Author Topic: Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)  (Read 3609 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Apeiron

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 6119
  • Students! The muses are silent.
    • ILS
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« on: April 15, 2008, 11:19:10 AM »
Plot introduction
Kinsey Millhone is a California based female private detective in the 1980's. Throughout this ongoing series of books the reader follows Kinsey's adventures largely from her perspective. Each book can be read separately.

Wikipedia
Sue Grafton
Kinsey Millhone

Offline roger

  • Well Established
  • *****
  • Posts: 1792
  • Please keep my karma balanced!
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2008, 09:50:41 AM »
I posted on this under the detective novel thread also.  I liked the middle books, around D-H or so.  I didn't like T all that much, and it wasn't even a mystery.  We knew what was happening the whole time.  In the earlier books she stuck to the first person narrative much better.  I like that a lot more since it is usually "submitted" at the end as a write-up of the case by Kinsey, so it shouldn't contain third person narratives.
the Euler identity, the coolest equation ever.

 
My 2008 booklist

Offline Apeiron

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 6119
  • Students! The muses are silent.
    • ILS
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2008, 09:52:47 AM »
Yeah, T is for Trespass is the only one that I read and I didn't like it that much. It was ok though.

Offline roger

  • Well Established
  • *****
  • Posts: 1792
  • Please keep my karma balanced!
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2008, 10:12:17 AM »
Quote from: "Apeiron"
Yeah, T is for Trespass is the only one that I read and I didn't like it that much. It was ok though.


I'll check out some plot summaries and see if I can remember the specific ones I liked best.  I started the series when she had only written up to C, so I've been reading with them for about 20 years now.  It's hard to remember what they were all about.

Another good detective series which I like (though it has occasional misses too) is the Brother Cadfael series by Ellis Peters.  It takes place against the backdrop of the English Civil War between King Stephen and the Empress Maud in the 11th century.  The second book One Corpse Too Many has to go down as one of the classic mystery novels of all time.  I'd start with that one and if you like the style read the first also.
the Euler identity, the coolest equation ever.

 
My 2008 booklist

Offline kikyo

  • Groovy Groovy Kitty
  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 4399
  • Chu! ^_^
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2008, 12:44:47 PM »
I've read a few of these. They are like "snack" books - they are fun and entertaining and I can read one in a day.

Also, the books describe areas in Central/Southern CA that I know pretty well, so I like reading to recognize the settings.

It seems like one of those series that is so reader-friendly because you could either read the whole thing in order and probably be rewarded with a deeper context of the main character, or you could just read some of them or read out of order and still feel like you are not missing much.
Quote
<LeetheAgent> Kikyo is awesome!

Quote from: Black_Magic
Sure... but Pokemon was FREAKIN' AWESOME, while your anime is gay :D

Offline Sabbie

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 3815
    • Facebook
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2008, 01:01:49 PM »
Quote from: "kikyo"
I've read a few of these. They are like "snack" books - they are fun and entertaining and I can read one in a day.

Also, the books describe areas in Central/Southern CA that I know pretty well, so I like reading to recognize the settings.

It seems like one of those series that is so reader-friendly because you could either read the whole thing in order and probably be rewarded with a deeper context of the main character, or you could just read some of them or read out of order and still feel like you are not missing much.


Oh that's a good thing, because I was thinking about reading just one of them, but I was not sure how annoying that would be without having read the rest of them.

Offline roger

  • Well Established
  • *****
  • Posts: 1792
  • Please keep my karma balanced!
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2008, 01:15:23 PM »
Quote from: "Sabbie"
Quote from: "kikyo"
I've read a few of these. They are like "snack" books - they are fun and entertaining and I can read one in a day.

Also, the books describe areas in Central/Southern CA that I know pretty well, so I like reading to recognize the settings.

It seems like one of those series that is so reader-friendly because you could either read the whole thing in order and probably be rewarded with a deeper context of the main character, or you could just read some of them or read out of order and still feel like you are not missing much.


Oh that's a good thing, because I was thinking about reading just one of them, but I was not sure how annoying that would be without having read the rest of them.


There is an overall development of characters and story, but each stands alone well.  This is truer of the earlier ones than the later.  T seemed to expect the reader to know a lot about the peripheral characters like Henry and his brothers.
the Euler identity, the coolest equation ever.

 
My 2008 booklist

Offline KarenX

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 6226
  • A Simple Girl with an Evil Plan
    • More Women in Skepticism
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2008, 01:57:38 PM »
Someone gave me "I Is for Innocent" on (abridged--ick) audiobook. I remember nothing about it except some business with a door peephole and driveway gravel. I don't really like any books in which the same character appears, especially if it's a wisecracking female detective. The books seem to require--as stated above--more than one book for real character development and they read like watching TV to me.

Now, don't get me wrong. I like TV. But I'd rather just watch it.

I think maybe the book being abridged made it terrible. It seemed at the end that there was no real way for a reader to have solved the crime and that you just had to take the detective's word for it that there was enough information available to come to that conclusion. I hope I didn't spoil the book for anyone by saying that the crime was in fact solved.

Offline Swagomatic

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2733
Sue Grafton - Kinsey Millhone / Alphabet series (1982 - ?)
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2008, 04:13:00 PM »
I've read "R is for Ricochet" and "S is for Silence,"  I enjoyed both of them.  Definitely not heavy literature, but Sue Grafton writes a decent story.
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
---George Bernard Shaw

 

personate-rain
personate-rain