Skeptics Guide to the Universe Forums

General Discussions => Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine => Topic started by: jaypee on October 04, 2010, 10:17:58 AM

Title: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 04, 2010, 10:17:58 AM
A thread for cyclists to share, brag, boast, and taunt.

Post pics of your bikes, the bikes you dream of owning, and maps of the routes you've taken.

Two weekends ago I did the Rodman Ride for Kids (http://www.bikely.com/maps/bike-path/Rodman-s-Ride-for-Kids-100mi) on a rented Specialized Roubaix Expert (http://www.bowcycle.com/bc10/bikes/road/specialized-roubaix-expert-sl-c2-blue.shtml), which was the greatest bike I've ever ridden.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Chew on October 04, 2010, 10:51:56 AM
Pedestrians 5 points
Cyclists 10 points
Wheelchair bound seniors 20 points
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: adr150 on October 04, 2010, 11:24:46 AM
nothing like a beautiful day on the potomac to go for a ride



(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs133.snc4/36976_10100366789203384_9309500_71439466_4753846_n.jpg)

here's my horse

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs097.snc1/5176_932401607634_9309500_59170177_5631070_n.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 04, 2010, 12:13:42 PM
Nice, are those MTB pedals?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on October 04, 2010, 02:11:05 PM
Unlike all you sporty types, I go for comfort when I'm riding, hence my practical town bike. Here's a pic with my son having a snooze in his chariot.

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs093.ash2/37992_419467092050_655587050_5388609_5901020_n.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on October 05, 2010, 12:45:10 AM
Keep meaning to get back on the bike. Had a string of injuries and illness which has kept me out of the saddle for over a year. I ride an Apollo Ascent MTB

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/xUHojneiyoi3h53v7rsUeA?feat=directlink (http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/xUHojneiyoi3h53v7rsUeA?feat=directlink)
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/8ixW0W3v-ypQjHH5ZK5Emg?feat=directlink (http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/8ixW0W3v-ypQjHH5ZK5Emg?feat=directlink)

I removed the deathtrap cages on the pedals shortly after this photo was taken.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on October 05, 2010, 12:53:12 AM
Nice, are those MTB pedals?

They look like road bike clipless pedals...single sided.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Green Ideas on October 05, 2010, 03:21:00 AM
One of the best and most elegant bikes ever built IMHO. I had a black one that ended up stolen.  :'(
Mine (as well as the one in the photo) was from the seventies, but I still think it was more comfortable and reliable than many state-of-the-art bicycles I've tried since. In Brazil it's known as "Peugeot Turismo", don't know its name in other countries.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_ZZws6rZEpzU/SdDzsHB3XxI/AAAAAAAAATE/Ixpt_4dIcUk/s1600/peugot%2B2.JPG)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 05, 2010, 03:30:47 AM
In Brazil it's known as "Peugeot Turismo", don't know its name in other countries.

We have those here in the States, too.

I have a Specialized Epic. <3
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4105/5042565782_8183197d96.jpg)

The handlebars aren't as tweaked up as they are in this photo. I still need to get new pedals for it. I absolutely love this bike.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Green Ideas on October 05, 2010, 04:09:10 AM
I also had one similar to this Swedish Monark from the 1940's (yes, I love antiques).

(http://img.mercadolivre.com.br/jm/img?s=MLB&f=137955348_1970.jpg&v=O)

Mine was Brazilian made and had a different braking system. It was in very bad shape when I bought it, and eventually it started falling apart. But the 28 inch wheels made a hell of a difference, I loved it. Now, at least in Brazil (and for a few decades already), the wheels in the new bikes are at most 26 inches wide. Is that also true elsewhere?

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on October 05, 2010, 05:46:36 AM
My MTB built mainly from old parts. Cheapish heavy aluminum frame with an old Marzocchi MX Comp ETA fork and heavy hand built Mavic wheels. Sram X7 shifters and rear derailleur, Shimano XT cranks and cassette, LX front derailleur, Avid Juicy Five disc brakes, Thomson seatpost.
(http://i54.tinypic.com/bhdjja.jpg)

(http://i52.tinypic.com/o6k3v7.jpg)

And the favorite trails just outside of Stockholm.
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1578623/hellas_trail/ (http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1578623/hellas_trail/)

Cam Test @ Fornstigen (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8koZGGS9Ws#normal)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Obvious Reasons on October 05, 2010, 06:14:51 AM
Fun story; Cycling was a key element in me finding out about the Skeptics Guide to the Universe. I decided to take up cycling last summer again and looked for podcasts to listen to. And sure enough, someone recommended the SGU.

I did about 30 - 40 km, basically every day. Mostly on gravel forest roads with no civilization around. It was awesome.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 05, 2010, 09:22:34 AM
That sounds like fun. There are a few wooded trails in and around Boston, but unfortunately you wind up having to cross a lot of busy roads to get from one part of the trail to another.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: leonet on October 05, 2010, 10:52:51 AM
I also re-started biking last spring and ended up getting one of these:
(http://www.montaguebikes.com/assets/images/crosstownlg.jpg)
It's a folding hybrid with full-size road bike tires and brakes, designed by an MIT student here in Boston.

It's great for the recreational-riding city dweller because you can just throw it in a car's trunk or take it on a train, and it also adjusts to different riding geometries (even different handlebar heights) with no tools.

It's also quintessentially geeky  ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 05, 2010, 10:58:43 AM
Woah.

That is really cool looking.. How much did it set you back, if you don't mind me asking?

I've always been interested in folding bikes, it's highly unlikely I'd ever buy one because I put a higher priority on speed than compactness, and the entry cost for folding bikes has always been too prohibitive for me to even consider the investment, but that looks cool.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: leonet on October 05, 2010, 11:40:18 AM
The base model (7-speed SRAM drivetrain, comfort saddle and tires) cost me about $600.  They have touring (27-speed, slick tires etc.) and mountain bike (reinforced frame, disc brakes etc.) variants for around a thousand.  link (http://www.montaguebikes.com/)

It was a bit pricier than a similarly-equipped hybrid, but it feels and performs like a "real" mid-range road bike.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 05, 2010, 11:42:18 AM
Hmm. That's cool.

I still probably wouldn't buy one, but at least it doesn't have those tiny wheels that most folding bikes have.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: leonet on October 05, 2010, 11:46:40 AM
. . . but at least it doesn't have those tiny wheels that most folding bikes have.

Aw, you don't want to go flying courtesy of Boston's historic potholes and tree roots? :D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 05, 2010, 11:47:51 AM
Hahaha.. nope.

I live in Somerville, which has even worse potholes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on October 05, 2010, 12:16:13 PM
When I have it, which is not often now that I live in Cleveland, and it lives in storage, I ride a '59 Mark IV Jaguar I inherited from my grandfather.

It looks like this, but in bronze and brown.  Mint.

(http://images.craigslist.org/3nf3ka3lc5Q35T55R0a7ge56d9b0e8f2013df.jpg)

It's just not worth riding in Cleveland - it would get all jimmied up on these streets in a second, and the road-salt sticks around 11 months a year.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Green Ideas on October 05, 2010, 12:42:34 PM
When I have it, which is not often now that I live in Cleveland, and it lives in storage, I ride a '59 Mark IV Jaguar I inherited from my grandfather.

It looks like this, but in bronze and brown.  Mint.

(http://images.craigslist.org/3nf3ka3lc5Q35T55R0a7ge56d9b0e8f2013df.jpg)

It's just not worth riding in Cleveland - it would get all jimmied up on these streets in a second, and the road-salt sticks around 11 months a year.

Wow, that's a real beauty.

One thing that amazes and befuddles me about old bikes is that they're not only prettier, but usually better regarding ergonomics.

Another advantage is that, since their weight is not ridiculously small as in some of the more recent bikes, the centre of mass of the biker/bike ensemble remains closer to the ground, which helps stability.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on October 05, 2010, 12:54:54 PM
Another advantage is that, since their weight is not ridiculously small... ...which helps stability.

And momentum.  When well maintained, they'll keep going for miles after you stop pedaling.  With no major uphill grades, I can cruise for a solid block with no major slowdown.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 07, 2010, 10:57:36 AM
Grr.. I think I might need a new crank set and bottom bracket. That is not good.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 07, 2010, 11:40:38 AM
avert your eyes, you might go blind

This is my baby. Chome Pista, fixed gear, white tires (gotta have em). Truthfully Ive never been into the fixed gear hipster culture, Im not cool enough for them. I stick with the bike punks and critical mass crew. My dad used to be a pro bike racer so I grew up riding road racing bikes and switched to a single speed and then a fixie for the simplicity. seriously easy bike to maintain, gotta change the tires often though
(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs188.ash2/45116_421238867395_526227395_5358587_5610948_n.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 07, 2010, 12:09:04 PM
White tires? You crazy.

I ride a single-speed free wheel, that only reasons I won't switch to fixed gear are

a) my tires cost $60 each, I can barely afford to replace them every 3,000 miles.. I would have to probably replace them every 2,000 miles if I rode fixed gear the way I ride my bike now.

b) I can go faster with a free wheel than I can with a fixie

and c) I'm not cool enough to ride fixie :(
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 07, 2010, 01:37:26 PM
Hmm.. Amazon has a pretty good deal on a SRAM crankset and bottom bracket

http://www.amazon.com/SRAM-S300-Courier-GXP-Crankset/dp/B003WOIQF2/ref=reg_hu-wl_item-added (http://www.amazon.com/SRAM-S300-Courier-GXP-Crankset/dp/B003WOIQF2/ref=reg_hu-wl_item-added)

Anyone know anything about SRAM's quality?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 08, 2010, 12:19:16 AM
Fixed gear. Why am I not surprised. ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 08, 2010, 01:57:53 AM
Fixed gear. Why am I not surprised. ;)

hater, you just jealous cause my ride shines

what you got against fixies?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on October 08, 2010, 02:00:13 AM
Fixed gear. Why am I not surprised. ;)

hater, you just jealous cause my ride shines

what you got against fixies?

Being a fat unfit bastard who lives at the top of a hill, my objection to fixies is purely pragmatic.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 08, 2010, 02:14:52 AM
Fixed gear. Why am I not surprised. ;)

hater, you just jealous cause my ride shines

what you got against fixies?

Being a fat unfit bastard who lives at the top of a hill, my objection to fixies is purely pragmatic.
^^

I don't live on top of a hill, but the principle is sound.

Also, I'm generally annoyed by the hipster crowd.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on October 08, 2010, 02:18:15 AM
Fixed gear. Why am I not surprised. ;)

hater, you just jealous cause my ride shines

what you got against fixies?

Being a fat unfit bastard who lives at the top of a hill, my objection to fixies is purely pragmatic.
^^

I don't live on top of a hill, but the principle is sound.

Also, I'm generally annoyed by the hipster crowd.

Hey check it out. You have the same birthday as my mum.

</offtopic>
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 08, 2010, 02:20:13 AM
Fixed gear. Why am I not surprised. ;)

hater, you just jealous cause my ride shines

what you got against fixies?

Being a fat unfit bastard who lives at the top of a hill, my objection to fixies is purely pragmatic.
^^

I don't live on top of a hill, but the principle is sound.

Also, I'm generally annoyed by the hipster crowd.

Hey check it out. You have the same birthday as my mum.

</offtopic>

It is the best day of the year. :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 08, 2010, 02:31:20 AM

Also, I'm generally annoyed by the hipster crowd.

as am I
I dislike coffee and wine, hate most indie music, cant stand the 70's look for guys coming back, prefer mp3s to record collecting, dont get me started on the womens fashions
I do have tight jeans though, it keep them from getting caught in the chain, Ive had other pants caught and literally ripped off. it took a while getting used to tight pants, i was a skater punk in baggy shorts growing up

the bike messenger + bike punk scene in atlanta was pretty cool though, had its share of hip folks but they held an annual large alley cats race for charity and many sporadic smaller ones for fun, they have a community bike depot where you can come and learn basic bike maintenance for free or donation or build a bike from donated parts for hella cheap, they also help send hundreds of bikes to Mexico, Central America, and Cuba with Bikes Across Borders. Monthly critical mass too that is pretty large and some of the after parties, my god! One involved 5 different apartments on various floor plus the roof moving from one room to the next highest one at different times through the night and each apartment had a theme drink and decorations, so drunk and loud...I miss atlanta...as you can tell Im ranting, I'll shut up now
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: leonet on October 08, 2010, 12:31:31 PM
Hmm.. Amazon has a pretty good deal on a SRAM crankset and bottom bracket

http://www.amazon.com/SRAM-S300-Courier-GXP-Crankset/dp/B003WOIQF2/ref=reg_hu-wl_item-added (http://www.amazon.com/SRAM-S300-Courier-GXP-Crankset/dp/B003WOIQF2/ref=reg_hu-wl_item-added)

Anyone know anything about SRAM's quality?

AFAIK SRAM parts are equivalent or superior to Shimano in quality/price ratio but they're better known in the mountain biking field.  The only thing to be careful about is the fact that some of their derailleurs are incompatible with other systems (i.e. a SRAM derailleur needs a SRAM shifter).

Cranksets and such should be interchangeable though.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 08, 2010, 12:33:29 PM
OK, good to know.

I've seen lots of mountain bikes with SRAM components, but never any track bike gear.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 08, 2010, 08:41:13 PM
FSM, what a miserable commute home I had today. Traffic was ridiculous in Boston, then when I finally got onto the Charles River Bike Trail the setting sun was directly in my eyes, and because the weather was unseasonably warm every idiot and their girlfriend decided to go for a romantic walk along the river, which totally choked up the bike trail.

Then there were all the shitty student running teams practicing.. guh. As I rode past the BU campus some fart huffing moron from the BU men's track team decided that rather than descending the remaining few steps down the foot bridge which joins up with the bike trail and then check for oncoming traffic before going around the guard rail which was erected presumably to prevent people from getting into easily avoidable (well, easily avoidable if you aren't a boner biting retard) accidents he was just going to vault OVER the guard rail, and land right on top of me.

Had I been six inches to the right it would have been a serious accident, as it was I just got slapped on the arm by him as I sped past at 22mph.. But he deserved a furious ass kicking for that shenanigan.

Then, crossing back into Cambridge the traffic in Harvard Square was epic. I broke one of my cardinal rules and started weaving in between cars because I literally wasn't moving.

Honestly, how do people drive cars during rush hour? At what point do they finally say "Enough! I spend 14 hours a week sitting in a car in stop and go traffic"? It only took me 12 months of living in the suburbs and commuting to the city to decide that I would never live further than a 10 mile radius from where I work.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: leonet on October 08, 2010, 09:52:03 PM
Wow, sorry to hear that.  I live in Boston but have a shuttle bus to work which sits in traffic for an hour each way.  It's less annoying when someone else does the driving.

But yeah, the traffic and road configuration is just obscene; one afternoon I was in a parking lot on the I-93 and it seemed as though two out of every three cars contained a solitary fat ass driver in a 4000lb SUV.  :-\  ::)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 08, 2010, 10:01:09 PM
Yeah, I used to commute from Framingham to Melrose everyday. I think round trip I spent like 4 hours a day in traffic.

I get the shuttle bus thing. I took the commuter rail a few times and even though it took me about an hour to get to work it seemed like time just flew by and I had time to read.

But the whole sitting in traffic staring at the taillights of the car in front of you thing just doesn't make sense to me.

There was a study out recently that showed the supposed cost savings of living in the suburbs are completely eliminated by the amount of money and time spent on gas and travel.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Chew on October 08, 2010, 10:01:52 PM
Had I been six inches to the right it would have been a serious accident, as it was I just got slapped on the arm by him as I sped past at 22mph..

Isn't the speed limit on the bike path 5 mph?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 09, 2010, 01:35:14 AM
Had I been six inches to the right it would have been a serious accident, as it was I just got slapped on the arm by him as I sped past at 22mph..

Isn't the speed limit on the bike path 5 mph?

Depends on where you are. Some areas around my house go as high as 15 mph on the bike trails. I don't know what the laws are in Boston.

My bus ride from home tonight was so jarring I actually got a little nauseous - and I never get car sick. I got off the bus early and rode the rest of the way home. It was nice.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on October 09, 2010, 01:53:32 AM
I watched a guy faceplant in front of my store this morning, since apparently he didn't know that garbage cans are made out of matter, and that your bike stops if you hit them, even if you're going over 15 mph when you do so.

People in Cleveland are so bad with bikes.  I think it's because there are only two to three weeks a year where you can use them here.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: David "Stubb" Oswald on October 09, 2010, 02:19:55 AM
There are always a few amazing bike wrecks on campus every year that I love to watch.

When I lived in the dorms there was a fairly busy street that needed to be crossed in order to make in to class.  This intersection was usually lined with about 20-100 kids on each end waiting for the walk signal to cross the street, and you could time the walk signal by watching for yellow lights from the street.  So naturally before the walk signal and after the cars stopped the students would march across the intersection.  One particularity busy day I see someone on a bike flying down towards the intersecytion on the cross walk, and this gentleman timed the flow of traffic right so that when he hit the intersection going way to fast he would be there right when the students started crossing.  This gentleman had the dressings of a complete tool and my suspicions where confirmed when he tried to get on the opposing sidewalk by bunny hopping at full speed off the street.  His front tire did not clear the very small height difference and he, in front of several dozen peers, went over the handle bars and landed squarely on his face.  He had a helmet on but he broke his oakleys and busted up his face bad enough to cause a fair amount of bleeding.  He got up fairly quick, picked up his bike, and ran with it away from the onlookers.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 09, 2010, 02:33:29 AM
One day, while cycling to school, I was literally across the street from campus on my bike (not my shiny new one, this was the bike I had years ago) when car tried to right turn into me. I was in the ped crossing, going with the walk signal (fully green light) and this jackass wasn't looking both ways (like you're supposed to). Fortunately, another biker saw what I couldn't (this was all happening in my blind spot) and screamed at the turd driver to stop. It was very nice of the man ^_^
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on October 09, 2010, 03:36:41 AM
I've nearly been cleaned up a few times while riding. My old route to work used to run down a main road which has a small bike lane on the side. However the bike lane also doubles as parking so you spend much of time in the door zone. Never hit one but I've had a few close calls.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: azinyk on October 09, 2010, 05:12:42 AM
I used to have a cheap steel department store bike, but this year I finally decided to get myself something nice, so I got a bright red Norco Mountaineer.  I put 1267 km on it this year, which is a lot considering how short the summer is in Edmonton, and that I only use it for fun.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 09, 2010, 09:43:46 AM
Quote
sn't the speed limit on the bike path 5 mph?

Maybe. There are no posted speed limit signs, and even if there were there would be no accurate way of enforcing a speed limit since bikes don't come with speedometers. I only have one because I'm a nerd who likes to collect data on things.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: barocon on October 09, 2010, 11:20:54 AM
(http://acidcow.com/pics/20101008/acid_picdump_77.jpg)
I want one.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 09, 2010, 03:31:23 PM
You want a speedometer/cyclometer? So get one, they start at like $20 on Amazon.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 09, 2010, 03:43:30 PM
That would ad a few unnecessary grams of weight though
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 09, 2010, 04:39:33 PM
Which just means that your muscles would get stronger from pushing the extra weight.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on October 10, 2010, 06:37:08 AM
I want one of each of these, different paint job on the Scalpel though.

(http://i55.tinypic.com/2yx5ik0.jpg)
Nicolai Nucleon TFR
(http://i53.tinypic.com/10hsg2b.jpg)
Canondale Jekyll
(http://i52.tinypic.com/2is9xg8.jpg)
Cannondale Scalpel
(http://i53.tinypic.com/331qddu.jpg)
Turner 5-spot
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 12, 2010, 04:13:36 AM
those are some sexy bikes.

i'm pretty happy with my Eric. I just can't wait until payday so that I can get some new pedals for it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 12, 2010, 10:03:28 AM
Blarg.

So on my way into work this morning I snapped another saddle bolt.

So now I guess that I really am putting too much weight on the nose of the saddle which is stressing the bolt. The first time it happened I blamed it on corrosion and age, but this bolt was only about 2 months old.

Also, I probably shouldn't buy an aluminum bolt this time, if I have the choice.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 13, 2010, 12:27:02 PM
This morning's commute was freakin' awful.

Starts out, I get stuck behind a bus whose driver absolutely refuses to do his job properly and pull into the bus stops, which would allow traffic behind him to pull around. And then, because the bus was either running late or had taken on passengers from another bus which had broken down he was absolutely packed to the gills, so every time he stopped to discharge and take on passengers it took like 5 minutes. Finally after the second bus stop I was able to pull around him.

Then, when I got into Boston, I was cutting over Beacon Hill, and on Joy St. I got stuck behind three minivans who just had to back into their little side street, but of course in order to facilitate that we had to wait for a utility truck to pull out of the side street. This cost me another 5-7 minutes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 14, 2010, 01:50:17 AM
I'm gonna have new pedals in two days \o/ I'm pretty excited about this. And to top it off, if I didn't have to go to school for 5 hours tomorrow, I'd be able to get them tomorrow.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 14, 2010, 09:48:05 PM
I have new pedals. They rock. I am very happy. Also a little sweaty.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: David "Stubb" Oswald on October 15, 2010, 12:56:49 AM
I was having trouble getting the bike to shift lately.  Rather than my normal oiling of the chain I completely disassembled, degreased, lubed, and reassembled the bike.  My baby is running like a swiss watch.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Green Ideas on October 17, 2010, 11:31:44 PM
(http://i52.tinypic.com/2is9xg8.jpg)
Cannondale Scalpel

Is there something wrong with my eyes or this bike doesn't come with a proper fork to hold the front wheel? (I like the paintjob BTW. But then I'm partial to green...)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on October 17, 2010, 11:45:16 PM
It certainly looks like it only has half a fork:
http://www.cannondale.com/fra/fre/Products/Bikes/Mountain/Full-Suspension/Scalpel/Details/2723-1VP0LREP-SCALPEL-ULTIMATE (http://www.cannondale.com/fra/fre/Products/Bikes/Mountain/Full-Suspension/Scalpel/Details/2723-1VP0LREP-SCALPEL-ULTIMATE)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: TheLostVertex on October 17, 2010, 11:51:18 PM
Nothing wrong with the bike, its just s single bladed fork.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 01:02:59 PM
Today was the first legitimately cold day of the fall, and I was struck by how much harder it is to breathe in cold weather.

I somehow managed to forget that fact over the past 6-8 months. Winter is going to be brutal.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on October 19, 2010, 01:10:33 PM
Why don't you try riding in a city (http://www.forbes.com/2010/02/05/weather-snow-storm-lifestyle-travel-winter-snowfall.html) with real winters, you number-two pansy?  :P

Seriously, though.  Our winters are so much worse here that our extreme sports enthusiasts actually bike inside.

(http://cdn0.mattters.com/photos/photos/1138155/20100316-indoor.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 01:16:16 PM
I'm surprised we're ranked so high.

I actually like riding in the winter, it's the one season of the year where I don't sweat like some sort of sweaty goon who sweats a lot.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on October 19, 2010, 01:19:48 PM
I'm surprised we're ranked so high.

I actually like riding in the winter, it's the one season of the year where I don't sweat like some sort of sweaty goon who sweats a lot.

Bean Town has a better streets division than C-town, also.  It's nigh impossible to ride in Cleveland for several days after a good storm, because we have all of three plows, only two are probably attached to a truck right now, only one of those trucks is probably able to turn over, and one of the two drivers of that truck is probably in jail on corruption charges.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 01:25:52 PM
Meh. We may be better, but it's not that much of a step up.

Main streets are cleared, but snow is never removed and you wind up having 3-4ft. high drifts which narrow every road by several feet.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 19, 2010, 04:20:19 PM
Do you guys have any advice (beyond the obvious: "just keep riding you pussy") for a guy whose having a hard time getting up hills?  I would like to ride my bike around town, but there's a dearth of flat roads.  I tried to ride my bike to school once, and didn't even get halfway- it's literally uphill the whole way.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 04:20:58 PM
What kind of bike are you riding?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 19, 2010, 04:22:11 PM
It's a Specialized mountain bike but I have street-ish tires on it.  It's nothing special, but it's a good bike.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 04:24:17 PM
Counter-intuitively, I think that's your problem.

Mountain bikes are incredibly heavy and have very small chainrings which don't put a lot of power to the wheels. My personal opinion is that mountain bikes are pretty much only good for going down mountains, not up them.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 19, 2010, 04:26:11 PM
Nuts.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 04:27:51 PM
You could probably get a larger chain ring for not too much money.

The other option is trying to find someone who wants to trade on craigslist or putting your bike on eBay and using the proceeds to buy yourself a cheap road bike or track bike.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 19, 2010, 04:43:03 PM
Not a bad idea.  Maybe I'll get a fixie, those are all the rage these days ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 04:47:04 PM
Ugg. don't.

There's little benefit, and if your problem is hills that's the worst thing you could get. If you want the simplicity of a fixie with the ability to coast downhill get a track bike and throw a BMX freewheel cog on the rear wheel. Most fixed gear track wheels will be "flip-flops" with a threaded mount on either side of the hub, one for a freewheel cog and the other for a fixed gear.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 19, 2010, 04:48:19 PM
Hence the winky.  I can't think of a worse idea, and all for a dumb trend too.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 04:51:51 PM
Heh.. For the record, you shouldn't rule out a single-speed or fixed gear bike just because of the hills.. I've done some pretty brutal climbs on my single-speed and it wasn't that bad. Your calves will be like forged steel after a while.

I think the most important thing is that no matter what type of bike you get, it has to be lightweight.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on October 19, 2010, 04:54:15 PM
It's a Specialized mountain bike but I have street-ish tires on it.  It's nothing special, but it's a good bike.
"Spin it to win it" as they say. Use a low gear, sit down, and just let your heart work "instead" of the muscles. I know of no one who thinks the big cake in front is to small (assuming you have three in front) when climbing, so you must be incredible strong if you a bigger one.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 19, 2010, 04:55:55 PM
What's the correct terminology? Are "low" gears the gears that spin faster or are those "high" gears?

It seems counter-intuitive to me because the gears that give you the most torque are "lower" on the cassette, but I have a feeling that doesn't mean they're the "low" gears.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on October 19, 2010, 05:02:57 PM
(http://i52.tinypic.com/2is9xg8.jpg)
Cannondale Scalpel

Is there something wrong with my eyes or this bike doesn't come with a proper fork to hold the front wheel? (I like the paintjob BTW. But then I'm partial to green...)
It's a Cannondale Lefty fork. They look kinda counter-intuitive, like they would snap off down by the hub.

(http://i54.tinypic.com/2w37wk4.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 19, 2010, 05:07:59 PM
High and low usually (in cars at least) refers to the gear ratio.  High would be higher ratio of engine revolution to gear or wheel revolutions.  I'm assuming bikes work the same way.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 20, 2010, 04:16:33 AM
-Warning: rambling on ahead-

I think of higher gears as the ones I have to shift up into - the ones I use when I'm going (downhill) fast. Lower gears would be the ones that are easier to pedal with when starting.

It is seemingly counter intuitive that the lower gears (the ones that you generally want to use when going up hills or when starting from a dead stop) are the bigger gears, while the higher gears are the smaller gears - at least in the rear gear thing.

The front I think is backwards to the rear - the smaller one makes it easier to pedal, the larger one makes it harder to pedal (that is, takes more force/work to move, but gives you the greater speed if you're going downhill or on flat land and are in decent enough shape to be able to pedal like the wind).

This is all just from observation from riding - I don't know if I've got the correct terminology, but I think I use the terms correctly. I've noticed that when my rear gear thing is on the biggest gear, it's easier to pedal and I think of that as the lowest gear; and when it's on the smallest gear, it's either more difficult to pedal or I'm going pretty fast and I think of that as the highest gear. I don't generally shift the front gear.

WDB - take it from an out of shape chubby: lighter bikes with appropriate gearing make all the difference. Also, make sure the bike is the right size for you. I can get all sorts of speed out of Eric that I couldn't get out of my last bike (which was also a road bike, but older and probably not as well maintained); Eric is geared better than my last bike and about 2 pounds lighter. That may not sound like much, but I can make it to the train station near my house in about 7-9 minutes on average rather than the 10-11 minutes it would have taken on my last bike. That's a combination of lighter bike, better gears, and better fit. It also doesn't seem to take as much effort on my part to get up even slight inclines. I like less effort. But this could just be that I'm getting in better shape.

PS: only the truly insane try to bike up the hill that UCSC sits on. You're either very brave or very insane to try it. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 20, 2010, 04:18:15 AM
Quote
PS: only the truly insane try to bike up the hill that UCSC sits on. You're either very brave or very insane to try it.

I see malnourished hipsters and old professors do it every day, so I guess I'm just underestimating them :P

It is a mean hill tho.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 20, 2010, 04:40:44 AM
Quote
PS: only the truly insane try to bike up the hill that UCSC sits on. You're either very brave or very insane to try it.

I see malnourished hipsters and old professors do it every day, so I guess I'm just underestimating them :P

It is a mean hill tho.

Like I said, brave or insane. :P Clearly the professors fall into the "brave but insane" category. Or their hearts are made of some sort of supernatural material that enables them to climb that hill without having it explode in their chests.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 20, 2010, 09:24:21 AM
I was tempted to put this in YRYL, but I figure it's more germane to this thread. This morning I got cut off by some scrotum in a Ford Focus, and I was so pissed off that I decided to confront him about it at the next red light.

As I started screaming at him he rolled down his window, and it literally took everything in me not to punch him in his stupid face. The guy nearly killed me, and he had the gall to play dumb when I asked him why he had cut me off and nearly run me into the pier of a highway overpass.

ARG.

Oh yeah, and just so people don't think I'm biased against drivers only, later on during my commute I was stuck behind a fucking moron who was trying to take his jacket off while riding his bike, and he had a courier bag on over the jacket so that made what he was attempting incredibly stupid. I let it be known that I thought he was a retard, and I politely suggested that he should pull the fuck over.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 20, 2010, 11:18:36 AM
you should carry a water gun filled with vinegar water
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 20, 2010, 12:46:12 PM
I should carry a real gun filled with real bullets. That way I can go out in the most bad-ass manner possible.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on October 20, 2010, 03:29:56 PM
You have a lot of anger in you.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 20, 2010, 03:31:15 PM
It is my humble opinion that in relation to the steady stream of morons and genetic disasters I'm constantly affronted by, I actually restrain myself pretty well.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on October 20, 2010, 03:52:18 PM
steady stream of morons and genetic disasters

You might be onto something here.  After all, you are in Boston.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 20, 2010, 03:59:53 PM
Sho' 'nuff.

Though we've got nothing on Cleveland. I've been there, so there's no use trying to deny it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on October 20, 2010, 05:04:56 PM
Yeah, but we have Lebron.

Oh.  Wait.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 20, 2010, 05:08:44 PM
I'm very careful around bikers, since there's a ton of you around here, and occasionally one gets killed by an uncareful driver.

I just wish most bikers would return the favor and be more careful around me.  I swear some of them are trying to get run over.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 20, 2010, 05:58:30 PM
I'm very careful around bikers, since there's a ton of you around here, and occasionally one gets killed by an uncareful driver.

I just wish most bikers would return the favor and be more careful around me.  I swear some of them are trying to get run over.

^^ This. My fellow bikers are prolific when I'm driving, and I do my damnedest to not run into them. Sometimes they do stupid things, though, and I want to slap them for it.

Not that I don't occasionally do stupid things.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: azinyk on October 20, 2010, 08:33:09 PM
Counter-intuitively, I think that's your problem.

Mountain bikes are incredibly heavy and have very small chainrings which don't put a lot of power to the wheels.

This makes no sense to me.  If you're having trouble going up hills, don't you want a smaller chainring?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 21, 2010, 09:33:37 AM
Not really.. you can only pedal so fast, you want to have a relatively large chainring and a larger gear for shifting down.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 21, 2010, 11:28:46 AM
psshhh...listen to you pansies talk about shifting

drop that whack derailleur
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 21, 2010, 11:31:17 AM
psshhh...listen to you pansies talk about shifting

drop that whack derailleur

*high five*
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 21, 2010, 11:40:56 AM
Curious, how much do you weigh Soymilk?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 21, 2010, 02:33:46 PM
139 lbs clothed. I don think I've ever weight more than 145 lbs. Why? I'm not rail thin but a little lanky. I'm only 5' 10"
I ride my fixie as my main source of transport, I take the train or bus if my girlfriend makes us otherwise I would rather bike for an hour than ride an hour on public transit.
The veganism helps keep me skinny too I would think, thouh I eat mostly junkfood like donuts, Mac & chreese, and pizza and too much soda. Despite my poor food choices I think I'm pretty damn healthy.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 21, 2010, 02:38:16 PM
If I added 100lbs of ballast to your bike, would you want to use gears?

Mostly kidding.  I think being a rather heavy guy makes the going up hills bit harder for me.  Then again my uncle was a competitive cyclist... after he was a pro football d-lineman.  So maybe I'm just rationalizing how out of shape I am ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 21, 2010, 02:39:14 PM
If I added 100lbs of ballast to your bike, would you want to use gears?

Mostly kidding.  I think being a rather heavy guy makes the going up hills bit harder for me.  Then again my uncle was a competitive cyclist... after he was a pro football d-lineman.  So maybe I'm just rationalizing how out of shape I am ;)

Hey, I weigh anywhere between 175-200lbs and I don't use gears.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 21, 2010, 02:46:45 PM
Ive know plenty of fatties that ride fixed or single speed. Drop the gears and brakes and it takes alot of weight off, mine weighs 21 lbs. Its a chromly frame, you could go lighter with a carbon fiber frame

when can I get a bike made from carbon nano tubes?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 21, 2010, 02:48:14 PM
A graphene bike could be so thin it'd look like you're the lolcat riding an invisible bike...

Science, get on this!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 21, 2010, 02:48:42 PM
Plus a fixie doesn't let your fat ass cheat with that "coasting" thing. Srsly what is up with that lame-o crap
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 21, 2010, 02:49:18 PM
Ive know plenty of fatties that ride fixed or single speed. Drop the gears and brakes and it takes alot of weight off, mine weighs 21 lbs. Its a chromly frame, you could go lighter with a carbon fiber frame


Wow, your bike is heavy.

I used to know a dude who is 6'8" and way over 200lbs who rode fixies. He usually had to buy his frames from Europe because most bikes shops in the US don't carry 68cm frames.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 21, 2010, 02:50:12 PM
Plus a fixie doesn't let your fat ass cheat with that "coasting" thing. Srsly what is up with that lame-o crap

Dude, coasting down hills is da bomb. Quit being such an elitist. :P

That's the only time I stop cranking though.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 21, 2010, 02:50:30 PM
My desire to solve problems with engineering leads me to avoid fixies.  In fact it leads me to avoid bikes, because I have a car. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on October 21, 2010, 03:07:20 PM
What? A fixie is a marvel of bike engineering. So clean and simple. The ease of use and upkeep. I just love the minimalist utilitarian feel of fixes plus the feeling of direct control

Yeah I know my bike is heavy for a fixie but it s one of the cheapest good qualiy ones I could get, also I don't know how accurate that weight was, I just grabbed my bike and hopped on the shipping scale here at work and did the math
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 21, 2010, 03:10:01 PM
My desire to solve problems with engineering leads me to avoid fixies.  In fact it leads me to avoid bikes, because I have a car.

Wait, are you saying that you avoid fixies because you want a complicated bike that requires complicated fixes or did you make a typo?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 21, 2010, 04:14:54 PM
Yes, what I mean is that instead of using my pedals for both accelerating and decelerating, I would like a brake.  And instead of one gear ratio for all occasions, I would like multiple gear ratios.  And instead of a human powered machine, I would like a machine powered by dinosaur tears which features climate controls and a radio ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 21, 2010, 04:17:27 PM
I have multiple gear ratios, they're called "Strong", "STRONGER", and "RAW UNADULTERATED MANPOWER".

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 21, 2010, 04:18:54 PM
Heh well played.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 22, 2010, 02:29:27 AM
I have multiple gear ratios, they're called "Strong", "STRONGER", and "RAW UNADULTERATED MANPOWER".

Weird, my bike comes with an extra gear above that - "Happy Funtime Super Unicorn Rainbow Power."
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on October 22, 2010, 05:01:47 AM
What's the correct terminology? Are "low" gears the gears that spin faster or are those "high" gears?

It seems counter-intuitive to me because the gears that give you the most torque are "lower" on the cassette, but I have a feeling that doesn't mean they're the "low" gears.

Like whitedevilbrewing said, low refers to the gear ratio. Lower gear means higher torque, that is the larger cogs on the cassette. And low gears are those that you have to spin faster.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 22, 2010, 05:46:48 AM
Shouldn't that be the other way around?

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: stands2reason on October 22, 2010, 07:55:17 AM
Shouldn't that be the other way around?

Gear ratio is in/out. What people think of as low gears are actually the higher gears, i.e., a gear ratio above 1.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on October 24, 2010, 06:28:56 AM
Shouldn't that be the other way around?

The gear ratio for bikes is usually calculated as (# of teeth front)/(# of teeth rear). That gives a gear ratio between 4 (44t/11t) for the highest and 0,7 (22t/32t) for the lowest on a standard mountain bike set up. 4 means that for every revolution of the crank set the wheel completes 4 revolutions. To calculate the torque around the rear hub (M1) you multiply the torque around the bottom bracket (M0) with (# teeth rear)/(# teeth front) which of course is the reverse of the gear ratio used when talking bicycles. 

I did some back of the envelope calculations to straighten this out to myself. Hope it makes sense and I'm notoriously sloppy when it comes to these kinds of calculations (feel free to correct me).

M is the torque
lcf is the lever for the front chaining
lcr is the rear.
(http://i54.tinypic.com/2ce25v6.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on October 24, 2010, 10:55:56 AM
I have multiple gear ratios, they're called "Strong", "STRONGER", and "RAW UNADULTERATED MANPOWER".

Weird, my bike comes with an extra gear above that - "Happy Funtime Super Unicorn Rainbow Power."

Is that the one where you attach a dildo to the seat? ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Chew on October 24, 2010, 01:12:19 PM
Dude. This thread is not in the Explicit section.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 24, 2010, 01:15:53 PM
Shouldn't that be the other way around?

The gear ratio for bikes is usually calculated as (# of teeth front)/(# of teeth rear). That gives a gear ratio between 4 (44t/11t) for the highest and 0,7 (22t/32t) for the lowest on a standard mountain bike set up. 4 means that for every revolution of the crank set the wheel completes 4 revolutions. To calculate the torque around the rear hub (M1) you multiply the torque around the bottom bracket (M0) with (# teeth rear)/(# teeth front) which of course is the reverse of the gear ratio used when talking bicycles. 

I did some back of the envelope calculations to straighten this out to myself. Hope it makes sense and I'm notoriously sloppy when it comes to these kinds of calculations (feel free to correct me).

M is the torque
lcf is the lever for the front chaining
lcr is the rear.
(http://i54.tinypic.com/2ce25v6.jpg)

You're right; I was the one mixing it up!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 24, 2010, 07:13:20 PM
That calculation is literally on the back of an envelope, isn't it? :D I always just assume that when people say "back of the envelope calculation" they're just using it as a figure of speech.

Also, bike math is awesome! And dildos are not appropriate for GD, sorry Anders.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Chew on October 24, 2010, 07:18:32 PM
That calculation is literally on the back of an envelope, isn't it? :D I always just assume that when people say "back of the envelope calculation" they're just using it as a figure of speech.

Back in my day, before all these fancy handheld computing whatnots, we really used the back of an---  oops, wrong thread. Disregard.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on October 25, 2010, 04:43:02 AM
That calculation is literally on the back of an envelope, isn't it? :D I always just assume that when people say "back of the envelope calculation" they're just using it as a figure of speech.

I only used an envelope for the final draft.  ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 25, 2010, 05:59:12 AM
Damn, I just thought of a funny joke that I now have no opportunity to pull off.  If anyone is in a physics or engineering class, do your homework, or anything you have to turn in, on the back of one or several envelopes. 

This is actually a terrible idea, but if you're like me an enjoy a joke no matter the consequences, I think it would make a funny story.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 26, 2010, 05:37:02 AM
Damn, I just thought of a funny joke that I now have no opportunity to pull off.  If anyone is in a physics or engineering class, do your homework, or anything you have to turn in, on the back of one or several envelopes. 

This is actually a terrible idea, but if you're like me an enjoy a joke no matter the consequences, I think it would make a funny story.

I may switch majors just so I can do this.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 27, 2010, 10:45:06 AM
Hey.. I know this isn't the automotive thread, but yesterday morning I was sitting behind a relatively new Honda Odyssey minivan at a traffic light when I suddenly noticed that the guy's exhaust was literally burning the back of my throat. Does anyone have any idea why this might be? I'm pretty familiar with all of the things that can go wrong with an engine when fluids mix (such as oil burning in the crank case, etc..), but I've never experienced this before. It almost reminded me of the sulfurous exhaust one sometimes gets from old diesel city buses, but this car was (I'm pretty sure) running on petrol, not diesel.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: whitedevilbrewing on October 27, 2010, 01:03:07 PM
Petrol, wtf are you from?

Hot (as in burny) exhaust usually means the car is running lean, which in new cars is a problem with sensors more often than not.   I've only ever worked on cars without computers though, so someone probably knows better than me :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 27, 2010, 01:31:44 PM
Petrol, wtf are you from?

Hot (as in burny) exhaust usually means the car is running lean, which in new cars is a problem with sensors more often than not.   I've only ever worked on cars without computers though, so someone probably knows better than me :P

I needed to distinguish between gasoline and diesel. Also, I watch a SHITLOAD of Top Gear.. so, yeah, it's rubbed off on me.

Yeah, the exhaust was way hotter than any car's exhaust had any business being at that time of the morning.. it definitely had some weird taste/quality to it which I've never experienced before though. It wasn't sulfurous, but it made me gag and retch a little.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 28, 2010, 03:02:44 AM
Maybe it was possessed by a demon? Was there a nearby herd of pigs you could have used?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on October 28, 2010, 04:26:23 AM
Damn, I just thought of a funny joke that I now have no opportunity to pull off.  If anyone is in a physics or engineering class, do your homework, or anything you have to turn in, on the back of one or several envelopes. 

This is actually a terrible idea, but if you're like me an enjoy a joke no matter the consequences, I think it would make a funny story.

I may switch majors just so I can do this.

I once turned in a lab report in hexameter. It passed.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 29, 2010, 12:24:05 PM
Just bought that SRAM crankset I was talking about after realizing this morning that my drive crank is barely clinging to the spindle (which is probably stripped beyond repair). Also bought a bicycle work stand and a vice clamp. I'll post product reviews once I get everything set up next week.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: stands2reason on October 30, 2010, 02:04:41 PM
Petrol, wtf are you from?

Hot (as in burny) exhaust usually means the car is running lean, which in new cars is a problem with sensors more often than not.   I've only ever worked on cars without computers though, so someone probably knows better than me :P

I needed to distinguish between gasoline and diesel. Also, I watch a SHITLOAD of Top Gear.. so, yeah, it's rubbed off on me.

Yeah, the exhaust was way hotter than any car's exhaust had any business being at that time of the morning.. it definitely had some weird taste/quality to it which I've never experienced before though. It wasn't sulfurous, but it made me gag and retch a little.

Sounds like coolant being burned in the engine. It has a unique smell that definitely doesn't match any of the usual suspects.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on November 02, 2010, 02:59:51 AM
(http://img89.imageshack.us/img89/5334/jessoct10.jpg)

we have big hills and bigger wind, I like carbon and durace.  we both stood up to 5K km in the last year.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 04, 2010, 10:11:13 AM
Petrol, wtf are you from?

Hot (as in burny) exhaust usually means the car is running lean, which in new cars is a problem with sensors more often than not.   I've only ever worked on cars without computers though, so someone probably knows better than me :P

I needed to distinguish between gasoline and diesel. Also, I watch a SHITLOAD of Top Gear.. so, yeah, it's rubbed off on me.

Yeah, the exhaust was way hotter than any car's exhaust had any business being at that time of the morning.. it definitely had some weird taste/quality to it which I've never experienced before though. It wasn't sulfurous, but it made me gag and retch a little.

Sounds like coolant being burned in the engine. It has a unique smell that definitely doesn't match any of the usual suspects.

That's sort of what I thought.. I was thinking the guy might have a cracked head gasket.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on November 04, 2010, 01:04:09 PM
Petrol, wtf are you from?

Hot (as in burny) exhaust usually means the car is running lean, which in new cars is a problem with sensors more often than not.   I've only ever worked on cars without computers though, so someone probably knows better than me :P

I needed to distinguish between gasoline and diesel. Also, I watch a SHITLOAD of Top Gear.. so, yeah, it's rubbed off on me.

Yeah, the exhaust was way hotter than any car's exhaust had any business being at that time of the morning.. it definitely had some weird taste/quality to it which I've never experienced before though. It wasn't sulfurous, but it made me gag and retch a little.

Sounds like coolant being burned in the engine. It has a unique smell that definitely doesn't match any of the usual suspects.

That's sort of what I thought.. I was thinking the guy might have a cracked head gasket.

... or worse yet, a failure in the head itself.  I recently found this to be very dear...  a bigger cheque to write than a new brake lever.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 04, 2010, 01:09:04 PM
Oh yeah, if you've got a head gasket problem you're looking at an expensive fix. I wound up having to scrap my first car because of a head gasket problem which was compounded by some sloppy mechanic who worked on the engine before I bought it having stripped the heads off of the bolts holding the engine together. My friend offered to ream out the bolts but it would have cost too much money.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 15, 2010, 09:52:01 AM
The temperate is technically 19^F right now, but according to Boston.com the wind chill is -1.

Yes, I biked to work today.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on December 15, 2010, 12:16:08 PM
Ok, seems like I'm gonna run a triathalon this spring.  I need a new bike or slightly used one.  Any suggestions?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 15, 2010, 12:18:07 PM
Want to buy my 1993 Specialized Allez Epic carbon frame?

I'm selling it.

But here's my advice: unless you're going to be a really serious cyclist, just get yourself a bike that isn't too heavy and is very practical for training, and then rent some sort of bonkers carbon fiber bike for the day of the race. That's what i did this year instead of rebuilding my Allez, and it was so much more fun.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: MountainManPan on December 15, 2010, 01:00:19 PM
How do your pronounce ALLEZ?

Al-lez
Or
Al-lay
?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 15, 2010, 02:27:10 PM
It's French, so I'm assuming it's Al-lay
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 15, 2010, 04:52:00 PM
Ah.hell, I have a Specialized Epic. It's pretty epic. But I got mine for fairly ridiculous cheap ($350) because it's like ten years old. Which is a step up from the 20 year old bike I'd had up until that point.

The only suggestion I really have, though, is check out craigslist. SF is bound to be crawling with decently priced bikes. Just don't get a fixie or I might have to disown you. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on December 15, 2010, 05:16:48 PM
Ah.hell, I have a Specialized Epic. It's pretty epic. But I got mine for fairly ridiculous cheap ($350) because it's like ten years old. Which is a step up from the 20 year old bike I'd had up until that point.

The only suggestion I really have, though, is check out craigslist. SF is bound to be crawling with decently priced bikes. Just don't get a fixie or I might have to disown you. :P
Trust me, the only use I would have for a fixie is beating the rider of said fixie with his own bike.  Unless of course that rider is in a velodrome, in which case a fixie is entirely appropriate.  I hate craigs list, last time I tried looking for a bike on Craigslist I spent a month responding to ads of bikes that had already been sold. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 15, 2010, 07:18:09 PM
Ah.hell, I bought this bike like 5 years ago.. it's a great deal because you get an aluminum frame bike made by some no-name company in china with a wheelset. It's easily convertible to single-speed by flipping the rear wheel over and putting on a freewheel cog from a BMX bike.

In the five years I've owned this model I've replaced everything, but that's only to be expected since I put about 3000-4000m on the bike every year. The frame is still perfect, and very lightweight.

http://cgi.ebay.com/52cm-Track-Fixed-Gear-Black-Alloy-Road-Bike-Bicycle-NEW-/380299415541?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item588b9c8ff5 (http://cgi.ebay.com/52cm-Track-Fixed-Gear-Black-Alloy-Road-Bike-Bicycle-NEW-/380299415541?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item588b9c8ff5)

A note about sizing, to figure out what size bike to buy first measure your inseam, then subtract 11 inches from that number and multiply the result by 2.54 to convert to centimeters.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: MountainManPan on December 15, 2010, 07:21:43 PM
J.P. do you ride in the winter?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on December 15, 2010, 07:25:48 PM
Jaypee,

Perhaps you missed my previous post regarding the appropriate use of fixed gear bikes.  I rarely ever found in a velodrome.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on December 15, 2010, 11:47:55 PM
Ok, seems like I'm gonna run a triathalon this spring.  I need a new bike or slightly used one.  Any suggestions?

If you are half serious, get a decent frame with lots of carbon, or all carbon.  Don't go less than a 105 groupset and you will have a great time with little maintainence.   Just arrived home from a nice hour on my Masi.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on December 16, 2010, 01:13:55 AM
Ok, seems like I'm gonna run a triathalon this spring.  I need a new bike or slightly used one.  Any suggestions?

If you are half serious, get a decent frame with lots of carbon, or all carbon.  Don't go less than a 105 groupset and you will have a great time with little maintainence.   Just arrived home from a nice hour on my Masi.
I'm serious in that I am likely to do it but not in that I am not going to be competitive.  Whats a 105 groupset?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 16, 2010, 03:18:13 AM
Ah.hell, I have a Specialized Epic. It's pretty epic. But I got mine for fairly ridiculous cheap ($350) because it's like ten years old. Which is a step up from the 20 year old bike I'd had up until that point.

The only suggestion I really have, though, is check out craigslist. SF is bound to be crawling with decently priced bikes. Just don't get a fixie or I might have to disown you. :P
Trust me, the only use I would have for a fixie is beating the rider of said fixie with his own bike.  Unless of course that rider is in a velodrome, in which case a fixie is entirely appropriate.
:lovewcc:

Quote
  I hate craigs list, last time I tried looking for a bike on Craigslist I spent a month responding to ads of bikes that had already been sold. 
That's fair enough.

There are some pretty awesome bike shops down here (both that I can think of off the top of my head are in Palo Alto) - I know that one of them sells used bikes, and the other just sells new bikes but might have decent sales. I don't know how often you make it to the ass of the Bay Area, though. Or if you'd even want to.

You could probably find some good used bike shops in the City, too.

Or you could buy my old ass, tiny, red road bike. ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 16, 2010, 05:40:59 AM
J.P. do you ride in the winter?

Yes.

Jaypee,

Perhaps you missed my previous post regarding the appropriate use of fixed gear bikes.  I rarely ever found in a velodrome.

Single-speed != fixed gear. I despise fixed gear as well, it blows my mind that San Francisco is the mecca of fixed gear cycling since fixed gear riding on hills shreds rear tires.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on December 16, 2010, 10:55:11 AM
Beside the hipsters they are associated with much of the time ( but not all) what about the inanimate object of a fixed gear bike actually makes you upset? It seems silly to me the hatred folks have for fixies, i dislike the hipster as much as anyone which is why I don't hang out the the hipster crowd. I ride my fixie because I was raise riding road bikes by my dad who used to be pro racer and switched to a fixie as a training bike and loved the feel of the ride. I also love the lightness and low maintenance.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 16, 2010, 10:58:39 AM
I guess it's just guilt by association. I don't think fixed gear is all it's cracked up to be: in hilly areas you run the very serious risk of shredding your tires by having to do perform a sudden backpedal stop, and on top of that you can't enjoy the fruits of your labor and coast downhill. Furthermore, when taking turns you have to slow down considerably more because you can't stop pedaling while turning like you can on a single-speed. When I'm taking a turn I can turn my crank so that the pedal on the inside of the turn is at the apex and that gives me a couple of extra inches that I can use to "lean in" to a sharp turn, which comes in handy when you're basically taking a series of 90 degree turns in the city.

Fixed gears have their place, and that place is pretty much the velodrome and nowhere else.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on December 16, 2010, 11:13:57 AM
Mine and most fixie have shorter cranks than normal to aid in pedal clearance on turns, also the frame geometry is differnt, more compressed which make for tighter handling. It got really quick response and acceleration. The ability to apply pressure on the pedals through the whole rotation helps save energy and I can "coast" by just spinning my legs in synch. I personally find it a quite energy efficient way to ride and don't have much trouble in San Fran, thouh I mostly ride in the east bay.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 16, 2010, 11:21:48 AM
Yeah, but doesn't shorter cranks = less power?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on December 16, 2010, 11:33:04 AM
Yeah, but doesn't shorter cranks = less power?

a bit, but that is compensated for by the gear ratio

you are always going to b making trade off in a bike do you want wide stable tire or skinny fast ones, do you want a 15lb bike of a 25lb one, do you want to fiddle with tiny screws and bolts or forgo those extras for convenience?
a minimalist fixie simply fits my personal riding style, needs and budget
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on December 16, 2010, 11:36:18 AM
Yeah, but doesn't shorter cranks = less power?

a bit, but that is compensated for by the gear ratio

you are always going to b making trade off in a bike do you want wide stable tire or skinny fast ones, do you want a 15lb bike of a 25lb one, do you want to fiddle with tiny screws and bolts or forgo those extras for convenience?
a minimalist fixie simply fits my personal riding style, needs and budget
...and hipness. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 16, 2010, 11:40:15 AM
Yeah, but doesn't shorter cranks = less power?

a bit, but that is compensated for by the gear ratio

you are always going to b making trade off in a bike do you want wide stable tire or skinny fast ones, do you want a 15lb bike of a 25lb one, do you want to fiddle with tiny screws and bolts or forgo those extras for convenience?
a minimalist fixie simply fits my personal riding style, needs and budget
...and hipsterness. :P

FTFY :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on December 16, 2010, 11:55:40 AM
Better than one of those dumbasses riding a knobby tired mountain bike with shocks through the city wasting energy and blocking the bike lane. Or one of those BMX punks without seats, tiny tires, and shitty gear ratio. Or worst or all one of those Lycra folk on their $2000 dollar bike( for which they don't do their own maintenance) riding slow as hell, those folks are total hipsters, just showing off their gear
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on December 16, 2010, 12:06:19 PM
Better than one of those dumbasses riding a knobby tired mountain bike with shocks through the city wasting energy and blocking the bike lane. Or one of those BMX punks without seats, tiny tires, and shitty gear ratio. Or worst or all one of those Lycra folk on their $2000 dollar bike( for which they don't do their own maintenance) riding slow as hell, those folks are total hipsters, just showing off their gear
I wouldn't say better...
I do know one guy who wears that gear and rides a $2000 bike that I let slide.  He commutes from marin to the City, I figure that's a long enough trip to justify the gear. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 16, 2010, 12:09:58 PM
Better than one of those dumbasses riding a knobby tired mountain bike with shocks through the city wasting energy and blocking the bike lane. Or one of those BMX punks without seats, tiny tires, and shitty gear ratio. Or worst or all one of those Lycra folk on their $2000 dollar bike( for which they don't do their own maintenance) riding slow as hell, those folks are total hipsters, just showing off their gear

True enough.

My favorite thing ever is blasting past some Lycra-clad carbon fibered dude on my shitty aluminum single-speed.

<3 <3 <3 <3
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on December 16, 2010, 12:11:00 PM
Ok, seems like I'm gonna run a triathalon this spring.  I need a new bike or slightly used one.  Any suggestions?

If you are half serious, get a decent frame with lots of carbon, or all carbon.  Don't go less than a 105 groupset and you will have a great time with little maintainence.   Just arrived home from a nice hour on my Masi.
I'm serious in that I am likely to do it but not in that I am not going to be competitive.  Whats a 105 groupset?

Shimano makes different grades of componentry to add to bicycle frames.  105 is their entry level for racing and is very good overall.  Good performance and low maintainence, relatively light.  Ultegra is next up  and Dura Ace is their top end. Tioga is a step down.   

You don't want to worry about mechanicals.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on December 16, 2010, 12:21:53 PM
Better than one of those dumbasses riding a knobby tired mountain bike with shocks through the city wasting energy and blocking the bike lane. Or one of those BMX punks without seats, tiny tires, and shitty gear ratio. Or worst or all one of those Lycra folk on their $2000 dollar bike( for which they don't do their own maintenance) riding slow as hell, those folks are total hipsters, just showing off their gear

I really like lycra and a $5k bicycle.  Do most of my own  maintenance too.  I like seeing anybody on two wheels when I'm out. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 16, 2010, 12:25:36 PM
Yeah, but do you clutter the bike trail going 15mph or less? Or if you go faster than 15mph, do cockishly cut people off or "draft" off of faster riders? Do you pointedly ignore all traffic signals while riding on the roads?

Because those are the most common variants of the species Lycra cladensis
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on December 16, 2010, 12:33:52 PM
Oh I didn't mention the scrapper bike kids on their gaudy ass bikes.

Really I like to see anyone riding, I don't really hate the BMX punks, mountain bikers, or even the hipsters. Well I still got something against Lycra itself. The bike culture in the Bay Area is really diverse and awesome, I've met many cool folks at bike events
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on December 16, 2010, 01:59:38 PM
Yeah, but do you clutter the bike trail going 15mph or less? Or if you go faster than 15mph, do cockishly cut people off or "draft" off of faster riders? Do you pointedly ignore all traffic signals while riding on the roads?

Because those are the most common variants of the species Lycra cladensis

Bullshit.  I would argue that a few poor riders, often in jeans and t shirts are to blame for a reputation of road code infringements.  Bike trails are for pottering along.  Ride enough and you too will wear lycra.  I value my aged crotch.  You wouldn't keep up (cycling) without it in my circles.

Of course I ride faster than 15mph, whatever that is.  I like to average 35 kph on a group ride, 30 training alone.  And of course I draught off faster riders, and they, me.  I also draught slower riders and encourage them to get on my wheel.  That's real cycling.  That's how it's done.  You take your turn at the sharp end, you sort out the best strategy for the moment.  Everyone rides faster and more easily.  I have to spend enough hours alone on the road .
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 17, 2010, 04:02:12 AM
 :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(
I can't ride my bike because the stupid rear tire's stem is broked. Stupid tire stem.

I'm going to have to take it into a shop, too, because I don't know quite enough about this bike to go fiddling with it. And I probably won't have time until Sunday. Maybe I can do it Saturday.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 17, 2010, 05:34:55 AM
The tire stem? You mean the tube stem, right?

One of these days, panda, you're going to have to fall in love with The Bicycle Tutor (http://bicycletutor.com/), or be doomed to a lifetime of paying for parts and labor.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on December 17, 2010, 07:30:07 AM
Keywords: Chain, Lubrication, Oil?

Is that a bicycle repair site or a how-to BDSM manual?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 17, 2010, 09:33:55 AM
Keywords: Chain, Lubrication, Oil?

Is that a bicycle repair site or a how-to BDSM manual?

I was going to make a bike porn joke, but then I remembered there is actually a traveling bike porn film festival. I would look it up, but I'm at work and have this weird desire to not be fired.

In other news, I had icicles (or perhaps booger-cicles) in my beard this morning.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on December 17, 2010, 09:49:50 AM
You worry too much. God will take care of you.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on December 17, 2010, 03:40:21 PM
:'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(
I can't ride my bike because the stupid rear tire's stem is broked. Stupid tire stem.

I'm going to have to take it into a shop, too, because I don't know quite enough about this bike to go fiddling with it. And I probably won't have time until Sunday. Maybe I can do it Saturday.

Not sure what sort of tires/tubes you run, but its probably a schraeder or presta tube, seperate from the tire.  When you go to the bike shop, buy a set of tire levers, patch kit, spare tube (and a pump if you don't have one already) and have them show you how to repair and change a tube.  Its a two minute job... less time than driving it to a bike shop.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 17, 2010, 07:11:18 PM
:'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(
I can't ride my bike because the stupid rear tire's stem is broked. Stupid tire stem.

I'm going to have to take it into a shop, too, because I don't know quite enough about this bike to go fiddling with it. And I probably won't have time until Sunday. Maybe I can do it Saturday.

Not sure what sort of tires/tubes you run, but its probably a schraeder or presta tube, seperate from the tire.  When you go to the bike shop, buy a set of tire levers, patch kit, spare tube (and a pump if you don't have one already) and have them show you how to repair and change a tube.  Its a two minute job... less time than driving it to a bike shop.
i do know how to change a tire, i didn't mean to imply that i didn't. there's something weird going on with the tire, though. usually i can push the tire aside a see the tube beneath, but this tire/tube seems to be 'stuck' to the wheel and that worries me.

as with most things, i know just enough about bikes to screw it up.

also, since i can't take the tire off without possibly doing damage, i'd rather do it at a bike shop where i'd have everything i need at hand.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on December 17, 2010, 08:28:42 PM
:'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(
I can't ride my bike because the stupid rear tire's stem is broked. Stupid tire stem.

I'm going to have to take it into a shop, too, because I don't know quite enough about this bike to go fiddling with it. And I probably won't have time until Sunday. Maybe I can do it Saturday.

Not sure what sort of tires/tubes you run, but its probably a schraeder or presta tube, seperate from the tire.  When you go to the bike shop, buy a set of tire levers, patch kit, spare tube (and a pump if you don't have one already) and have them show you how to repair and change a tube.  Its a two minute job... less time than driving it to a bike shop.
i do know how to change a tire, i didn't mean to imply that i didn't. there's something weird going on with the tire, though. usually i can push the tire aside a see the tube beneath, but this tire/tube seems to be 'stuck' to the wheel and that worries me.

as with most things, i know just enough about bikes to screw it up.

also, since i can't take the tire off without possibly doing damage, i'd rather do it at a bike shop where i'd have everything i need at hand.
Might be glued tires? What's the model name of the tire?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on December 17, 2010, 10:38:37 PM
Might be some no more flat goo got loose...  Might be just age.

I'd doubt they'd be tubular tyres, that's a little tekky.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 17, 2010, 10:46:13 PM
yeah, i was thinking it might be the no flat stuff or age. the tires look ok
but i don't know how old they are. they might be the original tires even.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on December 18, 2010, 02:45:56 AM
I have Stan's no more flats n one of my mtn bikes and I rate it.  The roadbike is Continental gator skin... no flats in 10,000+ of riding.  Oh, that's not on one set of tyres, just never have flats anymore and the seal here in Canterbury sucks.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on February 18, 2011, 01:31:21 PM
I'm reviving this thread for one reason and one reason only.

Feast your eyes, apostates!

http://www.christiancycleonline.com/ (http://www.christiancycleonline.com/)

THE RAPTURE IS NIGH, THE FOUR CYCLISTS OF THE APOCALYPSE ARE ON AN "EPIC" RIDE, THEY'RE BUSY TRACKING THEIR HEART RATE AND CADENCE ON THEIR $300 CYCLING COMPUTERS, BUT THEY'RE COMING.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on February 18, 2011, 07:40:16 PM
I wonder what MasterCard thinks of this one. (http://www.christiancycleonline.com/christcard-cycling-jersey.html)
(http://img195.imageshack.us/img195/3415/christcardjerseyfrontpo.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on February 18, 2011, 08:29:51 PM
I wonder what MasterCard thinks of this one. (http://www.christiancycleonline.com/christcard-cycling-jersey.html)
(http://img195.imageshack.us/img195/3415/christcardjerseyfrontpo.jpg)

You never see one of those jerseys pulling their weight at the front of the bunch... always sneaking around in the back, resting up for the sprint.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on February 19, 2011, 05:57:22 AM
I wish they made one that said "Jesus is in my peloton"
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on February 20, 2011, 05:08:39 AM
I keep putting off fixing my latest flat. I'm so lazy. X_X Of course, it's been raining the last few days, so I have a somewhat reasonable excuse. Maybe I'll do it tomorrow. Maybe.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on February 20, 2011, 06:17:02 AM
Hey panda, you can borrow mine:

Pink Floyd - Bike (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHRE5dyDKTA#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on February 20, 2011, 09:20:25 AM
I keep putting off fixing my latest flat. I'm so lazy. X_X Of course, it's been raining the last few days, so I have a somewhat reasonable excuse. Maybe I'll do it tomorrow. Maybe.
Bicycle Repairman (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U01xasUtlvw#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on February 21, 2011, 12:52:58 AM
I keep putting off fixing my latest flat. I'm so lazy. X_X Of course, it's been raining the last few days, so I have a somewhat reasonable excuse. Maybe I'll do it tomorrow. Maybe.

Stan's, or whatever.  Flats become history. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on March 29, 2011, 01:38:10 AM
:dance: New tires! They have tread! My old tires were so bald, the inside was showing on the outside.

Also, maybe one of you fellows could tell me: wth is a folding tire? And why would I want one?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on March 29, 2011, 03:38:09 AM
A folding tyre is one with a kevlar bead rather than a steel one.  I opt for that on my roadbike because they are that wee bit lighter and if you are tying to go fast or a long way, every bit helps... especially if you have made ti to the "vintage" or "classic" categorie.  A little easier to get on and off the rim, handy if one hasn't retained all the digits God served up at the start.

They are also good if you are touring and might want a spare tyre if you were to ruin one on the bicycle and buying a new one isn't a good option.  They fold into small spaces and are light... and ready to go.

They cost more, though.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on March 29, 2011, 03:50:23 AM
:dance: New tires! They have tread! My old tires were so bald, the inside was showing on the outside.

Also, maybe one of you fellows could tell me: wth is a folding tire? And why would I want one?
Folding tires are foldable ;) they also weigh less, usually. Unfolding ones have this wire bead round the edge. Some people say folding tires are easier to mount, others say the opposite.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on March 29, 2011, 03:57:10 AM
Dangerous DH track in Chile.
VCA Downhill Race Chile 2011 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Udd4xeElV8I#)

valparaiso polc 2011 gopro HD (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jO0VLouJFNQ#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on March 29, 2011, 04:08:58 AM
Okay, I got that they fold. It's kind of in the name. :P I was wondering about any specific advantages they might have. I like the idea of kevlar tires... and the ones I was looking at were only $15 more apiece. I don't do much long distance biking, though, so I probably wouldn't use them to their full advantage, if the main advantage deals with long-distance biking. 4 miles a day isn't long distance, is it?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on March 29, 2011, 05:40:25 AM
I don't know if there's any real advantage in folding vs. unfolding as far as mounting the tires are concerned. In fact, I think the folding ones are harder to mount (at first) because they have been sitting in a box for months and haven't ever taken the shape of a tire. I just bought a new Vittoria Rubino dual compound track tire for my front wheel. The one I had on there kersploded because it had about 5000 miles of wear. I didn't want to shell out for a new one in order to keep my set matched (since I have a newer Rubino on the back), so I just recycled some cheap (yet newish) Continental tires that I salvaged off of my road bike. And thus began the worst two weeks of flats I've ever had. It took me forever to finally find the small tears in the Continentals (yes, I tried using both of them) which was causing the flats, but before I found them I went through 8 tubes.

That's 8 times I was forced to walk > 2 miles home pushing my bike.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on March 31, 2011, 12:31:10 PM
PUT YOUR KID IN A BOX

http://www.boxcycles.com/blog/ (http://www.boxcycles.com/blog/)

WHEEL THAT BOX THROUGH TRAFFIC.

DON'T PUT A HELMET ON HIM, HILARITY WILL ENSUE.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Mainah on March 31, 2011, 12:41:49 PM
I'm nearing the end of my year without a car and I certainly couldn't have made it without my bike, a none too extraordinary diamondback that has served me well.  Sadly, this is hardly the most bike-friendly city.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on March 31, 2011, 12:55:52 PM
Which city?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Mainah on March 31, 2011, 01:46:09 PM
Charleston, SC buckle of the bible belt.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on March 31, 2011, 01:54:05 PM
Oh, I was thinking that your handle was meant to indicate that you're from Maine, since "Mainers" drop their Rs (like every good New Englander), so when referring to themselves it sounds like "Mainah".
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on March 31, 2011, 02:24:58 PM
PUT YOUR KID IN A BOX

http://www.boxcycles.com/blog/ (http://www.boxcycles.com/blog/)

WHEEL THAT BOX THROUGH TRAFFIC.

DON'T PUT A HELMET ON HIM, HILARITY WILL ENSUE.

See those all the time round here. Weirdest one I saw looked like this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61-bmofB0tL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I've no idea what that would be like to steer.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on March 31, 2011, 02:26:44 PM
How do they steer? I'm assuming that it's front wheel steering since the rear wheel is the drive wheel but.. oh never mind, I see how.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Mainah on March 31, 2011, 02:27:31 PM
Oh, I was thinking that your handle was meant to indicate that you're from Maine, since "Mainers" drop their Rs (like every good New Englander), so when referring to themselves it sounds like "Mainah".

And you'd be right.  I'm currently living in Charleston but it's not where I'm from nor will it ever be home. :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on March 31, 2011, 02:40:25 PM
I'm so clever sometimes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on March 31, 2011, 03:18:20 PM
Stumbled over this one. http://aarline.info/hotaar/?p=1 (http://aarline.info/hotaar/?p=1)
(http://i52.tinypic.com/j9rd5v.jpg) (http://www.manmadecreation.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/TypographicBicycle_AARLINE.png)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on March 31, 2011, 03:29:21 PM
Nice.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on March 31, 2011, 07:17:08 PM
Very attractive.  It suits my forty something Frejus Tour de France, but the shifters for my Masi are nicely tucked into the brake levers.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 01, 2011, 04:19:09 AM
Very attractive.  It suits my forty something Frejus Tour de France, but the shifters for my Masi are nicely tucked into the brake levers.
So are mine - when I first got my bike, I had to look long and hard at it to figure out how to shift.

I think I might go to a park tomorrow. It's supposed to be sunny and shit. A nice bike ride to the wetlands is just what I need.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 01, 2011, 06:14:40 AM
OH I LOVE THOSE SHIFTERS.

Seriously. The Roubaix I rented last year had those.. it was so much fun.

OK.. so it's the beginning of spring, more cyclists are out on the road.. and this is just Old Man Jaypee shaking his fist at the world right now, but I'm shocked at the number of salmon on the road. Yesterday alone I saw at least six incidences of salmoning down major thoroughfares. What do you guys do when you suddenly realize that there is a cyclist bearing down on you in the bike lane going the wrong direction (a/k/a a "salmon")? I generally force them into traffic because the only other option is they force me into traffic, and I'm not altruistic enough to risk my well being for some 'tard.

Oh.. and I also saw some scrotum talking on his cell phone while biking. If I'm being honest, that pisses me off more than anything else, up to and including ethnic cleansing in the Third World. There is no fucking excuse for sinking to the level of those degenerate subhuman motorists who think their time is so important that they can just disregard the outside world and drive distracted. This guy got off with a profanity laced warning, the next guy I see talking on his cell phone while biking I'm grabbing the phone out of his hand, throwing it in a puddle, and then beating him to death with my U-lock.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 01, 2011, 08:01:09 AM
...How the hell do you talk on a cell phone on a bike? I have a hard enough time just listening to music while riding my bike, and I don't need any hands for that.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 01, 2011, 09:33:38 AM
You do it really poorly. You know else really irks me? Since most people are right-handed they naturally hold their cell phone in their right hand, which means that this retard was steering with his left hand. Oh yeah.. you know what else is important to know? The right hand brake is the rear brake, a/k/a "the brake you want to engage first if you have to stop short so that you avoid flipping over your handlebars when you jam on the front brakes".
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 01, 2011, 09:53:21 AM
You do it really poorly. You know else really irks me? Since most people are right-handed they naturally hold their cell phone in their right hand, which means that this retard was steering with his left hand. Oh yeah.. you know what else is important to know? The right hand brake is the rear brake, a/k/a "the brake you want to engage first if you have to stop short so that you avoid flipping over your handlebars when you jam on the front brakes".
The front brake is the one you should to use to stop, but not with one hand.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 01, 2011, 10:11:37 AM
You do it really poorly. You know else really irks me? Since most people are right-handed they naturally hold their cell phone in their right hand, which means that this retard was steering with his left hand. Oh yeah.. you know what else is important to know? The right hand brake is the rear brake, a/k/a "the brake you want to engage first if you have to stop short so that you avoid flipping over your handlebars when you jam on the front brakes".
The front brake is the one you should to use to stop, but not with one hand.

You definitely do not engage the front brake first, even if that's where you get most of your braking power. Seriously, every bike safety class I ever took as a kid the lesson was always "right, then left" or "back, then front". This is especially true if you keep your bike well maintained and your brakes well adjusted.. if I were to engage my front brake first I will absolutely be flipping over my handlebars.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lukebourassa on April 01, 2011, 10:55:03 AM
Hey all...

Has anyone ever stretch their chain out unevenly?  The bike tech told me that it might mean either 1) one leg is stronger than the other or 2) one leg is slightly LONGER than the other.  I was thinking it might have to do with the fact that I always start peddling with the same foot, and when I want to put my feet down at a red light, I usually keep the same foot on the pedal, brake and use the momentum to propel me slightly forward while I step-up from that pedal, so I can stand up and put the other foot down (I know that's confusing to read). I do this because my legs are kind of short for my body and I can't really touch the ground while siting without tipping the bike.

Anyway..  advice on this issue would be appreciated. Thanks.

Also..  Am I putting unnecessary strain on my bike by standing up this way? If so, what's the "right" way to come to a stop and put my feet down?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 01, 2011, 11:02:03 AM
You do it really poorly. You know else really irks me? Since most people are right-handed they naturally hold their cell phone in their right hand, which means that this retard was steering with his left hand. Oh yeah.. you know what else is important to know? The right hand brake is the rear brake, a/k/a "the brake you want to engage first if you have to stop short so that you avoid flipping over your handlebars when you jam on the front brakes".
The front brake is the one you should to use to stop, but not with one hand.

You definitely do not engage the front brake first, even if that's where you get most of your braking power. Seriously, every bike safety class I ever took as a kid the lesson was always "right, then left" or "back, then front". This is especially true if you keep your bike well maintained and your brakes well adjusted.. if I were to engage my front brake first I will absolutely be flipping over my handlebars.
Nope I have disc brakes and don't flip over. You need do update what you learned as a kid, brakes are not on or off.
http://sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html (http://sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 01, 2011, 11:12:52 AM
Hmm.. food for thought. I never use one brake or the other, so I may have never noticed. I'll give front braking a try.. I still say that if you're the type of idiot who uses their cell phone while cycling the chances that you maintain your brakes is vanishingly slim, and that therefore neither brake has the requisite stopping power on its own to help you in an emergency situation. Also, people who talk on their cell phone while operating a vehicle--regardless of the type of vehicle--are idiots who should be rounded up and thrown into the ocean.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 01, 2011, 05:13:32 PM
The right hand brake is the rear brake, a/k/a "the brake you want to engage first if you have to stop short so that you avoid flipping over your handlebars when you jam on the front brakes".

be very alert for a little change if you ever hire (or buy) a bicycle in Australasia...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 01, 2011, 08:29:44 PM
Yeah, I try to avoid using the front brake first; I've had my back tire lift while using it before. I wasn't sitting on the seat at the time, so that might have been why, but it was unnerving. It could have definitely f*cked me up if I'd been going just a little faster. Fortunately, I don't go that fast. ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 03, 2011, 08:51:13 AM
Yeah, I try to avoid using the front brake first; I've had my back tire lift while using it before. I wasn't sitting on the seat at the time, so that might have been why, but it was unnerving. It could have definitely f*cked me up if I'd been going just a little faster. Fortunately, I don't go that fast. ;D

See, I usually jackknife at high speeds because my rear wheel keeps trying to move forward and the bike pivots around the fork.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 04, 2011, 01:14:55 PM
Damn it, P.J. O'Rourke, I used to like you but this is pretty much inexcusable:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704050204576218600999993800.html?mod=googlenews_wsj (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704050204576218600999993800.html?mod=googlenews_wsj)

Here's one choice quote:

Quote
Also, only a few bicycles are needed to take up as much space as my Chevrolet Suburban—just one if its rider is wobbling all over the place while trying to Tweet.  And my Suburban seats eight.

How often do you have eight people in your Suburban, you wretched, vile, irredeemable douche bag? Go fucking die in a fuel tank explosion in your shitty American Sport Utility Douchebag Conveyance.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 04, 2011, 01:40:46 PM
So it looks like he's been at it for like 25 years.

http://www.bikereader.com/contributors/misc/menace.html (http://www.bikereader.com/contributors/misc/menace.html)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 05, 2011, 12:32:30 AM
Damn it, P.J. O'Rourke, I used to like you but this is pretty much inexcusable:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704050204576218600999993800.html?mod=googlenews_wsj (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704050204576218600999993800.html?mod=googlenews_wsj)

Here's one choice quote:

Quote
Also, only a few bicycles are needed to take up as much space as my Chevrolet Suburban—just one if its rider is wobbling all over the place while trying to Tweet.  And my Suburban seats eight.

How often do you have eight people in your Suburban, you wretched, vile, irredeemable douche bag? Go fucking die in a fuel tank explosion in your shitty American Sport Utility Douchebag Conveyance.
Yeah, that makes no sense. But if that's the only reason he gives, then he must know he's defeated.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 05, 2011, 01:52:03 AM
I sent a copy of the bicycling section of our "Road Code" to a rather well to do and influential member of our community (after he squeezed past me with oncoming traffic on a rather narrow stretch of highway), along with a note that all the truckies that worked for his transport company seemed to know the rules and abide by them.  We're still friends.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 07, 2011, 09:59:35 AM
I saw some dude texting while cycling yesterday.

I was passing him when I noticed it, so I quickly cut in front of him hoping that he'd flail wildly and throw his phone in the river, but alas, no such luck.

Next time I notice something like that I'm going to yell "WATCH OUT FOR THAT DITCH!!" and hope that the moron flails wildly and throws their phone in the river while reaching for their brake levers.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on April 07, 2011, 02:23:26 PM
Caught the end of a news report yesterday that the police over here are going to start clamping down on reckless cyclists. Those who run red lights, on their phones etc. On the spot fines and, if you have a driving licence points on that. I hope that they get all those adults who cycle on the paths. It's Germany, there are cycle lanes and cars are pretty aware that cyclists abound. So why should I move out of my way so you can cycle down the path? Even more so on the quiet streets. There are no cars on the road, get on it!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 07, 2011, 02:33:14 PM
I may end up eating my words, but as soon as I establish residency in Boston (right now I live across the river) I'm going to petition my city councilman to crack down on cyclists. Here's a typical day for me.. this morning I saw on one four block stretch of Charles Street two salmon and three red light runners not counting the two salmon who were running a red light going the wrong way. When I turned from Charles Street onto Beacon Street I was nearly hit by a red light runner coming from the adjacent street. As I turned around the Public Garden I saw a red light runner at Commonwealth Ave and Arlington Street, and then six(!) red light runners on a five block stretch of Boylston Street. That's not counting the woman who nearly killed me when she didn't bother looking for oncoming traffic on the bike trail as she was coming down a pedestrian ramp on her bike.

I'm sure on my way home I'll see another 10-20 red light runners. That's one day. It's absurd. The city could probably make $5,000 a day in tickets by posting cops at the intersections around the Boston Common and Public Gardens during morning and evening rush hours.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on April 07, 2011, 02:42:27 PM
Yeah, a friend of mine got a ticket for cycling in a pedestrian area, weaving between shoppers. No sympathy for him at all and he doesn't fault it either.

I did see someone cycling down the road at 4am, wearing black with no lights on. Potential Darwin Award nominee, methinks.

On a lighter note, my parents bought my son his first trike and it is way cool.

(http://i487.photobucket.com/albums/rr240/SkepticsGuide/DSC04698.jpg?t=1302201688)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 07, 2011, 02:55:34 PM
That's an awesome bike.

P.S. I forgot to add that of the red light runners on Beacon Street and Boylston Street almost all of them were running the light to cross into the Public Garden or the Common and ride their bikes through a pedestrian-only park.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 07, 2011, 03:59:00 PM
I'm still too lazy to fix my flats. Blergh.

I don't notice the lawbreakers that often. I will admit to skimming through red lights late at night, because the sensors at the lights don't pick up bikers, and there are no buttons to push for bikers, just the pedestrian signal. Stop signs, too, but only on streets that aren't busy.

For all that some roads are bike friendly, this area still has a long way to go. The bike paths that we have are predominantly scenic, rather than practical, in nature.

Google maps now has a bike street overlay feature, and I'm loving it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 07, 2011, 07:06:09 PM
Heh, speaking of that Google Maps cycling thing.. I just used it to get directions from my office to the house we're buying because I had to swing by there on my way home, and below the route options for the bike routes it gave the option of "Drive/Taxi     13 mins". I thought that was a subtle dig at cyclists.

Anywho, I just did 19.24 miles. That's on top of the 8.4 miles I did this morning. Not too shabby.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 07, 2011, 11:09:33 PM
35 k's, an hour ten, gorgeous temperature, sunny and long easy hills... and little traffic.  Better go shift some electric fences...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 08, 2011, 04:32:57 AM
I want to be over this congestion bullshido so that I can enjoy my damn bike again. The weather is perfect for riding my bike, but I'm feeling like run-down dog-poo and I want mah bike fixed! >:(

I couldn't do 19 mi, though, I'd die.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 08, 2011, 09:16:50 AM

I couldn't do 19 mi, though, I'd die.

Sure you can, if you work at it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 08, 2011, 04:12:43 PM
Extended trailer from The Travel Channel's new show about NYC bike messengers called "Triple Rush". I hope this show is DOA.. if ever there were a way to make people hate cyclists more it's this nonsense:

http://vimeo.com/triplerushtv/extendedtrailer (http://vimeo.com/triplerushtv/extendedtrailer)

So many salmons, so much needless stupidity. No helmets, no signaling, no common sense. These people are the worst thing that could happen to "cycling advocacy" short of a long lost picture of Adolf Hitler "hill bombing" his Pista fixie through Vienna during his art student days surfacing.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 09, 2011, 02:53:40 AM
The good news is that you've given me an idea for a shirt. If I ever actually make the shirt design, I'll let you see it. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 09, 2011, 06:04:55 AM
Will it be Hipster Hitler?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 09, 2011, 06:24:23 PM
Will it be Hipster Hitler?
Ok, 2 shirt ideas. :D

My first idea was a "No Salmon" shirt. One of these:
(http://roof-washers.com/images/no%20symbol%205.png) over a drawing of a salmon.

Hipster Hitler... I'll have to think about that one. :D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on April 09, 2011, 10:39:15 PM
Here's my roadie, Bellatrix. She's carried me to many a stage finish line:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/182927_1290538999658_1715751196_522502_7063474_n.jpg)
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/TDM4.jpg)

This is Minerva, my time trial bike. She has hauled my worthless carcase to the finish line of more than a few Ironmans:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/photo3.jpg)
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/00394-24-1318-medjpeg.jpg)

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 09, 2011, 11:03:14 PM
Way to make me feel inadequate.  :-\
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Scaramaus on April 10, 2011, 02:52:19 AM
She's carried me to many a stage finish line:

Nice bikes mate!
I was just wondering, do male cyclists refer to their bicycles as female? And do female cyclists theirs as male?
I'm a male cyclist and both my bikes are female.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 10, 2011, 03:19:19 AM
My bike was named before I owned him, by a female - but originally by a male, who I think was the person to name him. His name is Eric, or ERIC - the bike is a Specialty Epic (EPIC), so I think you can see where the name is derived from. I tend to think of the things I ride as female, though. My car doesn't have a name, but she's definitely a she. My last bike, also nameless, was also a she. I think Eric would be a he even if I'd received him nameless. Or maybe I'm just projecting. Eric is rather girlie, if powerful.

What's more interesting is how seriously we tend to anthropomorphize the things we own.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on April 10, 2011, 08:25:37 AM
Rode an old trail bike for years. Last fall finally bought a road bike. I like it. It is a lot different then my trail bike (duh). I want to get use to longer rides but it is hard to do here in Chicago area unless I ride on busy roads or haul my bike to a trail. Looking forward to a full season on it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 10, 2011, 08:32:05 AM
Paris-Roubaix is on right now.

http://www.cyclingfans.com/node/1816 (http://www.cyclingfans.com/node/1816)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 10, 2011, 02:57:55 PM
Congrats to Johan Vansummeren.
(http://velonews.competitor.com/files/2011/04/6-660x992.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on April 10, 2011, 07:57:20 PM
She's carried me to many a stage finish line:

Nice bikes mate!
I was just wondering, do male cyclists refer to their bicycles as female? And do female cyclists theirs as male?
I'm a male cyclist and both my bikes are female.

I always thought vehicles (ships, planes etc...) were named after females.  However, my wife's 2 bikes are both named after men.  Her road bike is named Sisyphus (the Greek dude that has to perpetually roll the boulder up the hill) and her mountain bike is Tenzing (The name of the Sherpa that climbed Mt. Everest with Edmund Hillary)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on April 10, 2011, 08:46:13 PM
I have never named or thought of my bikes as female or male. I spend to much time reminding myself to breath to think about it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on April 10, 2011, 09:04:36 PM
I have never named or thought of my bikes as female or male. I spend to much time reminding myself to breath to think about it.
Same here, nor have I ever named any inanimate object since I turned 6 or so.  Seems odd to me.   :-\
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on April 10, 2011, 10:48:16 PM
Most of my time spent on the bike is in isolation.  I ride 200-300 miles per week. My typical training ride is anywhere between 3-6 hours.  I suppose I anthropomorphize my bikes as a loneliness coping mechanism.  Kind of like Tom Hanks talking to a volleyball in the movie Castaway.

Either that, or I need someone to vent my frustration on when I am having a tough ride (i.e. "come on you useless bitch! drag your sorry ass over this hill!) :D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on April 11, 2011, 07:26:30 AM
Here's my roadie, Bellatrix. She's carried me to many a stage finish line:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/182927_1290538999658_1715751196_522502_7063474_n.jpg)

This is Minerva, my time trial bike. She has hauled my worthless carcase to the finish line of more than a few Ironmans:

Nice ride!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 11, 2011, 09:25:22 AM
So this morning (during rush hour, FYI) I saw a group of about 40-50 cyclists running red lights, taking up multiple lanes, not signaling.. I think they were one of those bicycle tours of the city. I love the idea of a business which intentionally endangers their customers and further erodes the reputation of cycling as a mode of transportation.

No wait, I don't.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: alitta on April 11, 2011, 03:06:08 PM
So this morning (during rush hour, FYI) I saw a group of about 40-50 cyclists running red lights, taking up multiple lanes, not signaling.. I think they were one of those bicycle tours of the city. I love the idea of a business which intentionally endangers their customers and further erodes the reputation of cycling as a mode of transportation.

No wait, I don't.

In the city I live, it's illegal for cyclists to not obey the same traffic laws as cars/other vehicles.

On another similar, but slightly different note, there's been quite a few times that a group of bikers (motorcyclists) ride on the highway by my house.  It's a four lane highway.  They get a police escort and drive below the speed limit, not allowing any cars to pass them or merge onto the highway.  (The comment about business or groups endangering people made me think of this.)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 11, 2011, 04:04:03 PM
It's illegal in my city and state as well.

The funniest part was that this unruly mob of cyclists rode past a police detail at a construction site and the cop did/said nothing to them about their red light running.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 11, 2011, 04:28:56 PM
My bike has no flats. I don't feel half-bad. I think this means I should ride my bike to work. \o/
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 12, 2011, 09:18:34 AM
So I completely cleaned my bike last night.. got all the winter grime off of it, completely degreased and then regreased the chain.. everything is so much smoother now. I was easily doing 23mph on the straight away parts of the bike trail, and was able to push up to 28.4 without too much exertion. Me likee spring.

On a sad note.. rain the next two days. Rainy and around 55 degrees.. that's not a recipe for a good time. If it were rainy and 70 I wouldn't care.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 12, 2011, 02:02:08 PM
So I completely cleaned my bike last night.. got all the winter grime off of it, completely degreased and then regreased the chain.. everything is so much smoother now. I was easily doing 23mph on the straight away parts of the bike trail, and was able to push up to 28.4 without too much exertion.

surprise, surprise.  your chain and casette will last a lot longer as well.  clean it after any decent ride and the job is easy. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 12, 2011, 02:12:59 PM
So I completely cleaned my bike last night.. got all the winter grime off of it, completely degreased and then regreased the chain.. everything is so much smoother now. I was easily doing 23mph on the straight away parts of the bike trail, and was able to push up to 28.4 without too much exertion.

surprise, surprise.  your chain and casette will last a lot longer as well.  clean it after any decent ride and the job is easy.

Yeah.. for the record I usually clean my chain about twice a month.. sometimes more frequently during the winter.. but the past two weeks I was having some trouble with the chain.. I would increase the tension but I think I wasn't tightening the cone nuts down on the spindle and the wheel was being pulled out of alignment. At any rate.. cleaned and adjusted, everything was great. Also, new cork tape for the handlebars which should excite me as much as it does, but I seriously let the cork tape I had on there overstay its welcome. When I put the tape on it was a dark red, it was a light pink by the time I stripped it off yesterday.. plus it smelled of about a year or more of accumulated sweat and grime.

Now I need to true my wheels.. I noticed some lateral wobble on my rear wheel when I was adjusting my chain tension.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 13, 2011, 02:23:11 AM
So... bike maintenance. I should do that. Any good resources for someone who's fairly new to this whole "bike as primary transportation" thing? I can fix a flat tire, but beyond that I get a little lost. Oh, and I can clean a bike chain. Which I need to do for my Eric, actually. Hm. Anyway. Resources? Kthx.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 13, 2011, 04:29:37 AM
So... bike maintenance. I should do that. Any good resources for someone who's fairly new to this whole "bike as primary transportation" thing? I can fix a flat tire, but beyond that I get a little lost. Oh, and I can clean a bike chain. Which I need to do for my Eric, actually. Hm. Anyway. Resources? Kthx.

I'd say get a boyfriend but that probably wouldn't be appropriate (my beautiful wife... oh, it's too long a story...).  I do have a book called "Bicycle Repair Manual" by Chris Sidwell and it is ok.  Doesn't matter who made your brakes or whatever, Shram/Shimano whoever, so a book like this is pretty good as it covers the basics.  That said, bicycle maintainence differs from computers in that you can physically fuck things up, so whilst it is good and sometimes enjoyable to potter with your bicycle, you do need to learn where to stop.  Hang out a bit with your mechanic (if you like him/her... I like my Richie) and you might learn a bit about what not to do and pass on from someone that has been to bicycle school. 

Always count the rotations you make adjusting gears, remember that some helixes are reversed on the left side of your bike and never tighten anything carbon without a torque wrench.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 13, 2011, 04:34:49 AM
I'd say get a boyfriend but that probably wouldn't be appropriate
:raise:

Actually, I need to learn this so that I can impress future girlfriends. ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 13, 2011, 06:04:18 AM
So... bike maintenance. I should do that. Any good resources for someone who's fairly new to this whole "bike as primary transportation" thing? I can fix a flat tire, but beyond that I get a little lost. Oh, and I can clean a bike chain. Which I need to do for my Eric, actually. Hm. Anyway. Resources? Kthx.

Provided you can listen to someone speaking Canadianese this is the best resource you will ever find, bar none.

http://bicycletutor.com/ (http://bicycletutor.com/)

BAR NONE.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 13, 2011, 05:37:52 PM
So... bike maintenance. I should do that. Any good resources for someone who's fairly new to this whole "bike as primary transportation" thing? I can fix a flat tire, but beyond that I get a little lost. Oh, and I can clean a bike chain. Which I need to do for my Eric, actually. Hm. Anyway. Resources? Kthx.
ParkTool has a lot of guides/tutorials on their website.
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help (http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help)

And here are a couple of PDFs.
http://www.icelord.net/bike/ (http://www.icelord.net/bike/)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 13, 2011, 08:43:56 PM
This is Minerva, my time trial bike. She has hauled my worthless carcase to the finish line of more than a few Ironmans:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/photo3.jpg)

I always thought the finish line in an ironman event was after the marathon...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 13, 2011, 10:51:32 PM
http://bicycletutor.com/ (http://bicycletutor.com/)

BAR NONE.
ParkTool has a lot of guides/tutorials on their website.
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help (http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help)

And here are a couple of PDFs.
http://www.icelord.net/bike/ (http://www.icelord.net/bike/)
Thanks guis.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on April 13, 2011, 11:05:32 PM
This is Minerva, my time trial bike. She has hauled my worthless carcase to the finish line of more than a few Ironmans:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/photo3.jpg)

I always thought the finish line in an ironman event was after the marathon...

Yeah, I should have said "T2" but it doesn't sound as noble as "Finish line"  ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on April 14, 2011, 06:22:40 AM
Oh, spring, joyous spring! Time for bicycles and wind in the hair!

Just remember to check that all screws and bolts are in place. I especially recommend checking the ones holding the seat in position. It can be either back-wrecking or unmanning to have this slide back and forth when you are a couple of miles out...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 14, 2011, 06:24:18 AM
Oh, spring, joyous spring! Time for bicycles and wind in the hair!

Just remember to check that all screws and bolts are in place. I especially recommend checking the ones holding the seat in position. It can be either back-wrecking or unmanning to have this slide back and forth when you are a couple of miles out...

Yeah.. I've had that bolt break on me twice.. mainly because I keep my seat angled downward so I put more pressure on one end of the seat.

Very scary. Loud pop, momentary panic.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 15, 2011, 02:52:56 AM
I once had a petal break on me, while pedaling. It was uncool. I didn't crash, which is unusual, and I managed to pedal home limply. And I was having such a good bike ride until then, too.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 15, 2011, 04:40:24 AM
I once had a petal break on me, while pedaling. It was uncool. I didn't crash, which is unusual, and I managed to pedal home limply. And I was having such a good bike ride until then, too.

Ya sorta click in and think it's all good... and sumpin goes wrong.  good thing you didn't put a gash in your calf.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 15, 2011, 05:56:00 AM
I once had a petal break on me, while pedaling. It was uncool. I didn't crash, which is unusual, and I managed to pedal home limply. And I was having such a good bike ride until then, too.

Haha.. oh yeah, I had that happen to me once too. It was on this shitty old bike I was riding after my bike got stolen, the screw which holds the crank to the spindle had come out and I didn't notice. The irony is that when I actually want to remove a crank it's really hard. Seriously, my crank puller is frozen into a crank that I removed like two years ago and I can't get it off, so if I want to remove a crank I'll have to go buy a new tool.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 15, 2011, 06:01:29 AM
Oh, spring, joyous spring! Time for bicycles and wind in the hair!

Just remember to check that all screws and bolts are in place. I especially recommend checking the ones holding the seat in position. It can be either back-wrecking or unmanning to have this slide back and forth when you are a couple of miles out...

Yeah.. I've had that bolt break on me twice.. mainly because I keep my seat angled downward so I put more pressure on one end of the seat.

Very scary. Loud pop, momentary panic.
I had this seatpost that only had one bolt and you adjusted the angle by sliding the saddle over this curved surface. Since I mainly cycle on trails it happens that you bounce around on the saddle, and if you bounced just right the saddle would shift angle with a loud "pop" and hitting ones balls in the process. Must have looked pretty funny.

My evolution of seatposts. If you're gonna by one go for the Thomson.
(http://i52.tinypic.com/2q1xf2w.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 15, 2011, 06:31:48 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/W1QXKjc1nLY
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on April 15, 2011, 01:49:54 PM
Your old seatpost is the same principle as what I have now, kb. What's the good part about the Thomson? I was thinking of taking it apart, degrease it and putting a bit of Lockite on that treacherous screw.

And the Swedes over at www.hovding.com (http://www.hovding.com) are "working their asses off" (you can tell it isn't a large company :) ), but the product won't ship until sometime in the summer. Well, who waits for something good...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on April 15, 2011, 07:34:54 PM
This is pretty much INSANE!  All I can think of while watching this video is Duke Nukem saying "I've got balls of STEEL!" over and over hahaha.

http://www.youtube.com/v/xIe6hYAdw_I

And he's wearing a pinstripe suit on top of it all!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 15, 2011, 08:07:36 PM
Your old seatpost is the same principle as what I have now, kb. What's the good part about the Thomson? I was thinking of taking it apart, degrease it and putting a bit of Lockite on that treacherous screw.

And the Swedes over at www.hovding.com (http://www.hovding.com) are "working their asses off" (you can tell it isn't a large company :) ), but the product won't ship until sometime in the summer. Well, who waits for something good...

The Thomson doesn't bend :) It's milled out of one piece of aluminium which supposedly makes it stronger than most others, and reasonable light weight. The mechanism for adjusting the angle is also simple and works great. If you have no problem with bent seat post then it might not be necessary. I bent the middle one (FSA) in about a week, but I know of others who had no problem with it. I weigh around 91kg (200 pounds) and like to sit down pedalling also.

And that Hövding helmet will make me look soo cool.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 16, 2011, 12:33:18 AM
I think you guys should stand up more often.


Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Tai Fung on April 16, 2011, 01:42:43 PM
This is Minerva, my time trial bike. She has hauled my worthless carcase to the finish line of more than a few Ironmans:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/photo3.jpg)

Completely jealous!  I'm a horrible beginner triathlete, and modest runner.  My Sprint/Oly tris were all done on a 15-year old mtn bike I'd bought in law school.  Of course, now that I'm in the market for a tri bike, I'm injured and facing months of PT to build up a bunch of tendons . . . .    :-[    :(
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on April 16, 2011, 02:20:06 PM
The Thomson doesn't bend :) It's milled out of one piece of aluminium which supposedly makes it stronger than most others, and reasonable light weight. The mechanism for adjusting the angle is also simple and works great. If you have no problem with bent seat post then it might not be necessary. I bent the middle one (FSA) in about a week, but I know of others who had no problem with it. I weigh around 91kg (200 pounds) and like to sit down pedalling also.

And that Hövding helmet will make me look soo cool.

No bending problems here, but since it seems to have solved the loose screw issue and I'm a sucker for anything sleek and remotely mechanical I'll at least think about it :)

Yup, same here, but I expect Concerned Mothers will swear at me for not wearing a "real" helmet :)

And people who stand up on their cycles haven't cycled enough.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 16, 2011, 02:29:47 PM
And people who stand up on their cycles haven't cycled enough.

tell that to Lance.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on April 16, 2011, 02:42:51 PM
I'll have to back-peddle and start my earlier statement with "Mere mortals who stand up..." :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 16, 2011, 03:02:18 PM
I often stand... easier to readjust my... parts.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on April 16, 2011, 05:00:57 PM
I would get to numb after awhile if I didn't.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 16, 2011, 06:38:24 PM
oh, its a little easier to pee, as well
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Tai Fung on April 16, 2011, 09:23:39 PM
Brian Dunning just tweeted an interesting little video about the physics of bicycling.  Neat short film:

http://tinyurl.com/3fjtvxh (http://tinyurl.com/3fjtvxh)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 16, 2011, 10:05:14 PM
I stand up when I'm starting from a stop. I can't explain properly why I do, but it makes it easier to get a start without having to shift down all the way before a stop. And sometimes on slight upgrades that don't last for very long. I think it has to do with how much more room my legs have when I'm standing up - they have more room to move if I'm standing. It's like the difference between throwing from your elbow and throwing from your shoulder, if that makes any sense. I keep wanting to use the word torque, but I don't think that applies in this case. Maybe force is what I'm thinking of. Bleh.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on April 17, 2011, 02:29:11 AM
Completely jealous!  I'm a horrible beginner triathlete, and modest runner.  My Sprint/Oly tris were all done on a 15-year old mtn bike I'd bought in law school.  Of course, now that I'm in the market for a tri bike, I'm injured and facing months of PT to build up a bunch of tendons . . . .    :-[    :(

That sucks man. I am no stranger to injury.  Just be patient - you'll be back at 100% before you know it.  Kudos to you for doing an olympic distance on a MTB!  That's like running a 10K in ski boots! :D  When you do finally get a TT bike, you will be blown away at the difference in speed and handling!  The accelleration is so snappy you'll feel like you're on a motorcycle.  Good luck on your future training man!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 17, 2011, 08:39:44 AM
So random question for the gents.. have you ever touched your balls while in the middle of a really long ride in hot weather and experienced a violent burning sensation? Last fall when I was in the middle of a charity ride I reached into my shorts to "readjust" while at a checkpoint and it was one of the most excrutiating pains I've ever felt. It's happened other times too.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 17, 2011, 01:16:01 PM
NO! Actually maximum discomfort appears on really cold rides... sort of a semi-painful numbness. 

Yesterday's ride gave me a seriously painful set of seat rashes, the first cold and wet training ride of the aurumn season.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 17, 2011, 02:20:38 PM
Man.. well, my advice is don't touch your scrotum skin with your bare hands.. something about the salt on your fingertips or something is really painful.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 18, 2011, 02:28:42 AM
I've never been so glad that I don't have a twig 'n' berries. :D I get... uncomfortable... and I've probably sustained light bruising, but I've never felt like my crotch was on fire.

Of course, I have one of those wide, cushy seats. ;D Sure, it looks weird on a road bike, but I prefer comfort to style.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Tai Fung on April 18, 2011, 01:17:10 PM
That sucks man. I am no stranger to injury.  Just be patient - you'll be back at 100% before you know it.  Kudos to you for doing an olympic distance on a MTB!  That's like running a 10K in ski boots! :D  When you do finally get a TT bike, you will be blown away at the difference in speed and handling!  The accelleration is so snappy you'll feel like you're on a motorcycle.  Good luck on your future training man!

Thanks very much!  Now if only there were some sort homepathic healing elixer I could use . . .    :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 18, 2011, 01:27:43 PM
I almost bought a TT frame.. I just love their geometry.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on April 18, 2011, 01:35:56 PM
That sucks man. I am no stranger to injury.  Just be patient - you'll be back at 100% before you know it.  Kudos to you for doing an olympic distance on a MTB!  That's like running a 10K in ski boots! :D  When you do finally get a TT bike, you will be blown away at the difference in speed and handling!  The accelleration is so snappy you'll feel like you're on a motorcycle.  Good luck on your future training man!

Thanks very much!  Now if only there were some sort homepathic healing elixer I could use . . .    :P
There is its called.................water ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: AxeGrrl on April 18, 2011, 02:01:05 PM


I've been looking at one of these......

http://www.crystalyte.com/conversion%20kits.htm (http://www.crystalyte.com/conversion%20kits.htm)


Anybody know anyone who's converted their bike thusly?

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 18, 2011, 02:21:25 PM


I've been looking at one of these......

http://www.crystalyte.com/conversion%20kits.htm (http://www.crystalyte.com/conversion%20kits.htm)


Anybody know anyone who's converted their bike thusly?

Can I just say, and this is my snobbery bubbling to the surface, but for the same price as this kit you could buy a pretty decent used road bike which would be far lighter than a mountain bike + a battery + a motor. If this is the type of kit I'm thinking of, the motor isn't in use at all times, so when you're not using the motor (i.e. when charging the battery) you're pushing around a 30 pound bike.

This is just my opinion, but you'd probably be better off with a lighter framed road bike. That's just my 2 cents.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: AxeGrrl on April 18, 2011, 02:26:37 PM


I've been looking at one of these......

http://www.crystalyte.com/conversion%20kits.htm (http://www.crystalyte.com/conversion%20kits.htm)


Anybody know anyone who's converted their bike thusly?

Can I just say, and this is my snobbery bubbling to the surface, but for the same price as this kit you could buy a pretty decent used road bike which would be far lighter than a mountain bike + a battery + a motor. If this is the type of kit I'm thinking of, the motor isn't in use at all times, so when you're not using the motor (i.e. when charging the battery) you're pushing around a 30 pound bike.

This is just my opinion, but you'd probably be better off with a lighter framed road bike. That's just my 2 cents.


Oh I always welcome opinion/advice when it comes to bikes :)  (since my ignorance in the area is profound :)

Now, when you say a 'lighter frame road bike', what do you mean specifically?  something motorized, i assume (since that's the 'point' of the kit)

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Scaramaus on April 18, 2011, 02:34:03 PM
I'm a little confused why you would buy something like this. Don't you have mopeds/scooters in the US?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 18, 2011, 02:37:07 PM
Well, I was saying that instead of getting a really heavy mountain bike with a really heavy motor you could just eschew the motor altogether and get yourself a lightweight framed road bike and it would give you pretty much the same overall benefit. From what I understand about those kits is that the motor doesn't have enough juice to always be providing a motorized assist, so while it helps start from a standing stop and probably helps you on hill climbs, the other 70% of the time you're just pushing around a really heavy apparatus which is mounted on another pretty heavy apparatus (your MTB frame).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: AxeGrrl on April 18, 2011, 03:25:13 PM
I'm a little confused why you would buy something like this. Don't you have mopeds/scooters in the US?


i dont want to have 2 things to store that i dont have room for :)

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: AxeGrrl on April 18, 2011, 03:29:22 PM
Well, I was saying that instead of getting a really heavy mountain bike with a really heavy motor you could just eschew the motor altogether and get yourself a lightweight framed road bike and it would give you pretty much the same overall benefit. From what I understand about those kits is that the motor doesn't have enough juice to always be providing a motorized assist, so while it helps start from a standing stop and probably helps you on hill climbs, the other 70% of the time you're just pushing around a really heavy apparatus which is mounted on another pretty heavy apparatus (your MTB frame).


yeah, i was thinking mainly about some help on hill climbs primarily, that was the main motivation.......there are some bike trails around here that are rife with reeeeally steep hills that wouldn't really be possible for me right now  (and i have no idea how long it would take me to get into good enough shape to try them ~ a friend of mine, who bikes daily and is in great shape even avoids them )
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 18, 2011, 03:45:15 PM
Well, I don't think the solution is weighing yourself down with an even heavier bike.

The only way you'll get in shape is by trying.

For every hill climb there's an effortless descent.

Of course.. I'm not really a good person to ask because I used to live literally at the peak of one of the tallest hills in my county and because of a weird work/school schedule I found myself biking up it twice a day almost every day. That being said.. the first couple of weeks I lived there I couldn't make it all the way up the hill without having to dismount and walk the rest of the way up the hill.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 18, 2011, 04:01:28 PM
Do not use underpants under your BIB-/cycling pants, that's all.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 18, 2011, 04:05:24 PM
Do not use underpants under your BIB-/cycling pants, that's all.

Yikes.. I can imagine.

Anyone ever tried that "Chamois butter" stuff? I usually just use baby powder with corn starch during the summer months..
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on April 18, 2011, 04:16:59 PM
Do not use underpants under your BIB-/cycling pants, that's all.

Yikes.. I can imagine.

Anyone ever tried that "Chamois butter" stuff? I usually just use baby powder with corn starch during the summer months..
No haven't tried "Chamois butter", I think it's only needed on leather chamois. I have (may be this is for the "confessions thread") lubed my butt though, made no difference IIRC :-[. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 18, 2011, 04:18:21 PM
Hmm.. See, I'd figure that by putting a liquid lubricant "down there" you're just inviting the sort of swampy conditions which leads to rashes and infections, which is why I've always opted for absorbent powders.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 18, 2011, 09:53:55 PM
Baby powder. It's a god-send.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 19, 2011, 01:38:45 AM
oh,  harden up.  just wash the brown stain out of your chamois when it gets too disgusting.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 19, 2011, 01:44:40 AM
The only chamois I'm familiar with is the one I use in my drawing class.
(http://www.bigceramicstore.com/images/othertools/chamois.jpg)

It's also, apparently, a goat.
(http://wild-facts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/appenine_chamois.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 19, 2011, 01:50:51 AM
There are chamois cavorting in the hills near me, as I write.  There are also stinky ones in the laundry basket in the bedroom...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 19, 2011, 01:52:35 AM
There are chamois cavorting in the hills near me, as I write.  There are also stinky ones in the laundry basket in the bedroom...
I imagine that the ones cavorting in the hills are stinky, too. :D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 19, 2011, 02:29:31 AM
They are stinky (introduced) pests and occasionally massively slaughtered from helicopters by the Dept of Conservation.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on April 19, 2011, 05:12:42 AM
I think burning balls is Nature's gentle way of saying: "Take a break and get a nice, broad seat."

As for the steep hills: locking your feet to the pedals helps (not sure of the nomenclature here), and the tried and true "one meter more" goes a long way. At the end of the year you can stop on the top and laugh at the hill behind you.
Electrical assist will be nice the day it disappears into the wheels and frame. The only ones I have seen yet to make sense turns the bike into an electrical scooter.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 19, 2011, 06:06:50 AM
The only chamois I'm familiar with is the one I use in my drawing class.
(http://www.bigceramicstore.com/images/othertools/chamois.jpg)

It's also, apparently, a goat.
(http://wild-facts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/appenine_chamois.jpg)

"Chamois" is the polite term for the padded part of cycling shorts which wicks sweat away from your bits.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 19, 2011, 02:26:38 PM
The only chamois I'm familiar with is the one I use in my drawing class.
(http://www.bigceramicstore.com/images/othertools/chamois.jpg)

It's also, apparently, a goat.
(http://wild-facts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/appenine_chamois.jpg)

"Chamois" is the polite term for the padded part of cycling shorts which wicks sweat away from your bits.
Thank you.

I don't cycle for nearly long enough to get that sweaty down there. And I have baby wipes for when I do. ;D Seriously, baby products are awesome.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 19, 2011, 03:08:07 PM
Hence the baby powder.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 19, 2011, 07:10:28 PM
For some of us, cycling is just another excuse to shave our legs and dress up in lycra...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 19, 2011, 07:30:49 PM
I don't shave my legs.. I only shave the parts under the lycra.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 21, 2011, 10:12:23 AM
Sigh.

Boston is announcing the launch of one of those "bike sharing" programs like they have in most European cities. I can't imagine anything worse for the cause of cycling advocacy than having a bunch of novices loafing around on rented Amsterdam cruisers, riding on sidewalks and in crosswalks, salmoning, and doing all of the myriad other things that idiots do when they're tourists, only now they'll be doing them on a bike. I predict that my "cycling law breakers" spreadsheet is about to get a whole lot more interesting.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 21, 2011, 07:29:42 PM
I want to go for a bike ride, but my homework is staring at me plaintively. I hate it when it stares plaintively. I think I'll try to get it over quickly so that I can enjoy the rest of the day. I think I'll just go for a bike ride before work tomorrow. <3 mah bike.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on April 21, 2011, 08:27:59 PM
Did a nice 1 hour ride today. First good day to ride in about a week. Looking at the weather report it looks like the only good day for about a week. I hate early spring.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 21, 2011, 11:12:43 PM
Me too, ride that is.  thirty odd km solo trail ride.  You don't want much to go wrong when you're out there alone.  Good Friday and I couldn't get anyone to go along. 

Now my homework is staring me in the face, or will be when I shift the electric fence for the heifers.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 22, 2011, 06:13:04 AM
I definitely third that emotion about early spring. The wind yesterday must have been blowing steady at 25mph+, forcing me to divert from the river trail onto the surface roads. Cutting through Cambridge was an eye opening experience, in the space of 2 miles I saw 21 people running red lights. Come on, that's just fucking absurd.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on April 22, 2011, 08:16:43 AM
And to top it off when I was about 3/4 of the way through my ride I lost a screw on my shoe that held my cleat on. That made for an interesting last few miles.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 22, 2011, 09:28:03 AM
And to top it off when I was about 3/4 of the way through my ride I lost a screw on my shoe that held my cleat on. That made for an interesting last few miles.

Been there, done that.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 22, 2011, 01:44:21 PM
And to top it off when I was about 3/4 of the way through my ride I lost a screw on my shoe that held my cleat on. That made for an interesting last few miles.

Been there, done that.

I might toss two of those in in with the spare chain links... 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on April 22, 2011, 02:32:30 PM
And to top it off when I was about 3/4 of the way through my ride I lost a screw on my shoe that held my cleat on. That made for an interesting last few miles.

Been there, done that.

I might toss two of those in in with the spare chain links...
On the list now. It's one of those things that you don't think of until it  happens.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 22, 2011, 03:18:57 PM
Yeah, just like a tire lever set and a spare tube with a CO2 gun and a cone wrench (for those without quick release).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 23, 2011, 04:56:30 AM
Yeah, just like a tire lever set and a spare tube with a CO2 gun and a cone wrench (for those without quick release).
Got it, got it, have a hand pump, don't need it.

Have I mentioned that I'm not a fan of Presta stems? Because I'm not.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 23, 2011, 02:46:12 PM
Shrader doesn't work with nice wheels,
(click to show/hide)
too fat, too short.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 24, 2011, 02:20:05 PM
Yeah, just like a tire lever set and a spare tube with a CO2 gun and a cone wrench (for those without quick release).
Got it, got it, have a hand pump, don't need it.

Have I mentioned that I'm not a fan of Presta stems? Because I'm not.

Yeah, leave it to the Italians to design something so uselessly impractical. I was able to find long-stem Schraders for a while, but then the store which I was getting them from stopped carrying that brand and I had to switch to Prestas for my "Deep-V" rims.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 25, 2011, 01:40:09 PM
Has anyone ever had a chain stretch out on them? I'm wondering if that's a phenomenon because I finally tracked down the reason why my chain seemed to be sagging and I think it has to be that the chain has stretched out. I'm thinking that with the amount of torque after about a year (which is how old this chain is) each link would stretch enough so that the cumulative effect becomes noticeable.

I guess I'm going to have to drop a link for the time being until I can get a new chain.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 26, 2011, 01:31:01 AM
Oh yes.  I am not sure exactly how many links it entails but a new chain will have a perfect centre to centre (pins) at 12".  I swap for a new chain when I measure the stretch at over a few mms, maybe an eighth of an inch.  Letting it stretch too much , and they will, wears the cassette cogs so that a new chain will skip and you are up for a ne cassette, much more expensive.

I keep an old chunk of yardstick for the task.  Metric doesn't come out to such an even and easy number.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 26, 2011, 06:14:40 AM
OK.. good to know. I've definitely been getting some "skip".. every few turns of the crank there's a *CLANK* as the chain tries to come off the drive crank and then finds its way back on.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 26, 2011, 01:07:30 PM
Oh thank you Jeebus, that unholy abomination Triple Rush just got canceled after three episodes.

https://twitter.com/#!/search?q=%23savetriplerush

My biggest fear is that the show would gain some sort of popularity and then add fuel to the anti-cyclist lobby.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on April 27, 2011, 05:26:17 AM
I've never had a chain stretch that I know of. I haven't really ridden bikes long enough, though. Or hard enough, maybe. I've had them rust due to not storing them properly.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on April 27, 2011, 06:40:42 AM
Well, I shortened chain but I think the problem isn't that the chain stretched so much as that there seem to be two links which are frozen, and that's what is causing the clanking noise. I'm going to swap out those two links for the two links which I dropped from the chain yesterday to shorten it, and hopefully that will clear the problem up.. At least until this weekend when I'll probably go buy a new chain.

I seriously need to true my wheels.. the rear wheel is really off.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on April 27, 2011, 10:13:28 PM
sometimes you can get links unstuck by bending the chain back and forth a bit just at those links , but not so much as to bend the links themselves.  sometimes you can't.

I tried a new HIIT thing yesterday, sprint for a certain number of power poles and rest for anothe number of poles.  I think I need to make it less scattered than yesteerday to get the most out of it.

 sprint for 2 rest for 4, repeat... sprint for 2 rest for 1, sprint for 3 rest for 5, whatever.  I really liked it but It might be a once a fortnight thing.  It was hard!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: ohare on April 28, 2011, 01:26:29 AM
Baby powder. It's a god-send.

I've done a number of multi-week bicycle tours and I found corn starch works pretty well, too. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 02, 2011, 06:46:04 PM
Baby powder. It's a god-send.

I've done a number of multi-week bicycle tours and I found corn starch works pretty well, too.
That's pretty much what baby powder is, only with a nice scent. I have the non-talcum sort of powder.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 06, 2011, 10:15:14 AM
So I took my bike in to the shop to get the "clanking" problem diagnosed. The mechanic asked me how old the freewheel on my bike was, I had honestly never thought about it. The freewheel is easily 6,000-9,000 miles old, which is probably 3-6,000 miles older than it should be. So, I got a new freewheel and a new chain and everything is so smooth. Shortened my wheelbase too.

Also, Engrish funny:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidonformosa/3365736266/# (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidonformosa/3365736266/#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on May 06, 2011, 03:25:03 PM
So I took my bike in to the shop to get the "clanking" problem diagnosed. The mechanic asked me how old the freewheel on my bike was, I had honestly never thought about it. The freewheel is easily 6,000-9,000 miles old, which is probably 3-6,000 miles older than it should be. So, I got a new freewheel and a new chain and everything is so smooth. Shortened my wheelbase too.

Also, Engrish funny:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidonformosa/3365736266/# (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidonformosa/3365736266/#)

...multiplying everything by .6...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on May 06, 2011, 04:32:07 PM
Oh yes.  I am not sure exactly how many links it entails but a new chain will have a perfect centre to centre (pins) at 12".  I swap for a new chain when I measure the stretch at over a few mms, maybe an eighth of an inch.  Letting it stretch too much , and they will, wears the cassette cogs so that a new chain will skip and you are up for a ne cassette, much more expensive.
It might be a good idea to have 2 or 3 chains and alternate between them to make the cogs and chain wear down slower. When I'm using the mountainbike more frequently the chain usually needs cleaning and lubrication at least every 3 weeks, which makes it a good time to change.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Tai Fung on May 08, 2011, 11:10:51 PM
I love that people name their bikes.  If I ever get a really good Tri bike, I'm going to name it.  Something cool, like Thor, Loki, or "The Baloney Pony."

"Hey sweetie!  I'm going to go do a couple of hours riding The Baloney Pony!"

"Hey, if you need me, I'll be on The Mighty Thor.  Well, I'll be Mighty Thor after an hour on that seat!"


Thanks folks, I'll be here all week.  Try the veal!

Play me off, Johnny!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on May 09, 2011, 04:35:11 AM
Oh yes.  I am not sure exactly how many links it entails but a new chain will have a perfect centre to centre (pins) at 12".  I swap for a new chain when I measure the stretch at over a few mms, maybe an eighth of an inch.  Letting it stretch too much , and they will, wears the cassette cogs so that a new chain will skip and you are up for a ne cassette, much more expensive.
It might be a good idea to have 2 or 3 chains and alternate between them to make the cogs and chain wear down slower. When I'm using the mountainbike more frequently the chain usually needs cleaning and lubrication at least every 3 weeks, which makes it a good time to change.

If the cassette and chain on any of my bicycles doesn't shine at the start of a ride, I get total shit from my rather more serious cycling buddies.  I even cop it if my beautiful wife's bicycle is blemished.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Moloch on May 09, 2011, 04:38:01 AM
I love that people name their bikes.  If I ever get a really good Tri bike, I'm going to name it.  Something cool, like Thor, Loki, or "The Baloney Pony."

"Hey sweetie!  I'm going to go do a couple of hours riding The Baloney Pony!"

"Hey, if you need me, I'll be on The Mighty Thor.  Well, I'll be Mighty Thor after an hour on that seat!"


Thanks folks, I'll be here all week.  Try the veal!

Play me off, Johnny!

'Riding the baloney pony' sounds kinda.... eww
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on May 09, 2011, 08:41:21 AM
I love that people name their bikes.  If I ever get a really good Tri bike, I'm going to name it.  Something cool, like Thor, Loki, or "The Baloney Pony."

"Hey sweetie!  I'm going to go do a couple of hours riding The Baloney Pony!"

"Hey, if you need me, I'll be on The Mighty Thor.  Well, I'll be Mighty Thor after an hour on that seat!"


Thanks folks, I'll be here all week.  Try the veal!

Play me off, Johnny!

'Riding the baloney pony' sounds kinda.... eww

There's a Swedish porno movie where they do just that, Fäbodjäntan. (Mountain cabin girl?)

(http://akustik.wblogg.se/files/2010/02/fabodjantan.jpg)

It's a shitty photo, but yes that's a sausage. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falukorv) And yes, it's going to end up precisely where you think.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on May 09, 2011, 03:16:58 PM
Tragic death on stage 3 of Giro d’Italia. Ironically he (Wouter Weylandt) won the third stage last year.
http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/05/road/wouter-weylandt-biography_171968 (http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/05/road/wouter-weylandt-biography_171968)
http://www.espn.co.uk/cycling/sport/story/89674.html (http://www.espn.co.uk/cycling/sport/story/89674.html)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 09, 2011, 03:19:51 PM
Next time some pompous ESPN hack *COUGH* Tony Kornheiser *COUGH* ridicules cycling for being "soft" I'm going to point out this.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on May 10, 2011, 01:21:56 AM
I'm considering getting a Garmin  Edge 705 for both mountain and road.  My cycling buddies all have the 310xt but they are serious multisporters and don't think I would be happy with that one.  Anyone got a 705? 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 10, 2011, 12:30:19 PM
So.. Bike Snob guy is really pissed off by this PSA campaign.

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/bicyclists/dontbeajerk.shtml (http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/bicyclists/dontbeajerk.shtml)

My question is.. why?

There is nothing at all controversial about this PSA campaign in my view. He seems to be arguing that it's unfair to ask cyclists to obey the law as long as cyclists are prone to getting hit by careless and reckless drivers, but that is such an absurd argument it makes me want to vomit with rage. So what if drivers suck? Deal with it. They suck just as much when you're driving in your car as they do when you're riding on your bike. So maybe drivers have some animosity towards cyclists and treat them like dirt.. don't you think that maybe that's due--at least in part--to the fact that on an average day I witness 18 people running red lights, 5 "salmon", and 10 people illegally riding their bike on the sidewalk. That's all in about 30 minutes of riding on city streets.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on May 10, 2011, 12:47:30 PM
So maybe drivers have some animosity towards cyclists and treat them like dirt.. don't you think that maybe that's due--at least in part--to the fact that on an average day I witness 18 people running red lights, 5 "salmon", and 10 people illegally riding their bike on the sidewalk. That's all in about 30 minutes of riding on city streets.

Yesterday on a three mile drive from the hospital, I watched the same cyclist salmon the whole way, except when he was riding against the bus lane.  I caught every light, while he ran every single one.  He nearly bowled down some folks in a crosswalk, indicated no turns or merges, wasn't wearing any safety gear whatsoever, and his vintage fixie bike had no reflectors.

For the record:  guy in the car - obeys all traffic laws, stays out of oncoming traffic, uses indicator lights, and didn't run anybody off the road - still got where he was going in time.

Driver: 5 - Cyclist: 0

It's really no wonder that most drivers hate cyclists.  Most cyclists are pieces of shit that make the law-abiding citizens like you look bad.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Tai Fung on May 10, 2011, 06:37:53 PM
I watched all 3 of those videos.  Even as an admittedly-clueless cyclist (it's why I stick to bike/jogging trails), those seem like perfectly innocuous and reasonable rules.  The videos aren't even heavy handed about them.  It's just showing someone not following the rules, and asking cyclists to just be reasonable.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 11, 2011, 05:44:40 AM
I watched all 3 of those videos.  Even as an admittedly-clueless cyclist (it's why I stick to bike/jogging trails), those seem like perfectly innocuous and reasonable rules.  The videos aren't even heavy handed about them.  It's just showing someone not following the rules, and asking cyclists to just be reasonable.

Precisely. So why the uproar? I guess it's because NYC is also "cracking down" on law breaking cyclists and writing a lot of tickets, but again.. what's the problem? If there was an area of the city where motorists were just running red lights and driving the wrong way down streets and cutting over sidewalks in order to avoid bumper-to-bumper sidewalks I'd expect that the police would start staking out that area and crack down on those motorists hard. I'd be ecstatic if my city would crack down on cyclists the way NYC has been cracking down on their cyclists.

Complaining about the police making a big show of enforcing the law in order to deter running red lights is like a drunk drivers advocacy group protesting checkpoints or a reckless drivers advocacy group protesting speed traps. Suck it up and stop breaking the law ya pansies.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on May 11, 2011, 09:02:37 AM
I guess what people don't want is a strict enforcement of the law. I ride safe but I also don't stop for stop signs if no cars are coming. I ride more residential then city. I think we can all agree that we want the idiots off the road so as not to give cycling a bad name.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 11, 2011, 09:23:02 AM
I guess what people don't want is a strict enforcement of the law. I ride safe but I also don't stop for stop signs if no cars are coming. I ride more residential then city. I think we can all agree that we want the idiots off the road so as not to give cycling a bad name.

That's called an "Iowa Stop" or an "Idaho Stop" or something. I'm pretty ambivalent about that.. I generally stop on the stop line and wait, but I don't stop completely (I basically do a track stand), and as long as rolling through a stop sign doesn't entail cutting off a pedestrian or doing one of those idiotic "dodging-in-between-cars-coming-from-the-perpendicular-streets-of-the-intersection" things then I'm not going to get my panties in a bunch over it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Chew on May 11, 2011, 09:31:13 AM
Any cyclist breaking the traffic laws is fair game.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 11, 2011, 09:39:29 AM
Any cyclist breaking the traffic laws is fair game.

I actually wholeheartedly agree with this sentiment. I often encourage my wife to hit cyclists when she's driving.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on May 11, 2011, 05:09:29 PM
I often encourage my wife to hit cyclists when she's driving.

I've been thinking it would be fun to install a hidden pneumatic piston in my wheel well that could shoot out a few feet into the bike lane from a switch on my dash.  Some guy comes the wrong way down the bike lane one second, and the next...

(click to show/hide)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 11, 2011, 08:38:56 PM
It's funny that you mention that because I was thinking about installing some sort of pneumatic arm on my bike which blocks the bike lane so that when I'm stopped at a red light if anyone tries to either "shoal" me or just blatantly run the red light I can destroy their shit.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Marx on May 12, 2011, 08:25:03 AM
Bicycles don’t cause the sort of damage when they hit things like a lot of motor traffic do.

Having to be of a certain age & endorsed to pilot one are some measures in place all over the world, to one extent or another, in an attempt to reduce the sort of maelstrom of carnage motor traffic can inflict on a community if they were as openly available to all & sundry like bicycle are.
For this reason if no other,  the flagrant disregard of road rules displayed by some bike riders should not be weighted so heavily against them as is rightly should be to those driving a car (for example).

Even though the law is stated in black & white, justice should be metered out in moderation.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 12, 2011, 09:38:05 AM
I call bullshit.

Motorcycles also don't cause as much damage as cars, and mopeds are capable of causing even less damage than motorcycles. Conversely, trucks and buses and vans cause more damage than cars, so are we to have a sliding scale of how much attention should be paid to the rules of the road by an operator based on their GVW (gross vehicle weight)? No. One road, one set of rules. Period.

Enough of this namby-pamby "OH BUT BIKES ARE BETTER FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AND YOU CAN'T HURT SOMEONE AS BADLY IF YOU RUN THEM OVER ON A BIKE". Bull shit. If I'm barreling down on a pedestrian at 23mph the amount of damage that my 170lbs of meat and bone plus an additional 20lbs of bike and helmet and all of the sundry things I carry in my messenger bag like calculus textbooks and 5-lb. U-locks and stainless steel coffee thermos, etc.. I am going to destroy your shit if I hit you.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: TheLostVertex on May 12, 2011, 10:02:24 AM
I call bullshit.

Motorcycles also don't cause as much damage as cars, and mopeds are capable of causing even less damage than motorcycles. Conversely, trucks and buses and vans cause more damage than cars, so are we to have a sliding scale of how much attention should be paid to the rules of the road by an operator based on their GVW (gross vehicle weight)? No. One road, one set of rules. Period.

Enough of this namby-pamby "OH BUT BIKES ARE BETTER FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AND YOU CAN'T HURT SOMEONE AS BADLY IF YOU RUN THEM OVER ON A BIKE". Bull shit. If I'm barreling down on a pedestrian at 23mph the amount of damage that my 170lbs of meat and bone plus an additional 20lbs of bike and helmet and all of the sundry things I carry in my messenger bag like calculus textbooks and 5-lb. U-locks and stainless steel coffee thermos, etc.. I am going to destroy your shit if I hit you.

Wait, were you saying bikes didnt do alot of damage, or that they did? I think you did an illegal U-y with that one ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 12, 2011, 10:04:57 AM
I'm just saying that the argument that bikes don't cause a lot of damage and therefore cyclists don't need to follow the rules as scrupulously is bull shit. Yes, they don't cause as much damage, but nonetheless if I hit someone at a high rate of speed I'm going to ruin their day.

Which is why you can't have a sliding scale of rule obeisance.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on May 12, 2011, 12:20:22 PM
You can kill somebody in a 20 mph collision on a bike.  Happens a lot more than you'd think. (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2273214/Family-of-teenager-killed-by-cyclist-call-for-change-in-law.html)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 12, 2011, 03:28:46 PM
Oh, speaking of regulating traffic on a sliding scale.. Apparently the NY City Council has responded to the outcry from whiny cyclists who were getting ticketed running red lights on Central Park Drive by deciding that from here on in they will only ticket cyclists who run red lights while there are pedestrians attempting to cross. Yeah, that totally makes sense and will not at all result accusations of police harassment or "special treatment" from the police, depending on which side of the "bike lobby" you fall. What a fucking brilliant idea, for me to poop on.

Spineless cowards. That's what they are.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 13, 2011, 01:55:36 AM
I guess what people don't want is a strict enforcement of the law. I ride safe but I also don't stop for stop signs if no cars are coming. I ride more residential then city. I think we can all agree that we want the idiots off the road so as not to give cycling a bad name.

That's called an "Iowa Stop" or an "Idaho Stop" or something.
Is that similar to the California stop?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: TheLostVertex on May 13, 2011, 02:41:04 AM
I guess what people don't want is a strict enforcement of the law. I ride safe but I also don't stop for stop signs if no cars are coming. I ride more residential then city. I think we can all agree that we want the idiots off the road so as not to give cycling a bad name.

That's called an "Iowa Stop" or an "Idaho Stop" or something.
Is that similar to the California stop?

I assume so, i think he just is making up his own terminology to screw with people.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 13, 2011, 07:04:05 AM
I guess what people don't want is a strict enforcement of the law. I ride safe but I also don't stop for stop signs if no cars are coming. I ride more residential then city. I think we can all agree that we want the idiots off the road so as not to give cycling a bad name.

That's called an "Iowa Stop" or an "Idaho Stop" or something.
Is that similar to the California stop?

I've always called it the "California Roll"  ;D

@TLV:

http://www.cyclelicio.us/2009/04/idaho-stop-law-for-cyclists.html (http://www.cyclelicio.us/2009/04/idaho-stop-law-for-cyclists.html)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Marx on May 13, 2011, 09:06:09 AM
jaypee, sounds like you're posting on the wrong thread.
You've got issues with cyclists that posting here won't help you with.
Some cyclists will continue flaunt the road rules & your  frustration with that will only get worse, as more people will be getting out of their cars & onto bikes.

Although I must admit I've never been in the US, so I don't know how bad you have it. Over here in Australia most drivers are OK, but as traffic in the major cities is now gridlocked during peak times, cyclists who roll through it all (passing the stationary cars) are getting abuse from motorists who are stuck in it.

Also there is a bayside stretch of road from the city here in Melbourne , out south east for about 50kms that gets massive numbers of recreational road cyclists (numbering in the thousands across that length of road) early on weekend mornings, to the extent that between 6am & 10am cars are forced into the remaining outside lane & many residents with driveways backing out onto this road are unable to pull out (for long periods of time).
There's heaps of aggro from some motorists along there too.

Thing is, the sort of targeting you are doing to all cyclists due to the actions of a few that will just screw with your head until you're up on some road rage charge  & left to take the bus.

Public roads are not based on user pays. Like footpaths & driveways the councils & various community governments provide these facilities for all to use & none to claim as their own.
The drivers licence you have & the regstieration you pay for your vehicle is beacuse those things are bloody dangerous & have killed alot of people in the past, present & mostly likely into the future.  If they weren't so useful in getting people around they would be banned.

Cyclists fit into all this exactly the same way as pedestrains, horse drawn carraiges & trams. Motor traffic are required to share the roads with all other users.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 13, 2011, 09:28:58 AM
Wow, nothing you just said made any sort of sense. Congratulations for that.

1) I started this thread because I'm a passionate advocate for cycling and view it as something more than a hobby, something less than an obsession.

2) I don't drive, and unless you count joint marital property, I don't even own a car.

3) You cannot have different rules for different vehicles using the same roads. That's absurd. It's like saying that rich people should be subject to different laws than poor people, or white people subject to different laws than black people. Your assertion that cyclists should be allowed to just fuck around and not obey the law merely because cars are more dangerous is stupid and absurd.

4) Stop wasting my time.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Marx on May 13, 2011, 09:42:58 AM
phark.
you gotta work on your people skills.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 13, 2011, 09:45:33 AM
Why? My people skills are just fine. I fucking hate people, and I'm highly skilled at it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 13, 2011, 02:37:45 PM
Why? My people skills are just fine. I fucking hate people, and I'm highly skilled at it.
:roflolmao:

Also, simmer down you two.

But seriously. :roflolmao:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 14, 2011, 02:41:29 AM
Just rode about 15 miles. Tomorrow is going to be interesting. It was a pretty great ride, though. Except for the parts where I hit things with my tires. Ow.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 16, 2011, 10:03:05 AM
So.. I just broke my handlebars again.

For those of you keeping score at home, this is second (http://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,25720.msg633533.html#msg633533) time this has happened to me since joining the SGUF. I could understand when the last ones broke because they were cheap POS drop bars, but these were relatively expensive Profile Aero T2 bullhorn bars.

I really like(d) the bullhorn style, but now I'm worried they might not be able to support my weight. I'm tempted to just buy steel handlebars, but Amazon doesn't really have anything which grabs me.

Anyone have any suggestions/advice? I'm going to buy new bars today so that I can get them shipped overnight.


Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Tai Fung on May 16, 2011, 01:49:46 PM
Tragic death on stage 3 of Giro d’Italia. Ironically he (Wouter Weylandt) won the third stage last year.
http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/05/road/wouter-weylandt-biography_171968 (http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/05/road/wouter-weylandt-biography_171968)
http://www.espn.co.uk/cycling/sport/story/89674.html (http://www.espn.co.uk/cycling/sport/story/89674.html)

I just saw this means of supporting Weylandt's GF and in utero child on Twitter:

http://ow.ly/4UdbS (http://ow.ly/4UdbS)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quirk3k on May 16, 2011, 01:56:45 PM
Hey all,

I searched the thread, but couldn't find any info on this.

Does anyone use a cycling app? Do you like it? Do you find it useful?

I've been using Nike+ GPS to track my walks for a while and I really love it. I just got Cyclemeter for my bike rides but haven't had a chance to try it out yet.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 16, 2011, 02:06:24 PM
Hey all,

I searched the thread, but couldn't find any info on this.

Does anyone use a cycling app? Do you like it? Do you find it useful?

I've been using Nike+ GPS to track my walks for a while and I really love it. I just got Cyclemeter for my bike rides but haven't had a chance to try it out yet.

If you use Facebook a lot I'd recommend using the Cycling Log app.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 16, 2011, 10:24:22 PM
I'm actually thinking about getting a bike computer. I'd like to be able to track the distance I ride, my speed, but nothing too fancy. I always have my phone, so I don't need anything with GPS. Any recommendations? Not interested in spending too much, but cost probably isn't that big of an issue.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: TheLostVertex on May 17, 2011, 01:09:33 AM
Why? My people skills are just fine. I fucking hate people, and I'm highly skilled at it.

If karma was on, Id upvote the shit out of this.

So.. I just broke my handlebars again.

For those of you keeping score at home, this is second (http://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,25720.msg633533.html#msg633533) time this has happened to me since joining the SGUF. I could understand when the last ones broke because they were cheap POS drop bars, but these were relatively expensive Profile Aero T2 bullhorn bars.

I really like(d) the bullhorn style, but now I'm worried they might not be able to support my weight. I'm tempted to just buy steel handlebars, but Amazon doesn't really have anything which grabs me.

Anyone have any suggestions/advice? I'm going to buy new bars today so that I can get them shipped overnight.

Were they CF or aluminum? Did they crack or snap? How much do you weigh? I dont know anybody else that have used those bars, but its pretty hard to break a good set of bars even if they are CF.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on May 17, 2011, 03:03:05 AM
I'm actually thinking about getting a bike computer. I'd like to be able to track the distance I ride, my speed, but nothing too fancy. I always have my phone, so I don't need anything with GPS. Any recommendations? Not interested in spending too much, but cost probably isn't that big of an issue.

I'd go to Torpedo 7 but yu'll have a US equivalant.  Cateye is a really good brand, they have a big range and the wired ones aren't too dear... and they last.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 17, 2011, 06:58:38 AM

Were they CF or aluminum? Did they crack or snap? How much do you weigh? I dont know anybody else that have used those bars, but its pretty hard to break a good set of bars even if they are CF.

They were some sort of alloy I think. The thing is, I bought these used, so I have no idea how much wear and tear was put on them before I installed them on my bike.

I weigh about 170 and I do put a lot of weight forward, so I guess it's possible that this will just keep happening. I'm sort of bummed out now though, I went ahead and bought another alloy bullhorn handlebar on Amazon right before my friend found me an alloy set which has an internal steel sleeve. Oh well.

I'm actually thinking about getting a bike computer. I'd like to be able to track the distance I ride, my speed, but nothing too fancy. I always have my phone, so I don't need anything with GPS. Any recommendations? Not interested in spending too much, but cost probably isn't that big of an issue.

Whatever you do, don't buy a cheap Bell computer. They suck a ton.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on May 17, 2011, 09:26:44 AM
I have a cateye and it works well. I have used a computer for a few years now and it is nice to get an idea on how far you have rode and it keeps track on bike time which means that when you stop the time stops also. I have had both the wireless and the wired. both work well but I have never rode with a group so I don't know if the wireless would get interference from other computers. I would think not.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 19, 2011, 06:38:54 AM
Crap, I just found out that www.bicycletutor.com (http://www.bicycletutor.com) went from being a free online video resource to one which requires a monthly membership.

Now I has a sad. BICYCLE TUTOR, WHY HAST THOU FORSAKEN ME?

Ah well.. c'est la vie. Time to move on to my new love, Atlanta's In Town Bicycles channel on Youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/user/IntownBicycles (http://www.youtube.com/user/IntownBicycles)

I don't need you Bicycle Tutor.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on May 20, 2011, 12:57:06 AM
I have a cateye and it works well. I have used a computer for a few years now and it is nice to get an idea on how far you have rode and it keeps track on bike time which means that when you stop the time stops also. I have had both the wireless and the wired. both work well but I have never rode with a group so I don't know if the wireless would get interference from other computers. I would think not.

That's right, they don't conflict with other riders like heartrate monitors.  I love my wireless cateye (especially critical on the mountain bike)  but I really want a gps system with an integrated heartrate monitor.  What a mindless consumer I can be... and I just realised how much I spent on cf bottle cages...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: leonet on May 20, 2011, 01:20:57 AM
That's right, they don't conflict with other riders like heartrate monitors.  I love my wireless cateye (especially critical on the mountain bike)  but I really want a gps system with an integrated heartrate monitor.  What a mindless consumer I can be... and I just realised how much I spent on cf bottle cages...

There is one for a cool $300:
http://www.heartratewatchcompany.com/Timex-Global-Trainer-GPS-watch-p/timex-ironman-global-trainer.htm (http://www.heartratewatchcompany.com/Timex-Global-Trainer-GPS-watch-p/timex-ironman-global-trainer.htm)

This hobby can get really expensive :-\
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 20, 2011, 06:20:44 AM
Check out my early father's day present:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41JSSCR9M7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on May 20, 2011, 01:02:21 PM
Check out my early father's day present:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41JSSCR9M7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Sweet!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 20, 2011, 01:28:40 PM
The best part is that it has built in tire levers and a cone wrench, so now I can throw together an "emergency kit" with a spare tube plus my CO2 gun and I'll never have to worry about the "walk of shame" home whenever I blow a tube.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 21, 2011, 02:31:53 AM
Jaypee. You just invited a bunch of strangers to check out your tool(s). Have you no shame.

Also, nice tools, bro. ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on May 21, 2011, 08:21:03 AM
Check out my early father's day present:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41JSSCR9M7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Wow.  I know who's opening my beers from now on at parties.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 21, 2011, 01:52:58 PM
Jaypee. You just invited a bunch of strangers to check out your tool(s). Have you no shame.

Also, nice tools, bro. ;)

Hahah.. sorry, I just started dying laughing. It's sort of an inside joke, but I think it's worth an explanation.

My friend got irritated one day while looking at photos on Facebook by all of the girls who would comment on each others photos with comments like "Oh my god you look so cute in this picture!" or "Oh my god your [body part] looks so great in that dress!".. so he decided to start commenting on his friends Facebook photos with "Nice dick, bro!"
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 22, 2011, 01:46:51 AM
so he decided to start commenting on his friends Facebook photos with "Nice dick, bro!"
lol. Brilliant.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on May 24, 2011, 11:02:37 AM
Sorted out the seat problem easily enough, but finally got to the bottom of a noisy steering bar. When I bought the bike four years ago it seemed a good idea to have a bar with an easily adjustable angle. Only I never use it and it is a proprietary solution which requires regular (every trip) tightening of a big screw to stop it from coming loose and sounding lik a nest of dying mice.

Normally this could have been solved by just replacing the stem, but thanks to that proprietary solution (which never caught on and has since gone by the wayside), I'm now replacing the whole fork in order to put on a normal stem. Sounds awful, but it is way cheaper than getting custom parts made. Brings back memories of certain computers from IBM and Dell in years past.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 24, 2011, 11:19:48 AM
Man.. I hate proprietary technologies like that. It's why I always shy away from buying whatever new technology Sony is pushing. Half the time their stuff doesn't pan out since they're the only one who makes the hardware.

At any rate.. Anyone care to take a stab at diagnosing why my steering feels really stiff? I've check the tire pressure and everything, and other than replacing my broken handlebar I haven't changed anything, and the stiffness only started yesterday, and I've already ridden about 30 miles with the new handlebar.

I think my bike just needs a good cleaning, we've had about 20 straight days of rain here so I've sort of given up on keeping it free of mud and grime until we get some consistent sun.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 24, 2011, 11:50:48 AM
http://www.wired.com/playbook/2011/05/athletes-beat-heat/ (http://www.wired.com/playbook/2011/05/athletes-beat-heat/)

Quote
"The study, recently published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology, involved seven male cyclists engaging in various 30-minute stationary trials. Subjects were allowed to ride their own bikes, thanks to the use of a KingCycle ergometer, but what the study ultimately hinged on was that the temperature of the environment was displayed for the cyclists.

The control trial was conducted in a room kept at 71.2 degrees Fahrenheit. A second “hot” trial was held in a room at 88.5 degrees. The final one was a “deception” trial, in which the temperature was displayed as 78.8 degrees but it was actually 88.8 degrees, the hottest of the three. The trials were administered in a randomized way, and all seven subjects performed all three. (Rectal thermometers used to measure each cyclist’s core body temperature were also displayed as being slightly lower than what they were actually were.)"

dude.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 25, 2011, 01:39:05 AM
Was able to bike around Stanford a little today. It was pretty cool. The campus seems super-duper bike friendly; I've had to drive around the campus before and it's rather a nightmare, but on a bike you can just about go anywhere. It's also ridiculously pretty. I'll have to go again soon and take some pictures. They have trees, and old buildings, and a Rodin statue garden. I haven't been to the Rodin thing, strangely. I don't know why. I've worked near Stanford for like two and a half years and I've only been on campus a handful of times. It's not exactly hard to get on campus, either.

Also, having a Stanford student smile at you (in a friendly, "hey, you don't look like a psycho axe murderer" kind of way, not in a "how you doin'?" sort of way) is pretty cool. I don't know why. Maybe it's the idea that I'm indistinguishable from an Ivy-league student when not wearing a Whole Foods apron.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 25, 2011, 06:12:09 AM
No one's ever assumed I was an Ivy Leaguer when I was walking around Harvard Yard.

 >:(
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on May 25, 2011, 08:45:11 AM
At any rate.. Anyone care to take a stab at diagnosing why my steering feels really stiff? I've check the tire pressure and everything, and other than replacing my broken handlebar I haven't changed anything, and the stiffness only started yesterday, and I've already ridden about 30 miles with the new handlebar.

I think my bike just needs a good cleaning, we've had about 20 straight days of rain here so I've sort of given up on keeping it free of mud and grime until we get some consistent sun.

I had a wire go the wrong way once - that stiffened the steering right up.

Rain, yes, I'd take it apart and look for the presence of rust or the absence of lube. Constant rain can tease out a surprising amount of the former and wash away quite a few variants for the latter.

As for rectal thermometers, who better to take them than bikers?
Joking aside, I think DARPA was messing with core temperatures a while back. They went with the assumption that cooling would increase performance and got some impressive results. Either they pushed the placebo effect further or found something useful. Trying to find the article, think it was in Wired...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 25, 2011, 09:16:07 AM
Yeah, I gave my bike a good bath this morning and the steering problem went away. It was just grime. Lots and lots of grime.

On the plus side, we have at least two days of nice weather in our forecast, so that's good. This morning I saw my favorite combination of things for the first time in 2011:

70 degree weather + tank tops + hot chick wearing a tank top while riding her bike with her hands on the drop bars.

:pervert:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on May 25, 2011, 10:24:43 AM
No one's ever assumed I was an Ivy Leaguer when I was walking around Harvard Yard.

 >:(

The light of intelligence shines from panda's eyes. She is Pistis Sophia, Wisdome embodied.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on May 25, 2011, 02:22:20 PM
Yeah, I gave my bike a good bath this morning and the steering problem went away. It was just grime. Lots and lots of grime.

surprise

On the plus side, we have at least two days of nice weather in our forecast, so that's good. This morning I saw my favorite combination of things for the first time in 2011:

70 degree weather + tank tops + hot chick wearing a tank top while riding her bike with her hands on the drop bars.

:pervert:

one of the upsides of racing at the vintage level, plenty of group riding with healthy young lycra clad females.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on May 25, 2011, 07:13:43 PM
No one's ever assumed I was an Ivy Leaguer when I was walking around Harvard Yard.

 >:(
Well, to be fair, I'm white and in the right age group. Plus, he looked kind of nerdy, so he might have just been excited to see a girl.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on May 25, 2011, 07:36:59 PM
Check out my early father's day present:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41JSSCR9M7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Nice. I have one of these, Topeak Hummer:
(http://thth16102.staging-zeus.netregistry.net/images/P/topeak_hummer.jpg)

IIRC cheap but does it's job.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on May 25, 2011, 10:31:00 PM
I so desperately want this bike.

(http://www.splinterbike.co.uk/_/rsrc/1305316437427/splinterbike-gallery/09%20Splinterbike%20gallery.jpg)

Ultimate hipster cred.  "Oh, you have a fixie?  Lame.  I have a fixie that's made entirely of salvaged wood, and can still go over 30mph."
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on May 26, 2011, 06:00:07 AM
Enjoy tank-tops and tights while you can. In my neighbourhood the fashion is for baggy jackets in bright neon colours. A trend I find mystifying - why help the four-wheelers with their aim?

So my hypothesis bit the dust :) Well, at lest "take apart" was the right direction.

And here is the article I was thinking about. Just one of many aimed at improving the Mk. I engine.

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/15.03/bemore.html (http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/15.03/bemore.html)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 26, 2011, 06:05:20 AM
I so desperately want this bike.

(http://www.splinterbike.co.uk/_/rsrc/1305316437427/splinterbike-gallery/09%20Splinterbike%20gallery.jpg)

Ultimate hipster cred.  "Oh, you have a fixie?  Lame.  I have a fixie that's made entirely of salvaged wood, and can still go over 30mph."

I can't imagine trying to control that thing in a stiff wind though. I'd like to that for a spin on the Mass. Ave bridge in Boston, which is one of the windiest. Even on a regular bike you're fighting the cross wind which is pushing you either into the guardrail or into a bus.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on May 26, 2011, 08:41:16 AM
I can't imagine trying to control that thing in a stiff wind though. I'd like to that for a spin on the Mass. Ave bridge in Boston, which is one of the windiest. Even on a regular bike you're fighting the cross wind which is pushing you either into the guardrail or into a bus.

I dunno - seems to me that that bike is going to be pretty heavy.  Not a total solution, but having a bike-sized object made entirely of solid hardwood is going to probably help stabilize when at speed.  Getting up to speed, on the other hand...

My question is this:  why couldn't he lighten up the "frame" a little bit, do some knockouts?  I refer to it as a "frame" instead of a frame because it's more like an auto body.  Seems like wise construction, which he's certainly proven he's capable of, could allow the bike to be half its current weight.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 26, 2011, 09:15:46 AM
Not knowing much about carpentry or the properties of wood.. Well, I think because the only other way to make a bike out of wood would be to have metal lugs holding the frame together. I think if he knocked out large pieces of the wood it would make the frame too weak.

Not sure about that though.. I guess it depends on the type of wood.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 26, 2011, 12:31:23 PM
Wow.. it sounds like Bike Snob guy is finally catching on:

Quote
Anyway, to leave the park I would have to cross the park road. On the surface of it this should be easy, since there are traffic lights and crosswalks. However, in practice it proved much more difficult, since while the cars would stop at the red the legions of Freds and Wilmas all barreled right on through. I stood there with a couple of the other mommies for two light cycles until finally the light changed in our favor once again, the white hand beckoned, and there amazingly appeared to be a window for us to cross.

Walking my Big Dummy with the good child comfy in his seat and laughing at my haircut, I stepped out into the crosswalk, at which point a woman who looked like she was probably the most annoying person on the board at the Park Slope Food Co-Op pointed her road bike directly at us as though on purpose. At the last second she had the decency to change her path, and as she passed she issued a very Park Slopey "Ugh" and then said to me:

"You should know better."

She then continued through the red light.

At first I was amazed. I should know better? What did that mean? I looked at the traffic light above me: still red. I looked at the hand in front of me: still white. Suddenly though it dawned on me what she was implying: I had a bike, which meant I was a cyclist. And as a cyclist I should have known that nobody on a bike would stop for me, even with a child.

This made me feel depressed, and my depression was amplified when one of the other mommies said to me resignedly, "They never stop."

It suddenly all made sense to me: the lawsuit over the Prospect Park West bike lane; the "Don't Be a Jerk" campaign; the citywide crackdown on cyclists and the whole ticketing episode in Central Park.

I still don't agree with any of it, but this stupid woman was doing her best to justify all of it. Thanks to her, "They never stop" is what people think of all of us--even when we're lying in the street because some driver blew a light. It was all her fault.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on May 26, 2011, 12:49:06 PM
http://www.splinterbike.co.uk/wooden-bike-gallery (http://www.splinterbike.co.uk/wooden-bike-gallery)

That tandem is sweet...

In contrast to the other wood bikes, the Splinter is the result of a landfill and two Brits with a hacksaw. The looks probably has a lot to do with the quality of the wood. If it is some cheap laminate (as opposed to good laminates), then they might have run into problems keeping it rigid in pretty much all and any direction.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on May 26, 2011, 08:49:34 PM
The horses mouth:

http://podcast.radionz.co.nz/twu/twu-20110521-1325-all-wood_bicycle-048.mp3 (http://podcast.radionz.co.nz/twu/twu-20110521-1325-all-wood_bicycle-048.mp3)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 27, 2011, 11:31:42 AM
I've finally found something worse than Critical Mass, although if you were to make a Venn Diagram of the people who attend Critical Mass events and this event I'm sure the overlap would be considerable. Like 90%.

http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2011/05/bsnyc-friday-kosher-vegan-pig-roast.html (http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2011/05/bsnyc-friday-kosher-vegan-pig-roast.html)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on May 27, 2011, 01:21:06 PM
I've finally found something worse than Critical Mass

I have a perverse love of that video of a Critical Mass meetup where an inattentive driver plows through about 30 cyclists at decent speed without even trying to stop.

Though now I can't find it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on May 27, 2011, 01:27:12 PM
I've finally found something worse than Critical Mass

I have a perverse love of that video of a Critical Mass meetup where an inattentive driver plows through about 30 cyclists at decent speed without even trying to stop.

Though now I can't find it.

I think that was the one in Brazil, and that wasn't inattention, that was intention. The guy got pissed off about the Critical Mass d-bags.. While I understand the sentiment, I can't condone the tactics.

Also, I think I linked that video earlier in this thread.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on May 27, 2011, 09:59:48 PM
I think that was the one in Brazil, and that wasn't inattention, that was intention. The guy got pissed off about the Critical Mass d-bags.. While I understand the sentiment, I can't condone the tactics.

Yeah, that's less amusing.  Not a huge fan of attempted intentional vehicular homicide.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 01, 2011, 09:33:25 AM
So.. here's how enraged I am right now and why:

This morning as I was in the left lane of Arlington St. by the Public Gardens turning left onto Boylston St. some d-bag in the middle lane made an unsignaled hard left turn across my lane. Normally when people make left turns from the middle lane at that intersection I just let it slide because they're making the gradual left turn into the two rightmost lanes of Boylston, but this d-bag in his lime green Prius was making an unsignaled hard left turn into the leftmost lanes of Boylston.

So I said something about it. The guy had the nerve to roll down his window and shout at me from across the median dividing the left and right lanes of Boylston. He finally said "WHY DON'T YOU COME OVER HERE?!".. so I looked ahead and noticed that the light was changing to red and I said: "Fine, the light's turning red so I'll come over there and kick your ass you little pussy"... as he looked ahead and took note of the fact that the light was indeed about to turn red the look of panic and disappointment on his face was worth a million bucks. So he stops, I kick off my bike and drop it on the median and run over to his window. He starts saying that I have to yield to him, presumably because I'm on a bike, but I wasn't having any of his explanation. I told him he was a moron. I said "I will end you", then I told him to shut the fuck up and was about to yank open his passenger door and start beating the shit out of his snotty little officeworker face when I caught myself. I realized that I can't just wantonly destroy the faces of weak-armed little office drones, so I spat in his face and walked away. Got back on my bike and continued my commute.

Shit.. it was kind of scary. I was literally about to ruin this guy's day, and probably his week.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on June 01, 2011, 09:40:47 AM
I was literally about to ruin this guy's day, and probably his week.

You probably already ruined his year.  One thing I learned acting as a bouncer is that when you stare "tough guys" down in situations like this, it seriously damages their internal monologue about how badass they are, emasculates them, and sets them on a path of self-doubt that can last for months.

You probably did him a disservice by spitting on him and walking away instead of beating the shit out of him.  If you'd pounded his face in, at least you'd just be a crazy guy on a bike, and there's nothing wrong with getting attacked by a crazy guy.

But having a crazy guy decide that you're not worth the expenditure of his crazy?  That can be a crushing blow.


I guess what I'm saying is next time, do the right thing.  Crush the guy's skull.  But don't do it for you - do it for him.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on June 01, 2011, 11:40:12 AM
"I'm in a car and I can run over a bike or run away - I'm on the top of the world, ma - .... oh, red light..." :)

Once the prices get low enough, I'm mounting video cameras on my bike. It is that, or a shotgun.

In other news, it turns out I won't be getting a new fork since, drum-roll, the non-adherence to standards went even to the frame, so now the shop is ginning up a new stem from whatever they have laying around. Saves me a good chunk on money and hopefully it turns out well.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 01, 2011, 11:54:53 AM
I was literally about to ruin this guy's day, and probably his week.

You probably already ruined his year.  One thing I learned acting as a bouncer is that when you stare "tough guys" down in situations like this, it seriously damages their internal monologue about how badass they are, emasculates them, and sets them on a path of self-doubt that can last for months.

You probably did him a disservice by spitting on him and walking away instead of beating the shit out of him.  If you'd pounded his face in, at least you'd just be a crazy guy on a bike, and there's nothing wrong with getting attacked by a crazy guy.

But having a crazy guy decide that you're not worth the expenditure of his crazy?  That can be a crushing blow.


I guess what I'm saying is next time, do the right thing.  Crush the guy's skull.  But don't do it for you - do it for him.

Yeah, but I've got a kid and another on the way, and I'm also contemplating taking a civil service exam next year because I need a better job while I wrap up college. I can't risk going to prison or getting a felony rap.

I've pretty much managed to avoid getting into fights for about 5 or 6 years, and have even managed defuse one or two fights that my friends were about to get into. But I also have a pretty fierce temper.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on June 01, 2011, 02:44:12 PM
"I'm in a car and I can run over a bike or run away - I'm on the top of the world, ma - .... oh, red light..." :)

Once the prices get low enough, I'm mounting video cameras on my bike. It is that, or a shotgun.


My Dad told me a guy who he works with has a camera mounted on his helmet. Quick google found this (http://www.actioncameras.co.uk/X170) for £130. Comes with a remote control so you can start and stop recording as needed.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 01, 2011, 02:50:19 PM
"I'm in a car and I can run over a bike or run away - I'm on the top of the world, ma - .... oh, red light..." :)

Once the prices get low enough, I'm mounting video cameras on my bike. It is that, or a shotgun.


My Dad told me a guy who he works with has a camera mounted on his helmet. Quick google found this (http://www.actioncameras.co.uk/X170) for £130. Comes with a remote control so you can start and stop recording as needed.

Wow.. Helmet cameras are a lot cheaper than I would have ever expected.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=helmet+camera&x=0&y=0 (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=helmet+camera&x=0&y=0)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on June 01, 2011, 11:19:28 PM
A friend my brother rides with wears a helmet camera. It was very handy in dealing with the insurance company when this happened to him:

CRASH! (no accident) (http://vimeo.com/4081131)

I wish I had one on Sunday when I got buzzed at high speed. The person gave me the finger twice when he essentially saved no time when risking my life rather than make a lane change.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 02, 2011, 06:38:25 AM
Well at least that accident was pretty low speed.. but wtf was that driver doing?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on June 02, 2011, 07:41:46 AM
Well at least that accident was pretty low speed.. but wtf was that driver doing?

She was not stopping at a stop sign. The text at the link has:

"Despite the seriousness of being hit at force by a moving auto, and the fact that the driver admitted to hitting me through an intersection where she had a stop sign and I did not, the officer at the scene saw no reason to issue a ticket to the driver, and he cited "the officer's discretion" as the explanation. So I carried the broken bike back to the precinct, and the supervisor refused to take a written or verbal complaint, and then berated me for ten minutes for "ruining HER day!" because I requested that action be taken (and I guess because she had to wait with me for the officer to arrive). "

The insurance company, however, had to pay up for the repairs thanks to the video.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 02, 2011, 09:10:49 AM
At least they got the damages paid for. It's weird that you can be arrested for leaving the scene of an accident, but cops will also just not take a report because it's a waste of their time.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 03, 2011, 10:16:55 AM
You know.. considering that squirrels have eyes on the side of their head they're remarkably bad at looking both ways before crossing a bike path. I nearly killed one this morning, but even though I stopped in time the squirrel came within about a millimeter of getting run over by a bike coming from the opposite direction.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 03, 2011, 02:39:20 PM
I have learned that squirrels are very stupid. They often run at my car.

At least most other rodents know to run the other way.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 03, 2011, 04:25:28 PM
I think I saw the same squirrel on my way home.. at least it was near the same tree. This time the squirrel was trying to drag a branch which was about three times longer than the squirrel. Why would it do that? Do squirrels make nests in which to lay squirrel eggs? Or do you think the squirrel was planning on weaponizing that twig in some manner? I'm really intrigued. Does this forum have a resident squirrelologist?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 03, 2011, 07:18:32 PM
I think I saw the same squirrel on my way home.. at least it was near the same tree. This time the squirrel was trying to drag a branch which was about three times longer than the squirrel. Why would it do that? Do squirrels make nests in which to lay squirrel eggs? Or do you think the squirrel was planning on weaponizing that twig in some manner? I'm really intrigued. Does this forum have a resident squirrelologist?
I didn't know this before googling, but apparently, squirrels do make nests.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 03, 2011, 08:01:58 PM
Quote
Posted by: pandamonium:
I didn't know this before googling, but apparently, squirrels do make nests.

Yes Squirrels make nests. In the winter you can see all the nests in the trees.

I have learned that squirrels are very stupid. They often run at my car.

At least most other rodents know to run the other way.

If I was a squirrel I would try to commit suicide too.  ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 03, 2011, 09:06:59 PM
[If I was a squirrel I would try to commit suicide too.  ;D

Nothing to do with bicycles, that'll have to happen after lunch.  but, not to be outdone by squirrels...

a number of possums seemed to have committed suicide on my wodshed roof lately... six in the last week.

(http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/5466/animalsuicide.jpg)[/URL]

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on June 03, 2011, 09:10:58 PM
Squirrels are NOT stupid.

Squirrel Obstacle Course (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWU0bfo-bSY#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 03, 2011, 09:22:55 PM
Stop being such a squirrel apologist, Bunsen.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 04, 2011, 05:10:27 PM
I, for one, welcome our new squirrely overlords.

I too think that squirrels are outstanding critters, and wish to know how I might go about domesticating them in large numbers.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on June 05, 2011, 03:03:31 PM
I, for one, welcome our new squirrely overlords.

I too think that squirrels are outstanding critters, and wish to know how I might go about domesticating them in large numbers.

If I wasn't such a good person, I'd show a clip of the scene from Burtons Willy Wonka where the squirrels are sorting the nuts.

But I won't do that.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: stands2reason on June 05, 2011, 09:11:08 PM
Squirrels are NOT stupid.

Squirrel Obstacle Course (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWU0bfo-bSY#)

Right. They're not good at understanding fast-moving mechanical objects. Or human driving rules. Go figure...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 06, 2011, 12:29:44 AM
Or human driving rules.
Granted, most humans seem to not have any understanding whatsoever of these. Perhaps I've been to harsh on our squirrelly overlords...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 06, 2011, 01:03:56 AM
Or human driving rules.
Granted, most humans seem to not have any understanding whatsoever of these. Perhaps I've been to harsh on our squirrelly overlords...

I do get quite annoyed when smart folks who should know better insist that animal are just stupid for getting hit by cars.
If you have even the slightest concern for animals it not a trivial issue at all, right after meat eating cars are the leading form of human-caused death for other animals.
So just slow the heck down and keep an eye out, cause it aint their fault youre in a rush to buy beer and cigarettes at 1 am
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 06, 2011, 01:33:11 AM
... right after meat eating cars are the leading form of human-caused death for other animals.
So just slow the heck down and keep an eye out, cause it aint their fault youre in a rush to buy beer and cigarettes at 1 am

In NZ I'd say poisoning would be the biggest anthropogenic cause of death to "animals".  We lay waste to far more oppossums by 1080 than we kill sheep and cattle.  The number of rodents, rabbits, hares and birds killed in general agriculture would be uncountable.  The number of insects, astronomic.  You wanted guilt free vegies... LOL.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: David "Stubb" Oswald on June 06, 2011, 01:34:51 AM
When you run over a ground squirrel others gather round the dead one to eat it on the highway.  Its hard to miss 15 ground squirrels at 65.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 06, 2011, 02:07:04 AM
When you run over a ground squirrel others gather round the dead one to eat it on the highway.  Its hard to miss 15 ground squirrels at 65.
which is why moving road kill off the road is a good thing to do

Quote
You wanted guilt free vegies... LOL.
I never said that, Ive always recognized the imperfect nature of promoting human and non-human well-being. I also want folks to not shoot each other, that doesn't mean I realistically want or expect a perfectly peaceful society.
That begin said I am well aware of field deaths and we been over this, it still inst a good argument against a plant-based diet in efforts to reduce animal slaughter
oh look its even interactive
http://www.animalvisuals.org/p/1mc/swf/1mc.swf
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 06, 2011, 04:33:24 AM
So?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 06, 2011, 06:40:37 AM
Hmm.. I guess I always figured trophy hunting claimed more lives than roadkill, but I didn't take into account that there are a shitload of rodents out there.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Rai on June 06, 2011, 07:58:55 AM
Hmm.. I guess I always figured trophy hunting claimed more lives than roadkill, but I didn't take into account that there are a shitload of rodents out there.

And some of them are of unusual size
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 06, 2011, 09:16:02 AM
Hmm.. I guess I always figured trophy hunting claimed more lives than roadkill, but I didn't take into account that there are a shitload of rodents out there.

And some of them are of unusual size

Truer words have never been spoken.

So today was just balls out perfect. Mid 60s, no wind, sunny, very light traffic on the bike trail. It ruled.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: EmergentSystem on June 06, 2011, 09:30:08 AM
Or human driving rules.
Granted, most humans seem to not have any understanding whatsoever of these. Perhaps I've been to harsh on our squirrelly overlords...

I do get quite annoyed when smart folks who should know better insist that animal are just stupid for getting hit by cars.
If you have even the slightest concern for animals it not a trivial issue at all, right after meat eating cars are the leading form of human-caused death for other animals.
So just slow the heck down and keep an eye out, cause it aint their fault youre in a rush to buy beer and cigarettes at 1 am
Hitching a ride to work, I see a seagull with some food in its mouth come flying at an angle that would make it collide with our car unless it did a turn or we did a dramatic turn. The seagull with the food noticed that it was on an impact course with our windshield. The half a dozen others desperately flying after it, trying to steal its food, were not as observant.

None of them were injured (at least not enough that it rendered them unable to fly off), since we were driving slowly at the time and hit the breaks the second we saw them, but that if we had killed them that'd totally have gone down as suicide in my book.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 06, 2011, 10:51:30 AM
OK.. this thing is blowing my mind.

http://www.trisports.com/shimano-dura-ace-di2-drivetrain-build-kit.html (http://www.trisports.com/shimano-dura-ace-di2-drivetrain-build-kit.html)

$4,800 for a battery-assisted drive train? Seriously?

I know this is going to sound pompous and ridiculous, but I'm willing to bet the dollar value of that drive train that I could probably still outrun/outpace anyone shy of a professional cyclist on either my track bike or my old Allez Epic which I recently sold. There is no way that thing makes you $4,800 faster. No fucking way. It's just nouveau riche Fred crap.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 06, 2011, 11:30:17 AM
So?
i saw this
Quote
The number of rodents, rabbits, hares and birds killed in general agriculture would be uncountable.  The number of insects, astronomic.  You wanted guilt free vegies... LOL.
as a continuation of our previous arguments over the claim that plant agriculture kills more animals than animal agriculture.
So, I presented evidence, actual numbers based upon a peer reviewed paper, showing that more animal are NOT killed for plant-based agriculture than for animal agriculture.
All Ive seen you do is make vague assertions that more animals die in the fields than are killed in some way to feed humans without presenting actual evidence. You seen to make this claim because it undermine the argument that a plant-based diet can reduce animal exploitation, so back up you claim or i cant take it very seriously.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on June 06, 2011, 01:02:24 PM
OK.. this thing is blowing my mind.

http://www.trisports.com/shimano-dura-ace-di2-drivetrain-build-kit.html (http://www.trisports.com/shimano-dura-ace-di2-drivetrain-build-kit.html)

$4,800 for a battery-assisted drive train? Seriously?

I know this is going to sound pompous and ridiculous, but I'm willing to bet the dollar value of that drive train that I could probably still outrun/outpace anyone shy of a professional cyclist on either my track bike or my old Allez Epic which I recently sold. There is no way that thing makes you $4,800 faster. No fucking way. It's just nouveau riche Fred crap.

That seems excessive.  Also, that guy in the video on the site looks like Sean William Scott, but somehow managed to come off as even more annoying.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 06, 2011, 02:41:21 PM
So?
i saw this
Quote
The number of rodents, rabbits, hares and birds killed in general agriculture would be uncountable.  The number of insects, astronomic.  You wanted guilt free vegies... LOL.
as a continuation of our previous arguments over the claim that plant agriculture kills more animals than animal agriculture.
So, I presented evidence, actual numbers based upon a peer reviewed paper, showing that more animal are NOT killed for plant-based agriculture than for animal agriculture.
All Ive seen you do is make vague assertions that more animals die in the fields than are killed in some way to feed humans without presenting actual evidence. You seen to make this claim because it undermine the argument that a plant-based diet can reduce animal exploitation, so back up you claim or i cant take it very seriously.

There isn't any reasonable method to count rodents poisoned, cultivated, trapped or eaten.  How the hell are you going to count hundreds of millions of rabbits killed with RHD or mixamatosis, or the tens of millions of possums poisoned with1080?  Thats just in my corner of the world,  And of course you don't count animals driven from their habitat by creating new farmland, insects or fish kill from agricultural runnoff.  Been cycling in France?  Ever see many birds?  No?  What do you think happened there?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 06, 2011, 02:42:50 PM
oy.

Unless you guys are talking about rodents on bicycles, or rodent-powered bicycles, please take it to another thread.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on June 06, 2011, 02:51:02 PM
Closest I could get.

(http://www.ridelust.com/wp-content/uploads/biker_mice_from_mars.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 06, 2011, 02:52:59 PM
That'll work.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 06, 2011, 03:18:28 PM
My humblest apology.  I shan't do it again.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 07, 2011, 02:48:51 AM
So, I think I found a better (eg, safer, less car-traffiked, prettier) route to the train station, but I'm a bit tipsy, and I'm not sure that it's faster. I also just rode around my neighborhood for about 30 minutes trying to figure out how to get from my house to the road that would take me to the train station. I *think* I figured it out, but goddamn suburbia is complicated. >.<
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 07, 2011, 09:54:49 AM
Hey, you know what's awesome? When two people decide that it's really important that they ride side-by-side really slowly along a near stretch of bike trail, and then get all incensed when you're trying to pass them and you say "Move over, please".
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 07, 2011, 10:05:39 AM
Oh, and PS: If there are any NYC cyclists in this thread, you can all rest easy now that Anthony Weiner won't be your next mayor.

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/03/post_45.html (http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/03/post_45.html)

"When I become mayor, you know what I’m going to spend my first year doing? I’m going to have a bunch of ribbon-cuttings tearing out your fucking bike lanes." —Congressman Anthony Weiner to frenemy Mayor Bloomberg

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 07, 2011, 11:31:17 AM
Oh, and PS: If there are any NYC cyclists in this thread, you can all rest easy now that Anthony Weiner won't be your next mayor.

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/03/post_45.html (http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/03/post_45.html)

"When I become mayor, you know what I’m going to spend my first year doing? I’m going to have a bunch of ribbon-cuttings tearing out your fucking bike lanes." —Congressman Anthony Weiner to frenemy Mayor Bloomberg

seriously!? why the fuck would a dem of all people say that?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 07, 2011, 11:34:35 AM
Oh, and PS: If there are any NYC cyclists in this thread, you can all rest easy now that Anthony Weiner won't be your next mayor.

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/03/post_45.html (http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/03/post_45.html)

"When I become mayor, you know what I’m going to spend my first year doing? I’m going to have a bunch of ribbon-cuttings tearing out your fucking bike lanes." —Congressman Anthony Weiner to frenemy Mayor Bloomberg

seriously!? why the fuck would a dem of all people say that?

He represents Brooklyn, where the local Hasidic community and the ever-growing hipster community have been at loggerheads over bike lanes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 07, 2011, 01:13:46 PM
I like this video.

The Rights and Duties of Cyclists - Bicycle Safety (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rU4nKKq02BU&feature=player_embedded#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 07, 2011, 01:32:31 PM
Oh, and PS: If there are any NYC cyclists in this thread, you can all rest easy now that Anthony Weiner won't be your next mayor.

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/03/post_45.html (http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/03/post_45.html)

"When I become mayor, you know what I’m going to spend my first year doing? I’m going to have a bunch of ribbon-cuttings tearing out your fucking bike lanes." —Congressman Anthony Weiner to frenemy Mayor Bloomberg

seriously!? why the fuck would a dem of all people say that?

He represents Brooklyn, where the local Hasidic community and the ever-growing hipster community have been at loggerheads over bike lanes.

I can see why hipster want bike lanes, but not why Hasids would be opposed to them unless they are just peeved about gentrification? Though is it really gentrification as in raising housing prices drive the Hasidic community out (didnt think it was a poor community, controlling the world gold and banks and all you know), or do they just not wanna live around hipsters?
I do remember something a while back about the Hasidic community complaining about the scandalous way hipsters dress.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 07, 2011, 01:41:50 PM
I don't know.. part of the problem seems to be that the bike lanes mean that the Hasidim are getting ticketed for double parking their cars in bike lanes whereas before they were getting away with just double parking all over the damn place. Also, I think that the Hasidim don't want a bunch of upstart trust fund babies taking over their neighborhood, which I can't really blame them for.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 07, 2011, 04:13:19 PM
One problem I have with that safety video is that cars would not give two shits, especially for the lane changing stuff. I do like the parts about sharing the road and staying in the right most lane - all too often, though, I'll get cars that pass in the lane I'm in. The bastards are too bastardly to merge to the left for me. Even when no one is in the left lane.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 07, 2011, 04:16:18 PM
One problem I have with that safety video is that cars would not give two shits, especially for the lane changing stuff. I do like the parts about sharing the road and staying in the right most lane - all too often, though, I'll get cars that pass in the lane I'm in. The bastards are too bastardly to merge to the left for me. Even when no one is in the left lane.

Well, one of the points of the video was "controlling" your lane, which is something that you should really do.

Then again, that video was geared more towards faster cyclists, but even if I'm doing like 15-18mph I still try to control the lane because otherwise some d-bag will try to pass me when there isn't room to pass.

Just the other day I had to yell at someone who was trying to pass me on a narrow two-way street when I was doing about 23mph because they weren't actually going faster than me, so they were basically just straddling the double yellow line while riding alongside me. Finally I said "Hey ass hole, either pass me or get the fuck behind me because you're about to hit an oncoming car".

One of my favorite things about spring/summer is that people have their windows rolled down and they can finally hear all of the salty things I yell at them.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 07, 2011, 04:57:31 PM
I definitely don't go that quickly. But even when I try controlling my lane, the fuckers don't give me any quarter. Motorists just don't care. They expect everyone else to get out of their way. I think I've become a better driver since I've started riding my bike, but even I succumb to that sort of mentality every once in a while.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 07, 2011, 05:57:51 PM
"controlling" my lane is what gets things thrown at me, sideswiped, or passed dangerously close and fast. Cyclist generally have a right to a FULL lane of traffic and can ride two abreast yet so many drivers often don't know this or refuse to respect it. They just use their overwhelming might to bully cyclists out of the way.

Part of the reason I enjoy critical mass, we get to turn the tables and control the road.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 07, 2011, 07:27:09 PM
If there is no bike lane and we are riding on the road are bicycles suppose to ride with the traffic or against the traffic? When I was in school growing up I was told to ride against traffic. I think we are suppose to ride with correct? I am in the US.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 07, 2011, 08:12:18 PM
Ride with the traffic at all times, remember on the road your bike is a vehicle, or as the Critical Mass folks say "We aren't blocking traffic, WE ARE traffic!"

Riding against traffic is just plain wrong, its oft repeated misinfo possibly related to old suggestions for very small children to ride on the sidewalk (illegal) against traffic
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 07, 2011, 08:48:39 PM
Ride with the traffic at all times, remember on the road your bike is a vehicle, or as the Critical Mass folks say "We aren't blocking traffic, WE ARE traffic!"

Riding against traffic is just plain wrong, its oft repeated misinfo possibly related to old suggestions for very small children to ride on the sidewalk (illegal) against traffic
I ride with traffic because it just feels right but wanted a definitive answer thanks!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 08, 2011, 06:35:49 AM
"controlling" my lane is what gets things thrown at me, sideswiped, or passed dangerously close and fast. Cyclist generally have a right to a FULL lane of traffic and can ride two abreast yet so many drivers often don't know this or refuse to respect it. They just use their overwhelming might to bully cyclists out of the way.

Part of the reason I enjoy critical mass, we get to turn the tables and control the road.

For some reason people just don't fuck with me.

Maybe the vaunted "Masshole driver" is really just a meek kitten compared to the drivers y'all have on the left coast.

Ride with the traffic at all times, remember on the road your bike is a vehicle, or as the Critical Mass folks say "We aren't blocking traffic, WE ARE traffic!"

Riding against traffic is just plain wrong, its oft repeated misinfo possibly related to old suggestions for very small children to ride on the sidewalk (illegal) against traffic
I ride with traffic because it just feels right but wanted a definitive answer thanks!

Also, if you ride against traffic I'm going to call you a salmon, and if you're riding against traffic in the bike lane and you're coming towards me I'm going to play chicken with you and try to force you into oncoming traffic.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: David E. on June 08, 2011, 10:09:49 PM
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/06/cardboard-bike-helmet-better-than-plastic/ (http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/06/cardboard-bike-helmet-better-than-plastic/)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 08, 2011, 11:12:40 PM
Also, if you ride against traffic I'm going to call you a salmon, and if you're riding against traffic in the bike lane and you're coming towards me I'm going to play chicken with you and try to force you into oncoming traffic.
Did I ever mention that I made a "No Salmon" t-shirt design, but have yet to print it? I might Cafe Press it, because I'm pretty lazy.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 09, 2011, 06:45:35 AM
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/06/cardboard-bike-helmet-better-than-plastic/ (http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/06/cardboard-bike-helmet-better-than-plastic/)

Like, woah.

Also, if you ride against traffic I'm going to call you a salmon, and if you're riding against traffic in the bike lane and you're coming towards me I'm going to play chicken with you and try to force you into oncoming traffic.
Did I ever mention that I made a "No Salmon" t-shirt design, but have yet to print it? I might Cafe Press it, because I'm pretty lazy.

LIKE DOUBLE WOAH.

ME WANTEE
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 09, 2011, 12:48:39 PM
This is sort of awesome

bike lanes (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzE-IMaegzQ&feature=player_embedded#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 09, 2011, 02:08:41 PM
Nice video, I've got an issue here with the street sweepers brushing all the broken glass into the bike lane, fuckin annoying
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on June 09, 2011, 02:45:14 PM
Not too bad over here, most of the bike lanes take up the part of the footpath, so you just have to be aware of pedestrians who wander over. You often here bells ringing and polite requests to get out of the way.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 09, 2011, 02:52:22 PM
Not too bad over here, most of the bike lanes take up the part of the footpath, so you just have to be aware of pedestrians who wander over. You often here bells ringing and polite requests to get out of the way.

Politeness has no place on the bike trail.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on June 09, 2011, 02:53:56 PM
Not too bad over here, most of the bike lanes take up the part of the footpath, so you just have to be aware of pedestrians who wander over. You often here bells ringing and polite requests to get out of the way.

Politeness has no place on the bike trail.

This is Germany. If they weren't being polite, they'd be invading Poland again.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 09, 2011, 02:55:24 PM
I say go for it, those Poles need to be knocked down a peg or two.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on June 09, 2011, 05:04:13 PM
This is sort of awesome


Cool video.  Pretty much jibes with my experience. If people aren't parking in the bike lane ("Its just for a minute!!") they are pushing their way into it 'cause any second its gonna magically transform into a lane wide enough for their car, and made *only* for their car. In the meantime they'll just reserve their space by pushing in over 1/2 the bike lane.

And if the lane is one of the ones that is wide enough it is obviosuly just for them:

Motorist Driving Illegally in the Spruce Street Bike Lane (Philadelphia) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzQIdnbJA6g#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 10, 2011, 01:16:40 PM
I find that here it not even an issue of double parking, the regular street side parking often extends halfway into the bike lane which are pretty narrow here. It looks liek they took a normal two lane street with street parking on both sides and just painted in bike lanes...so yeah if you don't actually make more room for the bike lane or for the parked cars its gonna be a problem, now you just have a really narrow roadway with cyclist getting doored on either side
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 10, 2011, 01:20:44 PM
I find that here it not even an issue of double parking, the regular street side parking often extends halfway into the bike lane which are pretty narrow here. It looks liek they took a normal two lane street with street parking on both sides and just painted in bike lanes...so yeah if you don't actually make more room for the bike lane or for the parked cars its gonna be a problem, now you just have a really narrow roadway with cyclist getting doored on either side

Ditto here.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on June 10, 2011, 10:34:10 PM
I find that here it not even an issue of double parking, the regular street side parking often extends halfway into the bike lane which are pretty narrow here. It looks liek they took a normal two lane street with street parking on both sides and just painted in bike lanes...so yeah if you don't actually make more room for the bike lane or for the parked cars its gonna be a problem, now you just have a really narrow roadway with cyclist getting doored on either side

We have a fun section on Spring Garden St. here in Philadelphia where the bike lane was drawn so close to the parking lane that the cars actually have to park partially in the bike lane. That's bad enough but then the asphalt did some weird buckling so that these rather awkward ridges formed in the remainder of the bike lane.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 11, 2011, 12:40:28 AM
I have a noob question about patch kits. I have used a bike for transportation for a long time, but today was the first time I used a patch kit. I followed the directions carefully. They clearly state that you should only apply the patch after the glue has completely dried, which I did. I then applied the patch about 30 minutes ago, pressing tightly and making sure it was sealed all the way around. The directions say to use a blunt object to make sure pressure is applied over the entire patch for best adhesion. I did that, carefully, and it seemed to be sealed. However, I just checked on it, and the orange edge is lifting up off of the tube. If I try to push it back down, it just comes up again. I did sand it very well first so that the entire area was smooth, and I cleaned off the debris. I also made sure the surface was dry.

Then I watched the following YouTube video in which the guy applies the patch right after applying the glue. He does not let it completely dry first like the directions say. Is that the best way to do it? Should I try to remove this patch, put on some glue again, and then immediately apply the patch like that guy? I really need to make sure this tire doesn't leak.

ETA: I almost forgot the video. >.<

How to Repair a Bicycle Tire : Installing a Bicycle Tire Patch, Step Two (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euBCFHIaxGs&NR=1&feature=fvwp#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 11, 2011, 04:50:48 AM
I have a noob question about patch kits. I have used a bike for transportation for a long time, but today was the first time I used a patch kit. I followed the directions carefully. They clearly state that you should only apply the patch after the glue has completely dried, which I did. I then applied the patch about 30 minutes ago, pressing tightly and making sure it was sealed all the way around. The directions say to use a blunt object to make sure pressure is applied over the entire patch for best adhesion. I did that, carefully, and it seemed to be sealed. However, I just checked on it, and the orange edge is lifting up off of the tube. If I try to push it back down, it just comes up again. I did sand it very well first so that the entire area was smooth, and I cleaned off the debris. I also made sure the surface was dry.

Then I watched the following YouTube video in which the guy applies the patch right after applying the glue. He does not let it completely dry first like the directions say. Is that the best way to do it? Should I try to remove this patch, put on some glue again, and then immediately apply the patch like that guy? I really need to make sure this tire doesn't leak.

ETA: I almost forgot the video. >.<

How to Repair a Bicycle Tire : Installing a Bicycle Tire Patch, Step Two (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euBCFHIaxGs&NR=1&feature=fvwp#)
I've never had a patch kit tell me to let the glue dry before applying the patch.

This is what I do: clean area around hole*, scuff with sandpaper, apply glue, apply patch, pray to God*, let it dry, pray some more, hey, just because I've patched this tube thrice doesn't mean I have to get a new one, and besides it still holds air. Haven't had a patch blow yet. Have had a patched tire blow, just in a different area.




*optional.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 11, 2011, 05:00:46 AM
I've never had a patch kit tell me to let the glue dry before applying the patch.

I thought it was strange too, but here's what it says in steps 2 through 4:

Quote
2. Spread glue thinly over area the same size as patch to be used.
3. When glue has completely dried remove foil backing from patch, taking care to not touch the patch itself.
4. Apply patch to glued area and use any blunt instrument handy to apply pressure over entire surface of patch for best adhesion.

I had another hole on the other side of the same tube, and I applied the patch immediately after I applied the glue on that one.

I found this PDF (http://www.nashbar.com/images/nashbar/web/PDFs/NS-PTK%20Clincher%20Patch%20Kit.pdf) with instructions almost identical to my kit. Maybe there's a chemical bond that is supposed to form even if the glue is dry? I don't know.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 11, 2011, 05:03:56 AM
I'm okay admitting that I might be doing it wrong... but maybe I'm just using a different kind of patch kit? ??? Or maybe I'm thrown by your 30 min wait. I usually slap the patch on within 2-5 minutes of applying the glue.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 11, 2011, 05:10:08 AM
Like I said, the instructions say "when glue has completely dried", so I did wait quite a while to let the glue dry completely. The 30 minutes I was talking about in my post, though, was how long I waited after applying the patch. Then I went to check on the patch, and part of the orange edge was lifting off the tube.

Anyway, it is possible that it's a different kind of patch kit, or maybe I spread the glue too thin, or maybe that particular patch just wasn't up to snuff. But from now on, I will probably do it the way you and the guy in the video do it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 11, 2011, 05:15:20 AM
Yeah... I really do think that 30 minutes was too long. It's an understandable mistake, though. The only reason I haven't done something like that is 'cause my dad showed me how to patch a tire when I was younger, and he explained how the glue works. I can't think of the right terms, but iirc the glue basically melts the tire rubber, and the patch rubber, and they become as one. So, if you wait until the glue is completely dried, it can't react with the patch properly. Spreading the glue thin is key, too. You don't need much glue.

It's really neat chemistry, if you can find a good source on it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 11, 2011, 05:19:17 AM
Yeah... I really do think that 30 minutes was too long. It's an understandable mistake, though. The only reason I haven't done something like that is 'cause my dad showed me how to patch a tire when I was younger, and he explained how the glue works. I can't think of the right terms, but iirc the glue basically melts the tire rubber, and the patch rubber, and they become as one. So, if you wait until the glue is completely dried, it can't react with the patch properly. Spreading the glue thin is key, too. You don't need much glue.

It's really neat chemistry, if you can find a good source on it.

That makes sense. But in that case, the instructions in the patch kit give bad information. As you can see in the PDF in that previous post of mine, it clearly states that you should let the glue completely dry before applying the patch over it. So it seems likely that they made a mistake in the instructions in that particular type of patch kit.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 11, 2011, 06:06:28 AM
Sorry for the double post, but I want to pose another question to the cyclists out there because I really really need my bike and I want to be sure I do this correctly.

Near the end of that YT vid I posted, the guy says that taking the cellophane piece off too soon could pull the patch off. How long do you guys leave it on before you pull it off? Do you just not pull it off? I would think that it's OK to leave it on there. Btw, the glue and the type of patches I'm using look exactly like the one the guy is using. The manufacturer is Forte. Any advice would be appreciated.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 11, 2011, 10:57:45 AM
When ever I patch a tire I apply the glue let it set up a little (not dry completely) just get tacky not wet. Then I apply the patch. I have never had a problem ever when doing it that way.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 11, 2011, 11:03:11 AM
I would also make sure you have that piece that is next to the wheel and the inner tube. This is some times a piece of rubber or it can be tape that wraps around the wheel(not the tire the wheel) This will prevent the spokes (the ends that go up into the wheel) from puncturing your inner tube. If it is in bad shape this is the time to change it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 11, 2011, 04:26:30 PM
Sorry for the double post, but I want to pose another question to the cyclists out there because I really really need my bike and I want to be sure I do this correctly.

Near the end of that YT vid I posted, the guy says that taking the cellophane piece off too soon could pull the patch off. How long do you guys leave it on before you pull it off? Do you just not pull it off? I would think that it's OK to leave it on there. Btw, the glue and the type of patches I'm using look exactly like the one the guy is using. The manufacturer is Forte. Any advice would be appreciated.
I think I remove the plastic before applying the patch. I have a tube or two that I need to patch anyway, I can make a short "tutorial" for you after I'm off work tonight. I don't know if that'd be soon enough for you, but it's the best I can do.

Sorry I can't be more detailed - I just have a shitty memory.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 11, 2011, 05:04:18 PM
I would also make sure you have that piece that is next to the wheel and the inner tube. This is some times a piece of rubber or it can be tape that wraps around the wheel(not the tire the wheel) This will prevent the spokes (the ends that go up into the wheel) from puncturing your inner tube. If it is in bad shape this is the time to change it.

Thank you! I hadn't even considered that. I will check it out. And in the future I will let the glue get tacky as you suggested. I guess that is basically what you were saying too, panda, when you said you waited up to about 5 minutes.


I think I remove the plastic before applying the patch. I have a tube or two that I need to patch anyway, I can make a short "tutorial" for you after I'm off work tonight. I don't know if that'd be soon enough for you, but it's the best I can do.

Sorry I can't be more detailed - I just have a shitty memory.

I really appreciate your advice. I don't think I really need a tutorial at this point, but it is very kind of you to offer. I am also sorry if I seemed kind of persistent last night, panda. I was tired and feeling kind of desperate, and I was mostly just frustrated with those misleading instructions in my kit.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 12, 2011, 02:56:20 AM
it's all good. good luck getting your tire fixed. and don't hesitate to ask questions in this thread - that's what it's here for.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 12, 2011, 10:01:32 AM
I have a noob question about patch kits. I have used a bike for transportation for a long time, but today was the first time I used a patch kit. I followed the directions carefully. They clearly state that you should only apply the patch after the glue has completely dried, which I did. I then applied the patch about 30 minutes ago, pressing tightly and making sure it was sealed all the way around. The directions say to use a blunt object to make sure pressure is applied over the entire patch for best adhesion. I did that, carefully, and it seemed to be sealed. However, I just checked on it, and the orange edge is lifting up off of the tube. If I try to push it back down, it just comes up again. I did sand it very well first so that the entire area was smooth, and I cleaned off the debris. I also made sure the surface was dry.

Then I watched the following YouTube video in which the guy applies the patch right after applying the glue. He does not let it completely dry first like the directions say. Is that the best way to do it? Should I try to remove this patch, put on some glue again, and then immediately apply the patch like that guy? I really need to make sure this tire doesn't leak.

ETA: I almost forgot the video. >.<

How to Repair a Bicycle Tire : Installing a Bicycle Tire Patch, Step Two (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euBCFHIaxGs&NR=1&feature=fvwp#)

Here's how you use a patch kit:

Step 1: Take patch kit, insert directly into trash can.

Step 2: Walk down to your local bike shop

Step 3: Buy a new tube and several spare tubes so that you never find yourself stuck with flat tube and nothing to replace it with.

Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as necessary.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on June 12, 2011, 10:33:40 AM
Step 1: Take patch kit, insert directly into trash can.

Step 2: Walk down to your local bike shop

Step 3: Buy a new tube and several spare tubes so that you never find yourself stuck with flat tube and nothing to replace it with.

Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as necessary.

Things I'm not made of:

1.) Snips

2.) Snails

3.) Puppy dog tails

4.) Money



Pass the patch kit.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 12, 2011, 02:19:49 PM
Tyre patch glue is contact cement.  It wants to be pretty dry before applying the patch, 5 to 10 minutes.  Always have a well patched or new tube safely tucked under your bicycle seat.  Have a few tubes in reserve so you can patch a few all at once, once in a long while.  The right size of rim tape is critical if yo don't want to have constant flats from the INSDE of the tube.  Two holes in the tube can come from the tyre pressure being too low and/or hitting a hard bump. 

Duct tape works well for temporary fixes on mtn bike tyres, but what works best is tubless... never flat again... go Stan's!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 13, 2011, 01:30:49 AM
Tyre patch glue is contact cement.  It wants to be pretty dry before applying the patch, 5 to 10 minutes.  Always have a well patched or new tube safely tucked under your bicycle seat.  Have a few tubes in reserve so you can patch a few all at once, once in a long while.  The right size of rim tape is critical if yo don't want to have constant flats from the INSDE of the tube.  Two holes in the tube can come from the tyre pressure being too low and/or hitting a hard bump. 

Duct tape works well for temporary fixes on mtn bike tyres, but what works best is tubless... never flat again... go Stan's!

Maybe I'll try out the tubeless option down the road. It would be nice not to ever have to worry about getting a flat. And, yeah, a temporary solution like duct tape probably would have saved me some long walks.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 13, 2011, 05:06:52 AM
I have a noob question about patch kits. I have used a bike for transportation for a long time, but today was the first time I used a patch kit. I followed the directions carefully. They clearly state that you should only apply the patch after the glue has completely dried, which I did. I then applied the patch about 30 minutes ago, pressing tightly and making sure it was sealed all the way around. The directions say to use a blunt object to make sure pressure is applied over the entire patch for best adhesion. I did that, carefully, and it seemed to be sealed. However, I just checked on it, and the orange edge is lifting up off of the tube. If I try to push it back down, it just comes up again. I did sand it very well first so that the entire area was smooth, and I cleaned off the debris. I also made sure the surface was dry.

Then I watched the following YouTube video in which the guy applies the patch right after applying the glue. He does not let it completely dry first like the directions say. Is that the best way to do it? Should I try to remove this patch, put on some glue again, and then immediately apply the patch like that guy? I really need to make sure this tire doesn't leak.

ETA: I almost forgot the video. >.<

How to Repair a Bicycle Tire : Installing a Bicycle Tire Patch, Step Two (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euBCFHIaxGs&NR=1&feature=fvwp#)

Here's how you use a patch kit:

Step 1: Take patch kit, insert directly into trash can.

Step 2: Walk down to your local bike shop

Step 3: Buy a new tube and several spare tubes so that you never find yourself stuck with flat tube and nothing to replace it with.

Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as necessary.
Patch kit=$4
New tubes=$10

I've got a tube somewhere around here that's been patched at least twice. It might be in my bike, actually. Although I do think your advice about carrying a spare is sound. Patching a tire in the dark is pretty much impossible.

Besides, not patching a tire feels like waste to me. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 13, 2011, 06:11:50 AM
Step 1: Take patch kit, insert directly into trash can.

Step 2: Walk down to your local bike shop

Step 3: Buy a new tube and several spare tubes so that you never find yourself stuck with flat tube and nothing to replace it with.

Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as necessary.

Things I'm not made of:

1.) Snips

2.) Snails

3.) Puppy dog tails

4.) Money



Pass the patch kit.

What in the? Tubes are like $5-$10. Given that time is money the amount of time you'd waste patching a tube which is just going to deflate again in a few days.. what's the point?

I've never had a patch last me more than 2 or 3 days. Putting a patch on a tube is like driving on a donut, it's a temporary solution intended only to get you to a place where you can replace it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 13, 2011, 06:19:48 AM
What in the? Tubes are like $5-$10. Given that time is money the amount of time you'd waste patching a tube which is just going to deflate again in a few days.. what's the point?

I've never had a patch last me more than 2 or 3 days. Putting a patch on a tube is like driving on a donut, it's a temporary solution intended only to get you to a place where you can replace it.
Really? All of my patches have lasted. Maybe I'm doing it wrong.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 13, 2011, 06:22:10 AM
Maybe I'm doing it wrong.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 13, 2011, 06:28:27 AM
Maybe I'm doing it wrong.
Well, I wasn't going to say it...

I'm riding on patched tires right now, actually. I should get new tubes, but I have two parking tickets, a smog test, and registration for my car to pay for. Stupid car. I also need a new seat. I've finally worn down to the foam of my padded seat. It's only on the narrow end, though, and I think I'm going to ignore it for now. If it gets too bad, I have the original seat for it... I might just put that back on. I don't often ride it long enough to get terribly uncomfortable.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 13, 2011, 02:28:54 PM
Maybe I'll try out the tubeless option down the road. It would be nice not to ever have to worry about getting a flat. And, yeah, a temporary solution like duct tape probably would have saved me some long walks.

It was that 15 km walk staring at me that made me try duct tape.  The tyre was stlll sweet the next morning.  But, that said, I haven't even thought about what I am riding over for the last few years with the tubeless option.  A few of my favourite rides demand tubeless (or be punished by several flats).

It pays to keep a 10cm piece of an old tyre (with the lugs ground off)  in the bottom of our rucksack for the event of ripping the side out of your tyre. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on June 13, 2011, 10:07:33 PM
Maybe I'm doing it wrong.



I've never had a patch go.  I've had the same tire fail a dozen times, but never at a patch.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 14, 2011, 04:10:32 AM
This sounds like a job for science.

Ok, this is what we're going to do: all of us are going to puncture our tires, patch them up, and then ride them for a week. But we need a control. I volunteer to be the one who doesn't puncture their tire.

Remember, this is for science.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 14, 2011, 04:35:12 AM
Well, I'm doing my part. I've been riding on a punctured tire for a few days now. In fact, that was my plan all along. I saw the nail there in the street, just begging me to do science. How could I not run over it? So c'mon, guys. Let's see some holes in those tires!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 14, 2011, 04:39:43 AM
Well, I'm doing my part. I've been riding on a punctured tire for a few days now. In fact, that was my plan all along. I saw the nail there in the street, just begging me to do science. How could I not run over it? So c'mon, guys. Let's see some holes in those tires!
I hit a rock with my narrow road bike tires and that was enough to rupture my freaking tire. Not even a big rock, a gravel-sized rock. I've also ruptured tires by carrying too many groceries home.

I need to fix my cruiser. It's a beast.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 14, 2011, 06:30:53 AM
OK.. this is for science.. what PSI do you patch-happy fools inflate your tires to?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Marx on June 14, 2011, 07:57:43 AM
My patched tubes on the roadie - tyres Vittoria Rubinos - are usually at 120psi (range 100psi to 150psi).
My patched tubes on my MTB - tyres either Maxxis Ignitors or Hutchinson Cobras - usually 29psi~45psi depending on what & where they're rolling (I'm a luddite & haven't matured across to tubeless yet) .
My patched tubes on my commuter (MTB s/s) running Schwalbe Kojaks usually between 45psi~60psi.

No bumps due to the patches felt at all while rolling. Patches last ages. Whenever I puncture (I always carry spare tubes to replace a puncture) I usually patch the puncture when I get home & put the patched tube back on the bike so my 'good' tubes are always my spare ones I carry.

Sometimes I make patches by cutting a patch from an old discarded tube (I've gone through a few in my time, mostly failed valves etc), but I usually use purchased patch kit patches.

Oh yeah, when I patch punctures. I put the glued patch/tube in a vice or lockable clamp overnight or even a day after before I remove the tube & pack it away or place it back into the tyre again.
But it's always good to have a spare tube as a fall-back, I've had some punctures that just wont fix.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 14, 2011, 09:18:20 AM
Man. I have no idea what I'm doing wrong then.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 14, 2011, 02:39:39 PM
Sometimes I make patches by cutting a patch from an old discarded tube (I've gone through a few in my time, mostly failed valves etc), but I usually use purchased patch kit patches.
Is the method of application of these homemade patches similar to using a patchkit?

I'm curious because I have tubes that don't fit my bike and I don't have the receipt to return them because I'm a stupid head. Might as well do something useful with them.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 14, 2011, 02:40:12 PM
Man. I have no idea what I'm doing wrong then.
Maybe your tires secretly hate you.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 14, 2011, 02:48:04 PM
Man. I have no idea what I'm doing wrong then.
Maybe your tires secretly hate you.

They've made no secret of that over the years. Either I put more wear and tear on them than the average rider or I'm some sort of obese land cow who puts undue strain on the rubber of my tubes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 14, 2011, 03:22:31 PM
Im not a fan of patching, I ride high pressure road racing tires and dont want to even risk one failing. I just recycle the old tube into craft projects.* Though since Ive gotten tire liners Ive only had tubes fail at the valve. Tire liners are great, the initial cost of $10-20 is more than worth it. Ive had slices in my tire that  required me to replace the tire that still didnt pop the inner tube, i was able to ride home on it.
*
(click to show/hide)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 14, 2011, 03:43:33 PM
Yeah, my wife recycled some of my old tubes to weave a new seat for a chair which at one point had a wicker seat that had completely disintegrated.

Also.. for about $10 in hardware you can turn an old bicycle wheel into a really killer pot rack for your kitchen.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 14, 2011, 04:04:08 PM
I was thinking about recycling old tubes for craft projects, but I'm not very good at crafts. I'm not a very patient person, and am often easily frustrated with simple tasks.

However, I did once spend almost an hour untangling string. It was the most fun I'd had in ages.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 14, 2011, 09:49:18 PM
We use old tubes to support new trees between two large stakes.  I have 6500 km on the front tube on my road bike.  The rear failed at the stem.  Continental folding Gatorskin.  Way to go.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Marx on June 14, 2011, 09:52:07 PM
Tyres (tires) are the first line of defence when it comes to punctures.

I’ve found a massive difference in puncture ‘resistance’ from one type of tyre to another.  Without banging the drum for any in particular, I must admit that my  Schwalbe Kojaks  (http://www.schwalbe.com/gbl/en/produkte/specials/produkt/index.php5?flash=1&ID_Produktgruppe=52&ID_Produkt=221&ID_Land=38&ID_Sprache=2&ID_Einsatzbereich=10&tn_mainPoint=Produkte&tn_subPoint=Specials)  on my  commuter  (http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r209/MarxGarage/2011-02-22_10-05-13_280.jpg) have rolled through all sorts for sharp & pointy stuff, sustaining some pretty deep gashes but not actually puncturing.  As compared to a lot of my dirt specific MTB tyres that deflate at the mere mention of glass or a rusty nail. 
When patching tubes, both tube & patch to be clean as well as scrubbed to remove ridges on the tube & provide a good bonding surface. Glue to be allowed to dry fully & for pressure to be applied throughout the glue drying process. 

That’s the extent of my personal knowledge on punctures.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 14, 2011, 11:17:43 PM
I just swapped wheels back to front with my my gator skins (4500 kms) this arvo, the rear tyre profile has become a bit flat, maybe I'll get through the winter training rides on this set.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 15, 2011, 09:20:36 AM
Do you like boobies?

Do you like really fancy fixed gear bikes?

Do you think the combination of the two would be the best mixture of ingredients since Mr. Reese's combined chocolate and peanut butter?

Then have I got the site for you!

www.thefixfixfix.com (http://www.thefixfixfix.com)

(NSFW)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 15, 2011, 11:14:18 AM
Do you like boobies?

Do you like really fancy fixed gear bikes?

Do you think the combination of the two would be the best mixture of ingredients since Mr. Reese's combined chocolate and peanut butter?

Then have I got the site for you!

www.thefixfixfix.com (http://www.thefixfixfix.com)

(NSFW)

well I know what Im doing today
 >:D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 15, 2011, 11:19:03 AM
Yeah, I've spent the past 24 hours pretty much engrossed by that website.

FACT: I've had relations with one of the girls on there, which is how I came to find out about the site.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 15, 2011, 12:01:56 PM
Yeah, I've spent the past 24 hours pretty much engrossed by that website.

FACT: I've had relations with one of the girls on there, which is how I came to find out about the site.

I dated a suicide girl that did a photo shoot with her bike...fucking hot...she has some badass scarification and tats too that made it even hotter

My girlfriend and I are constantly doing double takes at the hotties on fixies here, so many hot bikes and hot people in The Bay. I love how she dosent get mad at me for snapping my neck and going "DAAAAAMMMMN" cause she is just as bad about it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 15, 2011, 12:08:41 PM
Yeah, for what it's worth I think at least a few of the girls on The FixFixFix are also on Burning Angel.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: moj on June 16, 2011, 07:22:47 AM
Sorry if this has already been covered but what are your thoughts on bike shares (http://www.capitalbikeshare.com/)? They recently opened one here and there is a rack by my work and one next to the building I'm moving to July 1st. I haven’t ridden in while and don't have any gear so thought it would be a good way to test the waters without a big investment. I'll be moving into DC and the idea of riding in the city freak's me out a little. I've befriended many a bike currier who had no teeth and made regular trips to the ER. I do not want to be like that. DC has a lot of bike lines but also a lot of traffic. Any tips on urban riding? The bike share bikes don’t look like they have gears, I guess the best thing to do is just take one for a spin and see if I enjoy riding them. In theory they seem like a great idea and love that they are there, but if I don’t like the bikes it’s all for naught.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 16, 2011, 08:24:49 AM
It's like riding a motorcycle. Keep your head on a swivel and anticipate as best as possible situations as they present themselves.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 16, 2011, 09:24:46 AM
I've befriended many a bike currier who had no teeth and made regular trips to the ER. I do not want to be like that.

You know why that is? Because bike couriers ride their bikes like epic douche bags. They run lights, make erratic and unpredictable lane changes, they ride against the flow of traffic, and take completely unnecessary risks.

If you obey the law and aren't an idiot you can probably go years--if not decades--without ever getting into an accident.

And also, what xenu said.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 16, 2011, 12:50:13 PM
for bike couriers its also about exposure time, most bike riders spend less than an hour a day on their bike while couriers are on em for many hours all day everyday

its a relatively low paying job that usually requires you to be a independent contractor and even pay for your own walkie talkie/radio (a monthly service). You are pressured to make runs as fast as possible, sometimes you risk not getting paid for a run at all if its a minute late. I wouldn't put all the blame on them being douches
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 16, 2011, 12:56:18 PM
Sorry if this has already been covered but what are your thoughts on bike shares (http://www.capitalbikeshare.com/)? They recently opened one here and there is a rack by my work and one next to the building I'm moving to July 1st. I haven’t ridden in while and don't have any gear so thought it would be a good way to test the waters without a big investment. I'll be moving into DC and the idea of riding in the city freak's me out a little. I've befriended many a bike currier who had no teeth and made regular trips to the ER. I do not want to be like that. DC has a lot of bike lines but also a lot of traffic. Any tips on urban riding? The bike share bikes don’t look like they have gears, I guess the best thing to do is just take one for a spin and see if I enjoy riding them. In theory they seem like a great idea and love that they are there, but if I don’t like the bikes it’s all for naught.

I never heard of that program but Ive helped out with Yellow Bike before. It seems like a good project but folks just steal and pointlessly destroy the bikes, it really sucks, I wish the classic yellow bike model of leaving bikes unlocked around the city could work right now but apparently people are dicks
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_sharing_system#North_America (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_sharing_system#North_America)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 16, 2011, 01:00:08 PM
for bike couriers its also about exposure time, most bike riders spend less than an hour a day on their bike while couriers are on em for many hours all day everyday

Also true.

its a relatively low paying job that usually requires you to be a independent contractor and even pay for your own walkie talkie/radio (a monthly service). You are pressured to make runs as fast as possible, sometimes you risk not getting paid for a run at all if its a minute late. I wouldn't put all the blame on them being douches

Yeah.. that's more of a systemic problem though. I can't really fault them for being under huge pressure to meet deadlines, but I still think that a lot of the law violating I see in my daily travels is somewhat gratuitous.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: moj on June 16, 2011, 01:06:39 PM
yeah I was reading up on it and a lot of people on yelp really like it. I was wrong the bikes are three speed and I don't think they get stolen that often. You have to sign up and get a key mailed to you, then you have to redock it every half hour or pay an extra 1.50 per half hour.  There are bike stations all over the city so it’s not normally a problem to make it to the next one in half hour and can then immediately take another one(maybe the same, seems like a silly way to do it).  Not a big charge, but annoying if you are doing it to save money. They've been adding a lot more bike lanes around the city to try and encourage people to use it.  I think it’s a great idea and would love to see more place’s start doing something like it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 16, 2011, 01:32:14 PM
yeah I was reading up on it and a lot of people on yelp really like it. I was wrong the bikes are three speed and I don't think they get stolen that often. You have to sign up and get a key mailed to you, then you have to redock it every half hour or pay an extra 1.50 per half hour.  There are bike stations all over the city so it’s not normally a problem to make it to the next one in half hour and can then immediately take another one(maybe the same, seems like a silly way to do it).  Not a big charge, but annoying if you are doing it to save money. They've been adding a lot more bike lanes around the city to try and encourage people to use it.  I think it’s a great idea and would love to see more place’s start doing something like it.

Im disappointed at how "free bike" programs have had to be modified to make them workable. The modifications (requirement of ID, rental costs and fees, strict time & local limits)  basically erase some of the original intent behind them as I understand it. They were often projects started by anarchists or other to provide bikes for the working poor and homeless

at this point I prefer the model of community bike kitchens where you can go to build a bike from some old junker that was donated and from spare parts. Usually for $10-25 bucks (or by volunteering labor) you can get everything you need plus someone will help teach you to build it up and maintain it. Since they have to invest something in it they are more likely to protect it from theft, the bike kitchen often sells locks dirt cheap and Ive heard of free bike lock programs.
Kinda reminds me of how mosquito nets that had to be paid for were apparently more valued by poor people....though Ive since read that this has been debunked by further research by Esther Duflo who concluded that free nets were more likely to be used (still looking for that actual paper)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: moj on June 16, 2011, 06:23:41 PM
yeah it's a fail if you think of it as a "free beer" type free bike program. It is though a cheap way to make bikes more accessible.  This is really compounded by the other efforts the city has already done to add bike lanes.  It's not as cool as a true bike share, but do like seeing the city pushing bikes as a realistic transportation option. They are building it into the info-structure and that is really cool.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 16, 2011, 07:44:33 PM
yeah I was reading up on it and a lot of people on yelp really like it. I was wrong the bikes are three speed and I don't think they get stolen that often. You have to sign up and get a key mailed to you, then you have to redock it every half hour or pay an extra 1.50 per half hour.  There are bike stations all over the city so it’s not normally a problem to make it to the next one in half hour and can then immediately take another one(maybe the same, seems like a silly way to do it).  Not a big charge, but annoying if you are doing it to save money. They've been adding a lot more bike lanes around the city to try and encourage people to use it.  I think it’s a great idea and would love to see more place’s start doing something like it.

Im disappointed at how "free bike" programs have had to be modified to make them workable. The modifications (requirement of ID, rental costs and fees, strict time & local limits)  basically erase some of the original intent behind them as I understand it. They were often projects started by anarchists or other to provide bikes for the working poor and homeless

at this point I prefer the model of community bike kitchens where you can go to build a bike from some old junker that was donated and from spare parts. Usually for $10-25 bucks (or by volunteering labor) you can get everything you need plus someone will help teach you to build it up and maintain it. Since they have to invest something in it they are more likely to protect it from theft, the bike kitchen often sells locks dirt cheap and Ive heard of free bike lock programs.
Kinda reminds me of how mosquito nets that had to be paid for were apparently more valued by poor people....though Ive since read that this has been debunked by further research by Esther Duflo who concluded that free nets were more likely to be used (still looking for that actual paper)
I got a sweet Schwinn cruiser from the Santa Cruz Bike Church a few years ago - all I had to do was do some cleaning for like an hour or two and they just gave it to me. It's the bike I'm going to renovate this summer. It needs a new paint job, a new chain, and a new front wheel (the whole thing - the bolt that attaches the wheel to the frame snapped).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 17, 2011, 04:51:21 AM
I'm going to have to wear booties and full fingered gloves for the next few months.  Maybe get some rollers and ride inside... I'm getting too old to freeze in lycra.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on June 19, 2011, 02:56:39 PM
I miss my rollers, but I just could not use them in my present home.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 22, 2011, 04:03:58 PM
Today's Bike Snob (http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2011/06/creative-class-selflessness-of.html) is definitely worth a read. He got all Andy Rooney up in this bitch.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 22, 2011, 08:05:57 PM
Wow.. so the incredible happened. I hit a massive pothole and cracked my downtube right near where it joins the headtube. That's just fucking fantastic.

Well.. farewell to a dear friend. We have about 15,000 miles of memories and good times and near misses and scrapes and blistering sun and freezing cold and atrocious humidity.

And hello to the new Masi Coltello TT frame I just bought for $400 on eBay. Really couldn't afford it, but I need a new frame and I wasn't really going to find anything for less.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 22, 2011, 08:10:12 PM
O HAI

(http://thumbs2.ebaystatic.com/m/mjmzNxlNgl8J1nPzURvTztQ/140.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 22, 2011, 08:25:41 PM
cool
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 23, 2011, 01:47:53 AM
Stupid tire got a flat last night. >:( It's fixed now, but GOD DAMMIT this needs to stop happening.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 23, 2011, 03:29:16 AM
I love my Masi roadie.

Panda, get some tubes with stop leak preloaded.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Straws Pulled At Random on June 23, 2011, 03:31:08 AM
Stupid tire got a flat last night. >:( It's fixed now, but GOD DAMMIT this needs to stop happening.

It's because you keep doing snakey skids all over the place and wearing out your tyre tread, don't ya Panda? I used to do that all the time.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 23, 2011, 03:36:08 AM
No, it's because I put too much weight on the back tire. And then I hit something (a rock, or a hole in the road) and that pops the stupid tube.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Straws Pulled At Random on June 23, 2011, 03:39:55 AM
No, it's because I put too much weight on the back tire. And then I hit something (a rock, or a hole in the road) and that pops the stupid tube.

Are you keeping the tyres inflated enough? Normally that only happens if they are flat or if they are weakened from previous punctures.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 23, 2011, 03:46:03 AM
No, it's because I put too much weight on the back tire. And then I hit something (a rock, or a hole in the road) and that pops the stupid tube.

Are you keeping the tyres inflated enough? Normally that only happens if they are flat
I just figured it was because I'm a fat ass. :P I'll check the pressure.

Quote
or if they are weakened from previous punctures.
This tube was. In a couple of places. <_< But it lasted for upwards of a month or more. I forget the last time I patched it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Straws Pulled At Random on June 23, 2011, 03:49:42 AM
I think you should just get a team of sled dogs to pull your bike along. I know that won't solve the tyre problem, but it would certainly be awesome and you would be KING OF THE STREETS. Or Queen in this case.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 23, 2011, 05:29:06 AM
No, it's because I put too much weight on the back tire. And then I hit something (a rock, or a hole in the road) and that pops the stupid tube.

I have only ever ridden a mountain bike. The thin tires on road bikes kind of scare me because of what you just described. People ride them all the time, so I'm sure the danger of getting flats isn't as bad as I fear it is. But I'm going to stick with my mountain bike. Besides, I often find that I need to go off-road, or sometimes I'll take a little short cut through a patch of desert.

And this one time, I had to jump my bike through a flaming hoop to get over this wall because I was being chased by a mountain lion. It turned out there was a saguaro cactus on the other side of the wall. But I hit it with my tires and it started to fall over, like it was a drawbridge lowering me to the ground, ya know? As soon as it hit the ground, I road over the length of the cactus. I soon realized, however, that I was now riding over a carpet of porcupines! I had jumped into a porcupine farm! I couldn't stop, though, because I could hear the lion close behind. It bit my tire but it's teeth just bounced off because I have thick mountain bike tires. And then the farmer comes out with a shotgun yelling, "Get off meh property!" Then he shot at my tires and the bullets just ricocheted right off and killed him mostly dead! Well, I road straight over his body, into his house, and then slammed the door shut behind me. Then I checked my tires. Barely a scratch. I kid you not. Then I called my boss and explained why I was late for work.

Btw, the patches I put on are still holding up. \o/
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 23, 2011, 05:58:35 AM
No, it's because I put too much weight on the back tire. And then I hit something (a rock, or a hole in the road) and that pops the stupid tube.

Are you keeping the tyres inflated enough? Normally that only happens if they are flat
I just figured it was because I'm a fat ass. :P I'll check the pressure.

Quote
or if they are weakened from previous punctures.
This tube was. In a couple of places. <_< But it lasted for upwards of a month or more. I forget the last time I patched it.

Gotta keep that pressure right. Check it at least once a week, and you should probably keep the pressure around 100psi if you're using road tires.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 23, 2011, 10:39:27 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/25QhN.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/F9QvU.jpg)

Seriously.. hanging on by a thread.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 23, 2011, 01:33:54 PM
Yeah, the recommended psi is 100lbs. But I discovered that I don't have a way to check the pressure. F* you presta stems. But hey, this means a trip to a bike shop... darn!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 23, 2011, 01:55:57 PM
Trust me, a good bike pump is a worthwhile investment.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on June 23, 2011, 02:22:41 PM
Sheesh, jaypee, you're lucky you didn't seriously injure yourself there.

Did you just suddenly stop, or were you airborne for a while?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on June 23, 2011, 02:25:03 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/F9QvU.jpg)

Seriously.. hanging on by a thread.

I hear you bitching, but I don't see any evidence in this picture of an attempted repair.  There isn't even any duct tape on there!

Wrap it up and hit the road, buddy!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 23, 2011, 02:31:00 PM
Sheesh, jaypee, you're lucky you didn't seriously injure yourself there.

Did you just suddenly stop, or were you airborne for a while?

Heh.. here's the funny thing.. here's how it went down:

I'm biking along in the rain, and I see this pothole coming, but because there is a car tailgating me to my left I don't have any room to avoid it so I just sort of brace and hit it. I hear a loud SNAP which I assume is the tension bolt in my seat post breaking as this has happened to me before. So I keep pedaling for about a 1/3 mile or so, just thinking that the "bouncy" feeling is my seat floating backwards and forwards as I pedal because the bolt has sheared off. Finally I get up to a red light and turn around to inspect my seat, only to find that it is completely intact. I was a little befuddled and it took me about a minute to finally figure out what went horribly wrong. I don't know if that fracture was as pronounced from the moment of impact or if the fact that I kept riding on it for at least six blocks just made it much worse and that I only discovered the fracture mere moments from complete failure. Either way.. yeah.

Lesson learned: Never trust cheap no-name brand Chinese bikes which are imported through eBay. Never.

When I bought that bike it was as a replacement for my old steel frame bike which had been destroyed in a car accident, and I only bought it as a temporary bike. I never planned on riding it for 5 years.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on June 23, 2011, 02:33:04 PM
Don't know how many hills you have in Boston, but you're damned lucky that didn't go whilst heading full speed down one. That could have got messy.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 23, 2011, 02:34:45 PM
JP, you're lucky it wasn't the top tube as well.  There was one of those propped up against the rego table at a race I attended... it included an ambulance ride. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 23, 2011, 02:36:57 PM
Yeah, I've been insanely lucky in that I've had aluminum components completely fracture on me three times now and every time it's happened without any serious injury.

There's a lesson in there somewhere, but I don't know what it is.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 23, 2011, 07:52:07 PM
There's a lesson in there somewhere, but I don't know what it is.
Have decent life insurance?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on June 23, 2011, 08:06:43 PM
There's a lesson in there somewhere, but I don't know what it is.

Her early leaf's a flower; but only so an hour - then leaf subsides to leaf, so Eden sank to grief, so dawn goes down to day - nothing gold can stay?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 23, 2011, 08:39:29 PM
Yeah, I've been insanely lucky in that I've had aluminum components completely fracture on me three times now and every time it's happened without any serious injury.

There's a lesson in there somewhere, but I don't know what it is.

I had this idea once of third time (un)lucky.

I gulped big time when I saw that carbon frame broken in two.  I just told (lied to) myself that Masi is a stronger frame.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 23, 2011, 09:45:44 PM
Just changed my seat to the original - the wide bottomed one I had is worn through to the foam near the front. The original is uncomfortable, but I'm not doing long distance riding, so I'll live. I'm going to get a new seat soon, though. I don't think I'll get a wide seat, though. It works, and is comfortable, to a point, but I think it makes me ride funny. I think I just need a new seat.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 24, 2011, 06:27:18 AM
Yeah, I've been insanely lucky in that I've had aluminum components completely fracture on me three times now and every time it's happened without any serious injury.

There's a lesson in there somewhere, but I don't know what it is.

I had this idea once of third time (un)lucky.

I gulped big time when I saw that carbon frame broken in two.  I just told (lied to) myself that Masi is a stronger frame.

It should be. If you look at the way my old frame was made it's all wrong. The down tube should be a wider diameter than the other tubes since it takes most of the weight, but it wasn't. As I said, this frame was bought as a stop gap purchase and I lazily never replaced it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 25, 2011, 02:17:46 AM
Does anyone use those clip shoes? I'm considering maybe getting some. I have the pedals (they came with the bike), but right now I'm using the toe clip pedals - the ones that have a dealy that comes over your toe. Someone mentioned that those might actually be more dangerous than the clip shoes, as you can adjust the clips so that the slightest torque will release you. I do worry that I'll get my foot caught in the toe clip, even though I'm used to them by now.

I've already reasoned that clip shoes are more efficient, I'm just wondering about their safety. As a consummate klutz, I have to be conscious of these things.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 25, 2011, 11:21:18 AM
I do, but I don't recommend them for city riding. I wore them for city commuting for about a year and in that span I managed to just randomly topple over like three times (because once you start losing your balance while slowing down you can't correct your balance) and I also just wore down the cleat that was on the foot which I used as my "plant" foot when I was waiting for a light to change. You'd be better off just using the pedals you have.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 25, 2011, 01:13:25 PM
I agree I have just switched over to clip on shoes and I like them for the riding I do but I would never use them in down town Chicago. Way to much traffic and if you have to stop quick and you don't unclip quick enough then you are falling over. I have done it once and it was when a light changed and I didn't unclip fast enough.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 25, 2011, 02:32:04 PM
I don't live in the big city, but I can't imagine riding anywhere without spd's and cleats.  Much easier to disengage than toe clips.   I have a pair of Cannondale shoes with well recessed cleats that I like for cycle touring.  They have worked a treat in Italy, France and Africa.

I do leave flat pedals on the old (very) Stumpjumper for getting around the farm in steelcaps and gumboots.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 25, 2011, 03:23:11 PM
I do, but I don't recommend them for city riding. I wore them for city commuting for about a year and in that span I managed to just randomly topple over like three times (because once you start losing your balance while slowing down you can't correct your balance) and I also just wore down the cleat that was on the foot which I used as my "plant" foot when I was waiting for a light to change. You'd be better off just using the pedals you have.
Cool, didn't think about that. If I pick up long distance riding, I'll consider getting some. I live near a great bike trail that leads to a park or to downtown San Jose, depending on if you turn left or right at Albuquerque.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: chionactis on June 25, 2011, 03:34:56 PM
Well, the tire that I patched went flat, but I got a lot of use out of it before it did, including riding to a new job to do some paperwork. I don't know yet if the leak is from the area that was patched or if it is a new hole, but luckily I was able to get a new tube to replace it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 26, 2011, 12:43:29 AM
It's great to go for a hard ride with friends (even if their combined ages don't add up to mine) that return to pick me up if I'm a bit slow getting up a big hill.

on another note, itit seems that Garmin gets it.

 http://www.bicycling.com/training-nutrition/nutrition-weight-loss/big-fat-lies?cm_mmc=Facebook-_-Bicycling-_-Content-Story-_-fatlies (http://www.bicycling.com/training-nutrition/nutrition-weight-loss/big-fat-lies?cm_mmc=Facebook-_-Bicycling-_-Content-Story-_-fatlies)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 26, 2011, 04:22:46 PM
Does anyone use those clip shoes? I'm considering maybe getting some. I have the pedals (they came with the bike), but right now I'm using the toe clip pedals - the ones that have a dealy that comes over your toe. Someone mentioned that those might actually be more dangerous than the clip shoes, as you can adjust the clips so that the slightest torque will release you. I do worry that I'll get my foot caught in the toe clip, even though I'm used to them by now.

I've already reasoned that clip shoes are more efficient, I'm just wondering about their safety. As a consummate klutz, I have to be conscious of these things.

you could always get combo pedals that allow you to use toe clips but also regular shoes
I personally used toes cages...with special plastic coated straps that dont wear through like my nylon straps did...its hard to find double straps that arnt $100 and leather though but I really want double straps, Ive broken single nylon straps from tryign to brake to hard
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 27, 2011, 02:06:16 AM
you could always get combo pedals that allow you to use toe clips but also regular shoes
This is relevant to my interests. The clip pedals I have are for clip shoes only - I had to use them for about a week before getting the toe clips and it sucked hard.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 27, 2011, 04:17:22 AM
you could always get combo pedals that allow you to use toe clips but also regular shoes
This is relevant to my interests. The clip pedals I have are for clip shoes only - I had to use them for about a week before getting the toe clips and it sucked hard.

Oh, my.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 27, 2011, 06:25:34 AM
you could always get combo pedals that allow you to use toe clips but also regular shoes
This is relevant to my interests. The clip pedals I have are for clip shoes only - I had to use them for about a week before getting the toe clips and it sucked hard.

FWIW I've never seen a pair of cleats for less than $100, and if you were to switch to cleats you would always have to carry a pair of walking shoes with you in your bag because you can't run errands with cleats on. I mean.. you can, but you'll probably snap every tendon in your ankles at some point.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Marx on June 27, 2011, 06:47:34 AM
I’m sold on SPDs & run them on all my bikes. The shoes I’ve owned over the last 17yrs have slowly become more ‘specialised’, but you can still buy heaps of nice comfy walking shoes with recessed SDP cleats to give you the best of both worlds.
SPD (cleats) offer you that extra drive you can get from ‘pulling up’, as well as the regular pushing down on the pedal stroke. Also it helps with hopping over gutters & the like.
Sure you can topple off the bike as you go for that pedal disengage that doesn’t happen, but as you use new SPDs that ‘wear in’ & the whole clip in & clip out gets way easier.  You can also clip out  just before you have to & coast with you foot on the pedal.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 27, 2011, 11:12:29 AM
you could always get combo pedals that allow you to use toe clips but also regular shoes
This is relevant to my interests. The clip pedals I have are for clip shoes only - I had to use them for about a week before getting the toe clips and it sucked hard.

FWIW I've never seen a pair of cleats for less than $100, and if you were to switch to cleats you would always have to carry a pair of walking shoes with you in your bag because you can't run errands with cleats on. I mean.. you can, but you'll probably snap every tendon in your ankles at some point.

yeah but you win major hipster points...srsly girls in cleats are hot...kinda like stilettos for us bike nerds and bike jocks
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 27, 2011, 01:48:54 PM
Like I said before, if you  want to walk about in shoes that look like normal casual shoes, with recessed cleats. Simple.
.
What about $NZ50 for servicable pedals? http://www.torpedo7.co.nz/products/1ZPDMN1CA/title/serfas-mtb-clipless-alloy-pedals--p10- (http://www.torpedo7.co.nz/products/1ZPDMN1CA/title/serfas-mtb-clipless-alloy-pedals--p10-)

You only have problems with the pedal cleat interface when you cross streams and your mates are watching.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 27, 2011, 02:34:47 PM
You should never "cross streams" with your mates.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 27, 2011, 06:36:41 PM
You should never "cross streams" with your mates.

well spotted
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 27, 2011, 07:21:54 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyaLZHiJJnE (ftp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyaLZHiJJnE)

I forgot how to imbed video
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 28, 2011, 02:02:27 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyaLZHiJJnE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyaLZHiJJnE)

I forgot how to imbed video
ah, I see your problem: you added the FTP tag. I don't even know wth an FTP tag does. All you have to do is post the link to the video: the forum software uses magic and a video appears instead of a link.
like this:
Cross the streams (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyaLZHiJJnE#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 28, 2011, 08:54:27 AM
Thanks panda. I can never remember how to post video. Different bb use different links. :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Green Ideas on June 28, 2011, 09:17:53 PM
I wanna watch "Ghostbusters" again now.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 28, 2011, 10:05:17 PM
I just got a new seat for my bike. It's cushy and sporty. The difference between this seat and my last two seats is palpable. Especially the last seat. That thing was as hard as a rock.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on June 28, 2011, 10:09:19 PM
Especially the last seat. That thing was as hard as a rock.

(http://straponseduction.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/dildo-bike-500x375.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 28, 2011, 10:13:42 PM
Especially the last seat. That thing was as hard as a rock.

(http://straponseduction.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/dildo-bike-500x375.jpg)
I can't see your image, but the name of the link leads me to think it's something that's not appropriate outside of explicit.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 06:23:03 AM
I'm going to start assembling my new bike right now
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 06:57:06 AM
...and I'm stuck.

Turns out my SRAM bottom bracket doesn't use a standard bottom bracket tool so I can't get my bottom bracket off.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 12:47:18 PM
Just dropped $80 on tools through Amazon. I probably would have had to pay that much to have a bike shop strip the parts off my old bike and build my new bike, so I consider it a good investment.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on June 29, 2011, 01:03:39 PM
Toolage is always good. ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 01:04:52 PM
Yeah..

One of the tools I bought was a 14" torque wrench, and there are multiple uses for torque wrenches, so that's a double bonus.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 29, 2011, 03:37:03 PM
Just wanted to post this
Quote
Riding the Tour De Vegetable
American David Zabriskie Aims to Compete in the World's Most Grueling Bike Race—As a Vegan*

* With a little fish thrown in
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304314404576414124184873028.html (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304314404576414124184873028.html)

so he is actually a pesky-tarian but still pretty cool.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 03:41:22 PM
Just wanted to post this
Quote
Riding the Tour De Vegetable
American David Zabriskie Aims to Compete in the World's Most Grueling Bike Race—As a Vegan*

* With a little fish thrown in
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304314404576414124184873028.html (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304314404576414124184873028.html)

so he is actually a pesky-tarian but still pretty cool.

 :siren: :siren: :siren: EPIC WOO ALERT  :siren: :siren: :siren:

Quote
But at the beginning of last season, his team's chiropractor gave him a blood test that screened his sensitivity to certain types of foods.

Good idea, buddy. Throw away your career based on the advice of a quack.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on June 29, 2011, 03:43:20 PM
Just wanted to post this
Quote
Riding the Tour De Vegetable
American David Zabriskie Aims to Compete in the World's Most Grueling Bike Race—As a Vegan*

* With a little fish thrown in
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304314404576414124184873028.html (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304314404576414124184873028.html)

so he is actually a pesky-tarian but still pretty cool.

 :siren: :siren: :siren: EPIC WOO ALERT  :siren: :siren: :siren:

Quote
But at the beginning of last season, his team's chiropractor gave him a blood test that screened his sensitivity to certain types of foods.

Good idea, buddy. Throw away your career based on the advice of a quack.

yeah I saw that right after I posted it... I fail at reading
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 03:47:06 PM
As long as he's being closely monitored by team doctors and isn't taking any unnecessary risks then more power to him, but if team Garmin-Cervelo is allowing a chiropractor to perform blood tests and interpret the results while also making dietary recommendations then that team is doomed to fail.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 29, 2011, 03:55:11 PM
It's getting easier to ride my bike. My knee has prevented me from really putting pedal to the metal, so to speak, but the last few days, I've been feeling much better. The two physical therapists I've asked about it have both said that it's good that I'm riding my bike, so double plus good for me. And my knee feels a lot better from only one PT session, so hurrah!

I still need to clean the chain & gears, though. Do you guys use anything special for that, or does any ol' brush and cloth do the job? and is there any special lube that I need for the gears, or just chain oil?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 03:59:42 PM
It's getting easier to ride my bike. My knee has prevented me from really putting pedal to the metal, so to speak, but the last few days, I've been feeling much better. The two physical therapists I've asked about it have both said that it's good that I'm riding my bike, so double plus good for me. And my knee feels a lot better from only one PT session, so hurrah!

I still need to clean the chain & gears, though. Do you guys use anything special for that, or does any ol' brush and cloth do the job? and is there any special lube that I need for the gears, or just chain oil?

The easiest way to clean your chain is to:

Step 1: Go to Home Depot and buy 2.3 gallon jug of citrus degreaser for like $10 (you can buy degreaser from your local bike shop, but it's usually about $10 for a 16oz bottle)

Step 2: Buy yourself a Park Cyclone chain cleaner tool

Step 3: Put citrus degreaser in Cyclone and clean.

Step 4: Only use a bicycle chain lubricant to re-grease your chain. DO NOT USE WD-40.

If you can't do step 2, then just use a rag. But the Cyclone actually cleans in between the links of your chain.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 29, 2011, 04:08:51 PM
It's getting easier to ride my bike. My knee has prevented me from really putting pedal to the metal, so to speak, but the last few days, I've been feeling much better. The two physical therapists I've asked about it have both said that it's good that I'm riding my bike, so double plus good for me. And my knee feels a lot better from only one PT session, so hurrah!

I still need to clean the chain & gears, though. Do you guys use anything special for that, or does any ol' brush and cloth do the job? and is there any special lube that I need for the gears, or just chain oil?

The easiest way to clean your chain is to:

Step 1: Go to Home Depot and buy 2.3 gallon jug of citrus degreaser for like $10 (you can buy degreaser from your local bike shop, but it's usually about $10 for a 16oz bottle)

Step 2: Buy yourself a Park Cyclone chain cleaner tool

Step 3: Put citrus degreaser in Cyclone and clean.

Step 4: Only use a bicycle chain lubricant to re-grease your chain. DO NOT USE WD-40.

If you can't do step 2, then just use a rag. But the Cyclone actually cleans in between the links of your chain.
Cool. Thanks. I have some citrus degreaser and chain lube, but not the Cyclone dealy. I've used a rag in the past.

The gears on my bike are pretty gross, though. Is there a good way to get at those buggers?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 04:18:17 PM
I'm not sure if the Cyclone comes with a cassette brush, but if it doesn't, get one of those as well. The cassette brush does a really good job of cleaning in between the different gears on your cassette.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 29, 2011, 04:21:20 PM
I'm not sure if the Cyclone comes with a cassette brush, but if it doesn't, get one of those as well. The cassette brush does a really good job of cleaning in between the different gears on your cassette.
Is that what the gear dealy is called?

Maybe I should learn what the parts of the bike are called. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 04:29:00 PM
I'm not sure if the Cyclone comes with a cassette brush, but if it doesn't, get one of those as well. The cassette brush does a really good job of cleaning in between the different gears on your cassette.
Is that what the gear dealy is called?

Maybe I should learn what the parts of the bike are called. :P

Yeah, it's called a cassette.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 29, 2011, 04:34:40 PM
Is it wrong that I want to make a "mixed tape" joke? Or that I can't come up with a good one?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 29, 2011, 04:39:40 PM
No, it's not wrong, but I'm sure it's been done.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 29, 2011, 08:46:05 PM
As long as he's being closely monitored by team doctors and isn't taking any unnecessary risks then more power to him, but if team Garmin-Cervelo is allowing a chiropractor to perform blood tests and interpret the results while also making dietary recommendations then that team is doomed to fail.

Tell that to Lance.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 30, 2011, 06:31:56 AM
As long as he's being closely monitored by team doctors and isn't taking any unnecessary risks then more power to him, but if team Garmin-Cervelo is allowing a chiropractor to perform blood tests and interpret the results while also making dietary recommendations then that team is doomed to fail.

Tell that to Lance.

Please explain
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 30, 2011, 03:59:38 PM
As long as he's being closely monitored by team doctors and isn't taking any unnecessary risks then more power to him, but if team Garmin-Cervelo is allowing a chiropractor to perform blood tests and interpret the results while also making dietary recommendations then that team is doomed to fail.

Tell that to Lance.

Please explain

Sorry. I thought everybody knew that Lance Armstrong had his chiropractor on board in the Tour.  I have no idea what chiros are up to but he endorses them, and won races.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on June 30, 2011, 04:12:06 PM
And? Lance Armstrong endorsing a product doesn't really mean anything to me, as the practice of chiropractic is chock full of woo, and athletes endorse lots of crap that I don't care about.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 30, 2011, 04:30:29 PM
As long as he's being closely monitored by team doctors and isn't taking any unnecessary risks then more power to him, but if team Garmin-Cervelo is allowing a chiropractor to perform blood tests and interpret the results while also making dietary recommendations then that team is doomed to fail.

Tell that to Lance.

Please explain

Sorry. I thought everybody knew that Lance Armstrong had his chiropractor on board in the Tour.  I have no idea what chiros are up to but he endorses them, and won races.

Oh, ok. But I guess the question is did his chiropractor perform blood tests and prescribe dietary regimens and the like? That's the point I was trying to make.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on June 30, 2011, 06:20:41 PM
As long as he's being closely monitored by team doctors and isn't taking any unnecessary risks then more power to him, but if team Garmin-Cervelo is allowing a chiropractor to perform blood tests and interpret the results while also making dietary recommendations then that team is doomed to fail.

Tell that to Lance.

Please explain

Sorry. I thought everybody knew that Lance Armstrong had his chiropractor on board in the Tour.  I have no idea what chiros are up to but he endorses them, and won races.

Oh, ok. But I guess the question is did his chiropractor perform blood tests and prescribe dietary regimens and the like? That's the point I was trying to make.

No idea, but I do know that you don't have to be an md to order or interpret blood tests, and in some cases, you might as well do it yourself.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on June 30, 2011, 07:51:16 PM
In the United States you have to be a doctor or at least a nurse practitioner.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on July 01, 2011, 05:23:21 AM
Or a diabetic with a test stick.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 01, 2011, 06:27:14 AM
Or a diabetic with a test stick.

That's not remotely the same thing as interpreting lab test results and you know it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on July 02, 2011, 12:01:33 PM
A Chiropractor - in its original role (lower back work) might actually be useful on a cycling team. Anything beyond that and woowoo!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 02, 2011, 06:45:41 PM
So you know that pothole which cracked my bike frame? Yeah, turns out it broke both of my wheels too, and I just found out when I cleaned them off and found a hairline crack on both wheels going around their entire circumference. SO I GUESS I GET TO SPEND ANOTHER HUNDRED AND FIFTY DOLLARS. THANKS JESUS!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 02, 2011, 07:36:15 PM
That was one hell of a pot hole. You should go back and take a pic of it. If you did all ready then I apologize.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 02, 2011, 08:58:44 PM
Yeah. I should get a picture of it.. It really didn't feel that  bad when I hit it, but I'm pretty adept at bracing for potholes because our city has really awful roads.

I knew those rims were past their prime, but I figured they would last me a few months. Oh well.

I'm not really as pissed about having to take on the $500 of credit card debt for the new frame and the new wheelset, I'm mainly pissed that now I have to wait a few more days for my wheels to arrive since all of the bike shops around here are closed for the holiday weekend.

I just want to ride my new bike. Sigh.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 03, 2011, 12:20:50 AM
Yeah. I should get a picture of it.. It really didn't feel that  bad when I hit it, but I'm pretty adept at bracing for potholes because our city has really awful roads.

I knew those rims were past their prime, but I figured they would last me a few months. Oh well.

I'm not really as pissed about having to take on the $500 of credit card debt for the new frame and the new wheelset, I'm mainly pissed that now I have to wait a few more days for my wheels to arrive since all of the bike shops around here are closed for the holiday weekend.

I just want to ride my new bike. Sigh.

We understand.  You'll like your Masi frame.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 04, 2011, 03:18:35 PM
I just want to ride my new bike. Sigh.
Every time I see someone standing in the pedals, I get jealous because I can't do that. I still can't put much pressure on my knee or it hurts, so I'm stuck riding slowly and in low gears. This is unacceptable.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 04, 2011, 04:01:59 PM
I just want to ride my new bike. Sigh.
Every time I see someone standing in the pedals, I get jealous because I can't do that. I still can't put much pressure on my knee or it hurts, so I'm stuck riding slowly and in low gears. This is unacceptable.

Well at least you have a bike, ya jerk.

I drove down the street where the bike-shattering incident happened and I can't find a pothole that looks big enough to have caused so much suffering and heartache, but it must be there. I'll have to take a look at it from a bike, see if I can see the culprit.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 04, 2011, 05:16:16 PM
I just want to ride my new bike. Sigh.
Every time I see someone standing in the pedals, I get jealous because I can't do that. I still can't put much pressure on my knee or it hurts, so I'm stuck riding slowly and in low gears. This is unacceptable.
Just keep at it panda you will get better(I have no idea I'm just trying to cheer you up  :)) Biking is the best way to rehab a knee. I tore my ACL and it was what got me through it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 05, 2011, 12:39:54 AM
Who has a clean chain? I have a clean chain! It was pretty gross. I'm not even sure I was able to get all the crap, but I got the worst of it. Something tells me this is the first time it's ever been cleaned. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 05, 2011, 02:03:38 AM
Who has a clean chain? I have a clean chain! It was pretty gross. I'm not even sure I was able to get all the crap, but I got the worst of it. Something tells me this is the first time it's ever been cleaned. :P

I'm not surprised.  You don't have a cycle-serious significant other.  (I was gong to say "boyfriend". but...)

Good on ya, yer chain'll luv ya.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 05, 2011, 06:42:42 AM
Now that your chain is clean your bike will run more quietly and you can sneak up on people.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 05, 2011, 08:47:16 AM
Now that your chain is clean your bike will run more quietly and you can sneak up on people.
That bugs the hell out of me I always try to get my bike as quiet as possible when I ride.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 05, 2011, 09:09:11 AM
Now that your chain is clean your bike will run more quietly and you can sneak up on people.
That bugs the hell out of me I always try to get my bike as quiet as possible when I ride.

One time I flipped out on some dude who was drafting off me on the bike trail and had some squeaky chain. It was bad enough that he was following me at an unsafe distance, but the grating squeaking noise while he did so.. guh.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on July 05, 2011, 03:08:04 PM
The gf is currently working on the Intensive Care Unit and they have a cyclist who was admitted yesterday after coming worst off in an encounter with a car. The only injuries he suffered were to his head and it looks like he might not survive the night.

Of course it's hard to say that if he'd been wearing a helmet, he wouldn't be in this position, we'll never know.

Moral of this story: wear a helmet people!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 05, 2011, 03:12:13 PM
That's sad. Hopefully he pulls through and makes a full recovery while also somehow acquiring superhuman powers which allow him to exact revenge against inattentive motorists everywhere.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 05, 2011, 03:15:28 PM
somehow acquiring superhuman powers which allow him to exact revenge against inattentive motorists everywhere.

And how do we know that it was the fault of an inattentive motorist?  In my experience, the same cyclists that don't wear helmets tend to be the inattentive and reckless types of cyclists that are largely responsible for their own collisions.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 05, 2011, 03:23:24 PM
somehow acquiring superhuman powers which allow him to exact revenge against inattentive motorists everywhere.

And how do we know that it was the fault of an inattentive motorist?  In my experience, the same cyclists that don't wear helmets tend to be the inattentive and reckless types of cyclists that are largely responsible for their own collisions.

Keep your conservative ideology out of this thread, comrade. :P



For what it's worth I wasn't making a value judgment about the cyclist or the motorist who struck him, you just naturally assumed that if the cyclist in question were miraculously gifted with superhuman abilities they would follow the natural comic book story arc of first exacting revenge against those who wronged him. I was merely stating my wish that if BikeMan were to become a reality he would furiously destroy inattentive motorists, which would not necessarily preclude him from also mercilessly beating law flouting hipster bike messengers about the groin and face.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 05, 2011, 03:25:49 PM
mercilessly beating law flouting hipster bike messengers about the groin and face.

I would read this comic.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 05, 2011, 04:43:56 PM
mercilessly beating law flouting hipster bike messengers about the groin and face.

I would read this comic.
I should write this comic.

In other news, my bike pedals much more smoothly. It shifts better, too. Clearly, this is a miracle of God. And I can't tell if it's quieter - I can't ride my bike without headphones. Yeah, I know, almost as bad as driving with headphones, but the wind in my ears drives me crazy and is way more distracting and detrimental to my attention than whatever audiobook I'm listening to at the moment.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 05, 2011, 04:48:51 PM
mercilessly beating law flouting hipster bike messengers about the groin and face.

I would read this comic.
I should write this comic.

In other news, my bike pedals much more smoothly. It shifts better, too. Clearly, this is a miracle of God. And I can't tell if it's quieter - I can't ride my bike without headphones. Yeah, I know, almost as bad as driving with headphones, but the wind in my ears drives me crazy and is way more distracting and detrimental to my attention than whatever audiobook I'm listening to at the moment.

Don't feel bad, I bike with headphones too. My optometrist questioned me about the wisdom of such a strategy once and I shot back with "I keep my volume much lower than your average young male driver, so I don't see that what I'm doing is inherently more risky"
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 05, 2011, 04:56:57 PM
mercilessly beating law flouting hipster bike messengers about the groin and face.

I would read this comic.
I should write this comic.

In other news, my bike pedals much more smoothly. It shifts better, too. Clearly, this is a miracle of God. And I can't tell if it's quieter - I can't ride my bike without headphones. Yeah, I know, almost as bad as driving with headphones, but the wind in my ears drives me crazy and is way more distracting and detrimental to my attention than whatever audiobook I'm listening to at the moment.

Don't feel bad, I bike with headphones too. My optometrist questioned me about the wisdom of such a strategy once and I shot back with "I keep my volume much lower than your average young male driver, so I don't see that what I'm doing is inherently more risky"
Yeah, like I said, it's mostly for protection from the wind. I can't stand wind whistling in my ears.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 06, 2011, 07:19:36 AM
Yeah, I don't like it either. It's made worse by the fact that I keep my chin straps really taut so they whistle too.

Unfortunately, in the summer I have to contend with sweat pooling in my ears and being soaked up by the foam surrounds of my in-earphones. I hate the summer heat.

Why can't it just be sunny and 70 year round?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ouwie on July 06, 2011, 07:40:12 AM
I wear headphones too.  My ears can't handle wind or cold and express their displeasure by making me feel as if someone is checking out their ice pick to see if it's sharp in enough, by trying to stab my eardrums.  I've also learned from experience, that I tend to "ruminate" and work myself into quite a mental lather if I don't keep my mind occupied when I bike alone.  I get so wrapped up in my thoughts that I pay even less attention, so I actually feel a bit safer when I'm listening to something.

 I'm not a serious biker, but I have not gotten my drivers license here and until this week, had no access to a car anyway.  I use my bike to commute to work (mainly on dedicated bike lanes), do my shopping, and go anywhere in town (except for the occasionally when the weather is bad and I take the bus downtown) and I sometimes go for a nice ride through the countryside with my SO when we actually have good weather. 

If I'm not going far or if I'm not going to be using dedicated bike lanes, I often turn the sound off for awhile.  It often depends on whether I can hear cars coming or not.  I guess it makes a difference that I live in a country where there are lots of dedicated bike lanes and drivers are used to bikers of all ages popping out from behind every tulip.  But I panic whenever I hear people talk about making it illegal to wear headphones.  If they do, I'll go get my drivers license.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 06, 2011, 09:20:31 AM
popping out from behind every tulip. 

Let me guess.. Holland?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 06, 2011, 01:36:30 PM
Oy vey.

DON'T.. I repeat.. DO NOT lock your brand new $750 bike to a fence by locking it around the seatpost. (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/victim-turns-to-twitter-in-bid-to-track-down-bike-thieves-2306987.html)

(http://www.independent.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00620/18-bikes_620262a.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 07, 2011, 04:53:40 AM
That's almost painful. I try to chain my bike through the front wheel, and one of the tubes of the frame, but I don't always have my long chain with me. I at least lock it using the frame, though, and not one of the removable parts. I once laid my bike on its side to lock it up because a B&N had these stupid little bike racks that required either a long chain or enough hope that a prospective thief wouldn't know how to take off a quick-release wheel.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 07, 2011, 06:22:33 AM
That's almost painful. I try to chain my bike through the front wheel, and one of the tubes of the frame, but I don't always have my long chain with me. I at least lock it using the frame, though, and not one of the removable parts. I once laid my bike on its side to lock it up because a B&N had these stupid little bike racks that required either a long chain or enough hope that a prospective thief wouldn't know how to take off a quick-release wheel.

Ditch the quick-release when you update your wheelset.. Quick release anything is a liability. I once had someone steal my saddle because the seatpost used a quick release mechanism for some reason.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 07, 2011, 06:29:43 AM
But I like quick release. :(
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 07, 2011, 06:31:53 AM
So do criminals.

You have to ask yourself how often the quick release mechanism has come in handy. Are you a professional cyclist or a member of a cycling team's "pit" crew? No? Well then you probably don't need quick release skewers. If you're worried about being unable to change a flat while on the road you should just get one of those Alien multi-tools, since they have a cone wrench built in.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 07, 2011, 07:11:24 AM
But I like quick release. :(

You're the only woman who does.   My girlfriend bitches about it constantly.  :D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 07, 2011, 04:11:42 PM
So do criminals.

You have to ask yourself how often the quick release mechanism has come in handy. Are you a professional cyclist or a member of a cycling team's "pit" crew? No? Well then you probably don't need quick release skewers. If you're worried about being unable to change a flat while on the road you should just get one of those Alien multi-tools, since they have a cone wrench built in.
I haven't yet changed a flat on the road. I prefer quick release because I'm lazy. Also, I worry less about stripping a quick release dohickey. yes, I'm sure stripping an indication that I'm doing it wrong. On the other hand, I'm a strong lass.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 07, 2011, 04:22:57 PM
You'd have to be a gorilla to strip a hex nut, those things are pretty strong.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 07, 2011, 05:30:03 PM
Did you just call Panda a gorilla?

Why are you always such a dick, Jaypee?  :D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 07, 2011, 06:03:30 PM
I'm getting too big for my britches.

Goddamnit my new wheels didn't arrive today. FUCK YOU POSTAL SERVICE.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 08, 2011, 08:36:53 AM
But I like quick release. :(

funny story...

When I built my first fixie no one told me you cant use quick-release. Well that resulted in me bending or breaking a few axles and bolts(mostly salvaged anyways) before i found out it was the quick release wheel that was the issue.
quick release sucks
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 08, 2011, 08:54:54 AM
Quote
I'm sure stripping an indication that I'm doing it wrong.

yes stripping often is a sign that youre doing life wrong  :laugh:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Stovetop32 on July 08, 2011, 09:03:24 AM
Agreed,

Quick release = great idea for racing/fast training/transportation to and from events.

Quick release = terrible, terrible idea for urban commuting and anti-theft.

I like these:  http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/pitlock.asp (http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/pitlock.asp)

They represent an aesthetically pleasing option for anti-theft skewering. 

...Skewer is an under-appreciated transitive verb, by the way.  Don't tell Eugenie Scott though...  ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 09, 2011, 01:05:57 AM
Easy enough to run your cable through both wheels, frame and some solid steel fixture.  Take your seat with you if you are really concerned.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 09, 2011, 07:59:41 AM
That's what I do. I haven't had an issue yet. I don't live in a high crime area though.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 09, 2011, 11:41:46 AM
So Ive talked to other folks (but non with direct experience it seems) about biking in Vegas. Yeah, Im planning on bringing my fixie with me to TAM. There will be 24 hour bike parking through Wednesday-Sunday for the big BMX event going on at the South Point (might be fun to get drunk and go watch) so I'll have somewhere to keep my bike at least. Ive ridden in humid as hell, 100 degree weather before in Atlanta and did a ride from Austin to San Antonio on a day that topped out around 98.
I realize Vegas will be worse (though Im not convince the dry air is worse than heavy humidity) and numerous folks have advised against it, yet there are obviously cyclists who live & bike in Vegas given that they actually have bike shops and bike rental places.
At this point from everything Ive been told Im planning to only ride after dark or before 7 am, even then folks say im crazy.
What do ya'll think?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 09, 2011, 12:30:58 PM
Never rode out there. I wouldn't think the heat as an issue I would be more worried about crime and getting hit by a car at night.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 09, 2011, 02:38:53 PM
Great mountain biking near town.  Even better rockclimbing.  Can be very hot, though.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 09, 2011, 03:19:02 PM
So Ive talked to other folks (but non with direct experience it seems) about biking in Vegas. Yeah, Im planning on bringing my fixie with me to TAM. There will be 24 hour bike parking through Wednesday-Sunday for the big BMX event going on at the South Point (might be fun to get drunk and go watch) so I'll have somewhere to keep my bike at least. Ive ridden in humid as hell, 100 degree weather before in Atlanta and did a ride from Austin to San Antonio on a day that topped out around 98.
I realize Vegas will be worse (though Im not convince the dry air is worse than heavy humidity) and numerous folks have advised against it, yet there are obviously cyclists who live & bike in Vegas given that they actually have bike shops and bike rental places.
At this point from everything Ive been told Im planning to only ride after dark or before 7 am, even then folks say im crazy.
What do ya'll think?

I'd rather bike in dry desert heat than oppressive humidity.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 09, 2011, 08:02:50 PM
Penn Jillette cycles with a recumbent several times a week in Vegas.

Of course, Penn also said that the best thing about Vegas is air conditioning, and even Superman would choose to drive in Vegas, so there is that.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on July 10, 2011, 01:52:04 PM
I fell down some stairs on July 4th and hurt my knee. I am hoping it is just bruised and will see a doctor soon but in the meantime I cannot bike.  :(
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 10, 2011, 02:52:58 PM
I fell down some stairs on July 4th and hurt my knee. I am hoping it is just bruised and will see a doctor soon but in the meantime I cannot bike.  :(

don't you just hate that.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 11, 2011, 11:15:35 AM
I am pretty frustrated right now. I was basically done putting the new bike together this morning when I went to attach the handlebar and discovered that the stem clamp is a 31.8mm and is therefore completely incompatible with my 26.0mm handlebar. So.. yeah. Had to take the subway again.. and.. I guess I have to go buy a new handlebar or a new stem.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 11, 2011, 12:11:55 PM
I just practiced folding and unfolding my bike box, then dissembling, packing, unpacking, and reassembling my bike. Shouldn't take too long. Now i just gotta figure out if i can store the folded bike box at  Greyhound in one of the lockers (i dont know their dimensions yet, cant get em on the phone) or if they can definitely reserve me a bike box for my trip home, cause its too bulky to ride more than a few miles with
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 11, 2011, 12:20:07 PM
I was going to suggest getting a new bike box from a bike shop in Las Vegas, but I guess that wouldn't really solve your problem of not being able to get the box to and from the Greyhound station.

So I just found out that I can get a 26.0 to 31.8mm shim to convert my handlebar stem, and it will cost way less than getting a new stem or a new handlebar. That's a huge relief.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on July 11, 2011, 12:46:35 PM
So Ive talked to other folks (but non with direct experience it seems) about biking in Vegas. Yeah, Im planning on bringing my fixie with me to TAM. There will be 24 hour bike parking through Wednesday-Sunday for the big BMX event going on at the South Point (might be fun to get drunk and go watch) so I'll have somewhere to keep my bike at least. Ive ridden in humid as hell, 100 degree weather before in Atlanta and did a ride from Austin to San Antonio on a day that topped out around 98.
I realize Vegas will be worse (though Im not convince the dry air is worse than heavy humidity) and numerous folks have advised against it, yet there are obviously cyclists who live & bike in Vegas given that they actually have bike shops and bike rental places.
At this point from everything Ive been told Im planning to only ride after dark or before 7 am, even then folks say im crazy.
What do ya'll think?

I live in Vegas and bike ~200miles per week.  The heat can be pretty brutal if you are not acclimatized to it.  Of prime importance is to stay hydrated.  I only have room for 2 bottles on my bike so I always make sure to have a convenience store along the route so I can refuel.  www.bikinglasvegas.com (http://www.bikinglasvegas.com) is a great resource for bike routes, group rides and lots of other helpful info regarding cycling in the Vegas valley.  You can also rent bikes at several different bike shops in town.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 11, 2011, 01:14:24 PM
I was going to suggest getting a new bike box from a bike shop in Las Vegas, but I guess that wouldn't really solve your problem of not being able to get the box to and from the Greyhound station.
Thats my plan C...hoping i would be able to get a ride with someone else if need be or take a cab if neccessary

i still couldnt find the locker dimensions but from pics online they dont look big enough
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 11, 2011, 01:36:52 PM
I was going to suggest getting a new bike box from a bike shop in Las Vegas, but I guess that wouldn't really solve your problem of not being able to get the box to and from the Greyhound station.
Thats my plan C...hoping i would be able to get a ride with someone else if need be or take a cab if neccessary

i still couldnt find the locker dimensions but from pics online they dont look big enough

If you had $350 you could just buy one of those soft-sided Thule bicycle suitcases. But who has $350 to spend on something like that other than Freds?

Are you actually shipping the bike through a carrier like FedEx or UPS or something? Or do you just need the box to keep the bike from getting destroyed while it's in the belly of the Greyhound?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 11, 2011, 02:34:46 PM
Im going on Greyhound (Oakland to Vegas, one transfer) and taking my bike as cargo. I got a bike box fro ma local shop and used a razor to score some folds into it (they will be reenforced with duct tape after packing) so that it folds up enough that i can strap it on my back and bike the 3 or 4 miles to the greyhound here...but thats in a town I know and decent weather, I doubt i will be able to carry the folded box on my back plus my luggage (probably just one messenger bag of cloths and my computer) the 12 miles to the South Point. Im getting in at 5 am so the riding weather shouldnt be bad right then but will get steadly worse.

I also still have to find some disaster blankets or something to use as padding for the bike. I really wanna bring it but at this point am starting to reconsider the hassle...but I HATE HATE HATE not having freedom of movement, i don't like relying on other individuals, companies, or the city buses for transportation and no one is gonna want to give me rides at 5 am anyways
I also have one stop i wanna make on the way to the hotel and i simply hate having to ask other to drive me around, especially just to get my ass some donuts
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 11, 2011, 03:00:02 PM
You need a bike bag.

http://www.groundeffect.co.nz/products-BAG.htm (http://www.groundeffect.co.nz/products-BAG.htm)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 11, 2011, 03:21:30 PM
Greyhound doesnt allow for bags, its gotta be a box.

But yeah i looked into such options...there is a folding hardcase box that looked nice, though im not sure if it folds up i n away that makes it easy to bike with, it just said that it folds flat for easy storage or folds from center for a compact nodule
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 11, 2011, 03:28:45 PM
Greyhound doesnt allow for bags, its gotta be a box.

But yeah i looked into such options...there is a folding hardcase box that looked nice, though im not sure if it folds up i n away that makes it easy to bike with, it just said that it folds flat for easy storage or folds from center for a compact nodule

I'd suggest bringing some extra pieces of cardboard with you that you can use as "stents" on the inside of the box to provide some extra rigidity (sort of like cross beams in a building), that way you can score the box even further to make it able to fold down small enough to fit into a locker or small enough to carry to the hotel.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Joe B on July 11, 2011, 09:00:26 PM
Getting into shape for the Navy so got my old bike out. Just put in 25 miles, my legs KILL.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 11, 2011, 09:43:42 PM
Nice first ride.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Joe B on July 11, 2011, 09:47:02 PM
Nice first ride.

Oh, not first, I've been out a few times in the last 3 weeks. Some 8-10 mile rides, then a 20 mile one last Friday.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 11, 2011, 09:50:03 PM
I got to ride in my very first monocycle today!

Thing's fucking hilariously fun to ride, but I fell sideways when my balance went wonky, and really torqued up my wrist.

Nonetheless, I want one.  I don't know how great it would feel going over the terrible potholes that are rife throughout my city, though.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 12, 2011, 06:22:14 AM
I got to ride in my very first monocycle today!

Thing's fucking hilariously fun to ride, but I fell sideways when my balance went wonky, and really torqued up my wrist.

Nonetheless, I want one.  I don't know how great it would feel going over the terrible potholes that are rife throughout my city, though.

Monocycle? Is that a colloquialism for a unicycle or something different?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 12, 2011, 09:42:03 AM
There she is:

(http://i.imgur.com/3R0Ky.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/1Uu3z.jpg)

Some thoughts: The wheelbase on this is even shorter than the already ridiculously short wheelbase on my old set-up. This bike features an integrated headset which I'm sort of wary of. Part of my unease is due to the fact that I couldn't find the actual installation manual from Ritchey for this headset, and from what I've been reading online integrated headsets are inferior to conventional headsets. I plan on poking around the 'nets some more today to see if I can get the skinny on whether or not I actually installed this headset correctly.

Other than that.. Well, the frame is gorgeous, and the acceleration is so insanely smooth. I'm having trouble getting the seat post to stay adjusted to the correct height, and because the seat post is carbon I'm terrified of over-tightening the collar and possibly cracking the seat post. I stupidly forgot to take the sensor off my old wheel and put it on my new wheel, so I have no objective measurements as to whether this bike is faster than the old one, but I'll take care of that tomorrow.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 12, 2011, 11:27:42 AM
Monocycle? Is that a colloquialism for a unicycle or something different?

Something different.  I've ridden unicycles for years.  A monocycle looks like this:

(http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/4/2007/08/1873monocycle.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 12, 2011, 12:08:56 PM
Like woah.

Although it reminds me of that thing that Mr. Garrison designed on South Park
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 12, 2011, 12:30:05 PM
Like woah.

Although it reminds me of that thing that Mr. Garrison designed on South Park

yeah there are ones even closer to that, they have motor driven monocycles
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 12, 2011, 12:35:54 PM
Like woah.

Although it reminds me of that thing that Mr. Garrison designed on South Park

yeah there are ones even closer to that, they have motor driven monocycles

Have you gotten in one yet, Soy?

I really want to try the motor monocycles, but I think I'd kill myself if my first manual outing was any indication.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 12, 2011, 12:39:21 PM
Like woah.

Although it reminds me of that thing that Mr. Garrison designed on South Park

yeah there are ones even closer to that, they have motor driven monocycles

Do you steer them by.. oh never mind.. I'm going to keep this thread out of the gutter.

In other news.. this is hilariously stupid and asinine.

Gothamist: Local TV Reporter Warns of Bike Lane Terrorist Threat (http://gothamist.com/2011/07/08/local_tv_reporter_warns_of_bike_lan.php)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on July 12, 2011, 12:55:33 PM
Beat me to it.

Best quote is
Quote
the vice president of the Turtle Bay Association, Bruce Silberblatt, says the bike lane makes no sense in neighborhood because "anybody trying to ride a bike is taking their life in their hands. It’s that dangerous." In other words, the streets are simply too unsafe to make safety improvements.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 12, 2011, 01:11:36 PM
Beat me to it.

Best quote is
Quote
the vice president of the Turtle Bay Association, Bruce Silberblatt, says the bike lane makes no sense in neighborhood because "anybody trying to ride a bike is taking their life in their hands. It’s that dangerous." In other words, the streets are simply too unsafe to make safety improvements.

Yeah.. and I tend to take cycling advice from a guy who is old enough that he was around when bicycles were first invented.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 12, 2011, 01:30:04 PM
Beat me to it.

Best quote is
Quote
the vice president of the Turtle Bay Association, Bruce Silberblatt, says the bike lane makes no sense in neighborhood because "anybody trying to ride a bike is taking their life in their hands. It’s that dangerous." In other words, the streets are simply too unsafe to make safety improvements.

Yeah.. and I tend to take cycling advice from a guy who is old enough that he was around when bicycles were first invented.

WTF im not sure how the law is worded everywhere but i know there are cities that have a LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY to maintain the streets in good condition for their original intended purposes...you wanna know why roads were first paved in various cities in the US...thats right bicycles, I believe it was the League of American Wheelmen who really pushed issue
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 12, 2011, 01:58:10 PM
Beat me to it.

Best quote is
Quote
the vice president of the Turtle Bay Association, Bruce Silberblatt, says the bike lane makes no sense in neighborhood because "anybody trying to ride a bike is taking their life in their hands. It’s that dangerous." In other words, the streets are simply too unsafe to make safety improvements.

Yeah.. and I tend to take cycling advice from a guy who is old enough that he was around when bicycles were first invented.

WTF im not sure how the law is worded everywhere but i know there are cities that have a LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY to maintain the streets in good condition for their original intended purposes...you wanna know why roads were first paved in various cities in the US...thats right bicycles, I believe it was the League of American Wheelmen who really pushed issue

You're trying to use logic and facts to argue against people who literally brought up terrorism as a reason why bike lanes are a bad idea?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 12, 2011, 02:15:08 PM
Quote
You're trying to use logic and facts to argue against people who literally brought up terrorism as a reason why bike lanes are a bad idea?

more just venting
but yeah srsly some people are plain dumbasses
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 12, 2011, 03:24:50 PM
Aha. I just double-checked my handiwork by checking Sheldon Brown's website and found out that the reason I felt so uneasy about my headset was because I didn't correctly install the compression ring. I felt pretty certain that I was doing that part wrong, but I couldn't find the manufacturer's instructions.

I love the internet.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 13, 2011, 06:33:56 AM
Weighed my new bike, it weighs 19.6lbs, which is a bit less than my old bike (21.2 lbs). In other news, my weight is down to ~163lbs, which puts me at exactly my "ideal" BMI.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 13, 2011, 11:08:14 AM
My wife just sent me this pic, apparently Cambridge, MA has started installing bike repair stations:

(http://i.imgur.com/MdAH6.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Roma Hicks on July 13, 2011, 05:09:02 PM
I would love to have those in my town, it would have been useful for the times I had no tools.  But we still don't have real bike lanes on 95 percent of 'bike streets'.  You still get stuff thrown at you and cursed at.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 13, 2011, 06:50:08 PM
OK.. this is just getting absurd. I broke a freakin' chain today. How do you break a freakin' chain? I don't know, but I managed to do it.

I'm beginning to think that I'm doing something ridiculously wrong, or there's some deity out there who's just fucking with me.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 13, 2011, 07:03:04 PM
I have never broken a chain. I have never broken a frame too so I don't know what you are doing to get this sorta bad luck.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 13, 2011, 09:08:20 PM
OK.. this is just getting absurd. I broke a freakin' chain today. How do you break a freakin' chain? I don't know, but I managed to do it.

I'm beginning to think that I'm doing something ridiculously wrong, or there's some deity out there who's just fucking with me.

Get a monocycle.  No chain, no tube, no struts.  Lot less to break.

ONE OF US ONE OF US ONE OF US
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 14, 2011, 02:29:22 AM
My knee's feeling almost 100%, and I'm considering doing a long ride this week. Maybe tomorrow. I think I should try to work up to it, though, even though I've been pretty consistently riding for the last month or so. I just don't want to go on a long ride and find that it's too much for my knee to handle. I did a 5ish mile ride last night, though, and it wasn't too bad.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 14, 2011, 03:41:20 AM
Weighed my new bike, it weighs 19.6lbs, which is a bit less than my old bike (21.2 lbs). In other news, my weight is down to ~163lbs, which puts me at exactly my "ideal" BMI.

Nice looking frame.  The weight seems a bit high for a carbon frame and one chain ring, though.  My Masi is 6.1 kg.  You'll need to get a decent little torque wrench with the carbon.  Seems there are little newton labels anywhere you can tighten anything!  I just ordered some rollers as it seems like carbon bikes don't like fixed trainers. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 14, 2011, 06:01:24 AM
Weighed my new bike, it weighs 19.6lbs, which is a bit less than my old bike (21.2 lbs). In other news, my weight is down to ~163lbs, which puts me at exactly my "ideal" BMI.

Nice looking frame.  The weight seems a bit high for a carbon frame and one chain ring, though.  My Masi is 6.1 kg.  You'll need to get a decent little torque wrench with the carbon.  Seems there are little newton labels anywhere you can tighten anything!  I just ordered some rollers as it seems like carbon bikes don't like fixed trainers.

Well only the seat post and the fork are carbon, the rest is aluminum.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 14, 2011, 09:27:13 AM
So here's the lesson I learned: I didn't realize the importance of having a straight chainline, especially with a track bike. It's just never been a problem for me before, but since this is a TT frame the rear dropouts are set up for a multi-speed cassette. I added some spacers to the left side of the hub and the chainline should be much more straight now. Unfortunately, when I was trying to size my chain for my drivetrain I accidentally pushed the rivet out all the way and have therefore totally fucked myself. Royally. I ran out of time this morning and I couldn't get the rivet back into the link. Sigh. So I had to take the train this morning.




Oh, and thank the Gods of Cycling, but Boston is finally going to start cracking down on cyclists and shitty drivers.

Boston Bike Crackdown 2011 (http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2011/07/14/boston_looks_to_make_city_safer_for_bicycles/?p1=News_links)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 14, 2011, 07:48:05 PM
Oh, and thank the Gods of Cycling, but Boston is finally going to start cracking down on cyclists and shitty drivers.

Boston Bike Crackdown 2011 (http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2011/07/14/boston_looks_to_make_city_safer_for_bicycles/?p1=News_links)
Nice.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 14, 2011, 11:31:06 PM
Cold but still rideable.  Tights, booties, layers... and coffee!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 14, 2011, 11:40:37 PM
Yeah, it's a bit nippy in the Bay Area atm. I'm enjoying it, but I should probably throw some gloves into my back pack for emergencies.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 15, 2011, 12:50:30 AM
I had the long finger gloves on today... and what an excuse to dress up in lycra.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 15, 2011, 06:12:29 AM
When it's 95 degrees with the humidity making it feel like it's 102 I dream of the day when it will be cold enough for me to wear my head-to-toe BikeNinja outfit, and when it's 22 degrees with the wind chill making it feel like it's -2 I dream of the day when it will be warm enough that I can bike in nothing but a bib and shoes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 15, 2011, 09:18:53 AM
:argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh: :argh:

Some fat wretched piece of shit who works for the Boston Globe: "Make Boston Bicycle-free" (http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2011/07/15/make_boston_bicycle_free/?p1=News_links)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jack wooster on July 15, 2011, 09:52:22 AM
Went downstairs this morning, flat back tyre, got the bus to work, seem to get way more punctures than I used too.

Seriously 'tyre'! Is it like one in five words that we spell differently in England?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 15, 2011, 10:19:42 AM
Went downstairs this morning, flat back tyre, got the bus to work, seem to get way more punctures than I used too.

Seriously 'tyre'! Is it like one in five words that we spell differently in England?

I have no idea what you just said, I'm going to have to run this post through Google Translate.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jack wooster on July 15, 2011, 11:42:49 AM
Sorry google what?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 15, 2011, 12:01:33 PM
Exactly.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 15, 2011, 01:40:07 PM
OK.. I need some advice. I need to adjust my drivetrain length by basically 1/2" (one half of a chain link).. since I stupidly bought a bike with vertical dropouts my only real choice is to change my sprockets.. Right now I have a 48t crank and 16t freewheel. I need to shed half an inch, or gain half an inch, which means that I need to add or subtract four teeth to the sprockets.. I was thinking about just going the cheap way and switch to a 44t chain ring, which would cost me the least amount of money since I would only have to buy one new part, and I can easily change out a chain ring, and if I were to change the freewheel and the chainring I'd have to go buy a new freewheel tool.. but I'm thinking that a 44t chainring would dramatically cut down on my power..

right now my gain ratio is: 5.83

with a 44/16 it would be: 5.34

Alternatively I could go with a 52t chainring: 6.31

or a 45/15: which would give me the same gain ratio as my current set up (5.83).

45/15 would be the most expensive choice.. I'm leaning towards the 52t or the 44t option.. 52t would require adding another spacer to my bottom bracket (probably), but the idea of adding that much more to my gain ratio excites me. I think 5.34 is just too little..
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on July 15, 2011, 03:20:40 PM
Well only the seat post and the fork are carbon, the rest is aluminium.

FTFY.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on July 15, 2011, 03:22:17 PM
Cyclists use viral video to track down alleged attacker (http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/bike-blog/2011/jul/15/cyclist-youtube-alleged-attack)

Quote
The victim, Simon Page, a 49-year-old lawyer, was one of seven cyclists riding from Dover to London in training for a charity ride. Page and his fellow riders reported the incident to the police as soon as it happened in May. Six weeks later, the police had failed to make an arrest despite having clear photographs of the assailant and the numberplate. The cyclists decided to try and identify him themselves. One of his fellow riders, having consulted the police, posted footage of the violent attack filmed with his headcam on YouTube.

The footage flew around the blogosphere, the BBC ran a news item on it.

It's a clear incidence of YouTube and the blogosphere helping the police to solve crime. Under the video the cyclists have now posted this statement: "Thanks to a powerful combination of clear video evidence and viral internet publicity [a] man [has been arrested]. Thanks to everyone who assisted in spreading this clip, which in four days has led to the apprehension of [a suspect]. Result!"

No, this should read 'YouTube and the blogosphere force the police to get off their arses and do their job.

Seriously, 6 weeks and they hadn't found the guy? With his licence plate and face clearly visible?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 15, 2011, 04:36:07 PM
Cyclists use viral video to track down alleged attacker (http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/bike-blog/2011/jul/15/cyclist-youtube-alleged-attack)

Quote
The victim, Simon Page, a 49-year-old lawyer, was one of seven cyclists riding from Dover to London in training for a charity ride. Page and his fellow riders reported the incident to the police as soon as it happened in May. Six weeks later, the police had failed to make an arrest despite having clear photographs of the assailant and the numberplate. The cyclists decided to try and identify him themselves. One of his fellow riders, having consulted the police, posted footage of the violent attack filmed with his headcam on YouTube.

The footage flew around the blogosphere, the BBC ran a news item on it.

It's a clear incidence of YouTube and the blogosphere helping the police to solve crime. Under the video the cyclists have now posted this statement: "Thanks to a powerful combination of clear video evidence and viral internet publicity [a] man [has been arrested]. Thanks to everyone who assisted in spreading this clip, which in four days has led to the apprehension of [a suspect]. Result!"

No, this should read 'YouTube and the blogosphere force the police to get off their arses and do their job.

Seriously, 6 weeks and they hadn't found the guy? With his licence plate and face clearly visible?

You mean you expect the police to get up out of their chairs when if they just sit around doing nothing for long enough eventually the public will shame criminals into turning themselves in? :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 18, 2011, 04:41:45 PM
All right, so I added a half-link, now the chain is super slack. I did some "mathings" and found out that adding that simple half-link actually slackens the chain by about 2" throughout the entire length of the chain.

So fuck it. I'm going to file 1/20th of an inch off the axle so that it fits in the drops a little bit closer to the BB and switch out my 48t chainring with a 47.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jack wooster on July 18, 2011, 05:09:16 PM

You mean you expect the police to get up out of their chairs when if they just sit around doing nothing for long enough eventually the public will shame criminals into turning themselves in? :P

That's the approach the Met tried in the phone hacking scandal, didn't work, now two of the most senior policemen in the UK have resigned in 24 hours.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 19, 2011, 03:20:00 AM
The rollers arrived.  A bit of a laugh to get going... I'll be riding inside a doorframe for a few rides.  What a gas.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: burpy on July 19, 2011, 04:38:49 AM
Cyclists use viral video to track down alleged attacker (http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/bike-blog/2011/jul/15/cyclist-youtube-alleged-attack)

Quote
The victim, Simon Page, a 49-year-old lawyer, was one of seven cyclists riding from Dover to London in training for a charity ride. Page and his fellow riders reported the incident to the police as soon as it happened in May. Six weeks later, the police had failed to make an arrest despite having clear photographs of the assailant and the numberplate. The cyclists decided to try and identify him themselves. One of his fellow riders, having consulted the police, posted footage of the violent attack filmed with his headcam on YouTube.

The footage flew around the blogosphere, the BBC ran a news item on it.

It's a clear incidence of YouTube and the blogosphere helping the police to solve crime. Under the video the cyclists have now posted this statement: "Thanks to a powerful combination of clear video evidence and viral internet publicity [a] man [has been arrested]. Thanks to everyone who assisted in spreading this clip, which in four days has led to the apprehension of [a suspect]. Result!"

No, this should read 'YouTube and the blogosphere force the police to get off their arses and do their job.

Seriously, 6 weeks and they hadn't found the guy? With his licence plate and face clearly visible?

I raged.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on July 20, 2011, 10:12:33 AM
Movie for this thread. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=607eTT2y1ZU#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 21, 2011, 12:21:37 PM
So today has got to be the most ungodly combination of weather conditions: 95, sunny.. but the humidity pushes the temps over 100.. oh, and there are 35mph wind gusts which make pedaling an even greater chore. Tomorrow will be worse.

I'm going to experiment with something I heard about from a former US soldier who was stationed in Afghanistan who called into NPR last summer with a tip on how to beat the heat: apparently what the Afghans do is take a shemagh (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Forces-SHEMAGH-Balaclava-Arab-TAN/dp/B000UCUDYG) and soak it in cold water and then coil it up like a snake and wrap it around their neck, so right now I have a wet cloth towel in a Zip Loc bag in the fridge at work which will hopefully prevent me from dying on my ride home.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Anders on July 21, 2011, 12:23:30 PM
I find that soaking my t-shirt in water and then putting it on produces enough cold to make me fear pneumonia.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 21, 2011, 12:37:10 PM
That's my hope. :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: SkepticalVegan on July 21, 2011, 12:39:25 PM
So today has got to be the most ungodly combination of weather conditions: 95, sunny.. but the humidity pushes the temps over 100.. oh, and there are 35mph wind gusts which make pedaling an even greater chore. Tomorrow will be worse.

I'm going to experiment with something I heard about from a former US soldier who was stationed in Afghanistan who called into NPR last summer with a tip on how to beat the heat: apparently what the Afghans do is take a shemagh (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Forces-SHEMAGH-Balaclava-Arab-TAN/dp/B000UCUDYG) and soak it in cold water and then coil it up like a snake and wrap it around their neck, so right now I have a wet cloth towel in a Zip Loc bag in the fridge at work which will hopefully prevent me from dying on my ride home.

I used to have this neck wrap filled with these beads that when soaked in water would swell up and get gel-like and stay pretty cool for a good while until it dried out...it saved my life numerous times
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 21, 2011, 12:43:16 PM
So today has got to be the most ungodly combination of weather conditions: 95, sunny.. but the humidity pushes the temps over 100.. oh, and there are 35mph wind gusts which make pedaling an even greater chore. Tomorrow will be worse.

I'm going to experiment with something I heard about from a former US soldier who was stationed in Afghanistan who called into NPR last summer with a tip on how to beat the heat: apparently what the Afghans do is take a shemagh (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Forces-SHEMAGH-Balaclava-Arab-TAN/dp/B000UCUDYG) and soak it in cold water and then coil it up like a snake and wrap it around their neck, so right now I have a wet cloth towel in a Zip Loc bag in the fridge at work which will hopefully prevent me from dying on my ride home.

I used to have this neck wrap filled with these beads that when soaked in water would swell up and get gel-like and stay pretty cool for a good while until it dried out...it saved my life numerous times

Yeah, my boss was talking about those too. Maybe I should look into them.. he mentioned them but he said he had never tried using one.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 22, 2011, 11:20:33 AM
This sounds like a solution in search of a problem.

Bicycle Anti-Harassment Ordinance (http://laist.com/2011/07/20/bicycle_anti-harassment_ordinance_passes.php)

In other words, don't do things which are already illegal to begin with or else we'll uh.. well, we'll impose the same penalties which you would have been subject to anyway! YEAH! TAKE THAT!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 22, 2011, 01:56:03 PM
So today has got to be the most ungodly combination of weather conditions: 95, sunny.. but the humidity pushes the temps over 100.. oh, and there are 35mph wind gusts which make pedaling an even greater chore. Tomorrow will be worse.

I'm going to experiment with something I heard about from a former US soldier who was stationed in Afghanistan who called into NPR last summer with a tip on how to beat the heat: apparently what the Afghans do is take a shemagh (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Forces-SHEMAGH-Balaclava-Arab-TAN/dp/B000UCUDYG) and soak it in cold water and then coil it up like a snake and wrap it around their neck, so right now I have a wet cloth towel in a Zip Loc bag in the fridge at work which will hopefully prevent me from dying on my ride home.

I heard about this other really cool device you can use that will help you stay cool on your commute.

...it's called a "car."

GET A JOB HIPPY
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 22, 2011, 02:01:47 PM
Cars are for poor people.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 23, 2011, 06:37:42 AM
I have a car and a bike, does that make me a poor hippie?

Wait... :(
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 23, 2011, 07:44:31 PM
I have a car and a bike, does that make me a poor hippie?

Wait... :(

Only if you don't take a bath  ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Marx on July 23, 2011, 09:36:54 PM
We’re all beside ourselves down here as Cadel Evans (being Australian) has technically won the Tour de France (last day today [Sunday 24July] is just a cruise into Paris with traditionally no challenge to the Overall placings).

I’m not sure what exposure overseas (centric) events like the Tour de France have in places like the US whose media is so saturated with local content.  Sure Lance Armstrong has won this event a number of times it may not seem like big thing - that a non-euro rider has won this event - but there is the way in which Cadel had taken this years event out which – I believe – is quintessentially Australian.


Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 23, 2011, 11:05:04 PM
the way in which Cadel had taken this years event out which – I believe – is quintessentially Australian.

In that case I give him a lot of credit.  It's hard to win the Tour de France while talking incomprehensible jibberish and antagonizing reptiles for Americans' amusement.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 24, 2011, 03:55:42 AM
I figured out why I keep getting flats, even though I'm maintaining tire pressure. You know that inner liner on the rim? Yeah, that's kind of important. :/

I had fixed it a few months ago, but it needs fixing again. I might recommission one of my dead tubes for that. Hm, that seems like a suspiciously communist kind of thought. :raise:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on July 24, 2011, 04:58:16 AM
The girl is visiting the olds (farm near Raymond Terrace) and when I called tonight she said that it was the first item on the news.  Nice annniversary present for us.  Go Cadel, Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, oi, oi, oi!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: burpy on July 24, 2011, 05:27:05 PM
Justed wanted to give a shout out to Mark Cavendish (http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2011/jul/24/mark-cavendish-tour-de-france) who won the green jersey this year. As a Manxman, it´s rare that our tiny nation gets any recognition, but to have the wold´s best ever sprinter is something.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 25, 2011, 06:06:26 AM

I’m not sure what exposure overseas (centric) events like the Tour de France have in places like the US whose media is so saturated with local content. 

What's "France"?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on July 25, 2011, 09:46:43 AM

I’m not sure what exposure overseas (centric) events like the Tour de France have in places like the US whose media is so saturated with local content. 

What's "France"?

To quote Michael Goudeau, "I've taken out the 'Tour,' and I've taken out the 'France.'  All that's left is the 'duh.'"
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 26, 2011, 12:05:39 AM
The Tour de France is broadcast in the US on major stations. Or at least one major station. I know I've seen it on CBS or something. At the very least, ESPN covers it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 26, 2011, 05:42:27 AM
The Tour de France is broadcast in the US on major stations. Or at least one major station. I know I've seen it on CBS or something. At the very least, ESPN covers it.

Versus carries it in the US, but ESPN will show highlights.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on July 26, 2011, 06:02:31 AM
The Tour de France is broadcast in the US on major stations. Or at least one major station. I know I've seen it on CBS or something. At the very least, ESPN covers it.

Versus carries it in the US, but ESPN will show highlights.
I might be remembering seeing just the highlights. I just remember watching it one Sunday back when I was in high school. We didn't have cable, so it had to be ABC (the US one), CBS, or NBC. Fox would only show crappy movies on Sundays, I think.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 26, 2011, 07:46:41 AM
Maybe they used to. Versus has only been around for like two or three years now.. they used to be a hunting channel.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on July 27, 2011, 02:38:14 PM
Maybe they used to. Versus has only been around for like two or three years now.. they used to be a hunting channel.

Now theres an idea. Adding hunters to the Tour de France. Should liven things up a bit.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on July 27, 2011, 02:39:18 PM
Maybe they used to. Versus has only been around for like two or three years now.. they used to be a hunting channel.

Now theres an idea. Adding hunters to the Tour de France. Should liven things up a bit.

I've always thought strategically places land-mines would help all sorts of sports.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on July 27, 2011, 08:01:41 PM
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2011/07/2011_tour_de_france_part_2.html (http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2011/07/2011_tour_de_france_part_2.html)

(http://inapcache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/2011_tour_de_france_2/bp22.jpg)

(http://inapcache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/2011_tour_de_france_2/bp27.jpg)

(http://inapcache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/2011_tour_de_france_2/bp11.jpg)

(http://inapcache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/2011_tour_de_france_2/bp25.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on July 28, 2011, 05:57:03 AM

(http://inapcache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/2011_tour_de_france_2/bp11.jpg)


Next time I hear someone say that Americans will never like cycling because it's not a "tough" sport.. this. Just this.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Scaramaus on July 28, 2011, 08:22:27 AM
That's the Dutchman Bram Tankink. Great guy with a great character.
During a downhill passage he was forced of the road and made a somersault with a faceplant. He kept cycling......

Look also for pictures of Johnny Hoogerland crash (NSFW due to bloody butcheeks). He got into a crash when a car swiveled in front of him and Flecha during an escape in the Tour de France. He got launched and landed in barbed wire. his reply afterwards: "Well I think the driver didn't do it on purpose. This stuff happens" Legendary guy.

I am not saying only Dutch cyclist know how to bear pain and wounds, most of the pro-cyclists do. Can you imagine cycling for hours with a broken collarbone? That has happened a couple of times now.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 28, 2011, 09:11:00 AM
I have only seen that pic from the back of the rider back handing that spectator. That is the one thing I hate about the tour. Spectators get to involved. They can cheer and run along side the riders but stay out of the way.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Scaramaus on July 28, 2011, 10:33:07 AM
I have only seen that pic from the back of the rider back handing that spectator. That is the one thing I hate about the tour. Spectators get to involved. They can cheer and run along side the riders but stay out of the way.

You've got to hand it to Alberto Contador (the one that is hitting the 'doctor') he is always a really nice guy, even when he gets booed during a race, but when a spectator touches a rider, just because that 'fan' wants to be on tv, the rider has all the rights to hit that guy. It seems to get worse every year and I'm wondering how long it will take before they put fences along the whole road during a mountain stage.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 28, 2011, 02:31:10 PM
I thought it was Contador but wasn't sure.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kb on July 28, 2011, 06:25:14 PM
That's the Dutchman Bram Tankink. Great guy with a great character.
It's another Dutchman: Laurens ten Dam.

(click to show/hide)

Next time I hear someone say that Americans will never like cycling because it's not a "tough" sport.. this. Just this.
It's certainly one of the toughest sports when it comes to enduring pain.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on July 30, 2011, 10:36:49 PM
Well, here's my rig on a ride this evening, exploring the coastline on FL's Gulf side. It's an old Schwinn Varsity with hybrid tires;
(http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6135/5992655598_8bd4fb6d23_b.jpg)

I've been thinking a lot about the amount of woo in the cycling industry and cycling communities, everything from the 'frame theory', for lack of a better term, or the weird twists and trends in frame designs over the years, to Shermer's tales of funny thinking in performance enhancement. Is it just me, or do people go all squishy in the head when they think about bikes, or is it that cyclists are kind of odd to begin with?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on July 31, 2011, 12:06:26 PM
Quote
............ Is it just me, or do people go all squishy in the head when they think about bikes, or is it that cyclists are kind of odd to begin with?

Yes
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on July 31, 2011, 04:54:38 PM
My wife got hit by a car this morning....the fucking idiot didn't see her. We live in Virginia Beach and the attitude around here stinks. As does most American's when they get behind a wheel....moronic, immature and un-safe....just see the comments down here.

http://hamptonroads.com/2011/06/va-beach-tries-find-balance-amid-bike-incidents (http://hamptonroads.com/2011/06/va-beach-tries-find-balance-amid-bike-incidents)

This is a fairly typical comment.

Quote
The "sport" of on-road cycling needs to be eliminated. Any use of a road for any reason other than to travel from one place to another, whether it's jogging for pleasure, biking for pleasure, or driving for pleasure, should be illegal and come with a massive fine - followed by confiscation and destruction of the vehicle for repeated offenses. It'll be difficult to separate the scum who bike on roads for recreation from the good people who bike on roads for transportation, but a good way to start would be to ban group rides, say by making it illegal for more than 3 or 4 unrelated adults to bicycle together on a road. Difficult as it is, though, it must be done because the only other choice is to make bicycles illegal altogether.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Henning on July 31, 2011, 05:36:06 PM
Tell me she's okay...  :-\

re. the comments....
Why is it when someone bitches about bikes on the road, the first complaint is always running red lights?
I'm not creating a danger or getting in anyone's way. If anything, I'm getting out of your way... removing myself from the rush of cars when the light does change. Obviously, I look both ways before crossing for my own safety; and if it's not safe or I would be putting myself in someone's way, I don't cross. I think car people are just angry that someone else gets to go while they have to wait like schlubs.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on July 31, 2011, 05:36:55 PM
I go through red lights because I value my life. I need a head start, especially if i'm turning left....
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on July 31, 2011, 10:48:54 PM
Redacted; who cares about my safety advise... Just be as visible as possible and wear a bloody helmet and bike defensively.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 03, 2011, 10:06:12 AM
Well, here's my rig on a ride this evening, exploring the coastline on FL's Gulf side. It's an old Schwinn Varsity with hybrid tires;
(click to show/hide)

I've been thinking a lot about the amount of woo in the cycling industry and cycling communities, everything from the 'frame theory', for lack of a better term, or the weird twists and trends in frame designs over the years, to Shermer's tales of funny thinking in performance enhancement. Is it just me, or do people go all squishy in the head when they think about bikes, or is it that cyclists are kind of odd to begin with?

You mean a $4,800 battery powered drivetrain might not be worth the money?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 03, 2011, 01:15:22 PM
I'd like to move to Vilnius, Lithuania (http://jalopnik.com/5826496/mayor-crushes-misparked-luxury-car-with-troop-carrier) now plz.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jack wooster on August 05, 2011, 11:58:10 AM
Oh, that is just perfect!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 05, 2011, 10:43:54 PM
I'd like to move to Vilnius, Lithuania (http://jalopnik.com/5826496/mayor-crushes-misparked-luxury-car-with-troop-carrier) now plz.
Nice. I mean, it would have been greater if it wasn't a junker, but it still makes a great photo. :D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on August 06, 2011, 05:27:26 PM
I've been trying to catch up on all 51 pages of this thread... I have to say, the more Soymilk_Gun denies being a hipster, the more I begin to suspect ;)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 06, 2011, 11:02:30 PM
I've met Soy. I wouldn't call him a hipster, but maybe I'm just biased. He seemed like such a nice, polite young man. Or if he is a hipster, he's one of the good kind.

I biked about 5 miles today and it didn't tax me in the least. This may not sound impressive, but I find that it's a victory. Shopping whilst on a bike is taxing.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: elert on August 07, 2011, 05:11:54 PM
I have owned 3 bicycles in my adult life: a 1981 Schwinn Varsity old-school ten speed with an estimated 45,000 miles on it, a 1998 Ryan Vanguard recumbent that died in a crash after 33,000 verified miles of service, and a 2009 Trek Portland with a mere 7700 miles of life experience.

(http://physics.info/images/sgu/varsity.jpg)
(http://physics.info/images/sgu/vanguard.jpg)
(http://physics.info/images/sgu/portland.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 08, 2011, 04:56:19 AM
I rode about ten miles today, twelve if you add in the ride to the train station this afternoon to get to work. It was hard. :( I think because I did it after work, and also because I just wanted to be home and drink mah beer.

I do need a better headlight if I'm going to be doing rides (almost) home a few nights a week like I want to. The one I have is good for making myself visible, but doesn't really help me see.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: seamas on August 08, 2011, 12:24:43 PM
Just bought a bicycle this weekend.

I got a Fuji Absolute 4.0--a “performance hybrid”
I’m fairly happy with it, and excited to ride.

The funny thing is, as I told my wife: this is my first real bicycle. Or my first new one.
Growing up my family was usually more or less short of cash, so whatever bicycle I “owned” was either a POS hand-me-down, something I pulled from someones trash or just plain broken.
So pretty much when friends would head off on bikes, I’d either have to hoof it or stay home.
(so sad, I know  :'().
It’s sort of funny in that I am 44, have a wife, 2 kids, a home and a fairly new car, but only now got my own bike.

I’ve been looking to get one for years, but due to home car and kids (expenses), have not had too many opportunities to spend money on one.
Now since the kids (4 & 6) are riding and my wife will soon have one, most of the riding will either be with wife & kids or just myself getting exercise in the mornings.
I will be looking to get a bike rack for the car, but it looks like in order to carry four bikes I’ll have to get a tail hitch installed as well.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 08, 2011, 12:29:22 PM
Looking online, that seems like a pretty decent bike. Steel frame?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: seamas on August 08, 2011, 12:41:20 PM
Looking online, that seems like a pretty decent bike. Steel frame?

I believe so.
I'm not terribly knowledgeable in this area, and pretty much checked out the spec/whatnot after purchasing it.
The shop gives it a tune-up before you take it home--also gives 3 years worth of tune-ups, etc.

It was actually inventory from another shop that this shop took over. The place I bought it from doesn't usually carry Fuji, so I got this for $325, it regularly lists for about $400. (as I was told, but confirmed online). It's the lower end of the Absolute series, but it works for me.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 08, 2011, 12:55:19 PM
Steel is great, don't let anyone tell you different.

If nothing else, you don't have to worry about your steel frame cracking or literally exploding underneath you.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: seamas on August 08, 2011, 01:14:37 PM
OK. sounds about right.
I figure there is always gonna be some trade off, strength vs weight, etc

I only picked it up yesterday, but have found it to be the most enjoyable riding bike I've ridden-(which have either been junk or beat-up rentals or borrowed bikes).

Rode it about 3-4 miles. I've got a little bit of butthurt, but I'll live.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on August 08, 2011, 01:26:27 PM
I bought a road bike last fall a Terk 1.5. and I'm 53. I didn't think I would like it but I have put on about 500 miles this summer. I haven't had a chance to get out in the last week or two because of home remodeling but I love it. I was riding a Trek trail bike that I had for about 20 years. Man talk about night and day in riding and speed. The last road bike I had was when I was in high school( A Schwinn Varsity). Your never to old to ride.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 08, 2011, 01:43:11 PM
I haven't had a chance to get out in the last week or two because of home remodeling

I'm with you on that one.

I bought a new chain ring to make my drive train length work and it arrived in the mail the day before we moved into our new house and I still haven't found the box it got packed away in.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on August 08, 2011, 05:05:56 PM
I haven't had a chance to get out in the last week or two because of home remodeling

I'm with you on that one.

I bought a new chain ring to make my drive train length work and it arrived in the mail the day before we moved into our new house and I still haven't found the box it got packed away in.

I don't see myself getting out on a ride for at least another week or two. Hockey and home improvement is getting in the way.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 09, 2011, 04:20:04 AM
The funny thing is, as I told my wife: this is my first real bicycle. Or my first new one.
Growing up my family was usually more or less short of cash, so whatever bicycle I “owned” was either a POS hand-me-down, something I pulled from someones trash or just plain broken.
Congrats! My first new bike was a kiddie bike, but I don't even know if it was a new bike. I was a kid, after all. I did get a Wal-Mart new bike when I was a teen, a mountain bike (I lived in a valley at least 100 miles from any hills, let alone mountains), and I don't actually remember what happened to that bike. I think I gave it to a cousin or family friend. All my bikes since then have been second/third hand. My Specialized Epic is about ten years old, iirc. Maybe older, actually. It's in ridiculously great shape, because the previous owners didn't ride it much. I've probably put about 1000 miles on it. Maybe a little less.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Halloran on August 12, 2011, 07:15:13 PM
"You first, dude."
(http://i.imgur.com/IXSTH.png)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on August 13, 2011, 02:23:19 PM
Yesterday, we bought the boy a cycling helmet as we're planning on doing a few rides on our holiday next week and more than likely he'll be in one of those bike seats. Yeah, that was fun. He hates wearing hats at the best of times, so trying on helmets resulted in major screams in the shop.

I'm hoping that once its on, he'll get used to it and I won't have to stop every 5 minutes to force it back on his head.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Scadilla on August 13, 2011, 07:03:02 PM
I just started bicycling last month, because I had to get rid of my car. It's the best exercise I've gotten in a long time. I bought a 2010 Cannondale Quick 4 from my LBS. It's a hybrid. Perfect for me.
(http://i.imgur.com/kkw2p.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on August 15, 2011, 12:27:12 AM
Now I feel like a tool for still scooting around on my mid-70's Schwinn.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 15, 2011, 02:46:08 AM
Now I feel like a tool for still scooting around on my mid-70's Schwinn.
Why? Schwinn's are doubelplusawesome.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 15, 2011, 09:20:54 AM
"You first, dude."
(http://i.imgur.com/IXSTH.png)

Love it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Halloran on August 15, 2011, 02:43:52 PM
"You first, dude."
(http://i.imgur.com/IXSTH.png)

Love it.

If you poke around the net, there are photos of a tractor hauling dozens of old bikes out of the river.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on August 15, 2011, 02:44:27 PM
Pah, this is the (in)famous cycle path from my home town of Warrington. As you can see, it's really, really helpful.

(http://homepage.ntlworld.com/pete.meg/wcc/facility-of-the-month/Nov2005.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 17, 2011, 02:36:53 PM
Wow.. what a weird thing to get irate about. I still don't get the line about not allowing his kid out on the street.. I mean, is the guy also a pedophile?

http://www.thecoast.ca/LovetheWayWeBitch/archives/2011/08/17/not-on-my-street (http://www.thecoast.ca/LovetheWayWeBitch/archives/2011/08/17/not-on-my-street)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Roma Hicks on August 17, 2011, 04:32:53 PM
Yeah I don't get it too.  If it is real, what a snide jerk.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 18, 2011, 07:51:24 PM
Wow.. what a weird thing to get irate about. I still don't get the line about not allowing his kid out on the street.. I mean, is the guy also a pedophile?

http://www.thecoast.ca/LovetheWayWeBitch/archives/2011/08/17/not-on-my-street (http://www.thecoast.ca/LovetheWayWeBitch/archives/2011/08/17/not-on-my-street)
I don't understand this at all. It's a rant, not a bitch.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on August 24, 2011, 02:29:50 PM
*sigh*

My car is in the shop for the past few days (possibly dying) so I have had to bike to work. This would be good if I were more used to doing it 4 days in a row, but no big deal.

What is a big deal is both my eggbeater pedals snapped a section. That makes it a pain in the ass. One I can live with, both? Bordering on a hazard. New ones ordered but I still gotta get home on this thing.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 24, 2011, 08:19:57 PM
Biking in Portland is pretty cool. I found a sweet hill on Hawthorne. But then I had to go back up it. Bad decision. And the bike lanes/paths are all really well marked. Plus, they give you directions to popular areas and how far it is. It's very nice. I rode about 5 miles today, and am pooped, but it was totally worth it. If anyone knows what Burgerville is, they will know why.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Henning on August 25, 2011, 01:00:42 AM
If anyone knows what Burgerville is, they will know why.

 :waycool:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 25, 2011, 09:16:32 AM
Biking in Portland is pretty cool. I found a sweet hill on Hawthorne. But then I had to go back up it. Bad decision. And the bike lanes/paths are all really well marked. Plus, they give you directions to popular areas and how far it is. It's very nice. I rode about 5 miles today, and am pooped, but it was totally worth it. If anyone knows what Burgerville is, they will know why.

I heard they recently experienced a rash of Hamburglary there.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 25, 2011, 11:39:32 PM
Biking in Portland is pretty cool. I found a sweet hill on Hawthorne. But then I had to go back up it. Bad decision. And the bike lanes/paths are all really well marked. Plus, they give you directions to popular areas and how far it is. It's very nice. I rode about 5 miles today, and am pooped, but it was totally worth it. If anyone knows what Burgerville is, they will know why.

I heard they recently experienced a rash of Hamburglary there.
:fu: I see what you did there.

I'm gonna miss Burgerville.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 26, 2011, 09:03:27 AM
I swear that I will get my bike back in working order this weekend.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on August 26, 2011, 12:15:24 PM
I want to go on a 100 mile bike ride in a few weeks. Ideas on what I should bring besides tire kit and water? It is organized with planed out routes. I don't know what type of food will be available. I would image something. Thoughts?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 26, 2011, 12:18:04 PM
I want to go on a 100 mile bike ride in a few weeks. Ideas on what I should bring besides tire kit and water? It is organized with planed out routes. I don't know what type of food will be available. I would image something. Thoughts?

Those "energy" gels and jelly beans saved my bacon once. They're kinda gross but really help.

My advice: strictly limit your banana intake at the rest stops on the ride. Bananas will shoot right through you like a greased poop missile.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on August 26, 2011, 01:45:21 PM
I want to go on a 100 mile bike ride in a few weeks. Ideas on what I should bring besides tire kit and water? It is organized with planed out routes. I don't know what type of food will be available. I would image something. Thoughts?

You've got a rear rack at least, yeah? If so, you're set. Trail mix types energy snacks really make a tremendous difference for me. Granola bars too. Not really into the power gels on long tours myself. Pump, gotta have a good pump with your tire kit... And tire bars in the kit too, of course.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 26, 2011, 04:40:59 PM
I want to go on a 100 mile bike ride in a few weeks. Ideas on what I should bring besides tire kit and water? It is organized with planed out routes. I don't know what type of food will be available. I would image something. Thoughts?
You mean besides jealousy? Energy bars/granola are delicious and good for a quick pick me up. If I were you, i'd overestimate how much water to bring.

In other news, I'm really digging travelling with my bike. I'm so glad I brought it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on August 26, 2011, 05:29:02 PM
Good Ideas everyone. I am thinking that water will be available. I am going to add an extra bottle holder for my bike.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on August 26, 2011, 05:47:28 PM
Yes, extra cages for water. On touring rigs, there is usually a third cage between the bar and the front tire, hanging 'off' the frame. Was it this thread where I discovered this amazing little low tech trick; keep your bottles in wet socks, the passing air evaporating the damp will keep them nice and cool (if your tour is in a not so humid region).

Make sure your first aid kit has pain killers, a variety is good. MREs are great too. Not 'great', as far as cuisine goes, but they really hit the spot on the long haul... Good energy boost, and a little taste of sanity. Better than cold cans of beans or something.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 26, 2011, 05:53:33 PM
Painkillers is a great idea.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on August 26, 2011, 06:00:16 PM
Now that I'm thinking about your tour, I'm thinking about safety. Lights, lots of daytime running lights, "see me" lights, and super bright lights "to see" at dusk, dawn, dark, during a storm, or in areas with low light. Here is my helmet;

(http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6071/6083447179_807c55d40c.jpg)

Also note the side mirror; this has made riding in traffic on surface streets in urban areas and county roads and state highways SOOOOO much safer. At a glance, I can see what is going on for miles behind me, and with a slight pan I get a full panorama off the conditions behind me. It allows me to keep my head facing ahead, looking back over your shoulder all the time is dangerous. Will never go on a ride without again, and I highly recommend one for any kind of ride.

My two rules for commuting and touring, or even just hauling groceries, are 1) safety and the art of being seen, and 2) redundancy; always have 2 of everything (at least)... Two headlights, two rear lights, two spare tubes, spare sets of batteries... Backup, backup, backup. If one light fails, and they do, you'll still be good to go. Of course this also makes you more visible; more lights the better.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on August 26, 2011, 06:46:52 PM
There I go again, prattling on about everything bike. Sorry.

 I would also throw in a bunch of anti-diarreal pills and antacids in your first aid kit too. If you have never gotten the runs on a long trip yet, and you will, trust me. It'll save your ass (see what I did there). Nothing quite like getting sick to your stomach while on the saddle, in the middle of nowhere, with nothing but bushes and disgusting public toilets between you and sanctuary. I'm serious about the anti-diarreal pills, gravely serious.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jack wooster on August 27, 2011, 11:13:20 AM
Combover, does the image in your mirror bounce around?  I had a handlebar mounted one once but it was unusable.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Henning on August 27, 2011, 12:53:09 PM
Your helmet looks like a spaceship. Which is pretty rad. :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on August 27, 2011, 02:53:00 PM
Combover, does the image in your mirror bounce around?  I had a handlebar mounted one once but it was unusable.

Surprisingly no. I think my upper body acts a shock absorber for it, takes out the jitters. So far I've been impressed with this little mirror. It looks flimsy, but it is solid.

I forgot to mention yesterday; there is a school of thought out there which warns about attaching ANYTHING to your helmet. Their initial argument is pretty sound; that anything that interferes in the event a catastrophic collision is probably not a good thing. I have noticed, however, that most of the people on the interwebs who promote the 'never attach anything to your helmet' thing seem to be coming from this very weird anti-helmet camp. They believe that helmets do more harm than good, and that laws and advocacy for helmet use are some sort of conspiracy... I'm not kidding, I've really been noticing these people out there. Has anyone else?

Another important point they, and others, have made is that anything you attach to anything needs a breaking strength, especially anything on your helmet. It needs to be able to break away if snagged in a branch or obstacle; don't want anything unexpectedly yanking your neck. Something to keep in mind when shopping for, or making your own, mounting rigs.

Your helmet looks like a spaceship. Which is pretty rad. :)

Hehehe. Thanks. It does draw a lot of attention, which is sort of the point. Not for the faint of dork... But we're all SGU fans, so I can safely assume everyone here can appreciate nerding things up. Sometimes, with all the other lights on my frame, with my helmet, I feel like a giant christmas tree on the side of the road zooming through the night.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jack wooster on August 27, 2011, 04:10:40 PM
I feel like a giant christmas tree on the side of the road zooming through the night.

I nearly got hit by a deer, well a stag really, cycling round here at night, maybe I could do with a bit of christmas decoration!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on August 29, 2011, 02:47:19 AM
 A hundred mile ride? Two spares, 3 co2cartriges and 60gms of carbs/hr if you're racing, less if you are cruising.  Drink to thirst.  Dress for the conditins. Easy.  Have fun.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on August 29, 2011, 08:47:50 AM
A hundred mile ride? Two spares, 3 co2cartriges and 60gms of carbs/hr if you're racing, less if you are cruising.  Drink to thirst.  Dress for the conditins. Easy.  Have fun.

Thanks looking to just cruise. I could race if I went only 40 but I wouldn't make it for the whole 100 if I did.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 29, 2011, 09:35:27 AM
Sigh. My bike did not get put together this weekend.

Turds.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on August 29, 2011, 10:34:06 AM
Sigh. My bike did not get put together this weekend.

Turds.

You have to get the bike fairies to come to your house. You must be using the wrong bait.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 29, 2011, 10:55:09 AM
I think I need the organization fairies to come first. We still haven't unpacked more than 50% of our moving boxes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on August 29, 2011, 02:56:07 PM
Stupid bloody rental bikes. On holiday we rented a couple of bikes and a trailer for the boy. Off we poodle with a rucksack full of stuff for the beach, unfortunately the weather turned so we didn't make the beach. Heading back, somehow I got lumbered with not only towing the trailer but also carrying the rucksack when we come across the first hill.

The bloody stupid rental bike wouldn't drop into the low gears.

That hurt.

Then, we get to the path running along the beach, nice and flat when the bike starts to feel a bit weird. Look down and the back tyre has a flat. Bugger.

Push it back to the village we're staying at and the rental place doesn't open for another three hours. Nothing for it, but go get some ice cream.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on August 29, 2011, 08:20:25 PM
My bike needs new tires already. This time, I'm getting the Kevlar tires. :ninja:

Anyone have recommendations? I apparently ride my bike more often than I thought - ~20 miles a week, but I'm probably going to be riding more when school starts up - say ~30/wk. I'd like them to last more than 3 months. :/
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on August 30, 2011, 04:46:13 AM
I have ridden over 5000km on my Continental Gatorskins (kevlar bead) without a puncture (knock on the proverbial here). Given the state of the seal here in mid Canterbury, I'm impressed. 

Upgrading to continental gp4000 this spring for a big 4 day tour.  Anything to help this old crank keep up with the group. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 30, 2011, 09:18:04 AM
My bike needs new tires already. This time, I'm getting the Kevlar tires. :ninja:

Anyone have recommendations? I apparently ride my bike more often than I thought - ~20 miles a week, but I'm probably going to be riding more when school starts up - say ~30/wk. I'd like them to last more than 3 months. :/

Hmm.

I've had really good experiences with Continental tires. They have some entry level tires which have lasted me about a year at much higher mileage which you can get for $30 a pair, and then they have some more rugged tires like their Gatorskin series.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on August 30, 2011, 08:02:30 PM
Just ordered the gator skin tires for my road bike. I have been told that they are much better then the stock tires that my bike came with. I have had one flat with the stock tires in I would say about 800 miles.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on August 31, 2011, 04:24:58 AM
OMG I blew out an ancient decrepit gatorskin (front) tyre on the rollers this afternoon.  WTF... panic mode.  When I held it to the light there were many holes and one fatal rip.  Lucky I wasn't cruising downhill at 70kph.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 31, 2011, 09:35:34 AM
OMG I blew out an ancient decrepit gatorskin (front) tyre on the rollers this afternoon.  WTF... panic mode.  When I held it to the light there were many holes and one fatal rip.  Lucky I wasn't cruising downhill at 70kph.

In my limited experience with rollers I think they really wear out tires a lot faster than normal road use.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on August 31, 2011, 01:08:57 PM
Wow. I'm pretty glad I don't live in NYC. We complain about shitty drivers here, but drivers in NYC are far more aggressive in my experience.

Anatomy of a Greenpoint Bike Accident (http://www.villagevoice.com/2011-08-17/news/michelle-matson-greenpoint-brooklyn-bicycle-accident/)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on August 31, 2011, 02:47:26 PM
OMG I blew out an ancient decrepit gatorskin (front) tyre on the rollers this afternoon.  WTF... panic mode.  When I held it to the light there were many holes and one fatal rip.  Lucky I wasn't cruising downhill at 70kph.

In my limited experience with rollers I think they really wear out tires a lot faster than normal road use.

Rollers are easier on the tyres than a wind trainer, I hear... and I kinda wonder about the rough seal I am sentenced to ride on!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on August 31, 2011, 07:08:47 PM
Anyone have insight into 700c hybrid tires on the market?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Bunsen on August 31, 2011, 07:13:50 PM
Only my second day on campus at my new school, and somebody already stole my bike.  :(

I'm going to pull a Chelovek and blame unwed mothers.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: kookbreaker on August 31, 2011, 07:27:22 PM
Wow. I'm pretty glad I don't live in NYC. We complain about shitty drivers here, but drivers in NYC are far more aggressive in my experience.

Anatomy of a Greenpoint Bike Accident (http://www.villagevoice.com/2011-08-17/news/michelle-matson-greenpoint-brooklyn-bicycle-accident/)

Ugh. I had the joy of some very impatient drivers yesterday on my ride home from the store. They decided saving 3-4 seconds was worth risking my life. The first tried to pass me on Main St, which is a one-lane each way street. While most folks are content to wait while I go full tilt on a downward slope this jackwagon wanted to get to the red light faster. So he crossed the double-yellow line when there was oncoming traffic he could see. When he realized he wasn't passing fast enough he dove back into the right lane and almost on me. I had to hit the brakes.

Then at an intersection near the Art Museum another driver decided I would not be fast enough for their satisfaction. They planted themselves in the left-turn only lane, and then went straight. Thing is, I get off the line at the green light pretty fast and am no slouch rider. So they drifted into the lane they wanted to be not bothering to check if I was there. Then they ran a red light.



Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 01, 2011, 02:29:38 PM
My bike needs new tires already. This time, I'm getting the Kevlar tires. :ninja:

Anyone have recommendations? I apparently ride my bike more often than I thought - ~20 miles a week, but I'm probably going to be riding more when school starts up - say ~30/wk. I'd like them to last more than 3 months. :/

Hmm.

I've had really good experiences with Continental tires. They have some entry level tires which have lasted me about a year at much higher mileage which you can get for $30 a pair, and then they have some more rugged tires like their Gatorskin series.
I have ridden over 5000km on my Continental Gatorskins (kevlar bead) without a puncture (knock on the proverbial here). Given the state of the seal here in mid Canterbury, I'm impressed. 

Upgrading to continental gp4000 this spring for a big 4 day tour.  Anything to help this old crank keep up with the group.
Thanks. I'll check out the Continentals. I'm going to guess that you can order them online.

What's really annoying is that I'm pretty sure I have less than 1000 miles on these tires. FTS.*






(click to show/hide)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on September 11, 2011, 05:15:24 PM
Well went on my ride. Didn't do 100 mi only did 50. (Longest ride ever for me) It went well for the first 25-30 mile but then hit a wall and my legs just died on me. Cardio wise I was fine didn't even push myself in that regards. Legs just craped out. This happened to me once before on a long ride, and it happened around the same mile marker. Not sure what I did wrong but I have to look into this. It doesn't help that I haven't been on a bike since July 30th.
Thanks for the advise everyone I need to train better for the next one. All in all it was a good experience and would do it again(except for the leg part).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on September 12, 2011, 02:44:58 AM
Well went on my ride. Didn't do 100 mi only did 50. (Longest ride ever for me) It went well for the first 25-30 mile but then hit a wall and my legs just died on me. Cardio wise I was fine didn't even push myself in that regards. Legs just craped out. This happened to me once before on a long ride, and it happened around the same mile marker. Not sure what I did wrong but I have to look into this. It doesn't help that I haven't been on a bike since July 30th.
Thanks for the advise everyone I need to train better for the next one. All in all it was a good experience and would do it again(except for the leg part).

Sounds like you had a good time.  Cool.  Enjoy your rides.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on September 12, 2011, 07:24:43 PM
Well went on my ride. Didn't do 100 mi only did 50. (Longest ride ever for me) It went well for the first 25-30 mile but then hit a wall and my legs just died on me. Cardio wise I was fine didn't even push myself in that regards. Legs just craped out. This happened to me once before on a long ride, and it happened around the same mile marker. Not sure what I did wrong but I have to look into this. It doesn't help that I haven't been on a bike since July 30th.
Thanks for the advise everyone I need to train better for the next one. All in all it was a good experience and would do it again(except for the leg part).

Sounds like you "bonked" i.e. ran out of fuel.  May I ask what kind of nutrition/hydration you were taking on the ride?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on September 12, 2011, 07:39:38 PM
Well went on my ride. Didn't do 100 mi only did 50. (Longest ride ever for me) It went well for the first 25-30 mile but then hit a wall and my legs just died on me. Cardio wise I was fine didn't even push myself in that regards. Legs just craped out. This happened to me once before on a long ride, and it happened around the same mile marker. Not sure what I did wrong but I have to look into this. It doesn't help that I haven't been on a bike since July 30th.
Thanks for the advise everyone I need to train better for the next one. All in all it was a good experience and would do it again(except for the leg part).

Sounds like you "bonked" i.e. ran out of fuel.  May I ask what kind of nutrition/hydration you were taking on the ride?

Sure I was thinking that might be my issue. On the ride I had 1 and a half bandanas, Peanut Butter Nature Valley granola bar (1) and about 4 Energy bar Jell Power bars. I feel I drank enough on the ride I think I had at least three 20 oz bottles of Gatorade / sweet ice tea. For Breakfast that day I had A bowl of Honey nut Cheerios and two English muffins with jelly. The night before I had pizza and ice cream.  Looking back that doesn't look like a lot of food.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 12, 2011, 09:01:46 PM
Nah, you gotta eat more than that.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on September 12, 2011, 09:36:36 PM
I'm thinking you are right.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on September 13, 2011, 12:05:22 AM
I'm thinking you are right.

Depending on your weight, age, sex, exertion and fitness level, you may need anywhere between 250-450 calories per hour to stay properly fueled. During an Ironman, I usually down a 24oz bottle of Gatorade and two energy gels per hour all day long.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on September 13, 2011, 01:30:42 AM
I use a rough guide of a gram of carbohydrate/hr/kg of bodyweight competing.  (Un)fortunately, those gels work pretty well for racing, when you get used to them.

I also like having a decent high fat breakfast, three or four eggs with cheese and bacon or sausage.  But I like fat and it likes me.  I did a hard 65km ride yeaterday instead of lunch.  I had a flat white (coffee) about halfway but that was it for nutrition... forgot my water bottle. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 13, 2011, 05:39:40 AM
I put my bike together last night. The new chainring works perfectly and there is no longer any slack or tension in my chain.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 13, 2011, 09:55:49 AM
First ride.. everything is great. The ride is smooth and not too taxing, there's no slack or excess tension on the chain. Finally, the bike that I thought I was getting when I bought it two months ago.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on September 13, 2011, 10:47:47 AM
To bad its late in the year.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 13, 2011, 12:07:36 PM
To bad its late in the year.

Meh. I prefer fall/spring and even winter weather to hot-ass summer.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on September 13, 2011, 02:20:27 PM
From the Economist, recent edition.

Calm down
With a very few exceptions, America is no place for cyclists
Sep 3rd 2011 | SEATTLE | from the print edition

DYING while cycling is three to five times more likely in America than in Denmark, Germany or the Netherlands. To understand why, consider the death of Michael Wang. He was pedalling home from work in Seattle on a sunny weekday afternoon in late July when, witnesses say, a brown SUV made a left turn, crunched into Wang and sped away.

The road where the 44-year-old father of two was hit is the busiest cycling corridor in Seattle, and it has clearly marked bicycle lanes. But the lanes are protected from motor vehicles by a line of white paint—a largely metaphorical barrier that many drivers ignore and police do not vigorously enforce. A few feet from the cycling lane traffic moves at speeds of between 30 miles per hour, the speed limit for arterials in Seattle, and 40 miles per hour, the speed at which many cars actually travel. This kind of speed kills. A pedestrian hit by a car moving at 30mph has a 45% chance of dying; at 40mph, the chance of death is 85%, according to Britain’s Department of Transport.

Had Mr Wang been commuting on a busy bike route in Amsterdam, Copenhagen or Berlin, his unprotected exposure to instruments of death—namely, any vehicle moving at 20mph or more—would be nearly nil. These cities have knitted together networks for everyday travel by bike. To start with, motor vehicles allowed near cyclists are subject to “traffic calming”. They must slow down to about 19mph, a speed that, in case of collision, kills less than 5%. Police strictly enforce these speed limits with hefty fines. Repeat offenders lose their licences.

In this section
Ground Zero plus ten
Micro scope
Not enough lawyers?
Coming up short
Greening the concrete jungle
»Calm down
Dick Cheney’s memoirs
Reprints
Related topics
Portland, Oregon
Seattle
United States
Calmer traffic is just the beginning. In much of northern Europe, cyclists commute on lanes that are protected from cars by concrete buffers, rows of trees or parked cars. At busy crossroads, bicycle-activated traffic lights let cyclists cross first. Traffic laws discriminate in favour of people on bikes. A few American cities have taken European-style steps to make streets safer for cycling, most notably Portland, Oregon, which has used most of the above ideas. The result: more bikes and fewer deaths. Nearly 6% of commuters bike to work in Portland, the highest proportion in America. But in five out of the past ten years there have been no cycling deaths there. In the nearby Seattle area, where cycling is popular but traffic calming is not, three cyclists, have been killed in the past few weeks.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 13, 2011, 02:27:05 PM
I've never been to Seattle and know nothing of its layout or streets firsthand, but from every video I've ever seen which involves something happening on a street somewhere in Seattle I'm always astounded by how wide and straight the streets are, and how fast the passing traffic appears to be going.

LA is the same way.. I've only driven there, but those long straight boulevards lend themselves to speedy driving, IMO.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on September 13, 2011, 02:33:15 PM
Some interesting info here .... re cycling on page 19. There isn't a lot of disagreement between dems, reps, tpartiers and indep about increasing cycle lanes....or even public transport.

http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf (http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf)

...which makes it even more pathetic.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 13, 2011, 02:40:16 PM
Some interesting info here .... re cycling on page 19. There isn't a lot of disagreement between dems, reps, tpartiers and indep about increasing cycle lanes....or even public transport.

http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf (http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf)

...which makes it even more pathetic.

Yeah, but I think that's a poorly worded question. Change the wording to "Would you support the addition of bike lanes on the streets in your neighborhood" and you'll get a completely different set of data.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on September 13, 2011, 02:43:43 PM
Some interesting info here .... re cycling on page 19. There isn't a lot of disagreement between dems, reps, tpartiers and indep about increasing cycle lanes....or even public transport.

http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf (http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf)

...which makes it even more pathetic.

Yeah, but I think that's a poorly worded question. Change the wording to "Would you support the addition of bike lanes on the streets in your neighborhood" and you'll get a completely different set of data.

Is that really a valid criticism? I think we can trust Yale and George Mason Uni to word questions properly....
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 13, 2011, 02:52:07 PM
Some interesting info here .... re cycling on page 19. There isn't a lot of disagreement between dems, reps, tpartiers and indep about increasing cycle lanes....or even public transport.

http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf (http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf)

...which makes it even more pathetic.

Yeah, but I think that's a poorly worded question. Change the wording to "Would you support the addition of bike lanes on the streets in your neighborhood" and you'll get a completely different set of data.

Is that really a valid criticism? I think we can trust Yale and George Mason Uni to word questions properly....

Why? Why can we trust them to do that? I'm not at all accusing them of trying to skew the results one way or another, I'm just saying that answers are different based on how the question is worded.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on September 13, 2011, 02:54:52 PM
Some interesting info here .... re cycling on page 19. There isn't a lot of disagreement between dems, reps, tpartiers and indep about increasing cycle lanes....or even public transport.

http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf (http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/PoliticsGlobalWarming2011.pdf)

...which makes it even more pathetic.

Yeah, but I think that's a poorly worded question. Change the wording to "Would you support the addition of bike lanes on the streets in your neighborhood" and you'll get a completely different set of data.

Is that really a valid criticism? I think we can trust Yale and George Mason Uni to word questions properly....

Why? Why can we trust them to do that? I'm not at all accusing them of trying to skew the results one way or another, I'm just saying that answers are different based on how the question is worded.

Clearly that is a problem with all questions and surveys. In this case it is coming from a reliable and respected source, ie not some random research institute. There is a point when you have to accept that things will never be perfect but that Yale / George Mason comes as close as you are likely to get.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 13, 2011, 02:59:32 PM
Surely they do, but they aren't saying in that .pdf how the question was worded. If it's worded similarly to how it's worded in that .pdf then I'd feel comfortable arguing that they aren't getting an accurate answer.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on September 13, 2011, 03:04:51 PM
Surely they do, but they aren't saying in that .pdf how the question was worded. If it's worded similarly to how it's worded in that .pdf then I'd feel comfortable arguing that they aren't getting an accurate answer.

The question about cycle lanes was in a section called 'national policies'. Presumably they are looking at it nationally because there is more data available .....it isn't a local study, its a national one.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 13, 2011, 03:29:28 PM
The more I cycle, the less I like cars. For one thing, I don't think you get the same sense of freedom in a car that you do on a bike. It's definitely a more personal experience. Plus, if I run into another human, they'll likely just get up and punch me in the face, not, you know, die.

Also, got the new tire a few days ago. week or so ago*. Panda like. Mainly because it makes my bike look 10% more badass. Now I just need to get the new cork on my handlebars (they've been nekkid for the last couple of days).



*Time: How the f*ck does it work?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 13, 2011, 03:34:38 PM
Surely they do, but they aren't saying in that .pdf how the question was worded. If it's worded similarly to how it's worded in that .pdf then I'd feel comfortable arguing that they aren't getting an accurate answer.

The question about cycle lanes was in a section called 'national policies'. Presumably they are looking at it nationally because there is more data available .....it isn't a local study, its a national one.

And therein lies the fault with the question. If you ask a very broad and vague question like "Do you support the addition of more bicycle lanes in your neighborhood?"  you will get a completely different answer than if you ask "Do you support constructing bike paths and installing bike lanes on city streets?".

The first question is very specific and a lot of the answers will be colored by NIMBYism, the second question is very broad and represents a vague idea that a lot of people could support in the abstract.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 16, 2011, 03:15:22 AM
Now I just need to get the new cork on my handlebars (they've been nekkid for the last couple of days).
Got the new cork on my handlebars. Well, it's not actually cork, it's silicon or something synthetic, but you know what I mean. Haven't test ridden it yet, but the new black covering looks better than the old (dirty) white covering. And it feels nice. All grippy like it should be.

I'd say my bike is at 85% badassocity. I need a better front lamp and back lamp. And a new reflector for my back wheel. I saw someone with light-up reflectors, and I think want.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on September 16, 2011, 05:25:03 PM
Picked this up yesterday;
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41CjuAovE4L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Michael Shermer's Sport Cycling (1985)

Started a thread in Books (http://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,38108.0.html), will post about highlights, or maybe even write a review there if it tickles me so. So far I'm loving it, 80s kitsch and all.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on September 16, 2011, 09:45:35 PM
Surely they do, but they aren't saying in that .pdf how the question was worded. If it's worded similarly to how it's worded in that .pdf then I'd feel comfortable arguing that they aren't getting an accurate answer.

The question about cycle lanes was in a section called 'national policies'. Presumably they are looking at it nationally because there is more data available .....it isn't a local study, its a national one.

And therein lies the fault with the question. If you ask a very broad and vague question like "Do you support the addition of more bicycle lanes in your neighborhood?"  you will get a completely different answer than if you ask "Do you support constructing bike paths and installing bike lanes on city streets?".

The first question is very specific and a lot of the answers will be colored by NIMBYism, the second question is very broad and represents a vague idea that a lot of people could support in the abstract.

Can't please some people eh? I suppose the general point that t partyers, reps and dems broadly agree that cycle lanes are a good ting is totally lost on you.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 18, 2011, 12:47:11 PM
That's not at all the case.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 19, 2011, 09:49:15 AM
On my ride home on Friday I noticed my rear tire getting really low. I stopped to check it out and discovered about 2 dozen small holes and tears in the rear tire.

Because my route to and from work from my new house has like three active construction sites on it.

That was a $35 tire.. which is super annoying. I bought a cheap $20 tire to tide me over, but I'm seriously considering getting some of those Continental Gatorskins..
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on September 19, 2011, 09:34:54 PM
I just bought a set of gator skins for my bike. I haven't put them on yet. I heard that they are real good.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 20, 2011, 09:30:37 AM
OK.. so, this morning I was trying to cycle through the modes on my bike computer while riding in order to find out what time it was when the damn thing popped out of it's mounting bracket, balanced precariously (and somewhat unbelievably) on my handlebar stem for about 5 seconds, and then fell onto the road and got run over by two cars. Amazingly, the thing is still intact.. unfortunately, the screen is busted.

Sigh.

Also.. Boston is installing these new grids in intersections.. there's no way to describe them other than to say they look like a waffle-pattern. Anyway.. I rode through one of these intersections for the first time and it induced a disorienting vertigo feeling. So that's wonderful.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on September 20, 2011, 11:55:18 PM
Time to stop juggling nearly dead gatorskins (one with 5400km on it) and install the new continental gp4000's.  Did a hilly 75k ride instead of lunch and those old tyres gave me no confidence at 60kph!  A tad wobbly. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on September 21, 2011, 11:01:43 AM
Time to stop juggling nearly dead gatorskins (one with 5400km on it) and install the new continental gp4000's.  Did a hilly 75k ride instead of lunch and those old tyres gave me no confidence at 60kph!  A tad wobbly.
Nice :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 24, 2011, 10:26:37 PM
I have a Gatorskin for my back tire (am saving up for the front :P), and just a word of warning: Don't let the tire get low, because it will try to fish tail. It is not a comfortable feeling. I've been trying to figure out why the ass of my bike slews on the downstroke, and I realized today that the back tire wasn't at optimal pressure. It wasn't even that low. But I pumped some more air in it and problem solved. :fu:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on September 24, 2011, 10:40:28 PM
motorcycles get the same way when you let the tire pressure get to low
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on September 25, 2011, 12:09:10 AM
I rate the Continental GP 4000.  Light, smooth and fast.  Hope they stand up to the local seal.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 25, 2011, 02:09:03 AM
motorcycles get the same way when you let the tire pressure get to low
Frankly, I'm just glad it wasn't something more serious, like the back half of my bike deciding to fall off.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 27, 2011, 06:21:18 AM
All right.. so inexplicably the right front brake cartridge is completely worn down, while all of the other brakes are completely fine. I replaced all of my brake cartridges about four months ago and have barely put any miles on them, so I have no idea why just this one cartridge looks like it's got about 3000 miles of wear on it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on September 27, 2011, 11:46:37 AM
A change of tubes and tires seems to be in order next spring (whew, I had no idea there was so much variation); I seem to be topping off the pressure more or less constantly. And given how much the fine citizens of my town like to break bottles in the streets, my paranoia tells me to get something a bit better than what came with the bike.

So, somewhere in April, I'll hit the road with spanking new tires and the (then) newly arrived Hövding.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on September 27, 2011, 02:13:18 PM
All right.. so inexplicably the right front brake cartridge is completely worn down, while all of the other brakes are completely fine. I replaced all of my brake cartridges about four months ago and have barely put any miles on them, so I have no idea why just this one cartridge looks like it's got about 3000 miles of wear on it.

Is there a slight buckle on the wheel? Are the brakes an equal distance apart? Just throwing out ideas, I had something similar and it turned out that the worn brake was closer to the wheel than its partner, so it ended up doing all the work.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 27, 2011, 02:21:58 PM
All right.. so inexplicably the right front brake cartridge is completely worn down, while all of the other brakes are completely fine. I replaced all of my brake cartridges about four months ago and have barely put any miles on them, so I have no idea why just this one cartridge looks like it's got about 3000 miles of wear on it.

Is there a slight buckle on the wheel? Are the brakes an equal distance apart? Just throwing out ideas, I had something similar and it turned out that the worn brake was closer to the wheel than its partner, so it ended up doing all the work.

No, I checked that and it didn't look like it was any closer. FWIW, these are side-pull cantilever brakes, and I think I probably need to strip them down and clean out some accumulated grime and viscous lubricant.. what could be happening is that since the pivot point isn't pivoting smoothly the brake on the side where the cantilever is gets more worn down since that side is doing more of the braking.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on September 27, 2011, 10:10:28 PM
All right.. so inexplicably the right front brake cartridge is completely worn down, while all of the other brakes are completely fine. I replaced all of my brake cartridges about four months ago and have barely put any miles on them, so I have no idea why just this one cartridge looks like it's got about 3000 miles of wear on it.

Is there a slight buckle on the wheel? Are the brakes an equal distance apart? Just throwing out ideas, I had something similar and it turned out that the worn brake was closer to the wheel than its partner, so it ended up doing all the work.

No, I checked that and it didn't look like it was any closer. FWIW, these are side-pull cantilever brakes, and I think I probably need to strip them down and clean out some accumulated grime and viscous lubricant.. what could be happening is that since the pivot point isn't pivoting smoothly the brake on the side where the cantilever is gets more worn down since that side is doing more of the braking.

could you have some abrasive damage on one side of the wheel?  I had to use some fine sandpaper and steel wool after a friend carried my bicyle rather poorly positioned on her tow ball mounted bicycle rack and kind of sandblasted the one side of the wheel.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 28, 2011, 05:22:24 AM
Nah, the wheels are basically brand new.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 28, 2011, 09:33:00 AM
So this is the "elevation profile" of my daily ride home from school. I was honestly thinking that I was climbing much higher, but as you can see.. that last half mile or so is pretty intense. The first week or so that we lived in our new house I nearly threw up every night at the end of my ride.

(http://i.imgur.com/1N9FR.png)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on September 28, 2011, 09:41:36 AM
Nearly threw up every night? I'd be hopping off and walking my bike up that last bit till I could overcome it. I'm about to head off to the next county for a Dr. appointment. Gotta take a long detour to a road with a marked bike lane. My stomach is already upset just thinking about this route. Very hairy, very bleak ride out into the sprawling boonies. It is physiologically draining; 18 miles of urban sprawl. I think I'll mix it up on the way back and take the bike trail that runs on gulf coast through some scenic nature and some quaint old timey towny main streets (I'm in the Tampa Bay area).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 28, 2011, 09:47:47 AM
Nearly threw up every night? I'd be hopping off and walking my bike up that last bit till I could overcome it. I'm about to head off to the next county for a Dr. appointment. Gotta take a long detour to a road with a marked bike lane. My stomach is already upset just thinking about this route. Very hairy, very bleak ride out into the sprawling boonies. It is physiologically draining; 18 miles of urban sprawl. I think I'll mix it up on the way back and take the bike trail that runs on gulf coast through some scenic nature and some quaint old timey towny main streets (I'm in the Tampa Bay area).

Bah. Can't build up my stamina if I quit midway through the climb.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on September 28, 2011, 01:20:08 PM
Amen. Still, those last two hillsides got to be hard. "Finally, I got all the way up, time to go all the way down and do it again. Hurray!"

In other news, last night I was left in the dust by a guy cycling in rubber boots, heavy construction worker clothing and a backpack. I'm nowhere near the world's best cyclist, but that was still kind of humbling.
An hour later your typical latex cycler with a race bike and some silly Tour shirt went past. Unfortunately for him, a long hill came next, where he had to stand up while I pedaled past, smugly sitting. Didn't see him after that. One of the rare occasions where I gloat over my physical achievements.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 28, 2011, 02:13:48 PM
Amen. Still, those last two hillsides got to be hard. "Finally, I got all the way up, time to go all the way down and do it again. Hurray!"

In other news, last night I was left in the dust by a guy cycling in rubber boots, heavy construction worker clothing and a backpack. I'm nowhere near the world's best cyclist, but that was still kind of humbling.


I hate when stuff like that happens. I used to encounter this guy on some old rusty frame fixie with a rusty chain and bald tires and he would SMOKE ME. I'd be doing 23-24mph (as measured by my cyclocomputer), and he would brush right past me and get ridiculous separation.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 28, 2011, 02:58:42 PM
23mph? Sheesh, I'm lucky if I hit 10. Although I might be lowballing that, I don't have a speedometer.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 28, 2011, 03:01:48 PM
23mph? Sheesh, I'm lucky if I hit 10. Although I might be lowballing that, I don't have a speedometer.

10 is pretty slow, I think you're selling yourself short.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 28, 2011, 04:10:09 PM
23mph? Sheesh, I'm lucky if I hit 10. Although I might be lowballing that, I don't have a speedometer.

10 is pretty slow, I think you're selling yourself short.
I calculated average speed based on approximate distance travelled (1.5mi) and time it took to travel (approx. 9 minutes, but I don't keep good track of time). Or 13 miles in 1.25 hours (that was mostly incline, the way back took almost exactly half the time). I get a pretty consistent 7-9 average, but the longer rides include stoplights and whatnot.

Lately, I have been using higher gears, though, because the lower gears feel too easy. I think this is progress.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on September 28, 2011, 04:28:35 PM
Bam! 40 miles! Just walked in (limped in is more like it, went too fast on the first leg in order to make my appointment, didn't recover at all, just powered through the next section after my appointment). So, 7 cities and 3 counties. Both the bayside and then the gulf side on the way home. Stopped at my fav. junker re-cycle bike shop to see if they had any replacement parts in, no luck, but the samwhich I had next door was like from the gods or something.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 28, 2011, 04:47:43 PM
23mph? Sheesh, I'm lucky if I hit 10. Although I might be lowballing that, I don't have a speedometer.

10 is pretty slow, I think you're selling yourself short.
I calculated average speed based on approximate distance travelled (1.5mi) and time it took to travel (approx. 9 minutes, but I don't keep good track of time). Or 13 miles in 1.25 hours (that was mostly incline, the way back took almost exactly half the time). I get a pretty consistent 7-9 average, but the longer rides include stoplights and whatnot.

Lately, I have been using higher gears, though, because the lower gears feel too easy. I think this is progress.

you've got to start somewhere. I rode a 14-speed commuter hybrid and then graduated to a 3-speed before switching to single-speed and even then I was only riding about half as far per day as I am now.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 28, 2011, 07:05:56 PM
23mph? Sheesh, I'm lucky if I hit 10. Although I might be lowballing that, I don't have a speedometer.

10 is pretty slow, I think you're selling yourself short.
I calculated average speed based on approximate distance travelled (1.5mi) and time it took to travel (approx. 9 minutes, but I don't keep good track of time). Or 13 miles in 1.25 hours (that was mostly incline, the way back took almost exactly half the time). I get a pretty consistent 7-9 average, but the longer rides include stoplights and whatnot.

Lately, I have been using higher gears, though, because the lower gears feel too easy. I think this is progress.

you've got to start somewhere. I rode a 14-speed commuter hybrid and then graduated to a 3-speed before switching to single-speed and even then I was only riding about half as far per day as I am now.
Yeah, I typically ride about 4 miles a day. Every day. I could do more, because I ride the bus and it doesn't matter which stop I go to, but I'm a lazy person. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 29, 2011, 10:14:39 AM
Oh joy, we're all gonna die!

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2011/09/bikers-lung/195/ (http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2011/09/bikers-lung/195/)

ETA: Uh.. OK, I just read the abstract. The only tested 10 people in total. That is.. pretty unscientific.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 29, 2011, 04:28:15 PM
Oh joy, we're all gonna die!

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2011/09/bikers-lung/195/ (http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2011/09/bikers-lung/195/)

ETA: Uh.. OK, I just read the abstract. The only tested 10 people in total. That is.. pretty unscientific.

But scientists did this! How could they have got it wrong?

I wonder what controls they used. I know bicyclists who smoke.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on September 29, 2011, 06:09:38 PM
Oh joy, we're all gonna die!

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2011/09/bikers-lung/195/ (http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2011/09/bikers-lung/195/)

ETA: Uh.. OK, I just read the abstract. The only tested 10 people in total. That is.. pretty unscientific.

But scientists did this! How could they have got it wrong?

I wonder what controls they used. I know bicyclists who smoke.

Hmm. Yes, I gave up smoking last year. 15 years of it. My first thought was that commuters in highly urban areas like London would be smokers too. Maybe I'm just thinking about a correlation between smoking scenesters and their fixies in the big cities.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 29, 2011, 09:28:13 PM
I didn't actually read the article, so it'll depend on what they were measuring. Iirc, carbon monoxide is found in both car exhaust and cigarettes, so if they were testing for that, and didn't control for smokers, science fail. I think the article mentioned something about soot, though, so I don't know how fail their fail is (10 is a really bad sample size - it's ok for preliminary, should-we-look-into-this studies, but not for something that gets media attention).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Scadilla on September 29, 2011, 11:41:28 PM
Do any of you use toe clips or cages? I recently got some cages for my pedals and they seem to be quite unpractical. Especially when starting off again from a dead stop. I sometimes have to fumble to get my foot into the cage as push off with the other. I've also been getting a bit of an ache right over my right patella. I think it might be due to restrictive positioning the cages are putting on my legs.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 30, 2011, 12:43:51 AM
I use the toe clips - the ones the you shove your foot into, and it just covers your toe, right? It takes some getting used to, but I hardly ever fumgle witht the pedals nowadays. No problems with my knees, either.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on September 30, 2011, 03:30:15 AM
I like my spds for both road and mtn.  your foot can move a lot more easily on the pedal, get a lot more power and (like ski bindings) they are more releasable in a crash than toe clips.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 30, 2011, 05:15:42 AM
I use the toe clips - the ones the you shove your foot into, and it just covers your toe, right?

Yes, that is the proper terminology. I think that because they were invented first "toe clips" were given that name. Ironically, shoes with locking cleats which physically clip into pedals are called "clipless".
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on September 30, 2011, 02:52:56 PM
(http://img801.imageshack.us/img801/4554/workjpg.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/801/workjpg.jpg/)

I had a nice couple of days at work with one of the HS outdoor ed classes I help look after.  Gorgeous weather, nice camping, good company... no flats, thanks Stan.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 30, 2011, 03:10:48 PM
So, I've recently figured out that if I use my entire leg on the downstroke (including calf muscles) I get more power out of my motion. Does anyone else pedal like this? For the last forever, I've been pedalling from my quads (big muscles group and all that). I'm riding my bike daily now, so I need a good pedalling method so I don't tire out. Plus, it's really awesome going a mile in about 5-6 minutes (I time myself using songs, so about 1.75 Modest Mouse songs).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 30, 2011, 03:52:06 PM
So, I've recently figured out that if I use my entire leg on the downstroke (including calf muscles) I get more power out of my motion. Does anyone else pedal like this? For the last forever, I've been pedalling from my quads (big muscles group and all that). I'm riding my bike daily now, so I need a good pedalling method so I don't tire out. Plus, it's really awesome going a mile in about 5-6 minutes (I time myself using songs, so about 1.75 Modest Mouse songs).

Yeah, I have my seat height set so that my leg is about 95% extended on my downstroke.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on September 30, 2011, 03:58:50 PM
Yep, about 95%. What is the 3 O'clock/pendulum method again? I need to move my seat back a bit, but I'm very close to messing up my pedal stroke if I go to far.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on September 30, 2011, 05:02:45 PM
The 95% thing is good for casual riding.  If you want to go fast, you do need to flex the leg more and fix your foot to the pedal and allow one's self to "sweep the floor" with each foot and pull up (hamstring) as well.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on September 30, 2011, 09:06:32 PM
The 95% thing is good for casual riding.  If you want to go fast, you do need to flex the leg more and fix your foot to the pedal and allow one's self to "sweep the floor" with each foot and pull up (hamstring) as well.

I go pretty dern fast as it is. I've tried lowering my seat and I don't like it. I don't like not being able to see over and be seen by cars, and I don't like using my hamstrings as much.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on September 30, 2011, 11:22:08 PM
I've had my seat lower before and didn't find it very comfortable.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on October 01, 2011, 04:33:12 AM
I've had my seat lower before and didn't find it very comfortable.

That's right.  I'm sure it was. I was thinking efficiency and keeping up with the bunch.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 01, 2011, 09:13:42 AM
I also feel like my knees are all splayed out like a $10 hooker when I have my seat lower. They probably aren't, but that's how I feel.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 01, 2011, 01:11:34 PM
I've had my seat lower before and didn't find it very comfortable.

That's right.  I'm sure it was. I was thinking efficiency and keeping up with the bunch.
Not comfortable to the point of hurting myself eventually. I try for the positions that put less stress on my knees, ankles, and feet, and a lower seat wasn't cutting it. Plus, I only have myself to keep up with.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 01, 2011, 06:26:17 PM
Protip: lube your axles.

Also, I just got a chain lube that clains it cleans as well as protects. Does anyone have experience with a product like this? Anything I should watch out for?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 01, 2011, 06:32:27 PM
Protip: lube your axles.

Also, I just got a chain lube that clains it cleans as well as protects. Does anyone have experience with a product like this? Anything I should watch out for?

Butt Butter. Lube your bits.

(http://fatmexicancyclist.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/n39357123371_1201596_2300.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on October 01, 2011, 08:13:19 PM
Protip: lube your axles.

Also, I just got a chain lube that clains it cleans as well as protects. Does anyone have experience with a product like this? Anything I should watch out for?

Sounds like White Lightning.  Works well but you need to use a lot... well I did when I used it.  Seems not to attract dirt like oil and cheaper than teflon lubes but doesn't seem to lubricate as well as those two sorts...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 01, 2011, 08:45:02 PM
Protip: lube your axles.

Also, I just got a chain lube that clains it cleans as well as protects. Does anyone have experience with a product like this? Anything I should watch out for?

Butt Butter. Lube your bits.

(http://fatmexicancyclist.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/n39357123371_1201596_2300.jpg)
...I was talking about my bike. Random advice is random. Also, I don't ride far enough for chafing to be a problem
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 02, 2011, 07:30:36 AM
Protip: lube your axles.

Also, I just got a chain lube that clains it cleans as well as protects. Does anyone have experience with a product like this? Anything I should watch out for?

Sounds like White Lightning.  Works well but you need to use a lot... well I did when I used it.  Seems not to attract dirt like oil and cheaper than teflon lubes but doesn't seem to lubricate as well as those two sorts...

Yeah.. I've also noticed that White Lightning gets really waxy and dry sometimes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 02, 2011, 03:02:17 PM
It's not White Lightning. It's Rock "N" Roll THE KING OF LUBES. :D

I'm going to apply it today. We'll see how it goes. Stupid me, losing my oil.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 02, 2011, 04:31:01 PM
I started wearing Under Armor "compression shorts" while running, walking, or cycling (Bah! to the whole compression-improving-atheletic-preformance-or-whatever, they are just better at protecting the rub on my skin than chamois)... They take out the chaff of my thighs and my bits. I've never used any of these B'utter things as I have yet to get a saddle sore. What about just plane old vaseline?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on October 02, 2011, 06:24:56 PM
... or slices of schnitzel.  Worked for the tour riders of history.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 02, 2011, 06:30:31 PM
...I was talking about my bike. Random advice is random. Also, I don't ride far enough for chafing to be a problem

I know you were talking about your bike, but I did a double take when I thought I read "Protip: lube your ankles", and my immediate thought was the graphic for the chamois lube.

Funny product is funny product. Also, lube is a funny word.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 02, 2011, 06:52:37 PM
I started wearing Under Armor "compression shorts" while running, walking, or cycling (Bah! to the whole compression-improving-atheletic-preformance-or-whatever, they are just better at protecting the rub on my skin than chamois)... They take out the chaff of my thighs and my bits. I've never used any of these B'utter things as I have yet to get a saddle sore. What about just plane old vaseline?

I just use baby powder with cornstarch.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 02, 2011, 06:54:25 PM
...I was talking about my bike. Random advice is random. Also, I don't ride far enough for chafing to be a problem

I know you were talking about your bike, but I did a double take when I thought I read "Protip: lube your ankles", and my immediate thought was the graphic for the chamois lube.

Funny product is funny product. Also, lube is a funny word.
ROFL. And, indeed, the graphic is amusing.






























Lube. *snicker*
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 02, 2011, 06:56:42 PM
Oh, almost forgot: the Rock "N" Roll lube seems to be working. It was a bit of hassle to apply....but I haven't cleaned my chain in a while. :P It's been over a month, actually, now that I think about it. Oops.

Also, Q-tips work to clean between the gears on the cassette. I think I lost the brush I bought to clean my chain. :(
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 02, 2011, 07:01:13 PM
I just use baby powder with cornstarch.

Hmm. Interesting, cornstarch eh? I'm going to be ramping things up to 200 miles a week now that it is cooling off outside. Shermer recommends that chamois product in his book, plus always putting on absolutely clean chamois before every ride, and being freshly showered, all of this to avoid saddle sores.

What does the cornstarch achieve?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on October 02, 2011, 07:44:44 PM
What about just plane old vaseline?

Some of the fancy-shmancy spandex type shorts don't react to well with petroleum based products.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 03, 2011, 05:31:18 AM
I just use baby powder with cornstarch.

Hmm. Interesting, cornstarch eh? I'm going to be ramping things up to 200 miles a week now that it is cooling off outside. Shermer recommends that chamois product in his book, plus always putting on absolutely clean chamois before every ride, and being freshly showered, all of this to avoid saddle sores.

What does the cornstarch achieve?


Reduced friction.

I've considered that Butt'r stuff, but I imagine that deposits of it build up in your chamois no matter how well you launder them, and that has kept me from buying it.

Oh, almost forgot: the Rock "N" Roll lube seems to be working. It was a bit of hassle to apply....but I haven't cleaned my chain in a while. :P It's been over a month, actually, now that I think about it. Oops.

Also, Q-tips work to clean between the gears on the cassette. I think I lost the brush I bought to clean my chain. :(

I'm super jealous of your climate.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 03, 2011, 10:06:37 AM
This morning I nearly got killed by two cops in an unmarked police cruiser making an unsignaled right turn across a bike lane. I told them they were fucking ass holes. That sort of ruled, because they had no response.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 03, 2011, 11:48:14 AM
This morning I nearly got killed by two cops in an unmarked police cruiser making an unsignaled right turn across a bike lane. I told them they were fucking ass holes. That sort of ruled, because they had no response.
FTW (barely)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 03, 2011, 12:03:59 PM
This morning I nearly got killed by two cops in an unmarked police cruiser making an unsignaled right turn across a bike lane. I told them they were fucking ass holes. That sort of ruled, because they had no response.
FTW (barely)

Should have just let them hit me, for the money. Of course as I was skidding and fishtailing on the rain-slickened road surface my powers of perception weren't really registering the fact that the car I was about to converge with was a Ford Crown Vic with the Police Interceptor package and emergency lights hidden in the front grill.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 03, 2011, 01:47:19 PM
I'm super jealous of your climate.
If it makes you feel better it's supposed to rain today and I don't have rain gear. And I have to go to school.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 03, 2011, 01:55:05 PM
This morning I nearly got killed by two cops in an unmarked police cruiser making an unsignaled right turn across a bike lane. I told them they were fucking ass holes. That sort of ruled, because they had no response.
FTW (barely)

Should have just let them hit me, for the money. Of course as I was skidding and fishtailing on the rain-slickened road surface my powers of perception weren't really registering the fact that the car I was about to converge with was a Ford Crown Vic with the Police Interceptor package and emergency lights hidden in the front grill.

My first thought was no, never let a cop hit you. Granted, I hold law enforcement culture in very low esteem, and this might be an overgeneralization, but all cops are thuggish high school GED morons who couldn't get employed out of a paper bag if their lives depended on it, and the only reason they are working as cops is because the crack dealer pimps wouldn't hire them and they are all complete bastards.

(actually, I have cop buddies and cops in my immediate family, and they are okay)

But no, a cop being at fault for an accident is bad news for the victim. Hit and run, or giving you a citation...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 03, 2011, 02:09:05 PM
You're probably right.. about the last bit.

But there is pretty intense competition for police jobs in Boston, because our cops have probably the strongest union and best pay in the country, if not the world, so they're rarely the GED type. I think most applicants these days at least get an Associate's Degree in Criminal Justice.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 03, 2011, 02:14:10 PM
You're probably right.. about the last bit.

But there is pretty intense competition for police jobs in Boston, because our cops have probably the strongest union and best pay in the country, if not the world, so they're rarely the GED type. I think most applicants these days at least get an Associate's Degree in Criminal Justice.

It's a good job. I'm being hyperbolic for funnys. Or, maybe it's cause I've been watching a live stream of the NYC protest since the Brooklyn Bridge arrests. Some of the best guys I know are cops, nice guys, fair guys, educated guy, guys going through college... But some of the sickest puppies I've ever had the misfortune of knowing were in (or are still in) law enforcement.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 03, 2011, 02:18:44 PM
True. It attracts two types of people, I think: people hungry for power, and people who want a really good career, with some idealists mixed in with the latter bunch who think they can really make a difference.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 06, 2011, 02:20:14 PM
This morning I was behind another cyclist at a five-way intersection waiting for the light to change. We were both going straight through the intersection when the light changed. She was slightly ahead of me when a car suddenly decided that it was going to bear right (the options were: hard right, bear right, straight, hard left) and turned directly in front of the other cyclist. The accident was avoided, but that was total bull shit. Either that driver is criminally inept or has an unhealthy disregard for human life.

I honestly.. if that had happened to me, I honestly would have done my darnedest to drag the driver out of their car and beat them unmerciful about their face and assneck. You fucking clown, you think that 2 seconds of your commute is more important than the rest of that person's life?

Anyway.. so afterward I was talking with the other cyclist when suddenly my non-drive crank decides that it just doesn't feel like staying attached to my bike. This, despite no prior warning that the bolt which holds it to the spindle was coming loose. Luckily for me I had that Alien Multi-tool that my wife bought me for Father's Day. Seriously.. that thing fucking rules. It has every size of hex bit including a crank puller. Totally rad.

Oh, and last night on my way home from school I hit a mound of gravel which punctured my tire and tube, as I was dejectedly walking home another cyclist stopped and offered to give me a tube and let me use his emergency pump. I politely declined because I was only a couple of miles from home, my wife was stuck in traffic anyway, and I didn't want to inconvenience the guy.. but that was seriously cool. I always stop for other cyclists if I see them having mechanical troubles, but that's the first time anyone has ever stopped to help me.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 06, 2011, 02:33:49 PM
I'm so going to mount one of those insanely loud air horns to my bars, and blast the living eardrums out of the offending drivers (your first paragraph) this kind of crap just keeps happening and happening to me too. Illegally loud horn plus middle finger plus an old chrome frame pump for swinging if necessary.

What tool do you have? I would like get the one you describe.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 06, 2011, 02:39:27 PM
I'm so going to mount one of those insanely loud air horns to my bars, and blast the living eardrums out of the offending drivers (your first paragraph) this kind of crap just keeps happening and happening to me too. Illegally loud horn plus middle finger plus an old chrome frame pump for swinging if necessary.

What tool do you have? I would like get the one you describe.

This guy

http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Alien-26-Function-Bicycle-Tool/dp/B000FIE4AE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317926157&sr=8-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Alien-26-Function-Bicycle-Tool/dp/B000FIE4AE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317926157&sr=8-1)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 06, 2011, 02:44:54 PM
Sweeeeeeet. How long have you had it, how's it holding up, how's the build quality? I love my Topeak rack and bags, but is this tool china made?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 06, 2011, 02:54:20 PM
OK.. so anyone care to help me decide between Continental Grand Prix 4 Season tires with Duraskin and Contintenal GatorSkins?

http://www.amazon.com/Continental-Grand-4-Season-Bicycle-700x23/dp/B001EC2LL4/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1317926538&sr=8-11 (http://www.amazon.com/Continental-Grand-4-Season-Bicycle-700x23/dp/B001EC2LL4/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1317926538&sr=8-11)

http://www.amazon.com/Continental-Gatorskin-Bicycle-700x23-Folding/dp/B001UL5JNG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317926538&sr=8-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Continental-Gatorskin-Bicycle-700x23-Folding/dp/B001UL5JNG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317926538&sr=8-1)

The Gatorskins look more like track tires, which is what I usually buy.. but let's face it: I'm an all-weather cyclist living in an all-types-of-weather city, and I think I should probably opt for the 4 season tires which have better treads..

But then my other big problem is frequent punctures, and having Duraskin + kevlar on the Gatorskins should really eliminate that problem.

Sweeeeeeet. How long have you had it, how's it holding up, how's the build quality? I love my Topeak rack and bags, but is this tool china made?

Since June.. it seems pretty solid. The only thing I don't like about it is that because it separates into two tools by design it comes apart really easily, but if you're really trying to get good torque the only comfortable way to hold it is if both halves are together. If you take it apart and use just one half of the tool the plastic body digs into the palm of your hand.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 06, 2011, 04:10:56 PM
I've survived three days of rainy weather with a Gatorskin back tire. I don't get the speeds you get, though I did bike from my college to lower lands (Foothill College is probably the most appropriately named college ever: it's on a hill). I think my back tire was a little low for the ride, but I wasn't skewing overly much.

Personally, I'd recommend the all-weather tires just because you live in Boston. I can probably get away with the Gatorskin (which is a fairly smooth tire) because the only weather we tend to get is wet or not wet, and you get wet, not wet, swimming, skiing, and Biblical weather.

I haven't had a puncture since I lined my rear tire with half of an old inner tube. The only punctures I was getting apparently were from where the spokes attach to the rim of the tire.

On a slightly related note, the lube I bought for my chain seems to be holding up despite the weather. I've had to lock it up in exposed areas at school because they don't provide many places to chain your bike up on campus. There's one bike rack not exposed to the elements and it's across campus from my classroom. The seat, too, seems to be water resistant. I'm a bit worried about the new cork on my handlebars, but it's my fault for not finding something to keep them from getting wet.

I am going to be cleaning the chain more often during the wet weather, though. I can't stop fretting over the chain and cassette, and am terrified that I'm going to get a rusty chain. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 06, 2011, 04:19:27 PM
Hmm. Thanks for the input.

I think I'll probably go with the 4 season tires, but I will be kicking myself so hard if I spend $100 on a set and then get a puncture.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 06, 2011, 04:26:07 PM
At least you didn't spend $60 on a set of tires that lasted less than six months with mild to moderate use. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 06, 2011, 04:27:14 PM
At least you didn't spend $60 on a set of tires that lasted less than six months with mild to moderate use. :P

No, you're right. I spent $80 and then I had to spend another $22 a couple of days ago to replace one of the $40 tires which had about 20 punctures in it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 06, 2011, 04:28:42 PM
At least you didn't spend $60 on a set of tires that lasted less than six months with mild to moderate use. :P

No, you're right. I spent $80 and then I had to spend another $22 a couple of days ago to replace one of the $40 tires which had about 20 punctures in it.
Do you ride to work over the back of porcupines? Or just through construction areas?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 06, 2011, 04:33:45 PM
At least you didn't spend $60 on a set of tires that lasted less than six months with mild to moderate use. :P

No, you're right. I spent $80 and then I had to spend another $22 a couple of days ago to replace one of the $40 tires which had about 20 punctures in it.
Do you ride to work over the back of porcupines? Or just through construction areas?

Dude. There are no less than three active construction sites on my ride to work, then there are about 10 inactive construction sites (meaning they've dug up the road to work on the sewer lines or what have you, and have covered up the holes with those massive iron plates), and then there is this unending minefield of broken glass bottles (because.. I dunno.. poor people?), especially outside the bottle redemption place.. and then just pot holes everywhere, because part of my commute is through an industrial district where they don't care about the roads. Yeah.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 06, 2011, 04:44:35 PM
I don't think Kevlar would help you. :P Maybe tires made out of sheet metal?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 06, 2011, 04:49:40 PM
I don't think Kevlar would help you. :P Maybe tires made out of sheet metal?

SRSLY. I think I need some milspec tires.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on October 07, 2011, 01:41:25 AM
Maybe you should go tubeless.  I go 5000km on my gatorskins with no punctures.  You couldn't have shittier seal than we have in mid-Canterbury and our weather is akin to Seattle.  I gave the GPs a 100k workout yesterday and didn't dent the ridge.  The roll like the business.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 07, 2011, 06:52:32 AM
Wouldn't that require a lot of.. um.. money?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on October 07, 2011, 01:04:35 PM
Wouldn't that require a lot of.. um.. money?

Tubeless isn't significantly more expensive with mountain bike tyres but I haven't looked at road tyres.  It does increase the spinning weight, though.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on October 10, 2011, 08:20:33 PM
I'm so going to mount one of those insanely loud air horns to my bars, and blast the living eardrums out of the offending drivers (your first paragraph) this kind of crap just keeps happening and happening to me too. Illegally loud horn plus middle finger plus an old chrome frame pump for swinging if necessary.

What tool do you have? I would like get the one you describe.

In boulder, colorado, drivers regularily get pelted with eggs if they do something moronic. They alzo have a 3 strikes and you are out rule, where cyclists can text the drivers car registration number to a dedicated police text number....and if the driver gets caufht 3 times they have to pay a fine.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 10, 2011, 08:23:01 PM
I'm so going to mount one of those insanely loud air horns to my bars, and blast the living eardrums out of the offending drivers (your first paragraph) this kind of crap just keeps happening and happening to me too. Illegally loud horn plus middle finger plus an old chrome frame pump for swinging if necessary.

What tool do you have? I would like get the one you describe.

In boulder, colorado, drivers regularily get pelted with eggs if they do something moronic. They alzo have a 3 strikes and you are out rule, where cyclists can text the drivers car registration number to a dedicated police text number....and if the driver gets caufht 3 times they have to pay a fine.
I like this. I don't seem to have the same problems with traffic you gents do, but it'd still be nice to know that I could have recourse in the event some douchebag douchebag'd all over my trip.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on October 10, 2011, 08:40:59 PM
I'm so going to mount one of those insanely loud air horns to my bars, and blast the living eardrums out of the offending drivers (your first paragraph) this kind of crap just keeps happening and happening to me too. Illegally loud horn plus middle finger plus an old chrome frame pump for swinging if necessary.

What tool do you have? I would like get the one you describe.

In boulder, colorado, drivers regularily get pelted with eggs if they do something moronic. They alzo have a 3 strikes and you are out rule, where cyclists can text the drivers car registration number to a dedicated police text number....and if the driver gets caufht 3 times they have to pay a fine.
I like this. I don't seem to have the same problems with traffic you gents do, but it'd still be nice to know that I could have recourse in the event some douchebag douchebag'd all over my trip.

There is absoluately no way id cycle where i live, which is virginia beach. Ive cycled in london for years but cycling here is a fucking death wish. The drivers here respect fuck all except their own ignorance. They are scum of the highest order.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on October 12, 2011, 04:17:04 AM
I don't expect to be taken down by a wildebeest, but the moral is the same;
Mountain Biker gets taken out by BUCK - CRAZY Footage - Only in Africa (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2oymHHyV1M&feature=player_embedded#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on October 12, 2011, 09:46:29 AM
I was emailed this a few days ago. The animal looks like he lined him up on purpose. Hell of a hit thinking how much that animal weighs and its speed. That guy was lucky he didn't get hurt bad.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 12, 2011, 04:01:20 PM
I'm so going to mount one of those insanely loud air horns to my bars, and blast the living eardrums out of the offending drivers (your first paragraph) this kind of crap just keeps happening and happening to me too. Illegally loud horn plus middle finger plus an old chrome frame pump for swinging if necessary.

What tool do you have? I would like get the one you describe.

In boulder, colorado, drivers regularily get pelted with eggs if they do something moronic. They alzo have a 3 strikes and you are out rule, where cyclists can text the drivers car registration number to a dedicated police text number....and if the driver gets caufht 3 times they have to pay a fine.

Holy shit dude.

Of course, that sort of system is incredibly prone to abuse. I can totally imagine jilted ex-lovers texting their ex's plate number just to get some sort of revenge.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on October 13, 2011, 02:33:10 AM
Huey lightened up today.  Nice training ride between chores.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quokka on October 26, 2011, 12:30:33 AM
I've been occasionally looking at this thread wondering what all the fuss was about.  I'm a long time dirt bike rider who thought the idea of pedalling up hills as some sort of self torture ritual.
Well, after trying some very flash bikes, I decided that the sport is bloody good fun. I took the plunge and brought myself a mountain bike 4 weeks ago and decided to jump in the deep end a go for a 4 day mountain bike endurance race. http://capetocapemtb.com/ (http://capetocapemtb.com/)

A few pointers
 – I’m not unfit, but 6 rides (only 3 of them with cleats) is not enough preparation for a competition in a sport you have never done before.
 - Motorbike experience translates beautifully to smashing downhill times, jumps, logs etc. It does not translate to riding up hills.
  - Don’t buy an old rusty 2nd hand iron bike and expect to enjoy it. I tried it a year ago and it destroyed the idea of the sport for me for a year.

So now I’m really loving this sport, and brought the girlfriend a bike yesterday.

(http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/317223_2330780641954_1622905944_2249642_330253421_n.jpg)
At the start of the 4 day in Western Australia; (That’s me in the middle)

(http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/318541_2330784282045_1622905944_2249653_1083994630_n.jpg)
The organisers decided to put 1.5 km (1 mile) of beach into the course..bastards.

(http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/24100_105037259525804_100000585906625_132060_6903166_n.jpg)
My other bike
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 26, 2011, 05:23:48 AM
Yeah.. You really don't know how unfit you are until you've challenged yourself to race or do a long distance charity ride or something.

Anywho.. I replaced my brake pads and fixed that problem with my front brakes.. I was right, the brakes were pulling harder on the right side which was causing that side to wear faster. I also bought and installed a new wireless bike computer.. a Sigma. I really like it so far, it has a backlight which I've always wanted for night riding.. the backlight is pretty weak, but it does the job. The only complaint I have is that I cannot fucking figure out how to set the clock on the thing. The instructions are not at all helpful.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on October 26, 2011, 02:29:15 PM
I like my bike computer. It is a catseye I don't even bother with the clock on it. I just look at the miles,average speed and time elapsed. I don't need anything after that. I doubt if I will get out any more this season(I'm in Chicago area) I hate riding in the cold. Plus by the time I get home it is dark outside and I do not care to get hit.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 26, 2011, 02:31:49 PM
I like my bike computer. It is a catseye I don't even bother with the clock on it. I just look at the miles,average speed and time elapsed. I don't need anything after that. I doubt if I will get out any more this season(I'm in Chicago area) I hate riding in the cold. Plus by the time I get home it is dark outside and I do not care to get hit.

Yeah, this is a Cat Eye.

I accidentally figured out how to set the clock this morning while randomly mashing buttons.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on October 26, 2011, 02:33:59 PM
I like my bike computer. It is a catseye I don't even bother with the clock on it. I just look at the miles,average speed and time elapsed. I don't need anything after that. I doubt if I will get out any more this season(I'm in Chicago area) I hate riding in the cold. Plus by the time I get home it is dark outside and I do not care to get hit.

Yeah, this is a Cat Eye.

I accidentally figured out how to set the clock this morning while randomly mashing buttons.

That's the way I reset mine ever time.  ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 27, 2011, 10:08:28 AM
Gr.. Motherfuckingstupidproprietarybottombrackets.

Why can't people just make standard spindles? I need a new BB because the SRAM deal I bought last year turned out to be a PoS, so I'm looking to upgrade to Shimano Dura Ace, but if I do that then I can't recycle any of my old square taper crank arms because Dura Ace only accepts OctaLink, and most of the Shimano OL cranksets I'm finding are like $200-$300. Absurd.

So do I opt for the cheaper Shimano BB with the square taper? I think I should for now.

ETA: Yeah.. I can't even buy just the replacement crank arms for my current GXP set up.. I dunno, I was really on the fence about this whole GXP system because it sounded like a bunch of hokum.

I'm tempted to give the SRAM Omnium crankset/bb a try, but that's a lot of money ($230) to sink into getting basically a step up from what I have now, especially since I already have the GXP bottom bracket and I can't find the Omnium arms separately, so I'd be wasting like $100.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 27, 2011, 12:12:39 PM
Update: F it. I bought the Omnium after seeing this (http://www.dametruth.com/blog/2010/09/bike-check-richards-masi-coltello-track/) Masi Coltello build.

Well.. after seeing it, then jealously fapping to the photos, then I bought the Omnium.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on October 27, 2011, 12:15:09 PM
Winter is coming but this year I'm determined to keep rolling until ice and snow becomes permanent. So far a double layer of wool and thick gloves keeps me fairly comfortable. Discovered that the batteries in the light was flat... when it got so dark I needed it. Thankfully there are few bikers out these days.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on October 28, 2011, 05:34:54 AM
Goddamnit, nearly got hit by some stupid cyclist last night who decided that the red light they ran through was there to make the street look pretty or something. It's a pedestrian crossing, when the red light shows, you stop and let the people walk across; not keep going, narrowly missing people before shouting an apology as you head on your way.

 :argh:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 28, 2011, 05:50:19 AM
Too bad they didn't hit you. If they had then you would have had an opportunity to pummel their face mercilessly.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on October 28, 2011, 07:48:03 AM
Going through a red is often a good way to preserve your life...especially in large cities where getting a jump on the traffic is important. You should not , however, go steaming through a group of pedestrians.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 28, 2011, 08:46:19 AM
Going through a red is often a good way to preserve your life...especially in large cities where getting a jump on the traffic is important. You should not , however, go steaming through a group of pedestrians.

No. No it is not. Fuck getting a jump on traffic, control your lane and make them go around you if there isn't a bike lane. Running a red light is never acceptable except maybe in a scenario where you're waiting for the light to turn green and you turn around and happen to notice a landshark rapidly coming up behind you. That is literally the only scenario where running a red light on a bike is a good way to preserve your life.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on October 28, 2011, 08:59:17 AM
Completely disagree. Getting ahead is the only way to control your lane. Otherwise you are racing to get ahead....which isnt safe either. Jumping a red is a perfectly legitimate thing to do.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on October 28, 2011, 09:00:59 AM
Completely disagree. Getting ahead is the only way to control your lane. Otherwise you are racing to get ahead....which isnt safe either. Jumping a red is a perfectly legitimate thing to do.

No, you don't jump a red, and if you're at an intersection in a line of traffic you just wait in your spot rather than ride on the shoulder to get to the head of the traffic. That's pointless, since all of those cars are just going to pass you anyway. Wait in line in traffic like a car, and you'll never have to worry about losing control of your lane.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on October 28, 2011, 09:09:37 AM
That's one advantage to cycling in Germany (and most of continental Europe as well, I guess) is that often times where there is a cycle lane running next to the road, it will have its own traffic lights that go green before the main lights. Gives you that little bit of a head start without risking pedestrians. That's not to say that the red lights are obeyed either.

It's weird, a German walking won't cross an empty road if the red man is there, but put them on a bike and they ignore lights all together. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: madjockmcferson on October 28, 2011, 09:11:00 AM
If im in the uk and i want to turn right, im gonna jump the red to do it.....if there are no pedestrians....or even is there are im gonna do it anyway, but im gonna do it slowy so not to annoy them. Its more complicated in the uk cos you have bus lanes that appear in the middle of the road.....i havent cycled in the US yet cos i dont have a bike and because american drivers are bat shit crazy.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on October 29, 2011, 08:18:37 PM
If im in the uk and i want to turn right, im gonna jump the red to do it.....if there are no pedestrians....or even is there are im gonna do it anyway, but im gonna do it slowy so not to annoy them. Its more complicated in the uk cos you have bus lanes that appear in the middle of the road.....i havent cycled in the US yet cos i dont have a bike and because american drivers are bat shit crazy.
Turning right on a red is fine, but going straight on a red is only cool if it's the middle of the night, or you're on the right side of a T-intersection.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 01, 2011, 09:45:51 PM
OH MY LORD! I am pulling my hair out trying to track down a used Trek 520 or a Surly LHT (or a CC), or any kind of equivalent touring rig. 58cm... Is that to hard to ask? Why am I living in area that has zero cycling? If only I could find a touring bike I could ride on out of here. You see the situation I'm in. All over craigslist, people are selling their 520s for reasonable prices, but nothing within a thousand miles of me. I don't like any of this new frame geometry crap, and touring bikes have been on the out for a long time, so freaking hard to find a used one. Oh, and the only Surly dealership near me is staffed by complete snobby bastards who are, according to people in the know, extremely deceitful in business.

I'm loosing my mind. Just. Want. A. New. Bike. Actually, not want, but need. My old rig is falling to pieces and I can't justify pouring more money into it, and if I'm going to have buy something, I really need to make sure I get something I am going to like to ride... Like a freaking 520... Oy vey. I've got to get off CL and eBay, I've wasted another day searching for this holy grail.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 02, 2011, 05:18:30 AM
Keep the faith, brother. Something will turn up eventually.

You can set up a "saved search" on eBay so that every morning the search results are delivered to your inbox.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 02, 2011, 05:28:42 AM
Keep the faith, brother. Something will turn up eventually.

You can set up a "saved search" on eBay so that every morning the search results are delivered to your inbox.
Saved search on eBay you say. Doing that now. I found a bunch of 58cm Trek 520s across the country last night (while pulling my hair out, I started searching cities where I don't have friends or family, just on a lark)... Everyone I've written to has responded that they are totally willing to ship the bike(s) to me, or otherwise take them into a LBS and have them box and ship... I'm very hesitant on doing business with someone on CL a thousand miles a way, sending a check (or something) and hoping I don't get ripped off and a Trek 520 finds its way to me by the grace of the bike god.

Thoughts on long distance purchases on Craigslist? Anyone?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 02, 2011, 05:30:33 AM
I dunno. I'd stick with eBay for long distance purchases because at least they offer buyers some protection.

But I sold my Specialized Allez Epic via Craigslist to someone in Vermont. Perhaps that's because I'm a trustworthy guy.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 02, 2011, 03:15:18 PM
Yeah, you're probably right. Stick to eBay for long distance commerce. I can't afford to take a hit right now anyway, as I'm living entirely on student loans (shudder)... I think what I'll do is scout out some local sellers tomorrow through the weekend, and try to find something that 1) isn't going to end up become mail fraud, 2) local and in person, and 3) doesn't break the bank. There is a guy who is selling this Cannondale touring style rig that I'm going to look at tomorrow;
(http://localbikeoutlet.com/IMG_20111020_171044.jpg)
I'd prefer a cro-moly frame, but I've been hearing good things about Cannondale's basic aluminum touring frames. The guy is asking about 150 and it's the most run down thing he's got, and I'm gonna talk him down to 100 or less, because the paint job is going to be a DIY bitch or a small fortune at a powder shop. It has the small gearing I'm looking for in a touring set up (triple crank), the frame size looks about right, I've got better racks than the rickety things dangling off from it and would rather take a discount for leaving them off or putting them on my old grocery hauler or something instead, um, I'd just want to update the brake levers to Aero and put in barend shifters... I think I could do these few things on my wee student budget, and this rig will get me through my daily 20 mile commutes (wanting to push this up to 30 milers this winter), and my weekend 170 mile tours to grandmas and back. I've got to be realistic, the Trek 520, or a Surly, or a Bianchi Volpe, or a Randonee, or a Jamis, or any bike I've been lusting over is out of price range right now... My dream bike will just have to wait, and I'll have to go with something 'good enough' for the time being.

Anyone know much about Cannondale's touring frames?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 02, 2011, 03:37:12 PM
I haven't got my back wheel fixed, but I'm worrying that I won't be able to get it trued - there's a crimp in the rim, and I don't know enough to know if it can be uncrimped. I need to take it into a bike shop to get it looked at, but without my bike, I either have to ride my backup (which, frankly, is about two inches too short in both height and length, and not comfortable for more than a mile, which gets me to the bus stop) or walk, or ride my scooter (the foot-powered kind, not the engine-powered kind). I'm also a little afraid that they'll just tell me there's nothing that they can do, so I'd be better off just buying a new one, but I don't know how to go about buying a new back wheel. A front wheel would be a lot easier, because I don't have to worry about things like chains and gears.

I'm a flurry of indecision.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 02, 2011, 04:07:23 PM
I haven't got my back wheel fixed, but I'm worrying that I won't be able to get it trued - there's a crimp in the rim, and I don't know enough to know if it can be uncrimped. I need to take it into a bike shop to get it looked at, but without my bike, I either have to ride my backup (which, frankly, is about two inches too short in both height and length, and not comfortable for more than a mile, which gets me to the bus stop) or walk, or ride my scooter (the foot-powered kind, not the engine-powered kind). I'm also a little afraid that they'll just tell me there's nothing that they can do, so I'd be better off just buying a new one, but I don't know how to go about buying a new back wheel. A front wheel would be a lot easier, because I don't have to worry about things like chains and gears.

I'm a flurry of indecision.
I've been looking at Amazon for cheapy rims because my back wheel needs to be trued too, and isn't worth the effort or money. As a student, with the free shipping of student Amazon Prime, it makes it seem affordable... But yeah, I feel ya, I don't know what to do about my wobbly wheel that makes my road bike almost unridable. More money, more money down this bike shaped hole...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 02, 2011, 04:27:28 PM
I haven't got my back wheel fixed, but I'm worrying that I won't be able to get it trued - there's a crimp in the rim, and I don't know enough to know if it can be uncrimped. I need to take it into a bike shop to get it looked at, but without my bike, I either have to ride my backup (which, frankly, is about two inches too short in both height and length, and not comfortable for more than a mile, which gets me to the bus stop) or walk, or ride my scooter (the foot-powered kind, not the engine-powered kind). I'm also a little afraid that they'll just tell me there's nothing that they can do, so I'd be better off just buying a new one, but I don't know how to go about buying a new back wheel. A front wheel would be a lot easier, because I don't have to worry about things like chains and gears.

I'm a flurry of indecision.
I've been looking at Amazon for cheapy rims because my back wheel needs to be trued too, and isn't worth the effort or money. As a student, with the free shipping of student Amazon Prime, it makes it seem affordable... But yeah, I feel ya, I don't know what to do about my wobbly wheel that makes my road bike almost unridable. More money, more money down this bike shaped hole...
Yeah, and I keep getting flats, but maybe my last patch blew. The hole was at the stem, though, not the crimp, so I think I'll just get a new tube tonight.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 02, 2011, 04:36:57 PM
I haven't got my back wheel fixed, but I'm worrying that I won't be able to get it trued - there's a crimp in the rim, and I don't know enough to know if it can be uncrimped. I need to take it into a bike shop to get it looked at, but without my bike, I either have to ride my backup (which, frankly, is about two inches too short in both height and length, and not comfortable for more than a mile, which gets me to the bus stop) or walk, or ride my scooter (the foot-powered kind, not the engine-powered kind). I'm also a little afraid that they'll just tell me there's nothing that they can do, so I'd be better off just buying a new one, but I don't know how to go about buying a new back wheel. A front wheel would be a lot easier, because I don't have to worry about things like chains and gears.

I'm a flurry of indecision.
I've been looking at Amazon for cheapy rims because my back wheel needs to be trued too, and isn't worth the effort or money. As a student, with the free shipping of student Amazon Prime, it makes it seem affordable... But yeah, I feel ya, I don't know what to do about my wobbly wheel that makes my road bike almost unridable. More money, more money down this bike shaped hole...

In my experience the wheels available on Amazon aren't great.. meaning they don't have a great selection. Then again, I'm usually looking for a very particular style that probably wouldn't appeal to a large enough audience to make it worthwhile for Amazon to stock them.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 02, 2011, 05:01:23 PM
Yeah, like nearly everything on Amazon, it's just Wal-Mart crap, but sometimes it's enough to get by on when your down and out and broke, at least until you can afford or track down what is really needed. Oh my god? Am I advocating for Wally or Amazon? OMG! NOOOOOO! Patronize your LBS and your local bike clinics! Support your local wheel builder! And for Christ's sakes buy American! Aughhhhhh!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 02, 2011, 07:34:39 PM
Well, I'm going to try a bike shop first. I'm just worried that they won't be able to fix the wheel.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 03, 2011, 05:22:53 AM
The question is almost never if they can fix it, it's usually "is it worth it to fix it?"
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 03, 2011, 10:46:35 AM
The question is almost never if they can fix it, it's usually "is it worth it to fix it?"
Well, I have to balance my hippie/poor-person's instinct to waste not against my practical side. The crimp isn't terrible, and the wobble isn't enough to notice while I'm riding, except my ability to "burn rubber" is reduced by the added inefficiency of riding on a wheel that isn't a circle.

I found a tube that I didn't know I had last night, and it's in the tire now. I was just getting too depressed about not being able to ride my bike. I never thought I'd get depressed because I couldn't ride a bike. I'll probably take it to a bike shop after work and get it looked at.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 03, 2011, 11:08:58 AM
The question is almost never if they can fix it, it's usually "is it worth it to fix it?"
Well, I have to balance my hippie/poor-person's instinct to waste not against my practical side. The crimp isn't terrible, and the wobble isn't enough to notice while I'm riding, except my ability to "burn rubber" is reduced by the added inefficiency of riding on a wheel that isn't a circle.

I found a tube that I didn't know I had last night, and it's in the tire now. I was just getting too depressed about not being able to ride my bike. I never thought I'd get depressed because I couldn't ride a bike. I'll probably take it to a bike shop after work and get it looked at.

So.. explain your problem again.. because I'll bet you can fix it yourself really easily.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 03, 2011, 03:29:53 PM
The question is almost never if they can fix it, it's usually "is it worth it to fix it?"
Well, I have to balance my hippie/poor-person's instinct to waste not against my practical side. The crimp isn't terrible, and the wobble isn't enough to notice while I'm riding, except my ability to "burn rubber" is reduced by the added inefficiency of riding on a wheel that isn't a circle.

I found a tube that I didn't know I had last night, and it's in the tire now. I was just getting too depressed about not being able to ride my bike. I never thought I'd get depressed because I couldn't ride a bike. I'll probably take it to a bike shop after work and get it looked at.

So.. explain your problem again.. because I'll bet you can fix it yourself really easily.
I hit a chunk of something that bent my back wheel such that there is a very noticeable wobble, and a crimp in the part that holds the tire. I could post picks after work if you'd like to see it.

I don't have any tools beyond an Ikea adjustable wrench, an allen wrench, a flathead screwdriver, and a hammer. I might be able to scare up two adjustable wrenches if I tried. I think the hammer might help, but it's not a very good hammer.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 03, 2011, 03:35:32 PM
So the rim itself is physically bent where the tire bead meets the rim bead? Yeah.. that's probably not worth repairing.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 03, 2011, 03:36:27 PM
I mean, if it was just a truing issue I could have given you some tips on how to true the lateral wobble using just a ruler, some tape, and a cheap spoke wrench.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 03, 2011, 03:39:31 PM
It's not bent enough that you can look at it and tell, the wobble is only evident when you spin the tire. The crimp in the tire is very noticeable, though, and is what's really bothering me.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 03, 2011, 03:50:03 PM
OK.. now I'm confused again.. There's a crimp in the tire or a dent in the rim? Can you take a picture and post it?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 03, 2011, 03:51:58 PM
OK.. now I'm confused again.. There's a crimp in the tire or a dent in the rim? Can you take a picture and post it?
Will do, son.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 03, 2011, 04:09:52 PM
I mean, if it was just a truing issue I could have given you some tips on how to true the lateral wobble using just a ruler, some tape, and a cheap spoke wrench.
Uh uh, can you give this advise anyway? Need to fix lateral wobble. Driving me bonkers.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 03, 2011, 04:21:39 PM
I mean, if it was just a truing issue I could have given you some tips on how to true the lateral wobble using just a ruler, some tape, and a cheap spoke wrench.
Uh uh, can you give this advise anyway? Need to fix lateral wobble. Driving me bonkers.

OK.. I'll give you the quick and dirty version because I don't have a lot of time, but:

Step 1: Remove wheel, then remove tire and tube

Step 2: Remount wheel to frame sans tires

Step 3: Take a ruler or preferably an L-square and tape it to either your fork or your rear drops (depending on which wheel you're truing)

Step 4: Elevate whichever wheel you're trying to true by stacking some books under the bottom bracket or something, don't flip your bike upside down as this will make everything more confusing.

Step 5: Slowly spin the wheel, keeping an eye on the markers on your ruler, every time you notice some lateral shift, take strips of tape and put a strip on the first and last spoke of the section of the rim which is out of true. Now that you've marked off your problem area(s),

Step 6: Important Note: before tightening/loosening the spoke nipples apply a small bead of lubricant to the spot where the nipple meets the rim so that you don't accidentally fracture a nipple which has slightly corroded and bonded with the rim:

So, if you have deviation towards one side you need to tighten the spokes on the opposite side of the deviation.. and you may have to loosen the spokes on the side of the deviation, but I'd recommend just tightening. So if you have a deviation to the left which spans 2 or three spokes then you should tighten the spokes at the start point and end point of the deviation (where you've taped) 1/4 turn, and then the spokes at the center of the deviation spot 1/2 turn.

Repeat as necessary.

If this doesn't make sense you can check the Park Tool Blog

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/wheel-and-rim-truing (http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/wheel-and-rim-truing)

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 03, 2011, 09:52:29 PM
Went to a bike shop. I was right: the dent in the wheel made it unfixable. Tomorrow, I'll have a shiny new rear wheel. :fu:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 05, 2011, 12:31:39 PM
Sweet, thanks jaypee! I've always wanted to learn how to do this.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 05, 2011, 03:45:48 PM
Last night, I made it home from the train station in Sunnyvale in 15 minutes (it's about 2.5-3 mi from my house). It usually takes me 20. I was pretty excited (and still am) about my bike being whole again.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 05, 2011, 03:57:15 PM
Tomorrow I'm going to go look at these two Novara Randonees. Probably gonna cycle away on the old white one, the blue one is pretty sweet, but the white one is more my budget and just needs a little love. Super stoked!
(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww198/bikecoffeehouse/106_1299.jpg)
(http://img1.claspics.com/581/876353/1319998263-903.JPG_m.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 05, 2011, 06:03:48 PM
It's hard to tell from the pics, but is the white one a smidgen longer? That's the one I'd probably get, too.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 05, 2011, 06:22:43 PM
For some reason the blue one comes up squished looking in the pic here. They are both 57cm, but I can't get a straight answer from the owner of the white one if they are measuring center to center. It looks about 57. I'm looking more for a 58cm-60cm for my 6'1" frame and 36" inseam, but 57cm is soooo dang close, I'll have to get a really long stem, probably. The white one is $290, the blue one is $500... So I'm trying to decide, fenders also come with the blue one, and the white one I'd definitely paint, so that's time and a little money, plus fenders and racks... I mean I've got a rear racks, but I've decided to keep them on the bike they're on for grocery hauling. Hmmmmm. I don't know what to do.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 05, 2011, 07:20:16 PM
Let's see, looks like if I go with the white one, and taking into account new racks and fenders (or second hand or whatever), I'm going to save a hundred bucks compared to the blue one. Don't mind at all putting my spare time into a nice paint job; a boy needs his hobby. I think a nice gloss black with black racks will round it out nicely. That's something else I've been thinking about; theft proofing. If it is a generic looking black steel mutt thing, and not some fancy carbon fiber thing with goofy paint and crap suspension everywhere, bike thiefs will overlook it (or so my theory goes).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 06, 2011, 09:35:36 AM
Sweet, thanks jaypee! I've always wanted to learn how to do this.

No problem.

It's entirely likely that your first attempt will go horribly awry, I know mine did.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 06, 2011, 07:39:51 PM
It already has gone horribly wrong, but I expected as much  :D

So, I picked up the white Novara today. Not the greatest, but a step up for me, talked the guy down 50 bucks, probably could have talked him down more, but that would have just been mean. Derailleurs and shifter levers are gonna need tuning, will need a much longer stem, and what's the deal with this; I feel hobbled when I peddle? It's like peddling a kid's bike, the cranks feel so freaking short (I'll have to measure them in the light of day and compare them with the ones I'm used to0. Even though the frame is larger than my old rig, the 26 inch tires really make it feel like I'm on a clown car, I'm used to the big 700c wheels. Hmmmm. I'm having the buyers remorse I think. Have to remember why I got it; to do 30 miles commuting a day easy with no breakdowns every 5 miles, and light to moderate touring on the weekends. This is the bike for that, or rather, the price was right for a bike 'good enough' for that. Now to strip it down and paint her black (the trashy white paint looks even worse in real life).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 06, 2011, 09:08:47 PM
Well, I just took it for a spin round the hood, and despite feeling like I'm hobbled on a mini clown bike for some reason, I did notice I got going ridiculously fast. And the lower gears were easier than I'm used to uphill and were easier on me going really slow. The barend shifters and derailleurs are seriously tweaked. Gonna need to learn how to tune those. What else what else, I guess I just need to adjust the seat and get a new stem and try to get a good fit. Too tired to feel good or lousy about it (it took all day driving out into the boonies and back, I'm a wee bit cranky as our the people who went along for the drive. Take that carbon footprint!).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 07, 2011, 05:44:45 AM
Based on my completely unscientific and inexpert inspection of the photo on the last page.. yeah, those crank arms look kind of short.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 07, 2011, 04:00:43 PM
$500?? Sheesh, I only paid $350 for my Epic. Is there something I'm missing here?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on November 07, 2011, 04:20:36 PM
Ok guys - I need your help.

I have a disc wheel for my rear on my time trial bike and I like putting graphics on it.  I have my big race coming up on the 20th and I want to do something new for the event.

Right now I have the "Vitruvian Man" design going but it's time to change it up.
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/990129931-lgjpeg.jpg)


Here are your choices for the new graphics - help me choose:

Quagmire
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/giggity.jpg)

Thing:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/THINGwheel.jpg)

Radioactive:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/DECALS/RADIOACT.jpg)

Skully:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/DECALS/Skull.jpg)

Mortal Kombat:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/DECALS/DRAGON.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 07, 2011, 07:04:48 PM
$500?? Sheesh, I only paid $350 for my Epic. Is there something I'm missing here?
Well, I only paid $240. Oh, also, I'm loving riding it. LOVING IT! So effortless. Except for the derailleurs and shifters, that shit's messed up. Grrrr.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on November 07, 2011, 07:18:43 PM
I like the radio active  and clobbering time.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 07, 2011, 09:54:47 PM
My vote's on radioactive.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 08, 2011, 06:12:35 AM
Don't listen to these punk kids, they don't know what's what. I remember pumping these things called "quarters" into the Mortal Kombat machine at this place called a "video arcade". Mortal Kombat all the way.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on November 08, 2011, 01:14:50 PM
Don't listen to these punk kids, they don't know what's what. I remember pumping these things called "quarters" into the Mortal Kombat machine at this place called a "video arcade". Mortal Kombat all the way.

Maybe I should add the text "Finish Him!" - or "Flawless Victory!" LoL!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on November 08, 2011, 02:02:31 PM
the less fun outcome of bicycle racing:

concussion
facial laceations and serious road rash
rotator cuff
pain

broken helmet
smashed glasses

lost entry fee
lost four days great touring
lost major ability to sleep, work and play for a while.

I don't even know what happened (I was told a rider a fewbikes in front of me wnet down and two others came to the er with me.)  Maybe I'm just getting too old for this sort of playtime :(

At least the Masi only needs new handlebar tape and a brake/shifter lever dust cover.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on November 08, 2011, 03:45:49 PM
the less fun outcome of bicycle racing:

concussion
facial laceations and serious road rash
rotator cuff
pain

broken helmet
smashed glasses

lost entry fee
lost four days great touring
lost major ability to sleep, work and play for a while.

I don't even know what happened (I was told a rider a fewbikes in front of me wnet down and two others came to the er with me.)  Maybe I'm just getting too old for this sort of playtime :(

At least the Masi only needs new handlebar tape and a brake/shifter lever dust cover.

Sorry to hear that man!  I had a major wreck this year as well.  Back in May, during a bike race, I went down at around 40mph.  Luckily, no broken bones - just massive contusions and the whole left side of my body looked like raw hamburger for almost 2 months.  Painful recovery.  Unfortunately, those of us who choose to ride have to face the conclusion that eventually there will be a crash.  It's not a matter of if but when.  Get better soon!

The funny thing is (and I'm sure you'll relate to this) the first thought going through my mind as I went down was: "Oh no, my BIKE!"  :-)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 08, 2011, 05:20:33 PM
Every time I've crashed, I've definitely been more worried about my bike. :P
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on November 08, 2011, 06:17:27 PM
(http://img713.imageshack.us/img713/6816/halloweenx.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/713/halloweenx.jpg/)

You're right, Cog.  I can't remember the number of times I've seen ambulances or helicopters taking "other" riders away. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 08, 2011, 06:36:11 PM
lonely moa, you look AWESOME!!! :rock:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on November 09, 2011, 12:47:24 AM
and finally shaving my legs was a plus... other than just being nice.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on November 09, 2011, 10:25:32 AM
But.. but.. Cycling isn't a "sport" with a real risk of injury, it's a hobby for effeminate Europeans and middle-aged executives! That's what all of the sports TV personalities on ESPN have told me!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 09, 2011, 12:47:22 PM
But.. but.. Cycling isn't a "sport" with a real risk of injury, it's a hobby for effeminate Europeans and middle-aged executives! That's what all of the sports TV personalities on ESPN have told me!
Riding 6 inches away from someone one a metal machine going 30+mph with only a helmet as protection is way girly. That's why I like to ride. Because I'm also way girly.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on November 09, 2011, 02:15:01 PM
But.. but.. Cycling isn't a "sport" with a real risk of injury, it's a hobby for effeminate Europeans and middle-aged executives! That's what all of the sports TV personalities on ESPN have told me!
Riding 6 inches away from someone one a metal machine going 30+mph with only a helmet as protection is way girly. That's why I like to ride. Because I'm also way girly.

This dude is even more girly than you:
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/0848f4aa.jpg)
(http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/e1526ff0.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 09, 2011, 05:54:30 PM
38 miles today, all FL urban sprawl and mostly bad traffic. Thigh cramps, panic, and nausea started around 32 miles. A super awesome lady who owns the bike shop I was headed to, to check out, gave me electrolytes, fluids, and snacks on the house, and also the run of the break room till I felt better. And boyhowdee, did I ever after about 15 minutes of rest and yumyums. Was still too shaky and weary to go through my shopping list, so I ended up buying a ton of electrolyte tabs, way overpriced, to show my gratitude. Think I've found my new LBS. They have everything I need, and their prices are super low compared to the rest of the area (like Amazon low). Except for their nutritional stuff... In fact, I got a total woowoo vibe on their big nutritional area, and the markups were a little shocking... Anyway, all in all, it was a good day.

Oh, and the incredible moonrise over Tampa bay all along the way back, and the stunning sunset. Oy! Unbelievable ride. Sometimes this place is okay.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 09, 2011, 06:34:33 PM
Hmm. I just emptied out all the crud I'd been accumulating today out of my jersey pockets, and I forgot that the super awesome lady gave me a ton of brochures to peruse... Total woo, naturalistic mumbojumbo products, energy stuff for cycling... This is obviously the area where they make bank... Do I shop there? Do I go in for the at cost prices on the stuff I need, the stuff they don't markup at all, and just ignore all the crap... What would Batman do? Hmmm.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 09, 2011, 07:32:27 PM
If they carry non-woo products that you like, and they're reasonably priced, buy from them. The only reason businesses carry woo crap is because it sells (ok, some business owners have some ideological stake in the woo, but they wouldn't sell it if it didn't sell). I ask myself the same questions whenever I shop at Whole Foods - which sells and buys into a lot of woo crap. That I work there also complicates the issue. I refuse to buy anything but food from them, though. And I don't buy organic unless it's on sale for less than conventional. That's how I'm using my dollars. It doesn't make a large difference, but I'm not spending my money on crap I don't want to spend it on, and that's what matters in these circumstances.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 09, 2011, 10:14:37 PM
I'm the same way at Whole Foods and Trader Joes and the like, or wherever. Push right past the organic crap, unless it is on sale and cheaper than anything else. I think I will do business with this bike shop, they have every single thing I'm after as far as parts and equipment. I got the vibe that they really push their energy/performance/nutrition stuff, like hard sell push. Maybe it was just me feeling queasy when the owner was pushing the stuff on me.

So, get this, I just got in from doing 7 more miles to market for much needed sammich stuff, and I got so sick while looking at the food in the aisles that I had to run to the bathroom and puke. Puked again on the way home. I did manage to finish my shopping and pay without incident, but it was a close call in produce. Don't know what's wrong with me. I feel okay now that I'm home (apart from massive butt/thigh and related hurt). Maybe I'm getting sick, or maybe it's the meds, or maybe I overextended myself today, or any combo thereof. Worst. Episode. EVER!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 10, 2011, 01:43:45 PM
That sounds bad. How far did you ride? And did you push yourself hard? And did you drink enough water? And did you remember to change your underwear?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 10, 2011, 03:15:15 PM
The moonrise/sunset over the ocean for the last 10 miles while riding all the way on the shore and through Phillippee Park was worth the pain and puking. I think I did push myself harder than I should have, and I obviously didn't have enough water, or food, and the damned depekote and zoloft I'm on now makes everything super weird physically (and mentally of course, where I loose track of time and forget to do things like drink or eat or pay attention to traffic; YIKES). Or maybe I'm getting a cold. I think I rode 45 miles by the end of the day, more or less, I made some funky detours due to road work, so probably more. I did change my undies. Compression shorts aren't enough for my new saddle, need to invest in a bunch of chamois next. Also, I think I broke my thighs and calves. I must be getting old, or a cold must be coming on. It's not the muscle soreness or stiffness, it feels as if my bones hurt, and I'm getting these deep cramps that come and go, the pain is intense. Oh well. It's okay. I'm trying to get tough and strong, and this is what it takes. I'm about to down some pain killers, stretch out, and go out again (full moonrise at 5:30-something EST during sunset again, w00t). I should probably focus on no more than 20 milers a day and build myself slowly. The goal is 200 miles a week... Yesterday was too much too soon. I only quit smoking 8 months ago, and I have four years of atrophy I have to take into account before I do stupid things to myself. Blahblahblah.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on November 10, 2011, 07:04:56 PM
Yeah, you probably just over did it physically. Getting nauseous after a physical workout is usually a sign of  over-exertion - not drinking enough water just makes it worse. I've been nauseous after long rides before (upwards of ten miles), but never puked. At this point, I could probably do 15 miles without feeling like I'm dying at the end of the ride.

I wouldn't do more than two or three days of hard riding, though, at least until you get used to using muscles again. You gotta give yourself time to heal, son.

And always bring water with you! One of my local trails has water fountains located at a couple of convenient points, which is just awesome, but I still bring my own water.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on November 11, 2011, 04:36:18 AM
Always carry a ton of water, and plan every route around watering holes (fountains, stores, parks, shops and so on), and places where I can take a break and rest if I need to (sometimes when I know I'm going way out into the boonies for very long rides for the entirety of the day, I freeze a gallon of water overnight and toss it in a rear rack... and that's on top of the water cage bottles and misc bottles of fluids that always seem to be rattling around or are strapped on with bungies, and when I know I'm going to be pouring sweat, like I tend to do in this godforsaken tropical dystopia, I always make sure I get the Gatorade kind of crap in abundance. Hydration is the one thing I usually get right. Usually.). I over did it the other day...

I cycled to the market again tonight, and had a massive panic attack while locking up the bike before walking in. Dunno. Sometimes I just don't what's wrong with me. I sucked it up and got my bits, but I was quite the spectacle while in line, visibly trembling and generally looking nervous and shady. I think the trauma of the night before, after riding there, and getting sick in there, was a wee bit, um, traumatic and caused me to freak out as I was thinking about walking in. Oh well. Life with panic disorder with agoraphobia is like this. Riding more, and working towards long tours, and getting out into the world, and exploring, and exercising are all part of the 'exposure therapy' I've been putting myself through this year to try to get better. Sometimes it just seems to get worse, this panic disorder.

I'm trying to decide what to do about new panniers, racks, trunk bag, and or messenger type bag/pannier for my school stuff and laptop. I have a topeak explorer rear rack on my old bike, and I'm leaning towards getting another one (the tourist model). Can't figure out what to do about cargo on my new bike... I just discovered these 'grocery bag' panniers the other day, which is like two birds with one stone. A Topeak trunk bag with zip out panniers is like two birds with one stone too. But a laptop messanger bag that is designed to be is a pannier is also two birds... Eventually front racks are going on, and a handlebar bag and front panniers too, but for now I just need to commute, and maybe strap on the occasional odd thing or make a random market run (just gonna leave the Wald folding grocery baskets on my old bike and call it my grocery hauler for the time being) . Does anyone have any experience with panniers and trunks? Or brands? Or commuting equipment/rigs/setups?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on November 11, 2011, 02:10:01 PM
The only thing about panniers I can suggest is to make sure that they are attached to the frame at the bottom. You can get ones that are designed for rear suspension bikes that just bolt on to the seat pole, problem is they bounce around a lot. I ended up using a load of cable ties to try to stop the damn thing hitting the wheel.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 01, 2011, 12:32:54 PM
So I finally started to install my new BB/crankset. Fuckin SRAM.. the spiders on the crankset hit the chainstay. Apparently this is a common problem with the SRAM GXP/Omnium set. So now I have to use probably three spacers to prevent it from rubbing. So goddamn annoying.

ETA:

Here's a picture I found online of a SRAM/Coltello build. Look at this shit.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33341370@N05/5325442663/#in/photostream/ (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33341370@N05/5325442663/#in/photostream/)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: elert on December 09, 2011, 09:05:41 PM
But.. but.. Cycling isn't a "sport" with a real risk of injury, it's a hobby for effeminate Europeans and middle-aged executives! That's what all of the sports TV personalities on ESPN have told me!

Climbing a 6000 foot mountain, riding the Interstate, just a few feet away from a 100 ton truck groaning to cross the continental divide. Soaring down the other side, pushing 50 mph, scorching hot brakes, dodging shredded truck tires just before the construction zone approaches. Night falls, no way off the Interstate, batteries dying, hope I don't get crushed under the wheels of a sleepy weekend warrior.

Crosswinds trying to toss you into the ditch. Crackheads trying to beat you to the next red light. Cold that burns your lungs. Heat that cooks your brains. Rain that soaks your bones. Grit, grime, road salt, corrosive exhaust. I'm never late to work.

Pussies sit in an ergonomic chair, in a climate controlled environment, in a crash resistant womb and bitch about how hard their lives are. They cry out for their Mommies to kiss their boo boos when they see a red light. They sob uncontrollably when they see a parking meter.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Grimner on December 10, 2011, 04:21:33 AM
You forgot detecting and stopping just before you crash into a fallen tree that has managed to place itself just at face-height right after sun-set on the last day of November (also last bike ride of 2011 for me).
The incident got me thinking: that tree probably went down during the previous night so during the day nobody had thought to break off the nastier boughs or try for any sort of marking of the place. Which left me doing the breaking and shaving off bark so that the next biker would at least see something white across the path instead of brown-black on black. Well, it did vindicate good eye-sight and carrying a knife.

And having the mangled remains of a Happy Meal fall right in front of your wheel. Thrown from a passing car. Naturally.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 12, 2011, 09:50:40 AM
So I get my bike put back together. I ride to work this morning.

I get to work, log in to Facebook so that I can add my ride data to my Cycling Log app and am greeted with this:

Quote
The Bicycle Log is down Indefinitely.
Unfortunately, Facebook has chosen to break my application - and many others - yet again by changing the basic model for authenticating and interacting with a Facebook page.
Also unfortunately, I make no money from the Bicycle Log and I have many other responsibilities. What began as a fun thing to do for myself and my sister has become a major burden as FB randomly adds and removes abilities and methods in the way applications are written.
I may choose to rewrite the Bicycle Log and revive it at some point, but that seems unlikely right now. In the mean time, if you would like a copy of all your riding data so you can try and add it to another site, feel free to contact me and I will try to get you your data as quickly as possible, or you can post a message on the discussions page.
My Apologies - but I simply don't have time to rewrite this tool yet again, with no assurance that FB won't do it to me again next month.


THANK YOU, ZUCKERBERG.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 12, 2011, 10:04:26 PM
That sucks.

In other news, I went for a jaunty bike ride to the bank and then by a circuitous route to my local office supply store (I think it's Office Max, but I can never remember), which is across the street from my local Goodwill. All in all, probably a 5 mile ride, and with the brisk weather even more enjoyable (except for my fingertips). I'm almost out of school for the quarter, and I need to start planning longer rides for my days off. I live near a some-what scenic 3-ish mile bike path, so that's not going to be a huge problem. The problem will be my will power. >.<
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 14, 2011, 09:05:41 AM
So.. it's true that you never forget how to ride a bike, but your ass and inner thigh skin sure does forget how to cope with it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 14, 2011, 06:09:54 PM
So.. it's true that you never forget how to ride a bike, but your ass and inner thigh skin sure does forget how to cope with it.
Yep.

I really need to get some sort of pants specifically for biking. I've ripped my 6th pair of pants this years. I have a pile of pants that I'm keeping around for no discernible reason, except that one day I might patch them up. I'm tired of buying new pants every two months. Especially since for a while there I only had one pair of pants.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on December 14, 2011, 11:38:58 PM
You can get some nice looking/riding shorts with legs long enough they won't catch on the seat and still be presentable in public.  My beautiful wife has a couple of skirts suitable for bicycle touring.  It's nice to have options other than lycra panel shorts.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on December 16, 2011, 10:23:14 AM
Sick of burning through regular pants myself, and not liking even the highest end baggy MTB shorts, I've opted for knickers and ordered two from two different makers the other week, superduper discounted on the cheap. I freaking LOVE these from Cutter (http://www.cutterbike.com/?cat=4&p=165), so much so I'm wearing them around and into work and school. Manpris are so out of style, but meh. Peddlepushars they were once called. I also got a pair of Louis Garneau baggy knicks, but they just came in the mail the last night and haven't tried them yet.

Blahblahblah. Mountain bike shorts would be the way to go, or knickers/pedalpushars. Even a cheap pair from a reputable cycle company will last a lot longer than normal pants, not to mention be more comfortable/less irritating, amongst other things (breathability, moisture wicking, rain repellant, stretch, and whateves).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 16, 2011, 12:09:25 PM
Wow, those are 'spensive.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on December 16, 2011, 05:17:32 PM
I got 'em for 35 buckaroos on geartrade (free shipping too). hehehehehe. Yeah, between bonktown, geartrade, and realcyclist, I rack up these 500 dollar carts... And then I have to close the browser and walk away before I do something stupid. Seriously stupid steals on some sites out there.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 17, 2011, 01:48:12 PM
I'll look into it after the holidays. For now I'll stick to my $5-10 Goodwill pants.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on December 18, 2011, 11:55:59 PM
Ha! My $3 Goodwill shorts wore through on a ride the other week. I've been wearing this other pair of  Louis Garneau knickers and I love them too, I look like a dork, but I'm okay with that;

Tyres - Spaced. Crossing. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QhHSl-bdpU&feature=related#)

(and trust me, I've also taken enough E to start rocking out like a maniack to crossing signals, and this is exactly what it's like)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on December 19, 2011, 04:24:13 PM
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7021/6539840553_1f41025f84_z.jpg)
Okay, here's my new rig; it's a medium to entry level Novera touring bike I picked up on craigslist for a song and a dance, and I have been putting a ton of work into it over the last few weeks (painted it black last week, it looked like a nasty pizza box before; white with green and red decals, ugh). Much more work to do to get her up to speed for long distance tours...

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7155/6539840557_52d6135c95.jpg)
So, my rear rack connection bars are interfering with my brake cable, eventually the cable rubbing on the sharp metal edge will make it fray. You guys have any ideas? I've got a few, but they are only stopgap.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on December 19, 2011, 07:23:58 PM
If you can get a plastic tube then you can put the cable inside the plastic tube this should prevent the cable from fraying. The closer the plastic tube it to the cable size the better. Just so the cable has room to move inside the cable.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on December 19, 2011, 07:44:40 PM
Hey xenu, yeah, I inserted a tube on the cable going to the other cantilever (out of focus in the pic), it is just the way these brake cables are designed/connected up; I can't slide a tube to this cable going to this cantilever. I'm thinking about slicing a plastic tube down longwise, and wrapping the cable with it, glueing or zip tying the tube around the cable. Anyway, yeah, that's the problem, I can't slide a tube over the cable in this area, like I did on the other side. I'm probably missing something, these are my first cantilever brakes, so I'm a noob.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on December 20, 2011, 02:11:34 AM
I got nothing, sorry. :(
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 20, 2011, 05:28:47 AM
It looks like that's just the excess cable, is that the case? If so, why don't you just bend it out of the way?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on December 20, 2011, 11:25:59 AM
Here's another angle, looking straight down. From here you can see the situation. It's not excess cable, it is a critical bit that will start to wear through; everytime I apply the breaks the cable grinds up against and rubs up and down on the metal edge. It'll take a while for it to start to fray. Anyways, I've got some ideas, but I feel like I'm missing something really obvious. There's got to be a simple 'duh' thing to do to keep these cantilever brakes from rubbing these rack mounts, but I'm missing it. The other side is fine with the plastic tube over the cable, as you can see, but there isn't a way to slide a tube on to the offending side. :P
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7028/6544152545_8177028fef_z.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 20, 2011, 12:12:58 PM
I got nothing.

I've never used center-pull brakes, so I don't have any tips.

So.. weird thing, and I think I sort of know what's causing it.. but anyway.. the past two days the "Max Speed" on my bike computer has been 84.7mph and 63.6mph respectively.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on December 20, 2011, 02:28:15 PM
If you want you can split the plastic tube down the middle and then place it over the cable. Maybe that will work.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on December 20, 2011, 04:59:39 PM
That will be Plan A  :)

(thankx xenu, thankx panda, thanx jaypee, center pulls are new to me too)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 21, 2011, 05:22:37 AM
My bike computer says I reached 115mph yesterday.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on December 21, 2011, 08:36:28 AM
My bike computer says I reached 115mph yesterday.
My bike computer does weird shit too sometimes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 21, 2011, 08:44:23 AM
My bike computer says I reached 115mph yesterday.
My bike computer does weird shit too sometimes.

I think I know what the reason is.. I think that the magnetic card pass reading machine in our office parking garage where I lock up my bike screws up the computer as I exit the garage.

Although it doesn't really make sense because it doesn't seem to scramble any of the other data sets.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on December 21, 2011, 10:05:00 AM
I don't know what causes mine to mess up, sometimes I'll get a top speed of 60 mph but my average time and speed is usually on Target. I have know idea why key does it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: DK on December 21, 2011, 02:39:21 PM
The one and only bike computer I bought gave me a reading of 90mph as I was attaching it in the shed.

Unfortunately, I hadn't kept the receipt to take the damn useless thing back to the shop.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 21, 2011, 04:38:20 PM
The funny thing is that this is my first midrange quality bike computer, all the other ones I've ever owned have been cheapos, and I never had a problem with those.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on December 27, 2011, 02:13:15 AM
Some more goodies from Shermer's lovely book on cycling; http://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,38108.msg9130982.html#new (http://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,38108.msg9130982.html#new)
hehehehe, of course, as we all know this is back when Shermer was drinking heavily from the woo (still is in my opinion, but at least as far as cycling he's got his shit together :))
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Henning on December 27, 2011, 05:08:15 PM
I got this shirt for xmas.... I hadn't laughed with joy at a gift for a long time!

(http://imgc.allpostersimages.com/images/P-488-488-90/60/6092/UMGF100Z/posters/portlandia-cars-man-why.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on December 28, 2011, 05:41:49 PM
So jealous.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 02, 2012, 05:38:19 PM
I have a shirt printed by a local(ish) artist that's an exploded view of a bike. It's one of my favorite shirts. Also, I'm a pretty big hippie.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 02, 2012, 09:40:31 PM
I have a shirt printed by a local(ish) artist that's an exploded view of a bike. It's one of my favorite shirts. Also, I'm a pretty big hippie.

:picsstfu:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on January 02, 2012, 11:58:45 PM
I finally got back on the bike yesterday after many months away from it. Took a short 20km ride from a friends place to the beach and back. What was slightly disheartening was the fact that a lot of my friends recently bought road bikes and I was the only shmuck on a mountain bike so they pretty much left me in the dust. Time to upgrade I think.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 03, 2012, 05:52:43 AM
It's supposed to be 15 degrees today. This sucks. What sucks the most about this is that there has been no build-up towards this temperature. The weather has been what can only be described as "balmy" for the past month.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 03, 2012, 08:05:46 AM
I lose all my motivation when it gets cold out. I can not wait for spring. It was like in the 40's just a day ago and then this wind and the temps drop down to the teens. Working at the airport sucks this time of year.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 03, 2012, 08:56:09 AM
I actually prefer the cold.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 03, 2012, 10:09:15 AM
I actually prefer the cold.
Not me the hotter the better
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on January 03, 2012, 10:28:54 AM
The thing about the cold is that I start out freezing but endup sweating like a pig by the time I get to were I'm going on account of the heavy close clothes.   :-\

Edit:  funny how its so much easier to see spelling errors the second time through.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 03, 2012, 10:48:49 AM
The thing about the cold is that I start out freezing but endup sweating like a pig by the time I get to were I'm going on account of the heavy close.   :-\
One reason why I hate the cold. It takes to long to warm up and then your sweating. Stop for a light and your freezing. Give me the heat any day.  Ya I know I'm a wimp.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 03, 2012, 12:11:06 PM
The thing about the cold is that I start out freezing but endup sweating like a pig by the time I get to were I'm going on account of the heavy close.   :-\
One reason why I hate the cold. It takes to long to warm up and then your sweating. Stop for a light and your freezing. Give me the heat any day.  Ya I know I'm a wimp.

I sweat too much and in the summer I'm just a hot stinky mess by the end of the day. At least in wintertime I can be reasonably sure that I won't reek by the end of the day.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 03, 2012, 03:03:03 PM
I sweat too much and in the summer I'm just a hot stinky mess by the end of the day. At least in wintertime I can be reasonably sure that I won't reek by the end of the day.
^This. That's why I like the Bay Area for biking - it's a lovely 48*F outside (according to my computer). That's perfect for biking in. 50-60F is not bad, and anything above 65 has me poring the sweat after only a couple of minutes. During the summer sweat -a-thons, I'll drink probably half a gallon of water each day just to keep from getting dehydrated.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 03, 2012, 03:45:28 PM
Yeah, the colder the better for me. Humid balmy heat is the worst, it's like being cooked alive, like a lobster in a pot. I get physically sick in the shade sitting down in the FL summers. Desert mountain heat, I do okay, it must be the humidity that does me in. Anyway, I'll take all the cold weather riding I can get.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 03, 2012, 04:05:19 PM
Yeah, the colder the better for me. Humid balmy heat is the worst, it's like being cooked alive, like a lobster in a pot. I get physically sick in the shade sitting down in the FL summers. Desert mountain heat, I do okay, it must be the humidity that does me in. Anyway, I'll take all the cold weather riding I can get.
Seriously. I've gotten dizzy just from the ten minute ride to the train stop because of how humid it was - humidity is oppressive, and to me at least makes it feel a bazillion times hotter. I think it has something to do with the sweat not evaporating as effectively from the skin, and if the sweat isn't leaving your skin, it's sitting there magnifying the horrors of the sun. It's one of the reasons I can't wear heavy sunscreen - it makes me sweat more, which makes me feel hotter because it's not evaporating quickly enough, and it feels like I'm being cooked alive.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 03, 2012, 04:08:15 PM
Yeah, the colder the better for me. Humid balmy heat is the worst, it's like being cooked alive, like a lobster in a pot. I get physically sick in the shade sitting down in the FL summers. Desert mountain heat, I do okay, it must be the humidity that does me in. Anyway, I'll take all the cold weather riding I can get.

Yeah.. I've nearly vomited from heat exposure so many times.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 03, 2012, 04:13:09 PM
I'm getting anxious about the upcoming summer months now. I've so far avoided heat exhaustion, so let's see if I can keep the trend up. Of course, now I work in a part of the store that is heavily refrigerated, so getting too hot won't be so much of a problem. The front end (cashiering) was hell because it's basically a greenhouse up there - the AC was ineffective due to the constantly opening doors, and there are huge windows along 1.5 walls. It's usually about 10 subjective degrees warmer in the front of the store. Not fun.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 03, 2012, 06:04:47 PM
The summer heat has never effected me that way. I am warm when I ride but do not really notice it that much. Now when I stop the heat hit's me like a ton of bricks but when I am moving it isn't that bad.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 03, 2012, 06:57:42 PM
Yeah, as long as you've got air moving past you to cool you off it's not so bad. But there are times in the summer where it's so humid it literally feels like you're pushing through water.

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 03, 2012, 07:32:01 PM
There are also times when you can't get enough wind going to satisfy the burning.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 04, 2012, 05:36:08 AM
Or the wind will just make your life more miserable by adding more resistance to push against.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 04, 2012, 08:55:07 AM
Holy shit it is cold out. It is way colder than yesterday. I had beardsicles. Two pairs of socks and I still felt like my toes were submerged in ice water.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 04, 2012, 03:41:17 PM
Wool socks! Wool sock those footses! Double wool socks!!! WOOL!!!

Getting air moving over my (sopping dripping pouring) perspiration in the fever swamps of the FL summer does drastically reduce my suffering, but as panda said, there are just times when you can't get enough wind. I sweat buckets in the south, and the only thing that keeps me moving are things like poweraide or whatever electrolyte salts and carb crap products, or whatever, gallons of it, chugging it while I ride. If I stick only with water to rehydrate, I get much sicker much faster. Ugh, that kind of heat exposure/heat stroke nausea and puking and passing out queazy sickness in the muggy inescapable bog of the Gulf Coast summer, terrible. Buckets of water I sweat, just standing in the shade. Oh, how I miss cool mountain air and desert heat and frigid dry nights.

I'm really enjoying this cold spell down here, 22F (-6C) last night, and a good long ride... The Cutter jacket I was wearing was just perfect, and only bibs and shoes otherwise.... I come alive in colder temps. I know these temps aren't 'cold' cold for some of you guys (they're not for me, as I'm a native Utahn and an Alaskan transplant), but holy shit, for FL, this is heaven. HEAVEN! More night riding tonight :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quokka on January 05, 2012, 08:02:43 PM
Holy shit it is cold out. It is way colder than yesterday. I had beardsicles. Two pairs of socks and I still felt like my toes were submerged in ice water.

I have the exact opposite at the moment in Australia.  Although we are having a spell of 30 degree C (86F) days at the moment, so everyone is keen on getting out on the tracks.  The last couple of weeks have been hovering close to 40C (100F) which pretty much means the bikes stay in the shed.  Still, I would prefer a 40C day to pushing a bike through the snow, changing gears with frost bitten fingers and having my nuts shatter on a frozen seat :).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quokka on January 05, 2012, 08:12:16 PM
Will a cheap road bike destroy biking for me?

I tried a cheap mountain bike 1 1/2 years a go that nearly wrecked the idea for me. It wasn't until I jumped on a nice light frame with decent brakes shocks and gears that I thought this would be good fun.

Now, I've been riding my mountain bike on the road a bit and would like to buy a road bike which weigh in about 4kg lighter. Is a cheap $500 bike going to ruin the idea of riding on the road, or do I just not stuff around and spend $2000 on a carbon and ultegra set up and just be done with it?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 06, 2012, 02:38:54 AM
Is a cheap $500 bike going to ruin the idea of riding on the road, or do I just not stuff around and spend $2000 on a carbon and ultegra set up and just be done with it?
Are you interested in buying new or used? IMO, you can find some great used bikes for $500 or less (I know I did - and after looking around a bit after I dropped a cool $350, I realized I'd actually gotten a great deal). If you go new, you can probably find a decent bike for ~$1500(US).

Depends on how often you plan on riding, too. If it's just casual riding, a lower-end bike is fine. I had a Wal-Mart bike that I rode for a while before selling to a coworker for $20. When I finally got my Specialized road bike, I finally realized what I'd been missing. I also had a cruiser I got for free and liked it, as well as an old-school road/commuter bike that was way too small for me. Actually, I still have those two bikes. I should do something about that.

Personally, I'd start with used bikes, just to get a feel for what you want. I know what I like and dislike about my precious, and it'll influence my inevitable upgrade. But until that upgrade (probably when I can no longer find parts for my bike), I've got a good bike in decent shape and it didn't cost me much. There's nothing worse than dropping a crapton of money on something that you come to loathe.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quokka on January 06, 2012, 03:24:23 AM
Thanks Panda, I've come to my senses, and only really plan to get on it for a quick ride maybe 2 times a week.  I've had a look around today and there are plenty of $500 late 2000 models with the odd bit of bling and don't carry the weight of the Titanic on them. I'm staying away from the Walmart bikes because, like I said before, they have the potential to discourage me from the sport.

I do have the problem that my friends are willing to lone me their Specialized, Cannondale or Giant carbon goodness for me to play with, this also has the potential to depress the crap out of me, so I might just tell them to get stuffed.

I was also once told that, you buy the bike and that's it; but the whole mountain biking bit is already blowing out to $8,000 if you include my girlfriends bike, the accessories, upgrades, first aid and the odd competition. The more I think about it, the less I wan't to spend an exorbitant amount of money on it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 06, 2012, 03:37:26 AM
I'm staying away from the Walmart bikes because, like I said before, they have the potential to discourage me from the sport.
This is wise.

Yeah, if you're just going to casually ride it, I definitely recommend you find a used bike. And if you're not in a rush, you can take your time in looking for it. $500 is what I remember the average price for good used road bikes on craigslist; it kept me from buying for a while, but that worked out to my advantage. If you're able to lay down $500, go for it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 06, 2012, 05:26:38 AM
Thanks Panda, I've come to my senses, and only really plan to get on it for a quick ride maybe 2 times a week.  I've had a look around today and there are plenty of $500 late 2000 models with the odd bit of bling and don't carry the weight of the Titanic on them. I'm staying away from the Walmart bikes because, like I said before, they have the potential to discourage me from the sport.

I do have the problem that my friends are willing to lone me their Specialized, Cannondale or Giant carbon goodness for me to play with, this also has the potential to depress the crap out of me, so I might just tell them to get stuffed.

I was also once told that, you buy the bike and that's it; but the whole mountain biking bit is already blowing out to $8,000 if you include my girlfriends bike, the accessories, upgrades, first aid and the odd competition. The more I think about it, the less I wan't to spend an exorbitant amount of money on it.

Avoid the super cheap bikes because they will not be fun.. but you could probably find a great used road bike on eBay or the used market for $500.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 06, 2012, 09:48:40 AM
Used.

Go into good bike shops and try out different road frames, and get your size down, and figure out what you like and what you can do without; materials (steel, carbon, aluminum), components, drivetrain, etc, etc, etc, so you'll know what to shop for on the used market.

But yeah, defiantly used. A quality used rig at entry level (or near) prices up to a mid range rig at a decent price (or better). No other way to do it. Older 'vintage/retro' frames are a good way to drop into road riding too. You'll sort out what your upgrade will be down the road as you break into it.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 06, 2012, 12:09:39 PM
So uh..FUCK YES (http://www.instructables.com/id/Night-Bike/?ALLSTEPS)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on January 06, 2012, 12:19:57 PM
So uh..FUCK YES (http://www.instructables.com/id/Night-Bike/?ALLSTEPS)

That dude used strontium-based paint.  I don't think I'd let that bike anywhere near my testicles! (http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/lookaround1-1.gif)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 06, 2012, 12:28:09 PM
Bah. I've got my kids, I don't need any more.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 07, 2012, 02:04:03 AM
So uh..FUCK YES (http://www.instructables.com/id/Night-Bike/?ALLSTEPS)

That dude used strontium-based paint.  I don't think I'd let that bike anywhere near my testicles! (http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/lookaround1-1.gif)
As someone without testicles, this does not concern me.

Also, it's not straight up strontium, it's strontium aluminate. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strontium_aluminate) It's chemically and biologically inert  and is used in toy manufacturing. It does not radiate, so far as I could find.

Here's a riveting scientific report on strontium aluminate. (http://www.nicnas.gov.au/publications/car/new/na/nasummr/na0900sr/na989.asp) It seems, if I'm reading this right, that the manufacturer mixes the strontium aluminate with something else in order to make the chemical as harmless as possible.

Quote
The notified chemical will be encased in microspheres to make Luxalum GID 300 which are further mixed with polyester resin chips at 5% Luxalum GID 300 for incorporation into terrazzo pavement, or further mixed with an aqueous acrylic emulsion at 60% Luxalum GID 300 for incorporation into a dyestuff for application to safety vests. These applications render the notified chemical inaccessible to human contact. It is only in the early stages of its life cycle before it is encased, that the notified chemical may be accessible to human contact following a transport accident. The low likelihood of contact with the notified chemical, the low toxicity of the notified chemical and of Luxalum GID 300 suggest that it will not pose a significant hazard to public health when used in the proposed manner.
Emphasis mine.

Nothing in the first two pages of my "strontium aluminate safety" mentioned anything about radioactivity, except to say that it wasn't (but that's from a manufacturer's site, so, yeah, not a good source imo).
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quokka on January 08, 2012, 11:44:55 PM
O.K. After a bit of advice from the experienced lot around here; I'm going for 2nd hand $500.  I have a friend who has loaned me Giant + shoes that have been sitting in his house idle for the last year and will sell it to me for around that mark.

Unfortunately it is an XL; where my 6'1" frame is just a smidgen small for, and the shoes are a size too big. But I figure the stem and seat are adjustable to cramp it up a bit and I have plenty of pairs of thick wool socks I can wear.

There's no fancey Shimano Ultegra gear on it, but I put it on the scales, and it is 9.8kg with some carbon forks and it has had stuff all use, (this is where Cognoscento comments, "9.8kg??!!!! Pft, Overweight aluminum sandbag. Good luck dragging that uphill"):)


(http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/408710_340112786018249_100000585906625_1309024_589454201_n.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 09, 2012, 12:46:24 AM
O.K. After a bit of advice from the experienced lot around here; I'm going for 2nd hand $500.  I have a friend who has loaned me Giant + shoes that have been sitting in his house idle for the last year and will sell it to me for around that mark.

Unfortunately it is an XL; where my 6'1" frame is just a smidgen small for, and the shoes are a size too big. But I figure the stem and seat are adjustable to cramp it up a bit and I have plenty of pairs of thick wool socks I can wear.

There's no fancey Shimano Ultegra gear on it, but I put it on the scales, and it is 9.8kg with some carbon forks and it has had stuff all use, (this is where Cognoscento comments, "9.8kg??!!!! Pft, Overweight aluminum sandbag. Good luck dragging that uphill"):)


(http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/408710_340112786018249_100000585906625_1309024_589454201_n.jpg)
Nice. I hope you and your new friend have a long and happy relationship. ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on January 09, 2012, 05:16:40 AM
O.K. After a bit of advice from the experienced lot around here; I'm going for 2nd hand $500.  I have a friend who has loaned me Giant + shoes that have been sitting in his house idle for the last year and will sell it to me for around that mark.

Unfortunately it is an XL; where my 6'1" frame is just a smidgen small for, and the shoes are a size too big. But I figure the stem and seat are adjustable to cramp it up a bit and I have plenty of pairs of thick wool socks I can wear.

There's no fancey Shimano Ultegra gear on it, but I put it on the scales, and it is 9.8kg with some carbon forks and it has had stuff all use, (this is where Cognoscento comments, "9.8kg??!!!! Pft, Overweight aluminum sandbag. Good luck dragging that uphill"):)


(http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/408710_340112786018249_100000585906625_1309024_589454201_n.jpg)

Nothing wrong with aluminum, pal.  One of my bikes is aluminum!  XL is a bit large for someone 6'1" though. It's got a freaking ginormous front tube. You're probably going to have to slide the seat forward and take the spacers out of the stem.  Your best bet is to go to a local bike shop and get a good fitting.  It can make all the difference in the world.  The last thing you want to do is get discouraged because the ride is so damn uncomfortable! In the worst case, you can snap a pic of you on the bike (leaning against the wall) with one foot at the bottom of the pedal stroke and your hands on the hoods - and I can eyeball it to give you some adjustment advice...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on January 09, 2012, 05:21:19 AM
So uh..FUCK YES (http://www.instructables.com/id/Night-Bike/?ALLSTEPS)

That dude used strontium-based paint.  I don't think I'd let that bike anywhere near my testicles! (http://i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq245/ripalamungalin/lookaround1-1.gif)
As someone without testicles, this does not concern me.

Also, it's not straight up strontium, it's strontium aluminate. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strontium_aluminate) It's chemically and biologically inert  and is used in toy manufacturing. It does not radiate, so far as I could find.

Here's a riveting scientific report on strontium aluminate. (http://www.nicnas.gov.au/publications/car/new/na/nasummr/na0900sr/na989.asp) It seems, if I'm reading this right, that the manufacturer mixes the strontium aluminate with something else in order to make the chemical as harmless as possible.

Quote
The notified chemical will be encased in microspheres to make Luxalum GID 300 which are further mixed with polyester resin chips at 5% Luxalum GID 300 for incorporation into terrazzo pavement, or further mixed with an aqueous acrylic emulsion at 60% Luxalum GID 300 for incorporation into a dyestuff for application to safety vests. These applications render the notified chemical inaccessible to human contact. It is only in the early stages of its life cycle before it is encased, that the notified chemical may be accessible to human contact following a transport accident. The low likelihood of contact with the notified chemical, the low toxicity of the notified chemical and of Luxalum GID 300 suggest that it will not pose a significant hazard to public health when used in the proposed manner.
Emphasis mine.

Nothing in the first two pages of my "strontium aluminate safety" mentioned anything about radioactivity, except to say that it wasn't (but that's from a manufacturer's site, so, yeah, not a good source imo).



Ok - here's from wisegeek.com (looks like you were right):

From stickers to toys, an object's ability to glow in the dark instantly adds to its appeal. Making things glow in the dark is a simple matter of chemistry.

The most common way of making an object glow in the dark is to use chemicals called phosphors to produce light. These kind of glow-in-the-dark objects need to be exposed to light, or charged, in order to glow. The light energizes the phosphors and excites their electrons. As the electrons lose this extra energy, they release it as a light of their own.

Scientists have created numerous phosphors in the lab, but zinc sulfide and strontium aluminate are the ones that are most commonly used in glow-in-the-dark products, with strontium aluminate being the longer lasting of the two. The chemicals are mixed right in with the plastic that is molded into glow in the dark stars for your ceiling or added to the pigment of your Halloween make-up.

On rare occasions, something will glow in the dark without needing to be charged. These items still use phosphors to create the glow, but they add a radioactive element like radium to the compound. The radioactive element gives off small amounts of radiation, not enough to be dangerous, that constantly charge the phosphors in the same way a light would. Radiation-charged phosphors are typically used on clock or watch hands that need to glow hours after a light has been turned off.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 09, 2012, 05:33:24 AM

Nothing wrong with aluminum, pal.

Well, nothing except for the tendency aluminum has to fail fantastically and without warning.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on January 09, 2012, 07:17:20 PM

Nothing wrong with aluminum, pal.

Well, nothing except for the tendency aluminum has to fail fantastically and without warning.

Over the long haul, aluminum is more prone to failure from fatigue and more difficult to repair than steel, but most modern aluminum frames are pretty bulletproof and will give many years of reliable service if you take good care of them.

Carbon frames are much easier to destroy than metal frames: they can easily be compromised by hard knocks or deep gouges. They are the ones that can fail suddenly and catastrophically in my experience.  If you maintain and inspect your bike regularly, it's much easier to spot trouble areas on an aluminum bike than carbon. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 09, 2012, 08:32:09 PM
Ok - here's from wisegeek.com (looks like you were right):
Don't thank me, thank the dedicated Aus scientists who wrote that riveting piece of science documentation. Also Google.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 10, 2012, 06:53:24 AM
It snowed overnight.. just a light dusting. I was going to bike to work anyway, until I saw cars skidding down my street even when they were driving slow and safe. Someone rang my doorbell at 6:30 to ask if I knew whose car they had just hit (it was mine, but fortunately there was no damage), and then 5 minutes later a car narrowly avoided smashing into my car.. but only by smashing into my neighbor's front yard and taking out their fence.. guess it's too dangerous to ride my bike today, especially with the relatively treadless tires I have.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 10, 2012, 11:42:59 PM
Yikes!

Wouldn't help cars from skidding into you, but damnnnnn; these Pugsly and Moonlander tires would sort out the slick snow riding (the one of the guy going in and out of the water hole, top right hit, is something else).

Pugsly winter ride (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCoJon6JYiM&feature=related#)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 11, 2012, 06:07:06 AM
Yeah, that was my fear.. not that I would skid out and lose control, but that to a driver who is in the middle of a skid a bike lane looks like a safe place to steer towards.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: MikeHz on January 11, 2012, 10:21:00 AM


(http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/408710_340112786018249_100000585906625_1309024_589454201_n.jpg)

That's my bike you got there.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 12, 2012, 06:27:33 AM
So this is a new one.. yesterday my chain fell apart. It appears that one of the pins had worn to the point that it was no longer capable of keeping the side plates on, so the links basically just separated. I tried putting it back together but it only held for about a half mile.

It's weird because I think there's only about 400 miles on that chain. Oh well, guess I'll be taking the subway today and I'll pick up a new chain at the bike shop on my way home. It's pouring rain and freezing out today anyway, so I guess I'm not really missing out on anything by not biking.

By the way, have you guys seen this? It's a "Wikibook" (a thing I didn't know existed) on bike repair.

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Bicycles/Maintenance_and_Repair (http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Bicycles/Maintenance_and_Repair)

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 12, 2012, 10:18:41 AM
No I have never seen this. Could come in handy. Thanks
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 12, 2012, 12:35:25 PM
Hmm, interesting. I shall be checking out this 'wikibook' you speak of.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 12, 2012, 08:31:58 PM
No I have never seen this. Could come in handy. Thanks

Broke 'em when they were worn but never saw that... I always buy xt or durace, though. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quokka on January 13, 2012, 12:49:11 AM


That's my bike you got there.

Ahh Giant bikes. They're just like penises....every 2nd person has got one.

Yes, My mountain bike is a Giant also - man do I cop some abuse for not buying some exotic European brand.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on January 13, 2012, 12:53:48 AM
I'm not sure if I posted this ages ago, but this is my beast:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-0TIPi_CdRl4/R1ipTkns5cI/AAAAAAAAAIU/TASfc0aZIQ4/s640/IMG_3574.jpg)

I just got a new computer for it and started riding again. Next week I'm going to start riding to work.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 13, 2012, 04:28:09 PM
I'm so going to mount one of those insanely loud air horns to my bars, and blast the living eardrums out of the offending drivers (your first paragraph) this kind of crap just keeps happening and happening to me too. Illegally loud horn plus middle finger plus an old chrome frame pump for swinging if necessary.

What tool do you have? I would like get the one you describe.

This guy

http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Alien-26-Function-Bicycle-Tool/dp/B000FIE4AE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317926157&sr=8-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Alien-26-Function-Bicycle-Tool/dp/B000FIE4AE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317926157&sr=8-1)
A'ight jaypee, this just came in the post today... I knew if I didn't order it in my manic 3AM bike-list shopping spree the other night, I never would. How's this thing working out for you? I'm about to go adjust some things I haven't had the proper tools for... See how this thing works out.

Update- okay, pretty nifty unit. Able to fully adjust my brakes (FINALLY) with the unit split in half, allen in one hand and wrench/spanner in the other...

Update Update- UPS dropped off the Topeak DXP trunkbag; SQUEEEEE!!! It's all comin' together guys... Last weekend I put on my new pedals and picked up a proper frame pump... Now, just need fenders and to return a thing or two to Realcyclist or Bonktown, I can't remember, and some other odds and ends. The rig is nearly complete (is it ever? is it ever really? But, I can start doing my 140 to 170 mile (225 to 274 km) round trip 'tours' over the weekends now. It's been leading up to this, this winter, and the trunkbag was the one last thing I needed before I headed out, for cargo and shit. Super psyched tonight!)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 15, 2012, 09:47:12 AM
That multi-tool is outstanding. It literally changed my life.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 16, 2012, 01:13:43 PM
That multi-tool is outstanding. It literally changed my life.
Yes it is; outstanding. I'm quite impressed. It is changing my life right now... Only wish it had a 14mm wrench for my seat tube/post nut. But, the three different bikes I've been stripping down and upgrading and tuning up over the weekend (for a two day trip next week), all have different sized nuts for the seat posts. So, a small(ish) monkey wrench will be going along with us.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 16, 2012, 04:11:33 PM
What was awesome was the other day when my chain gave out I was able to get to work on time by using the chain tool, and then when the chain completely shit the bed on my way home I was able to remove my front wheel using the cone wrench so that I could fit the bike in the trunk of our car when my wife came and rescued me.

And I love that vicious knife on there. If anyone tries to fuck with me I'm pretty confident I could behead them with that little guy. The only blade I've ever had that was sharper than that was on a fishing knife.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 16, 2012, 09:53:03 PM
The knife is a wee gnarly thing not to be trifled with. But, better practice whiping it out, sliding it apart, and then unlocking it and prying it out in a snap  ;) I've taken three bikes apart with this thing so far (and put them back together, even better)... I freaking love this tool. Thanks for the recommend, jaypee (we sound like we are tag teaming some viral marketing for this thing).

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7003/6712009519_e71844542f_b.jpg)
Well, she's coming along nicely. Not a good pic, and ignore the crap water bottles (I was on a long one today). I really like the new trunkbag, except; 1) the panniers look super dumpy when deployed, but the volume these things hold makes up for that [this is one of the topeak bags (http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Trunk-Bicycle-Molded-Panels/dp/B000ZKES0S/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1326778361&sr=8-1) that has zip out panniers on both sides], 2) I wish they hung much lower as the center of gravity is higher than I anticipated, 3) the carry handle is sewn to the flap that accesses the main compartment, so if it's not zipped closed and you grab it to go, it's kind of a disaster, and 4) those zippers around the main compartment are kind of meh. Oh well, can't have everything...yet. I went with this one as I already had a Topeak rear rack with the newfangled instant/quick release thingy for these trunk bags. I'm impressed with how well it works as an over the shoulder messenger bag off the bike around town, that pretty much makes up for the high center of gravity, more or less... Got my tools, spare parts, tubes, patch kit, first aid kit, rain cape and other rain gear, batteries, all the misc stuff like zip ties...and that's only 1/4 of the main compartment.

Now, for a front rack and some fenders. Mwahahahaha.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on January 16, 2012, 11:44:30 PM
That multi-tool is outstanding. It literally changed my life.
Yes it is; outstanding. I'm quite impressed. It is changing my life right now... Only wish it had a 14mm wrench for my seat tube/post nut. But, the three different bikes I've been stripping down and upgrading and tuning up over the weekend (for a two day trip next week), all have different sized nuts for the seat posts. So, a small(ish) monkey wrench will be going along with us.

I have/had the same tool. Unfortunately I lost my first one when I took my saddle bag off at a friends place and forgot to pick it up again. I have another one on order from Wiggle which should arrive soonish.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 17, 2012, 03:24:12 PM
What other tools do you guys carry with you. What tools do you have at home/work/shop for bike maitanance/repairs.

(click to show/hide)
Looking good khendar, looks as if that thing is comfy as a cloud over all kinds of terrain  :)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on January 17, 2012, 07:40:29 PM
What other tools do you guys carry with you. What tools do you have at home/work/shop for bike maitanance/repairs.

(click to show/hide)
Looking good khendar, looks as if that thing is comfy as a cloud over all kinds of terrain  :)

Funnily enough, I haven't taken it off-road yet. I've got Continental Town and Country tyres on it and have been focussing on road riding, for which I usually have the suspension locked off as I find I lose some power with the suspension on.

Rode to work today for the first time in years. Only 7km and mostly downhill but I'm not looking forward to the ride home. Its really tempting to go out and get a roadbike...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: MikeHz on January 17, 2012, 10:26:29 PM


That's my bike you got there.

Ahh Giant bikes. They're just like penises....every 2nd person has got one.

Yes, My mountain bike is a Giant also - man do I cop some abuse for not buying some exotic European brand.

Mine might not be the coolest bike or be the easiest to peddle, but I'm on it for exercise anyway.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quokka on January 18, 2012, 01:28:03 AM
There's no fancey Shimano Ultegra gear on it, but I put it on the scales, and it is 9.8kg with some carbon forks and it has had stuff all use, (this is where Cognoscento comments, "9.8kg??!!!! Pft, Overweight aluminum sandbag. Good luck dragging that uphill"):)

Nothing wrong with aluminum, pal.  One of my bikes is aluminum!  XL is a bit large for someone 6'1" though. It's got a freaking ginormous front tube. You're probably going to have to slide the seat forward and take the spacers out of the stem.  Your best bet is to go to a local bike shop and get a good fitting.  It can make all the difference in the world.  The last thing you want to do is get discouraged because the ride is so damn uncomfortable! In the worst case, you can snap a pic of you on the bike (leaning against the wall) with one foot at the bottom of the pedal stroke and your hands on the hoods - and I can eyeball it to give you some adjustment advice...

I was seriously thinking of your offer Cognoscento, but I decided to hand the bike back yesterday as I just couldn't make it fit (thanks anyway).  The good thing is, my girlfriend is having her first go at a social triathalon in 2 months time (1/4 distance I think) which means a nice road bike upgrade for her; which means a nice road bike upgrade for me - we have a tit for tat thing going with toys. >:D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 18, 2012, 09:21:38 AM
What other tools do you guys carry with you. What tools do you have at home/work/shop for bike maitanance/repairs.

(click to show/hide)
Looking good khendar, looks as if that thing is comfy as a cloud over all kinds of terrain  :)

This is one of those things that I really should start doing again, but I used to carry a CO2 gun and spare tubes.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 18, 2012, 04:35:05 PM
URL(http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/5743/toolsjpg.jpg)[/URL]

Nothing here I haven't used on the trail.  There's a pump in the pack and a spare tube to lend under the seat.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: MikeHz on January 18, 2012, 04:50:32 PM
My only tool is my cell phone. Anything goes wrong, and I call my wife to come with the car and bike rack. I drop the bike off at the repair shop.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 18, 2012, 05:29:38 PM
My only tool is my cell phone. Anything goes wrong, and I call my wife to come with the car and bike rack. I drop the bike off at the repair shop.

I'd have to call a helicopter...
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: MikeHz on January 18, 2012, 07:10:02 PM
My only tool is my cell phone. Anything goes wrong, and I call my wife to come with the car and bike rack. I drop the bike off at the repair shop.

I'd have to call a helicopter...

I do ride the Hiawatha Trail every year, [ http://www.skilookout.com/hiaw/ (http://www.skilookout.com/hiaw/) ] which is well out of cell reach (though I usually carry my ham radio, just in case). A couple of years ago, I had a flat tire, but didn't notice it until the end of the ride. I really do carry a tire repair kit, but would probably be lost if I actually had to use it. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 18, 2012, 09:00:54 PM
My only tool is my cell phone. Anything goes wrong, and I call my wife to come with the car and bike rack. I drop the bike off at the repair shop.

I'd have to call a helicopter...

I do ride the Hiawatha Trail every year, [ http://www.skilookout.com/hiaw/ (http://www.skilookout.com/hiaw/) ] which is well out of cell reach (though I usually carry my ham radio, just in case). A couple of years ago, I had a flat tire, but didn't notice it until the end of the ride. I really do carry a tire repair kit, but would probably be lost if I actually had to use it.

That's what the duct tape is for... works as well as a tire patch and no messy glue though I haven't used it since I went tubeless, total winner, that.  Good for mending jerseys and jackets, too.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 18, 2012, 10:11:56 PM
Oooo, I like the duct tape idea. I have glueless patches, but I don't think I can use them correctly. Duct tape is really easy to use.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 18, 2012, 10:44:14 PM
Oooo, I like the duct tape idea. I have glueless patches, but I don't think I can use them correctly. Duct tape is really easy to use.

I discovered it works by accident, rather than design.  I wouldn't trust it for long term, though.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 18, 2012, 10:51:01 PM
Oooo, I like the duct tape idea. I have glueless patches, but I don't think I can use them correctly. Duct tape is really easy to use.

I discovered it works by accident, rather than design.  I wouldn't trust it for long term, though.
I wouldn't expect it to, but if it gets me home I'm all for it. I haven't had a single flat tire since I got a new back wheel, which is nice.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on January 19, 2012, 07:38:39 PM
So I decided to make a conscious effort this year to get back on the road. I pumped up my tires, checked my brakes, and made the short ride to work for the first time in ages. All good, I thought. I can do this, I thought. I was all enthused. I had a plan; ride to work every other day for a few weeks, then start riding to work every day. Gradually work my way up to be able to ride hundreds of kilometers a week.

Next day: Headcold  ::) Head full of snot, ears ringing, eyes watering, throat itching.

My body hates me.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: seamas on January 20, 2012, 12:56:13 PM
Kind of pissed.

The bike shop where I purchased my bike this past summer closed their doors (without explanation) just after Christmas.
Sort of a mystery there. Seemed like a "moved out under the cover of darkness" situation.  >:(

It was a franchise of a 4-5 store brand.
What sucks is I have 3 years of maintenance/tune ups and it was only 2 miles away.

Now the closest remaining shops are 25-30 miles away.

Don't like this at all. The maintenance plan was a pretty good selling point for me.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 20, 2012, 03:51:52 PM
My favourite bikeshop was wrecked in the September eathquake, but they are again up and running in a new location.  Worse, my optometrist rooms and all the (my) records records totally destroyed. 
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 20, 2012, 08:04:46 PM
So I decided to make a conscious effort this year to get back on the road. I pumped up my tires, checked my brakes, and made the short ride to work for the first time in ages. All good, I thought. I can do this, I thought. I was all enthused. I had a plan; ride to work every other day for a few weeks, then start riding to work every day. Gradually work my way up to be able to ride hundreds of kilometers a week.

Next day: Headcold  ::) Head full of snot, ears ringing, eyes watering, throat itching.

My body hates me.
That happened to me too. Wednesday I had a 30 mile (48 km) round trip in the cold rain to make a doctors appointment. Bad idea. Very bad. I was already feeling the cold coming on. Fortunately I had enough wet weather gear to wear, but unfortunately no fenders kind of defeated the purpose of my that rain gear (water coming up, whaaaaa?). Spent yesterday in bed shivering between cold sweats and hot flashes with unholy pains in my bones and fluids coming out of every hole. Today was pretty bad too. I need a car, or a city to live in.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 21, 2012, 07:34:52 PM
Hi folks, I'm new here.

I join SGU forum and find a cycling thread!  As a competitive cyclist and professional cycling coach, this is right up my alley. :)

I haven't looked through the thread as it's pretty long, but happy to help out if people have questions about cycling and cycling performance.

Cheers
Alex
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 21, 2012, 07:36:05 PM
Yeah, against all odds this thread has survived.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 21, 2012, 07:49:46 PM
All odds? It's like the best thread that has ever happened in the history of internet. Well, like top 10, definitely.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 21, 2012, 08:44:53 PM
Yeah, against all odds this thread has survived.
We're trend setters, jaypee.
(click to show/hide)

I still have this bike, although I've made some slight mods to it. The handlebars are definitely not as tweaked up as they once were, I have new pedals for it, and a new seat and new back wheel. I should take a new pic of it.

Oh, and I have some slight rust (that grew overnight) on the chain. I'm going to clean it, but any other recommendations?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 21, 2012, 09:35:14 PM
Yeah, against all odds this thread has survived.
We're trend setters, jaypee.
(click to show/hide)

I still have this bike, although I've made some slight mods to it. The handlebars are definitely not as tweaked up as they once were, I have new pedals for it, and a new seat and new back wheel. I should take a new pic of it.

Oh, and I have some slight rust (that grew overnight) on the chain. I'm going to clean it, but any other recommendations?

Lubricating it after cleaning would be ideal.  The best lubes are not cheap, but you don't use much at a time.  Make your riding easier and your chain last longer.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 22, 2012, 01:30:28 PM
If you have rust, I'd recommend getting a new chain. And then keeping the new chain lubricated and cleaned. I see people riding on some rusty-ass chains and I can't fathom how they do it. A new chain and a chain tool is like a $35 investment tool, and you get to use the chain tool again and again.

I just bought a red and black chain from Amazon.. it looks pretty fucking awesome. I was thinking about going all 'hood and getting the BLACK AND YELLOW BLACK AND YELLOW chain, but that wouldn't really work with the black/red/white colorway of my bike.

HOLY SHIT? Colorway isn't being picked up by my spellcheck. Way to go, Bike Snob NYC for getting that one into the vernacular.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 22, 2012, 02:21:19 PM
Yeah, against all odds this thread has survived.
I love this thread. I don't post much on it but I read it all the time when something new pops up. Unlike some other threads that I wish I could delete from my "Show new Replies to your posts"
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 22, 2012, 02:23:36 PM
Hi folks, I'm new here.

I join SGU forum and find a cycling thread!  As a competitive cyclist and professional cycling coach, this is right up my alley. :)

I haven't looked through the thread as it's pretty long, but happy to help out if people have questions about cycling and cycling performance.

Cheers
Alex

Nice to have a professional cyclist on board. Jaypee and others have given really great advise too.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 22, 2012, 11:45:23 PM
If you have rust, I'd recommend getting a new chain. And then keeping the new chain lubricated and cleaned. I see people riding on some rusty-ass chains and I can't fathom how they do it. A new chain and a chain tool is like a $35 investment tool, and you get to use the chain tool again and again.

I just bought a red and black chain from Amazon.. it looks pretty fucking awesome. I was thinking about going all 'hood and getting the BLACK AND YELLOW BLACK AND YELLOW chain, but that wouldn't really work with the black/red/white colorway of my bike.

HOLY SHIT? Colorway isn't being picked up by my spellcheck. Way to go, Bike Snob NYC for getting that one into the vernacular.
I'll keep this in mind, although I'll probably just try to clean this chain for the time being. It's a pretty old chain, and I'll need to change it soon anyway, so a little rust isn't going to change it's performance. And colorway is being picked up by my spellcheck. As is spellcheck. Did you perhaps add the word "colorway" to your dictionary?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 23, 2012, 06:21:34 AM
Nah, I didn't add it. I guess we're just cooler on the right coast.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 23, 2012, 01:25:41 PM
If you have rust, I'd recommend getting a new chain. And then keeping the new chain lubricated and cleaned. I see people riding on some rusty-ass chains and I can't fathom how they do it. A new chain and a chain tool is like a $35 investment tool, and you get to use the chain tool again and again.

I just bought a red and black chain from Amazon.. it looks pretty fucking awesome. I was thinking about going all 'hood and getting the BLACK AND YELLOW BLACK AND YELLOW chain, but that wouldn't really work with the black/red/white colorway of my bike.

HOLY SHIT? Colorway isn't being picked up by my spellcheck. Way to go, Bike Snob NYC for getting that one into the vernacular.
I'll keep this in mind, although I'll probably just try to clean this chain for the time being. It's a pretty old chain, and I'll need to change it soon anyway, so a little rust isn't going to change it's performance. And colorway is being picked up by my spellcheck. As is spellcheck. Did you perhaps add the word "colorway" to your dictionary?

Keeping an old chain can be expensive.  As a chain ages, it stretches and wears the cogs (badly) on your cassette.  When the chain is replaced due to breakage, you might find changing gears difficult (with the new chain) and maybe some gears won't actually carry the chain properly at all.  Chains are cheaper than cassettes and much easier to replace.  It is easy to measure the stretch and a bicycle mechanic could help with that.  BTW if you clean your chain often, it's easy with citrus cleaner, if you let things go, the only way to clean it will be to remove it and soak it mineral turps (paint thinner, something relatively safe) and retun it to the bicycle.  But what do I know, I'm having major surgery next week due to crashing in the last race I was in.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 23, 2012, 02:53:07 PM
If you have rust, I'd recommend getting a new chain. And then keeping the new chain lubricated and cleaned. I see people riding on some rusty-ass chains and I can't fathom how they do it. A new chain and a chain tool is like a $35 investment tool, and you get to use the chain tool again and again.

I just bought a red and black chain from Amazon.. it looks pretty fucking awesome. I was thinking about going all 'hood and getting the BLACK AND YELLOW BLACK AND YELLOW chain, but that wouldn't really work with the black/red/white colorway of my bike.

HOLY SHIT? Colorway isn't being picked up by my spellcheck. Way to go, Bike Snob NYC for getting that one into the vernacular.
I'll keep this in mind, although I'll probably just try to clean this chain for the time being. It's a pretty old chain, and I'll need to change it soon anyway, so a little rust isn't going to change it's performance. And colorway is being picked up by my spellcheck. As is spellcheck. Did you perhaps add the word "colorway" to your dictionary?

Keeping an old chain can be expensive.  As a chain ages, it stretches and wears the cogs (badly) on your cassette.  When the chain is replaced due to breakage, you might find changing gears difficult (with the new chain) and maybe some gears won't actually carry the chain properly at all.  Chains are cheaper than cassettes and much easier to replace.  It is easy to measure the stretch and a bicycle mechanic could help with that.  BTW if you clean your chain often, it's easy with citrus cleaner, if you let things go, the only way to clean it will be to remove it and soak it mineral turps (paint thinner, something relatively safe) and retun it to the bicycle. 


This ^

But what do I know, I'm having major surgery next week due to crashing in the last race I was in.

Sorry to hear that, hope you have a speedy recovery.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 23, 2012, 05:13:10 PM
My understanding of chain stretch was that it is due to the wearing down the cogs or the links in the chain, not an actual stretch, as it were.

But what do I know, I'm having major surgery next week due to crashing in the last race I was in.

Whoa, yikes. What's this now?

Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 23, 2012, 05:21:17 PM
If the chain has been rusty and used for a while, it's probably already accelerated cog wear to the point where both will need to be replaced before long.  It'll still be useable, provided none of the chain's links have seized.

A quick way to keep chain in good condition is to soak some WD-40 into a rag, run the chain through the soaked section of rag, then run it through dry section of rag and then apply chain lube, one small drop per chain link roller.

Always clean/lube chain immediately after a ride if there has been any moisture on the chain (e.g. from rain or sweat).  Simple maintenance like this can extend a chain and cog's life by many times.  I have seen a new chain seized by rust after one ride, and another well kept last for 20,000km.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 23, 2012, 05:25:38 PM
My understanding of chain stretch was that it is due to the wearing down the cogs or the links in the chain, not an actual stretch, as it were.
Yes, chains do stretch as they wear.  Bike shops that do mechanical repairs will all have a special tool that measures the amount of stretch to determine whether a chain is within typical useable tolerance or not.  e.g.:
http://www.parktool.com/product/chain-wear-indicator-CC-3-2 (http://www.parktool.com/product/chain-wear-indicator-CC-3-2)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 23, 2012, 05:36:52 PM
Nice to have a professional cyclist on board. Jaypee and others have given really great advise too.
Just to clarify, I'm a professional coach (and work with some pro riders), but am not a professional cyclist myself.  I have competed up to UCI World Cup level (in 2011).

As an aside, I had a cycle training accident in 2007 that resulted in a trans tibial (lower leg) amputation.  I got back to riding and racing again and had my all time best ever season in 2011, winning several able bodied events, setting able bodied state & national records in masters team pursuiting as well as success in Australian national paracycling championships.

I've been measuring my performance with power meters for many years, and my data has been submitted for a science study write up comparing performance pre- and post-amputation.

To give some idea of what's possible and what the impacts are on performance for trans tibial amputee cyclists, below is a chart showing my pre and post amputation mean maximal power over all durations:

(http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd226/ASimmons/PowerpreandpostamputationAP.jpg)

For durations of about 4-minutes and longer, I've actually been able to match or exceed my pre-amputation power to weight ratios.  I have however had a fair dent put in my short range sprint power.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 23, 2012, 10:32:20 PM
A friend  (and former collegue), Mark Inglis, lost both his lower legs on a climb gone bed on Mt Cook in the early 80's. He took up cycling and competed in a couple of para-olympics some time ago.  I think he still rides.  I see him on facebook and occasionally at airports.  I think he has been getting aritificial limbs to Nepal of late. 

Ever met him? 

Love to hear of people that get back on the horse after a bit of trauma.  I still wear a yellow wristband put out by a guy that helped me through a very annoying round of cancer.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: lonely moa on January 23, 2012, 10:36:01 PM
My understanding of chain stretch was that it is due to the wearing down the cogs or the links in the chain, not an actual stretch, as it were.

But what do I know, I'm having major surgery next week due to crashing in the last race I was in.

Whoa, yikes. What's this now?

Mr. Evison is going to try to re-attach the supraspinatus to the head of the humerous, and bit of other repair as well.  Hope it works.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Cognoscento on January 23, 2012, 10:38:51 PM
Nice to have a professional cyclist on board. Jaypee and others have given really great advise too.
Just to clarify, I'm a professional coach (and work with some pro riders), but am not a professional cyclist myself.  I have competed up to UCI World Cup level (in 2011).

As an aside, I had a cycle training accident in 2007 that resulted in a trans tibial (lower leg) amputation.  I got back to riding and racing again and had my all time best ever season in 2011, winning several able bodied events, setting able bodied state & national records in masters team pursuiting as well as success in Australian national paracycling championships.

I've been measuring my performance with power meters for many years, and my data has been submitted for a science study write up comparing performance pre- and post-amputation.

To give some idea of what's possible and what the impacts are on performance for trans tibial amputee cyclists, below is a chart showing my pre and post amputation mean maximal power over all durations:

(http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd226/ASimmons/PowerpreandpostamputationAP.jpg)

For durations of about 4-minutes and longer, I've actually been able to match or exceed my pre-amputation power to weight ratios.  I have however had a fair dent put in my short range sprint power.

What kind of bike(s) are you riding? Someone at your level must have some nice bike porn to post up for us to drool on -right? ;D
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: quokka on January 24, 2012, 09:10:58 AM
While we are waiting for Alex's bike porn........

This guy reminds me of me.

Sh!t mountain bikers say
Shit Mountain Bikers Say (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kW7xzBC-qa0#)

Fixed!!
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 24, 2012, 03:51:36 PM
Mark Inglis, ...

Ever met him? 
No, but I'm pretty sure it's same guy that my bike fit specialist has helped out.

Love to hear of people that get back on the horse after a bit of trauma.  I still wear a yellow wristband put out by a guy that helped me through a very annoying round of cancer.
Yeah, nice.  I had a client who for a while we had trouble working out what was causing her inconsistent performance.  Turned out she had bowel cancer.  Nearly 6 years after her operation and all clear thankfully.

Me winning a major A-grade Masters race in Sydney last May:

(http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd226/ASimmons/Alexsprintwin.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 24, 2012, 03:53:57 PM
What kind of bike(s) are you riding? Someone at your level must have some nice bike porn to post up for us to drool on -right? ;D
Not sure I'd call my bikes porn.  I have 4 bikes:
1 x alu custom racing bike (7-8 years old, with corrosion everywhere, hole in top tube where cable guide broke off but I still win bike races on it)
1 x steel custom training bike (I love riding that bike, nearly 10 years old, but the rust is taking its toll)
1 x chinese carbon TT bike (put together from lots of bits, keeping costs down as much as possible)
1 x Teschner Track Pro

Here's my race bike (sans race wheels):
(http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd226/ASimmons/Protheticpic.jpg)


Here's the track bike:
(http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd226/ASimmons/IMG_0225.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 24, 2012, 04:58:40 PM
I never posted a pic of my bike It's a 1.5 triple. Bought it in the fall of 09. Really happy with it. Was looking at a 2.1 but it didn't fit me as well.

(http://www.roadcycler.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/2008-trek-1_5-black-white.jpg)
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on January 24, 2012, 06:16:30 PM
Nice to have a professional cyclist on board. Jaypee and others have given really great advise too.
Just to clarify, I'm a professional coach (and work with some pro riders), but am not a professional cyclist myself.  I have competed up to UCI World Cup level (in 2011).

As an aside, I had a cycle training accident in 2007 that resulted in a trans tibial (lower leg) amputation.  I got back to riding and racing again and had my all time best ever season in 2011, winning several able bodied events, setting able bodied state & national records in masters team pursuiting as well as success in Australian national paracycling championships.

I've been measuring my performance with power meters for many years, and my data has been submitted for a science study write up comparing performance pre- and post-amputation.

To give some idea of what's possible and what the impacts are on performance for trans tibial amputee cyclists, below is a chart showing my pre and post amputation mean maximal power over all durations:

(http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd226/ASimmons/PowerpreandpostamputationAP.jpg)

For durations of about 4-minutes and longer, I've actually been able to match or exceed my pre-amputation power to weight ratios.  I have however had a fair dent put in my short range sprint power.

Interesting. Is the reduction in sprint power a direct result of the loss of the leg or is it a result of lost conditioning during your recovery ? I guess if you stand up for a sprint your calves will be more in play than when you're sitting back spinning.

I noticed that you're in Sydney. I don't suppose you're a member of the bicycle.net.au forums ?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 24, 2012, 07:57:59 PM
Cleaned my chain and no more rust. \o/ I'm still going to get a new chain, 'cause it just sounds like a good idea. But it'll be my next paycheck treat to myself.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 24, 2012, 11:17:59 PM
Interesting. Is the reduction in sprint power a direct result of the loss of the leg or is it a result of lost conditioning during your recovery ? I guess if you stand up for a sprint your calves will be more in play than when you're sitting back spinning.
The data is best power outputs over seasons pre and post amputation, so no, not due to a loss of condition. 

The reduction in sprint power is simply due to the different muscle activation when performing maximal sprint efforts compared to regular riding (lower limb is engaged much more when sprinting), i.e. the loss of gastroc and lower limb affects the peak power I can generate.  I was able to generate 1450-1500W, but have since only been able to peak at ~1200W.

Since cycling is an aerobic sport, and not a strength sport, the loss of high force production ability has not inhibited my sustainable power (the forces in endurance cycling are quite low).
 
I noticed that you're in Sydney. I don't suppose you're a member of the bicycle.net.au forums ?
Don't know that forum, the link points to an online bike shop.  I am a member of the BNA forum, as well as several cycling training and power training forums.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: khendar on January 24, 2012, 11:21:48 PM
I noticed that you're in Sydney. I don't suppose you're a member of the bicycle.net.au forums ?
Don't know that forum, the link points to an online bike shop.  I am a member of the BNA forum, as well as several cycling training and power training forums.

Sorry typo. I did mean the BNA forums.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 25, 2012, 12:36:03 AM
Sorry typo. I did mean the BNA forums.

OK, well I'm easy to identify as I use my real name on all forums.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: WC on January 25, 2012, 02:59:47 PM
Off to get some last minute provisions, and then it's cycling up to tomorrow's starting/meeting spot, and off we go on our little two day tour though hill people country. See you guys when I get back. Or not, I think Deliverance was filmed here  :aaa:
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 25, 2012, 07:02:09 PM
Off to get some last minute provisions, and then it's cycling up to tomorrow's starting/meeting spot, and off we go on our little two day tour though hill people country. See you guys when I get back. Or not, I think Deliverance was filmed here  :aaa:
If you hear banjos, don't look back. God speed, son. God speed.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 26, 2012, 05:36:13 AM
The new chain works great, I guess the chain I had on there was pretty much destroyed by all of the stress put on it while I was experimenting with my drive train, because that chain was only a few hundred miles old.

In trying to find a new route to school/home that completely avoids the nightmare that is Chinatown traffic I managed to get seriously lost in Southie last night, and ended up being 15 minutes late for school. I think I've sort of figured out the route though, and it will be much faster and more scenic once I manage to not get lost in the rabbit-warren that is the area by the convention center.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 26, 2012, 06:55:12 AM
The new chain works great, I guess the chain I had on there was pretty much destroyed by all of the stress put on it while I was experimenting with my drive train, because that chain was only a few hundred miles old.

In trying to find a new route to school/home that completely avoids the nightmare that is Chinatown traffic I managed to get seriously lost in Southie last night, and ended up being 15 minutes late for school. I think I've sort of figured out the route though, and it will be much faster and more scenic once I manage to not get lost in the rabbit-warren that is the area by the convention center.
Don't feel bad - I got lost trying to find a route from the train to my house, and I only live about 1.5 miles from the train. In the suburbs, in my defense. Even in old suburbs, everything looks the same.

Granted, I was a bit tipsy (shut up, I know), and it was dark, and I assumed that all the streets were parallel... however, I did discover a better way home. It's only something like 1/10 of a mile longer, but I don't have to worry about traffic.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: xenu on January 26, 2012, 09:06:37 AM
I wish I could ride to work. I would have about a 9 mile ride each way. The problem is they won't let me on the airport with my bicycle.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 26, 2012, 09:08:06 AM
I wish I could ride to work. I would have about a 9 mile ride each way. The problem is they won't let me on the airport with my bicycle.
D'oh. I live 15 miles from work, but 1-1.5 miles from public transportation that allows bikes on board.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 26, 2012, 09:18:12 AM
I'm sort of starting to figure out my way to work, I avoided Chinatown this morning and got to work about 10 minutes later than I normally would but I kind of have the lay of the land now.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on January 26, 2012, 03:00:39 PM
I'm sort of starting to figure out my way to work, I avoided Chinatown this morning and got to work about 10 minutes later than I normally would but I kind of have the lay of the land now.

Eventually you start looking for longer rides anyway to get more time on the bike.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 26, 2012, 03:59:19 PM
I'm sort of starting to figure out my way to work, I avoided Chinatown this morning and got to work about 10 minutes later than I normally would but I kind of have the lay of the land now.

Eventually you start looking for longer rides anyway to get more time on the bike.
I don't think his wife would accept that excuse. It could be an amusing comedy sketch.
"Honey, where have you been all night?"
"I was, uh, spending time with friends."
"No you weren't! You were out with that trollop of a bike again, weren't you?!"
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 26, 2012, 04:37:04 PM
I'm sort of starting to figure out my way to work, I avoided Chinatown this morning and got to work about 10 minutes later than I normally would but I kind of have the lay of the land now.

Eventually you start looking for longer rides anyway to get more time on the bike.

Oh yeah, but I recently moved. From my old apartment I could take a 5mi route or an 8.5mi route, guess which one I took?
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: jaypee on January 27, 2012, 09:06:24 AM
Today is one of those days where I wished I still wore contacts. Riding through dense fog with glasses on is challenging at best.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: MikeHz on January 27, 2012, 01:47:52 PM
My boss used to ride his bike to work 15 miles each way, with lots of hills. He did this every day, including rain, whenever there wasn't snow on the road.
Title: Re: The Cycling Thread
Post by: pandamonium on January 28, 2012, 05:09:20 AM
My boss used to ride his bike to work 15 miles each way, with lots of hills. He did this every day, including rain, whenever there wasn't snow on the road.
yeah, well, your boss sounds like a show off and a jerk >:(

actually, i would love to be able to bike to work everyday. i'd save so much money on transportation. granted, i&