Author Topic: Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)  (Read 3610 times)

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Offline Apeiron

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Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« on: April 15, 2008, 11:02:56 AM »
Plot introduction
Shadow gets released from jail a couple of days early because of a tragic accident. With no prospects of a job or even a home, he accepts an employment offer by the mysterious Mr. Wednesday. As the story develops, Shadow meets more and more characters that are apparently gods of ancient mythologies, severely weakened now that almost no-one worships them anymore.

Wikipedia
Neil Gaiman
American Gods

Offline seanahan

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Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2008, 08:30:14 PM »
This is a fabulous book.  Highly recommended to any fans of good Science Fiction.  The plot weaves around in a fabulous manner, and the dialogue is fascinating.  Add to that the literary and mythological references and it is all in all an amazing novel.
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Offline Kurt

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Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2008, 10:33:16 PM »
Quote from: "seanahan"
This is a fabulous book.  Highly recommended to any fans of good Science Fiction.  The plot weaves around in a fabulous manner, and the dialogue is fascinating.  Add to that the literary and mythological references and it is all in all an amazing novel.



I would call it Magical Realism or Slipstream so it might appeal more to the fantasy side of the brain rather than the scifi.
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Offline Apeiron

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Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2008, 06:44:52 AM »
It is difficult to apply it to a certain genre. There's elements of fantasy of course (but not epic/high fantasy mind you), and Wikipedia mentioned Americana.

I'm roughly halfway through the book at the moment, and am liking it very much. Perhaps Anansi Boys will be next on my reading list.

Offline seanahan

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« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2008, 08:39:34 PM »
Quote from: "Kurt"
Quote from: "seanahan"
This is a fabulous book.  Highly recommended to any fans of good Science Fiction.  The plot weaves around in a fabulous manner, and the dialogue is fascinating.  Add to that the literary and mythological references and it is all in all an amazing novel.



I would call it Magical Realism or Slipstream so it might appeal more to the fantasy side of the brain rather than the scifi.


I was careful not to call it SF, because it certainly isn't, but that it appeals to the reasoning part of the brain.  Magical Realism is a label I wouldn't have thought to apply to it, there is a sense Shadow gets of how fantastical the things are that happen, and although he occasionally takes it with aplomb, it is nothing near the casual absurdities of 100 Years of Solitude.  This book doesn't have a specific genre, which is why I think the appeal is broader than to just fans of SF or Fantasy.
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Offline Kurt

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Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2008, 08:41:19 PM »
Quote from: "seanahan"
Quote from: "Kurt"
Quote from: "seanahan"
This is a fabulous book.  Highly recommended to any fans of good Science Fiction.  The plot weaves around in a fabulous manner, and the dialogue is fascinating.  Add to that the literary and mythological references and it is all in all an amazing novel.



I would call it Magical Realism or Slipstream so it might appeal more to the fantasy side of the brain rather than the scifi.


I was careful not to call it SF, because it certainly isn't, but that it appeals to the reasoning part of the brain.  Magical Realism is a label I wouldn't have thought to apply to it, there is a sense Shadow gets of how fantastical the things are that happen, and although he occasionally takes it with aplomb, it is nothing near the casual absurdities of 100 Years of Solitude.  This book doesn't have a specific genre, which is why I think the appeal is broader than to just fans of SF or Fantasy.


Maybe we should invent a name for it. maybe Neomythic.
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Offline Casper

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Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2008, 01:57:28 PM »
Im halfway reading American Gods. Having read Anansi Boys before. Ive been a fan of Gaimann since the Sandman was in print and caught my eye.
And anyone with that last name who evokes that much respect is a genius in my books. :D

Offline cerveauxfrits

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Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2008, 02:09:22 PM »
I'm halfway through reading it right now, too.  Seems a popular book with the SGU fans. . .

I think anyone who likes this book should check out The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov.  Be sure to get the one of the more recent translations, older ones are based on based on the heavily censored Soviet-era edition.

Offline Domino

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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2008, 03:06:15 PM »
I love this book.





Way too much.

Offline Apeiron

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« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2008, 02:12:37 PM »
I finished the book today. I'm still a bit confused by it, by which I don't mean that there are things I don't understand. It is just that this book is so different from anything else I've read, it's such a crazy premise and worked out so naturally and logically that it all just seems to fit right in.

At the moment I'm ready to call it a true masterwork, but I do tend to be more enthusiastic about books right after finishing them than when I reflect on them several weeks later. I wonder how I'll look back on this book in the future. It's special, that's for sure.

Offline KarenX

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Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2008, 05:11:14 PM »
What are you confused about? I am assuming we can discuss specific elements of the books without marking spoilers. I don't remember any ambiguous plot resolutions, but it's been a while. I have nothing but praise for this book a few years later, though, so your enthusiasm isn't misplaced.

I think there were a few extraneous bits, though.

Offline Apeiron

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« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2008, 01:34:10 AM »
As I tried to explain, "confused" isn't really the correct word. :P

Offline KarenX

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« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2008, 02:07:52 AM »
And I tried to elicit a specific conversation about the book. Yet here we are, in the thread dedicated to this specific book, saying nothing.

Offline Grimner

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« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2008, 06:51:02 AM »
Apeiron is not confused.
Apeiron is scared:

Quote
it's such a crazy premise and worked out so naturally and logically that it all just seems to fit right in


Who knows, he might succumb to the Bible next - same thing :)
Quaere verum

Offline Empty Soul

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Re: Neil Gaiman - American Gods (2001)
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2008, 05:31:43 PM »
I just started reading this book the other week. Very compelling!
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