3 to 4 weeks.

Yes, I should. But I don't. I am below chance. I am terrible at SoF. Thus I brag about it when I do get one right. The perks of being an old fart: I get to rant about how good kids have it these days, tell boring stories from my life, and brag about meaningless accomplishments. ;D
Daniel
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Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2019, 09:47:02 AM »
Having watched a lot of Star Trek recently, they still fail to use existing technology to solve their problems, fairly regularly.

They let political ideology get in the way of saving doomed worlds. Starfleet seems to be such a tiny institution, compared to the size of their combined worlds and the resources at their disposal. The United Federation of Planets could probably accomplish a lot more than they do, if they weren't set on maintaining the status quo, to the point where they ignore and fail to respond to existential threats.

Honestly, that might be the most realistic thing about Star Trek. Governments act slowly, spastically, and irrationally. Really effective governments that can act quickly and decisively are fine in a homogeneous and authoritarian system. In any system that puts the worth of the individual above the worth of the state - or even on par with the state - the government will be a tangled mess.
All the more true of a confederation, they have to get all(or the majority) of their constituent governments to agree on action.  It would pretty much require an undeniable existential threat. 

Offline brilu34

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Re: Episode #748
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2019, 06:59:11 PM »
Bill Maher has had good science communicators on his show before. People like Neal DeGrasse Tyson & Bill Nye among others. It would have been interesting if someone like that had been a guest on the show to refute the anti vax bs he was peddling.

 

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