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General Discussions => Tech Talk => Topic started by: The Latinist on August 01, 2017, 03:42:37 PM

Title: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 01, 2017, 03:42:37 PM
Car maintenance and repair has come up a number of times in other threads, so I thought it would be interested to have a thread devoted to talking about what we're doing to and for our cars.

Some of the possible topics for discussion:

What repairs have you recently done or had done to your car?
What problems have you encountered with repairs or mechanics?
What regular maintenance do you perform on your vehicle?
What kind of idiosyncrasies does your car have?
What do you feel comfortable doing on yourself on your vehicle?
What kinds of fluids and expendables do you use?
What tips and tricks do you have for car maintenance and repair?

By all means, don't limit yourself to these topics. The sky's the limit!
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 01, 2017, 03:54:16 PM
Today I replaced the evap. purge solenoid (canister purge valve) on my 2006 VW Rabbit.  Symptoms were difficulty starting after refilling the tank (I had to fully depress the accelerator to start the car) and a large leak MIL code.  My mechanic says that a purge valve that won't close is often caused by a saturated canister, but at $16 on Amazon (vs. $60+ at the parts stores) I could replace the valve a bunch of times before I approach the cost of installing a new canister.

Sadly, I've got a catalytic converter that's dying.  A bottle of 44K stopped the smell, but it's still throwing a code and the cat rattles when jiggled, suggesting the matrix is breaking down.  I think I'll try to nurse this one as long as I can.  They aren't cheap.

I also just changed the oil.  I use Mobil 1 0W-40 and this time I put in a Mobil 1 filter instead of the usual Purolator because it was on sale and should last longer.  I usually go about 1yr/15K between oil changes, so I don't scrimp on oil and filters when I do change it.

Oh, and next oil change I need to replace the oil pan gasket.  Last time I changed the oil it was leaking significantly and, while tightening the bolts significantly slowed the leak, it's still seeping slowly.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 01, 2017, 04:06:43 PM
On my Mustang (2001 with 2003 engine), I recently replaced the environmental control panel, radio, and blower.
Brother sent me a gift card for Amazon I used to get the radio.

I recently got an older (1997) Ford Escort as a backup / more economic car for cheap.
Has a problem with the brakes and seems to be the ABS module.
Got a used one off eBay but went to examine it and looks like beyond my ability.

Jeep (1994) failed inspection and had to replace pulley, belt, rack, and rear shocks.
Bolts broke on the rear shocks so had to get a shop to replace them.

Last month was an incredibly expensive month. . . .Had to use a credit card to pay for it.

Still looking for a good backyard mechanic locally.

As far as what I feel comfortable doing, I have to eyeball it and see. Many things are not as hard as they might seem to be at first. One thing I don't feel comfortable doing is putting spark plugs in an aluminum head because it is very easy to strip the threads in the aluminum. Brakes, shocks, struts, alternator, starter, and plenty of other items are easy enough to do yourself.

Get yourself a good tool box and socket set. One item that drives me crazy is when they keep changing sizes of bolts on the same item and even bouncing between Imperial and Metric sizes. Also get yourself an OBD II reader so you can check codes.

Certain tools you don't need to get and can rent / barrow from an auto part place - this includes a rear brake tool and a pulley tool. You pay a fee which you get back when you return the tool. I would recommend that you look at the tool when you ge it. Recent pulley tool I got had stripped threads.

While I can do oil changes no sweat, Walmart charges $20 to do it for you. I cannot do it myself for cheaper than that. They also check air in your tires at the same time. My tires also come from Walmart so they will rotate them as well.

I check my oil and transmission fluid about one a week to make sure the level is good.

Right now, the passenger window needs to be replaced because it is out of its clips. Tried to glue it but did not work. Permanently in the up position as a result.  Need to also see if I can get my AC repaired. I had it tested a little and there is no power to the compressor. There is a chip I am wondering if it might be the cause but not sure if I want to continue experimenting. These repairs have had to wait because almost the whole load of the house is on my shoulders.

Ever so often I end up taking apart the upper part of the throttle body and cleaning it out. Don't use carburetor cleaner, use throttle body cleaner. On an older vehicle, use fuel injector cleaner once in a while.

Sorry it is so long.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 01, 2017, 04:29:07 PM
I have a 2011 ford ranger.
I pulled my dash out to replace a shift indicator.  When I put it all back together I lost the center dash lights for the fuel and temp gauge. Went to find new bulbs and  believe it or not ford wanted 40 dollars for them so I figured I'll just swap out the bulbs from the tach and be on my way until I can get bulbs that were cheaper. When I put it all back together half the dash lights were out in the speedometer and the good bulbs I pulled from the tach didn't work. The bulbs that I swapped to the tach worked. Looks like I might have a ground issue. It's just a plug on the back of the panel so I'm not sure where its getting its ground from but from the plug. Aug I'm going to pull it apart again and see what's going on.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 01, 2017, 04:35:28 PM
I've got the original plugs in my car.  11 years/125k miles.  Modern iridium plugs last forever.

With the use of my father-in-law's lift I've replaced brakes, fixed leaky exhaust, and the left front half-axle on my car.  Also replaced an O2 sensor.  Oh, and when the blower in my car started working on high only, I replaced the resistor module.  Got one on Amazon for $9; parts stores wanted $80+ and VW wanted $120+.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 01, 2017, 04:50:54 PM
I've got the original plugs in my car.  11 years/125k miles.  Modern iridium plugs last forever.

With the use of my father-in-law's lift I've replaced brakes, fixed leaky exhaust, and the left front half-axle on my car.  Also replaced an O2 sensor.  Oh, and when the blower in my car started working on high only, I replaced the resistor module.  Got one on Amazon for $9; parts stores wanted $80+ and VW wanted $120+.

My blower went out completely . . . I tried the resistor first actually but then pulled the blower and tested it by plugging it directly into the battery.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 01, 2017, 04:58:44 PM
My blower went out completely . . . I tried the resistor first actually but then pulled the blower and tested it by plugging it directly into the battery.

The resistor is used only to slow the fan; when it goes, the fan should still work on high speed.  I understand that it's usually not the resistor itself that goes, but the thermal fuse attached to it.  If I were more competent with a soldering iron, I probably could have replaced the fuse only.  I might have tried it still if I hadn't found such a cheap replacement unit.  I'm told that the fuse usually burns out because a gunned-up blower overheats the resistor, so when I replaced the resistor I took apart the blower, cleaned it with carb cleaner, and re-lubricated.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 01, 2017, 05:01:18 PM
My blower went out completely . . . I tried the resistor first actually but then pulled the blower and tested it by plugging it directly into the battery.

The resistor is used only to slow the fan; when it goes, the fan should still work on high speed.  I understand that it's usually not the resistor itself that goes, but the thermal fuse attached to it.  If I were more competent with a soldering iron, I probably could have replaced the fuse only.  I might have tried it still if I hadn't found such a cheap replacement unit.  I'm told that the fuse usually burns out because a gunned-up blower overheats the resistor, so when I replaced the resistor I took apart the blower, cleaned it with carb cleaner, and re-lubricated.

I have read some suggests that a blown resistor can cause the blower to go out completely. The resistor was only $20 so that it was a cheap test.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 01, 2017, 05:06:15 PM
My blower went out completely . . . I tried the resistor first actually but then pulled the blower and tested it by plugging it directly into the battery.

The resistor is used only to slow the fan; when it goes, the fan should still work on high speed.  I understand that it's usually not the resistor itself that goes, but the thermal fuse attached to it.  If I were more competent with a soldering iron, I probably could have replaced the fuse only.  I might have tried it still if I hadn't found such a cheap replacement unit.  I'm told that the fuse usually burns out because a gunned-up blower overheats the resistor, so when I replaced the resistor I took apart the blower, cleaned it with carb cleaner, and re-lubricated.

I have read some suggests that a blown resistor can cause the blower to go out completely. The resistor was only $20 so that it was a cheap test.

Cheaper to test continuity with a multimeter. ;-)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 01, 2017, 05:10:23 PM
Cheaper to test continuity with a multimeter. ;-)

I also could have pulled the damn blower out in the first place and plugged into the battery.
I actually have a multi-meter, I pulled it out and it was broke. 
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 01, 2017, 05:17:52 PM
Cheaper to test continuity with a multimeter. ;-)

I also could have pulled the damn blower out in the first place and plugged into the battery.
I actually have a multi-meter, I pulled it out and it was broke.

Haha.  Murphy's law.  Today when I went to replace the purge valve I found that someone (presumably my mechanic when fixing a previous evap leak) had replaced the hose and used ear crimp clamps in place of the factory spring clamps.  I had to put the engine cover back on, reattach the breather hoses and drive to the part store for some hose clamps before I could do the repair.

Just to be clear, I'm not meaning to be critical; I'm just sharing what I learned myself in the same situation and gently teasing.  I like talking about this stuff.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 01, 2017, 05:32:21 PM
Something stupid I did. I replaced the environment controls, thinking that was the problem. Got them for $10 off eBay.

When I finally replaced the blower though, I was only getting defrost. Took it all apart and found that I had not connected a vacuum line. Turned the key to where the blower comes on but did not turn on the engine. Would not switch to vent.

Gave up eventually though and put it all back together. Started the engine, tested the blower and got vent, defrost, and floor. I did not think about until somebody suggested that in order to have vacuum, the engine  has to be running. Once I put that vacuum line back on, it was probably fixed but did not know it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Billzbub on August 02, 2017, 05:43:14 PM
My dad keeps telling me to use Amsoil oil when I do oil changes because it is so much better.  Anyone ever heard of it?  Is this just some scam he picked up from AM radio advertisements?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 02, 2017, 05:45:57 PM
My dad keeps telling me to use Amsoil oil when I do oil changes because it is so much better.  Anyone ever heard of it?  Is this just some scam he picked up from AM radio advertisements?

I would suspect the later. I would argue that oil is oil if it is the same basic type.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 02, 2017, 06:32:12 PM
My impression is that all of the major brand synthetics are about the same, and all significantly outperform conventional mortor oil. Everything I've seen online saying Amsoil was better coukd ultimately be traced back to Amsoil or Amsoil dealers.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 02, 2017, 07:17:45 PM
My impression is that all of the major brand synthetics are about the same, and all significantly outperform conventional mortor oil. Everything I've seen online saying Amsoil was better coukd ultimately be traced back to Amsoil or Amsoil dealers.

Like you, I have a slight oil leak. As such, it does not really benefit me to use synthetics.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on August 02, 2017, 09:37:32 PM
I have a 1927 Chevy pick-up truck that is running rough. I think the timing is off but it's to spec with the manual.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Big Dave on August 03, 2017, 05:55:56 AM
I Plastidipped the grille on my FJ Cruiser, flat black with a graphite pearl metallizer. It's silver, so it looks much better with a dark grille

I also just bought some fog lights off ebay, I just have to figure out the wiring, I want them to turn on using the switch for the rear fog lights.

Sent from my D6503 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 03, 2017, 11:22:08 AM
Oh, and I'm waiting to hear back from VW about my warranty claim for rust-through.  I've got a rotted fender and one that's starting to rot, plus a left rocker panel that's nearly perforated.  We'll see how much of it they'll cover.

The corrosion warranty is 12 years/unlimited mileage.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 03, 2017, 03:05:25 PM
Oh, and I'm waiting to hear back from VW about my warranty claim for rust-through.  I've got a rotted fender and one that's starting to rot, plus a left rocker panel that's nearly perforated.  We'll see how much of it they'll cover.

The corrosion warranty is 12 years/unlimited mileage.

Bet you that they did not have New England in mind  ;D
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 03, 2017, 03:17:00 PM
Oh, and I'm waiting to hear back from VW about my warranty claim for rust-through.  I've got a rotted fender and one that's starting to rot, plus a left rocker panel that's nearly perforated.  We'll see how much of it they'll cover.

The corrosion warranty is 12 years/unlimited mileage.

Bet you that they did not have New England in mind  ;D

No, probably not.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Knightrunner on August 04, 2017, 09:20:09 AM
I used to do most of our vehicle maintenance. About two years ago we moved from a country home into the city. (For various reasons) One of the compromises included loosing my nice big shop and automotive bay.  Honestly I was ready to get out of the business. I had enough skill to take advantage of the financial savings but was never very passionate about the work.

For many years I would find used cars with scary sounding problem, buy them cheaply, then repair them into good working order. Have not had a vehicle payment  since 1997 in this fashion and always had reliable vehicles on the cheap.

I think my biggest success was buying a 1999 suburban in 2004 for $1500 because the engine "blew up". Ended up behind a blown manifold gasket. Replaced some sketchy looking plug wires and fan switch to make her good as new. Drove it until last year and put nearly 250,00 miles on it. Sold it for $1000 still in pretty good shape.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 04, 2017, 11:30:02 PM
Don't happen to know anything about the ABS system on a 1997 Ford Escort do you?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 05, 2017, 02:00:45 PM
Don't happen to know anything about the ABS system on a 1997 Ford Escort do you?

When I get into computer-controlled stuff, I feel like I've moved beyond what I can do at home.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2017, 02:27:03 PM
Don't happen to know anything about the ABS system on a 1997 Ford Escort do you?

When I get into computer-controlled stuff, I feel like I've moved beyond what I can do at home.

I ordered a Haynes (Got is for less than $4 online) and should be able to determine if it is doable.
Funny thing is that my Mustang, which is newer, does not have ABS.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 05, 2017, 02:36:10 PM
I have a subscription to AlldataDIY which gives me access to tech specs, parts diagrams, and procedures..
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2017, 02:43:44 PM
I have a subscription to AlldataDIY which gives me access to tech specs, parts diagrams, and procedures..

$30 a year / $50 for five years is a little steep for me at the moment. As well, with multiple vehicles, would hurt.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 05, 2017, 02:51:13 PM
I have a subscription to AlldataDIY which gives me access to tech specs, parts diagrams, and procedures..

$30 a year / $50 for five years is a little steep for me at the moment. As well, with multiple vehicles, would hurt.

Oh, I didn't pay that.  I think I got three years for $29.  They have promotions from time to time for new users, and if you let it expire they start throwing discounts at you.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2017, 02:52:55 PM
Oh, I didn't pay that.  I think I got three years for $29.  They have promotions from time to time for new users, and if you let it expire they start throwing discounts at you.

If you find a link to a promotion I can use, PM it to me?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 05, 2017, 02:53:43 PM
Oh, I didn't pay that.  I think I got three years for $29.  They have promotions from time to time for new users, and if you let it expire they start throwing discounts at you.

If you find a link to a promotion I can use, PM it to me?

If I get something in my E-mail, I will.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 08, 2017, 09:09:54 PM
Follow up on the purge solenoid: filled the gas tank today and started the car without incident.  Still no large leak code.  That seems to have done the trick.  Time will tell if it fails again because of a saturated canister, but for now I'm happy.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 09, 2017, 08:21:54 PM
Follow up on the purge solenoid: filled the gas tank today and started the car without incident.  Still no large leak code.  That seems to have done the trick.  Time will tell if it fails again because of a saturated canister, but for now I'm happy.

Another good reason not to top off your tank
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 09, 2017, 09:14:39 PM
Follow up on the purge solenoid: filled the gas tank today and started the car without incident.  Still no large leak code.  That seems to have done the trick.  Time will tell if it fails again because of a saturated canister, but for now I'm happy.

Another good reason not to top off your tank

Yeah, I never top off for that reason.  But the car and canister are now 11 years old...
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 09, 2017, 09:23:56 PM
Follow up on the purge solenoid: filled the gas tank today and started the car without incident.  Still no large leak code.  That seems to have done the trick.  Time will tell if it fails again because of a saturated canister, but for now I'm happy.

Another good reason not to top off your tank

Yeah, I never top off for that reason.  But the car and canister are now 11 years old...

Me too. I quit topping off about a year ago for that same reason.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 18, 2017, 07:41:29 PM
Curious, how many tools and car supplies do you carry in your car?
I have socket set, hydraulic jack (hate those jacks with the car), blanket, wrenches, four way lug wrench, tire patch kit, air pump, fuses, screwdrivers, pliers,  vice grips, and rubber hammer. Also carry extra oil, transmission fluid, brake fluid, and anti-freeze.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 18, 2017, 08:32:19 PM
What no duct tape?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 18, 2017, 09:28:15 PM
I carry the following:

1. A small tool kit containing interchangeable screw/socket driver, locking pliers, etc.
2. 20' 6AWG jumper cables
3. Assorted fuses
4. My full-sized spare tire, tire iron, and the jack.
5. Tire gauge and 12-volt DC compressor
6. Flares

I also belong to AAA.

In the winter I keep a blanket and some extra warm clothes in my car.

ETA: when my sister bought her first car, I bought her a set of heavy-duty jumper cables.  She called me up last month to tell me it was the best gift she'd ever gotten. Yep, she'd left her lights on.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 19, 2017, 06:48:15 AM
Yes I have a set of Jumper cables too. . . Forgot to mention that. Used to keep a booster pack in the car as well but it died and never bothered to replace it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 19, 2017, 08:34:01 AM
Yes I have a set of Jumper cables too. . . Forgot to mention that. Used to keep a booster pack in the car as well but it died and never bothered to replace it.

I find that there's always someone willing to give a boost as long as you've got the cables.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 19, 2017, 11:36:29 AM
Yes I have a set of Jumper cables too. . . Forgot to mention that. Used to keep a booster pack in the car as well but it died and never bothered to replace it.

I find that there's always someone willing to give a boost as long as you've got the cables.

Jumper cables should be standard equipment when you buy a car. Like a spare tire.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Belgarath on August 19, 2017, 01:17:52 PM


Jumper cables should be standard equipment when you buy a car. Like a spare tire.

The last 3 cars I've bought didn't have spare tires, but they did come with 'run flat' tires. So I wasn't too upset, although maybe I should be.

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 30, 2017, 04:57:12 PM
Have to replace the rear windshield wiper on my car.  The nut cracked broke the arm at the base.  Hardest part is going to be getting what's left of the nut off the spline; it's corroded on there pretty well.  I've got penetrating oil on it right now, and I picked up a special wiper pull tool in case it's necessary in the end.  OEM arm and cover from ECS Tuning will be cheaper than aftermarket from the parts store, and they'd have to order it anyway.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 30, 2017, 05:00:59 PM
Have to replace the rear windshield wiper on my car.  The nut cracked broke the arm at the base.  Hardest part is going to be getting what's left of the nut off the spline; it's corroded on there pretty well.  I've got penetrating oil on it right now, and I picked up a special wiper pull tool in case it's necessary in the end.  OEM arm and cover from ECS Tuning will be cheaper than aftermarket from the parts store, and they'd have to order it anyway.

Try heat on it. Might help.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 30, 2017, 05:13:17 PM
I was changing my brake fluid in my truck. I have a power bleeder and it works great. Well I was trying to loosen the bleeder screw on the caliper(Disc brakes on all 4 wheels) and like always the bastards were frozen. I got them all unfrozen except the left rear. Well I snapped the bleeder off. I got an easy out but it wouldn't budge. I tried to put heat and penetrating oil on it. No luck. So I took the caliper off and put it in a vise and got a bigger easy-out and was finally able to break it loose. Replaced the bleeder screw and put some anti-seize on the bleeder and put it back together. I figured since I had the brake apart and the brakes were getting close I figured I might as well change the brakes. That wasn't to bad. Disc brakes are so much easier to change then drum. I hope next time I have to do this I don't have this much of an issue.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 30, 2017, 05:16:25 PM
Have to replace the rear windshield wiper on my car.  The nut cracked broke the arm at the base.  Hardest part is going to be getting what's left of the nut off the spline; it's corroded on there pretty well.  I've got penetrating oil on it right now, and I picked up a special wiper pull tool in case it's necessary in the end.  OEM arm and cover from ECS Tuning will be cheaper than aftermarket from the parts store, and they'd have to order it anyway.

Try heat on it. Might help.

I will if I have to, but I'm worried about the rubber parts nearby and that contact the drive shaft.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on August 30, 2017, 05:44:17 PM
ETA: when my sister bought her first car, I bought her a set of heavy-duty jumper cables.  She called me up last month to tell me it was the best gift she'd ever gotten. Yep, she'd left her lights on.

I am now the proud owner of a new set of jumper cables for that very reason.  It was raining when I left my house and by the time I'd gotten to work it had cleared off. Sat there all day with the lights on. everybody but our maintenance tech had gone home, and he didn't have any either. We made a run to wal-mart and I got me some fancy 6AWG 20' foot cables.


Do Honda's now have a dinger when you leave your lights on? apparently with my model you can buy a certain "beeper" from Radio Shack and somehow plug it into your fuse panel. It doesn't happen to me often enough to have gone to the trouble.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 30, 2017, 05:50:17 PM
Cars should turn their lights off at most five minutes after the key is removed from the ignition.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 30, 2017, 05:59:47 PM
Cars should turn their lights off at most five minutes after the key is removed from the ignition.

I agree
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on August 30, 2017, 06:09:08 PM
Can I retro fit that on a '94 Honda Civic? half the time it doesn't even beep at me when I leave my key in the ignition and open the door. I've locked myself out of my car more than once.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 02, 2017, 11:48:42 AM
My shiny coating on my steering wheel is worn and the softer material beneath is starting to crumble.  I've ordered a stitch-on leather wrap from Amazon which should arrive this afternoon. Hopefully that will keep the padding from completely disintegrating. I'll try to get a couple of pictures during the lacing process and of the finished product.

My rear wiper is scheduled to arrive Tuesday.  Forgot about the holiday.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 02, 2017, 02:18:27 PM
My shiny coating on my steering wheel is worn and the softer material beneath is starting to crumble.  I've ordered a stitch-on leather wrap from Amazon which should arrive this afternoon. Hopefully that will keep the padding from completely disintegrating. I'll try to get a couple of pictures during the lacing process and of the finished product.

My rear wiper is scheduled to arrive Tuesday.  Forgot about the holiday.

Kind of ironic because I recently got a steering wheel cover for basically the same reason you ordered one. I went to eBay however.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 04, 2017, 03:04:05 PM
Here are some images of the wheel wrap project.  Took a lot longer than I had hoped because I had to learn the best technique for tightening, undoing several sections in the process.  It didn't come out too badly in the end, but I think I could do it better if I did it again now.

(https://i.imgur.com/kN7MTG3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YDPeJ6x.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bP4f2R2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kK5uWFL.jpg)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 04, 2017, 03:26:30 PM
Mine I had to roll onto the steering wheel because it is not a lace up type.

(http://kitsunesden.xyz/images/Steering_Wheel_Cover.jpg)

It actually was quite to fight to get it on there but firmly in place in spite of not being laced onto the wheel.

Edit: I do have a question for you. I bought some floor mats a couple of years ago and the driver side one is basically wrecked. How well do the solid rubber ones hold up?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 04, 2017, 03:33:16 PM
Mine I had to roll onto the steering wheel because it is not a lace up type.

I don't think I could stand the extra bulk of such a wrap.  Certainly it would have been easier to install, though.

Quote
Edit: I do have a question for you. I bought some floor mats a couple of years ago and the driver side one is basically wrecked. How well do the solid rubber ones hold up?

I've had the monster mats for eleven years--since I bought the car.  About 2 years ago I noticed the tread started to break off on the driver's mat, but it's still watertight.  They weren't cheap, but I think they are worth it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 04, 2017, 03:40:58 PM
I don't think I could stand the extra bulk of such a wrap.  Certainly it would have been easier to install, though.

Took me just a few minutes to get used to the extra bulk. I wish I could show you what the steering wheel looked like before I put the cover on because it was badly degrading. Too much work to take off and put back on again to bother though  :)

I've had the monster mats for eleven years--since I bought the car.  About 2 years ago I noticed the tread started to break off on the driver's mat, but it's still watertight.  They weren't cheap, but I think they are worth it.

"Monster Mats" are VW only?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 04, 2017, 03:44:34 PM
"Monster Mats" are VW only?

Yeah, it's VW's marketing term for the heavy rubber all-weather floor mats.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 04, 2017, 03:52:11 PM
"Monster Mats" are VW only?

Yeah, it's VW's marketing term for the heavy rubber all-weather floor mats.

I think Husky might be what I need to look for. . . .$70 for a front pair.
Too bad that I cannot just get the drivers side.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 04, 2017, 03:57:01 PM
"Monster Mats" are VW only?

Yeah, it's VW's marketing term for the heavy rubber all-weather floor mats.

I think Husky might be what I need to look for. . . .$70 for a front pair.
Too bad that I cannot just get the drivers side.

I think the most important thing is that they be fitted to your make and model.  I've had horrible luck with generic cut-to-fit ones.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 04, 2017, 04:06:29 PM
Been trying to do searches both on Amazon and eBay. They go stupid on me. Either they filter for every single car part available for my car or when I search for mats, they don't filter by car. After you click on something that you like the price,  they tell you that it does not fit  ???

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on September 04, 2017, 07:22:32 PM
Looks good Latinist
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 06, 2017, 09:58:36 AM
Have to replace my eight-year-old battery.  Hoping Costco stocks the right size battery to replace my MTP-91.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 06, 2017, 10:53:00 AM
Have to replace my eight-year-old battery.  Hoping Costco stocks the right size battery to replace my MTP-91.

Basically I think it is just battery size 91.

The Escort I got for cheap is suppose to have a top post battery but has side mounted posts instead. It should be using the same exact battery as my Mustang and Jeep. The previous owner put in a side post battery however and runs the risk of shorting across the chassis. Ended up putting a piece of rubber mat that I got from Dollar Tree in to prevent that until I get a new battery.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 06, 2017, 11:11:46 AM
I think the original battery was an H6.  The 91 was a tighter fit.  Costco doesn’t carry a 91, but they have a 48/H6 (which they call a “Fitment Code 29.”  Just picked one up.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on September 06, 2017, 11:17:35 AM
I always get the strongest battery that will fit in the hole
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 06, 2017, 11:52:45 AM
I always get the strongest battery that will fit in the hole

The hole is not big.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 06, 2017, 12:19:21 PM
I hate when they put batteries in the wheel wells, under the seat, etc.
Never had a car that had one but had to help people with them.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 06, 2017, 07:34:39 PM
I hate when they put batteries in the wheel wells, under the seat, etc.
Never had a car that had one but had to help people with them.

Yeah, mine's in the engine compartment, but there's not a lot of room under the hood on a Rabbit/Golf.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on September 06, 2017, 08:05:55 PM
My BMW was in the trunk in the Right rear Wheel well. It wasn't to bad but was a big mother.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 06, 2017, 08:06:43 PM
My BMW was in the trunk in the Right rear Wheel well. It wasn't to bad but was a big mother

Does that require venting?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on September 06, 2017, 08:08:37 PM
Yes it had a vent tube that went over board.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 29, 2017, 05:42:48 PM
So my battery went dead.  I assumed I’d left a light on.  Charged it up, drove to work, and it was dead when I came out at the end of the day. Last night I ran the charger and it said the battery was charged after just a couple of hours.  Left it on overnight.  Today, it wouldn’t start the car just seconds after being removed from the charger.  I think my new battery is a dud.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on October 30, 2017, 12:55:31 AM
So my battery went dead.  I assumed I’d left a light on.  Charged it up, drove to work, and it was dead when I came out at the end of the day. Last night I ran the charger and it said the battery was charged after just a couple of hours.  Left it on overnight.  Today, it wouldn’t start the car just seconds after being removed from the charger.  I think my new battery is a dud.

Should be under warranty. I just replaced my car battery as well. If I ran anything off an inverter from the accessory outlet for more than maybe about 20 minutes, I would drain the battery.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 30, 2017, 07:06:12 AM
So my battery went dead.  I assumed I’d left a light on.  Charged it up, drove to work, and it was dead when I came out at the end of the day. Last night I ran the charger and it said the battery was charged after just a couple of hours.  Left it on overnight.  Today, it wouldn’t start the car just seconds after being removed from the charger.  I think my new battery is a dud.

Should be under warranty. I just replaced my car battery as well. If I ran anything off an inverter from the accessory outlet for more than maybe about 20 minutes, I would drain the battery.

Oh, it’s definitely under warranty. Headed bavk to Costco tonight.  Going to jump the car this morning, though, and park on a slope so I can pop start it after work.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on October 30, 2017, 07:15:30 AM
Oh, it’s definitely under warranty. Headed bavk to Costco tonight.  Going to jump the car this morning, though, and park on a slope so I can pop start it after work.

My car is an automatic so can't do that.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 30, 2017, 08:08:07 AM
One of the many advantages of a manual transmission.

But, on second thought, I’ll be late for work.  Tree down across power lines at end of street.  One bright side: the guy from a street over might think twice about parking his work van right in the street there, from now on:

(https://i.imgur.com/40Yirv5.jpg)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on October 30, 2017, 11:59:30 AM
One of the many advantages of a manual transmission.

But, on second thought, I’ll be late for work.  Tree down across power lines at end of street.  One bright side: the guy from a street over might think twice about parking his work van right in the street there, from now on:

(https://i.imgur.com/40Yirv5.jpg)

The winds were interesting on my drive home and I believe winds were lower down in Virginia.
I have to cross two long bridges however on my way home.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on October 30, 2017, 12:30:27 PM
I had a 1999 BMW 5 series that would have the battery go dead every once in awhile. I checked the battery it was good put it on a load tester all checked out. It charged per the spec. Looked up what the amp draw on the battery was when off and everything checked out normal. Then I just happened to hear the cabin fan turn on, it was really quiet and if I wasn't in my garage I wouldn't have heard it. It turns out that there was a bad relay that would stick once in awhile. Had it changed and all was better. That one was a real head scratcher.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 30, 2017, 01:11:37 PM
I had a 1999 BMW 5 series that would have the battery go dead every once in awhile. I checked the battery it was good put it on a load tester all checked out. It charged per the spec. Looked up what the amp draw on the battery was when off and everything checked out normal. Then I just happened to hear the cabin fan turn on, it was really quiet and if I wasn't in my garage I wouldn't have heard it. It turns out that there was a bad relay that would stick once in awhile. Had it changed and all was better. That one was a real head scratcher.

I wondered if it was something like that, but the fact that was dead when I took the charger off makes me think it's the battery itself.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on October 30, 2017, 01:52:48 PM
I had a 1999 BMW 5 series that would have the battery go dead every once in awhile. I checked the battery it was good put it on a load tester all checked out. It charged per the spec. Looked up what the amp draw on the battery was when off and everything checked out normal. Then I just happened to hear the cabin fan turn on, it was really quiet and if I wasn't in my garage I wouldn't have heard it. It turns out that there was a bad relay that would stick once in awhile. Had it changed and all was better. That one was a real head scratcher.

I wondered if it was something like that, but the fact that was dead when I took the charger off makes me think it's the battery itself.

Just about any auto part store will test it for free
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 30, 2017, 01:59:51 PM
I had a 1999 BMW 5 series that would have the battery go dead every once in awhile. I checked the battery it was good put it on a load tester all checked out. It charged per the spec. Looked up what the amp draw on the battery was when off and everything checked out normal. Then I just happened to hear the cabin fan turn on, it was really quiet and if I wasn't in my garage I wouldn't have heard it. It turns out that there was a bad relay that would stick once in awhile. Had it changed and all was better. That one was a real head scratcher.

I wondered if it was something like that, but the fact that was dead when I took the charger off makes me think it's the battery itself.

Just about any auto part store will test it for free

That's my plan...as soon as the street is unblocked.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: moj on October 30, 2017, 02:28:12 PM
I have a 2008 honda fit but it was parked for many years when i lived 2 blocks from a metro. Now it has 43,000 miles and starting to need a little work. I took it in for a passenger air bag recall and the dealership came up with a long list of other things they wanted to do. I agree with and will change the battery myself soon, I may change the brake pads myself but never have before. I suspect much of the things on the list where the dealership is going to charge a ton for labor and not really all that pressing.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on October 30, 2017, 02:43:01 PM
I would not trust a dealer not to drag you over the coals. The only repair I ever took a car, an airbag light, they basically fed me a line.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 30, 2017, 02:46:24 PM
I have a 2008 honda fit but it was parked for many years when i lived 2 blocks from a metro. Now it has 43,000 miles and starting to need a little work. I took it in for a passenger air bag recall and the dealership came up with a long list of other things they wanted to do. I agree with and will change the battery myself soon, I may change the brake pads myself but never have before. I suspect much of the things on the list where the dealership is going to charge a ton for labor and not really all that pressing.

Brake pads aren't hard as long as you've got the tools. Remove the wheel, a few bolts remove the calipers.  Clean them with a wire brush, replace the pads, reassemble in reverse.  The main stumbling block is likely to be getting the caliper piston retracted so that you can reinstall the calipers; you may need a caliper piston tool to retract the piston so you can fit the new, thicker pad in there.

Personally, I usually replace the rotors when I replace the pads.  That's easy enough, too; once the wheel is off, they're usually just held in place by a single screw.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 30, 2017, 03:52:44 PM
Battery tested with a bad cell at the local auto parts store.  Costco took it back no questions asked.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on October 31, 2017, 09:49:06 AM
Most of the stuff a mechanic will write up are not life threatening.  Without seeing the list and looking at the car it is hard to tell if it was frivolous or stuff that was critical. It really depends on the dealership or mechanic.

Changing brake pads are straight forward. Look on YouTube will give you an idea on what you are up against. Problems come about when something goes wrong.  Example I was going to change my brake fluid but a bleed screw was frozen and it snapped off. Had to pull the caliper off and use an "EZ Out" to get the bleeder out. Otherwise it is a straight forward process.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 31, 2017, 10:46:43 AM
Changing brake pads are straight forward. Look on YouTube will give you an idea on what you are up against. Problems come about when something goes wrong.  Example I was going to change my brake fluid but a bleed screw was frozen and it snapped off. Had to pull the caliper off and use an "EZ Out" to get the bleeder out. Otherwise it is a straight forward process.

Yeah, the biggest problems are the unexpected.  Like I stripped the centering screw on my brake rotor trying to remove it.  Was finally able to get it out, but it turned a 45 minute job into a 90 minute one.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 12, 2017, 01:40:25 AM
I know you are suppose to replace them in pairs but I replaced one of my front brake rotors. The pads were worn unevenly where the drivers side was badly grooved while the passenger side was fine. The two sides wore unevenly for some reason. Going to have to keep a closer eye on the situation.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on December 12, 2017, 05:00:12 PM
I don't do anything to my car from a mechanical POV. When I was younger and cars were simpler I used to tinker a little but I was never overly mechanically minded. I do however have a very good local mechanic that specialises in my type of car - a 2007 Mark V Golf TDI. 170,000+ km on the odo.

I recently had the ECU remapped/tuned (using Elite Tuning remaps) and had the exhaust gas re-circulation unit removed. It was soot ridden.

Holy crap the performance difference is incredible. It's now more powerful than the current model Golf GTD and has better pick up than my brother's GTI.

And it's made the car drive much more nicely at low speeds. And when I do on the odd occasion decide to put the foot down, I no longer send plumes of black particulate out the exhaust. The sports mode on the DSG gearbox used to be pretty useless - it would hold a gear way too long. Now it works brilliantly - it actually needed the extra power to work as intended.

On long drives the economy hasn't changed. Did a 1600km run the other weekend. On highway I'll typically get 4.8-5.0 l/100km (47-49 mpg). On some days I'l get that to 4.1l/100km (57mpg) - tailwinds help!

I have been truly amazed at how much better the car is as a result of such a fairly simple modification. Cost was ~A$1100 (~US$850).
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Friendly Angel on December 12, 2017, 05:44:57 PM
I watched a video of an Australian guy who had 999,999 km on his car and he recorded the odometer expecting it to turn over to 000 or maybe 1,000,000 (digital display he wasn't sure if it had the ability).  So he was driving around trying to get it to do something and then he realized it was just going to stay at 999,999 forever.

I changed the wiper blades on my minivan.  And the air filter.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 20, 2017, 06:46:22 PM
Anybody ever have a convertible and replace the rag top yourself?

Looking at a used 1991 Mustang as a backup car. The mechanic he uses is the same one I used and has known the guy 25 years. The mechanic (Who is my roommate's uncle and has never steered me wrong)  has worked on it for years and says it is a good car.

It is a convertible though and the top needs to be replaced. Wondering how hard it is?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: MTBox on December 20, 2017, 08:11:49 PM
Rag tops are easy, as long as you take it slowly and make sure to hit the mounting points dead on. It's like putting a fitted sheet on a bed; if you are short on one corner, then the entire thing is off-kilter. If you are not sure, then take the new top to the body shop and let them change it out for you.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 21, 2017, 03:38:46 AM
Rag tops are easy, as long as you take it slowly and make sure to hit the mounting points dead on. It's like putting a fitted sheet on a bed; if you are short on one corner, then the entire thing is off-kilter. If you are not sure, then take the new top to the body shop and let them change it out for you.

I am competent to do most reasonable repairs. Some major repairs I do have trouble with but it does not sound like it is truly major.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: MTBox on December 21, 2017, 02:59:05 PM
A Rag Top replacement is easy. Installing one for the first time is harder; putting on the attachment fittings, drilling holes, lining up things that will be under strain once installed, etc, is much harder.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 24, 2017, 02:55:39 AM
Question with car stereos.

I replaced the car stereo in my main car with one that is a cd player with a blutooth receiver. I have used the cd player once but mostly just use the blutooth.

Considering for the new car I want to get and the jeep getting radios with no cd player but just blutooth? Thoughts? They are only about $20. Second, should I get two different brands if I do to avoid conflict issues?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on December 24, 2017, 11:09:49 AM
I haven't used the CD player in my car in years.  Now that I think about it, I wonder if I've still got some disks in there.

I'm not sure what you mean about "conflict issues."  Could you explain what you're worried about?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 24, 2017, 02:13:17 PM
I was driving the Jeep and found that I had a Great Courses CD in it  >:D

It may be a nothing that I am worried about with conflicts. Being that I am having trouble articulating the issue it is probably even more likely.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: MTBox on December 24, 2017, 04:22:21 PM
You can get a separate multi-disk player that installs in the trunk, later, as long as you shop for a head unit that provides for expansion.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 25, 2017, 02:54:45 AM
You can get a separate multi-disk player that installs in the trunk, later, as long as you shop for a head unit that provides for expansion.

Why bother these days when a cell phone can hold thousands of albums?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on December 25, 2017, 12:28:10 PM
You can get a separate multi-disk player that installs in the trunk, later, as long as you shop for a head unit that provides for expansion.

Why bother these days when a cell phone can hold thousands of albums?

If you have the right radio. My wife's VW has blue tooth and it is excellent for playing off a phone. As soon as you get in the car it picks up where you left off.
My truck does not have blue tooth so I have to plug it in to play through the radio. It's a pain but it works.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on December 25, 2017, 03:50:50 PM
You can get a separate multi-disk player that installs in the trunk, later, as long as you shop for a head unit that provides for expansion.

Why bother these days when a cell phone can hold thousands of albums?

If you have the right radio. My wife's VW has blue tooth and it is excellent for playing off a phone. As soon as you get in the car it picks up where you left off.
My truck does not have blue tooth so I have to plug it in to play through the radio. It's a pain but it works.
I had an after market bluetooth system fitted to my car many years ago - it connects with the existing stereo (plus they add a roof mic and small controller for some basic functions when managing calls or when managing music) and means I can play music / podcasts etc on my phone through the car's existing stereo, as well as make/receive hands free phone calls as well as use Siri. Cost a few hundred $. I don't think the CD player has ever had a CD in it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on December 25, 2017, 03:55:54 PM
My 2006 Rabbit doesn’t have Bluetooth, of course.  I use a Jabra Cruiser Bluetooth to FM speakerphone and streaming solution. I get FM quality streaming, which is good enough for my use, especially sinc eIm mostly listening to podcasts these days.

My next car will have CarPlay.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 26, 2017, 02:29:48 AM
I had an after market bluetooth system fitted to my car many years ago - it connects with the existing stereo (plus they add a roof mic and small controller for some basic functions when managing calls or when managing music) and means I can play music / podcasts etc on my phone through the car's existing stereo, as well as make/receive hands free phone calls as well as use Siri. Cost a few hundred $. I don't think the CD player has ever had a CD in it.

You can now get a CD player / bluetooth care stereo for $40 to $50 and one with just the bluetooth for around $20.


Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on December 28, 2017, 03:02:57 PM
Anybody know how accurate/reliable those tire pressure indicator lights are? It seems that once it gets down to below 10F for a while the light comes on, and I just wonder how sensitive they are. If I put air in the tire to turn off the light, how over inflated is it going to be when it get back above freezing?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on December 28, 2017, 05:42:36 PM
Anybody know how accurate/reliable those tire pressure indicator lights are? It seems that once it gets down to below 10F for a while the light comes on, and I just wonder how sensitive they are. If I put air in the tire to turn off the light, how over inflated is it going to be when it get back above freezing?

Your manual will say at what level the TPMS will light. There are so many different systems that it’s impossible to make a general statement about it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on December 28, 2017, 08:21:12 PM
(http://www.ozoneasylum.com/imagestore/rtfm.gif)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on December 29, 2017, 01:33:31 AM
Anybody know how accurate/reliable those tire pressure indicator lights are? It seems that once it gets down to below 10F for a while the light comes on, and I just wonder how sensitive they are. If I put air in the tire to turn off the light, how over inflated is it going to be when it get back above freezing?
Given volume and amount of molecules of air in the tyre doesn't change, then the pressure increase will be proportional to the rise in absolute temperature (i.e temperature above absolute zero).

e.g. increase temp from 10F to 70F, converting to Kelvin
10F = 261K
70F = 294K

The tyre air pressure will rise by (294-261)/261 = 12.6%
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 29, 2017, 08:05:43 AM
With the "Check Engine" light, I will get a code once in a while, sometimes the same code and other times different codes. Just got one today but think it is because of the cold. If I get it again in a short period of time, they I will start looking at a cause.

I was thinking though that if you took your car to the shop every time you get a "Check Engine" light, they would rake you over the coals in terms of cost. Seems like you really need to have a reader yourself and have to make your own judgement calls.

Thoughts?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: DonA on December 29, 2017, 08:24:36 AM
With the "Check Engine" light, I will get a code once in a while, sometimes the same code and other times different codes. Just got one today but think it is because of the cold. If I get it again in a short period of time, they I will start looking at a cause.

I was thinking though that if you took your car to the shop every time you get a "Check Engine" light, they would rake you over the coals in terms of cost. Seems like you really need to have a reader yourself and have to make your own judgement calls.

Thoughts?

Having a reader is helpful.  A lot of times the fix is something simple you can do on your own (e.g. changing a filter or cleaning a part).  I've learned a lot using a reader, YouTube, and repair manuals.

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on December 29, 2017, 10:48:46 AM
I second getting a reader.  I’ll post later the Little WiFi reader I’ve got that works perfectly and gives all kinds of details.  I’ve changed O2 sensors and the canister purge valve myself because of codesmyself.  Very worthwhile investment of less than $20.

One thing to remember is that the CEL is actually an emissions light.  It’s not about a malfunction in the engine that’s going to cause imminent failure or anything, but a failure in the emissions control system; while it sometimes indicates a problem that if left unfixed could affect the engine, usually it’s just a problem with the evaporative recovery system.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on December 29, 2017, 11:13:27 AM
Anybody know how accurate/reliable those tire pressure indicator lights are? It seems that once it gets down to below 10F for a while the light comes on, and I just wonder how sensitive they are. If I put air in the tire to turn off the light, how over inflated is it going to be when it get back above freezing?
Given volume and amount of molecules of air in the tyre doesn't change, then the pressure increase will be proportional to the rise in absolute temperature (i.e temperature above absolute zero).

e.g. increase temp from 10F to 70F, converting to Kelvin
10F = 261K
70F = 294K

The tyre air pressure will rise by (294-261)/261 = 12.6%

(https://redwinecats.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/science.jpg)

Thanks you guys, I'll take a look at the manual and then find my pressure gauge, and fill the tires until the temps rise a little and then back them off if I need to.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on December 29, 2017, 01:33:05 PM
This is the code reader I use.  It creates its own WiFi network that you can join on your device.  There are apps for Android and iPhone which not only give details for each code and reset codes, but also fun things like give real-time tachymetry and even timing your 0-60.  It paid for itself on the first use, too.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075FQH8JR/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_rIOrAbXBT0GY1
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 29, 2017, 02:09:07 PM
I just have a wired OBD2 scanner myself that gives basic codes. Have the book but I tend to usually just Google the codes.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on December 29, 2017, 02:32:35 PM
I just have a wired OBD2 scanner myself that gives basic codes. Have the book but I tend to usually just Google the codes.

I was surprised to see that there was a lot more information available through this app, including things like miles since reset, raw readings of O2 sensors, etc.  Very interesting stuff.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on December 29, 2017, 04:04:25 PM
When I get a check eng light I erase it first and then if it comes back I try to figure it out. It could be a one time fault. (You would be surprised on how many times we do this on airplanes.) Also just because you get a fault it dosen't mean that that is the issue. Sometimes it is a symptom of another fault. You tube and BB are a big help in figuring it out.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 30, 2017, 02:21:08 AM
The problem I see if that a person who does not want to learn anything about their car will then be at the mercy of mechanics.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 31, 2017, 03:12:15 PM
I was  told by by somebody that if you polish a set of headlights, you will then end up having to polish them against every few months. Anybody hear the same thing? If so, might be better just to replace them.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on December 31, 2017, 03:45:55 PM
I was  told by by somebody that if you polish a set of headlights, you will then end up having to polish them against every few months. Anybody hear the same thing? If so, might be better just to replace them.
About 3 years ago I had a treatment done to the outer glass of my headlights which made them look like new - they did have a pretty cloudy look about them. But they've since reverted to a slightly cloudy look.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on December 31, 2017, 05:29:17 PM
My impression is that all of the major brand synthetics are about the same, and all significantly outperform conventional mortor oil. Everything I've seen online saying Amsoil was better coukd ultimately be traced back to Amsoil or Amsoil dealers.

Like you, I have a slight oil leak. As such, it does not really benefit me to use synthetics.
If it’s possible the oil will ever run low then synthetics are much better


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Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on December 31, 2017, 05:30:20 PM
I was  told by by somebody that if you polish a set of headlights, you will then end up having to polish them against every few months. Anybody hear the same thing? If so, might be better just to replace them.
About 3 years ago I had a treatment done to the outer glass of my headlights which made them look like new - they did have a pretty cloudy look about them. But they've since reverted to a slightly cloudy look.
Our local car wash does them if you get the super-delux wash


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Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on December 31, 2017, 05:33:50 PM
This is the code reader I use.  It creates its own WiFi network that you can join on your device.  There are apps for Android and iPhone which not only give details for each code and reset codes, but also fun things like give real-time tachymetry and even timing your 0-60.  It paid for itself on the first use, too.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075FQH8JR/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_rIOrAbXBT0GY1
That’s a very useful link.  I looked at several a few weeks ago and they all had a scene where you could see the code on your smartphone but a translation or anything else required using their pay per use service


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Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on December 31, 2017, 05:37:18 PM
With the "Check Engine" light, I will get a code once in a while, sometimes the same code and other times different codes. Just got one today but think it is because of the cold. If I get it again in a short period of time, they I will start looking at a cause.

I was thinking though that if you took your car to the shop every time you get a "Check Engine" light, they would rake you over the coals in terms of cost. Seems like you really need to have a reader yourself and have to make your own judgement calls.

Thoughts?
I was going to get a meter but the local Cragens auto parts store did free code check and reports. I’m thinking about getting the one Latinist linked to


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Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on January 06, 2018, 10:14:28 AM
This is the code reader I use.  It creates its own WiFi network that you can join on your device.  There are apps for Android and iPhone which not only give details for each code and reset codes, but also fun things like give real-time tachymetry and even timing your 0-60.  It paid for itself on the first use, too.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075FQH8JR/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_rIOrAbXBT0GY1
Ordered and on the way!


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Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 02, 2018, 12:42:03 PM
In December, I bought a 1991 Mustang as a backup car.

The battery drained to nothing. Tested battery and turned out to not be battery. Thought it was the alternator is ordered a new one. Turned out to be completely the wrong alternator. It appears as if the previous owner put a higher output alternator on the engine. At the same time, found that one of the wires was corroded.

Had a hell of a time finding what the model of the alternator actually but was able to get it tested and it tested fine as well. Redid the wiring and seems to be doing alright.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: John Albert on April 05, 2018, 04:44:24 PM
I'm considering buying one of these OBD-II port readers. Anybody have experience with them?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrgdxq3rP0g
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on April 05, 2018, 06:48:10 PM
They are nice but its not a magic bullet. You still have to research the codes and then figure out what is wrong. They are worth getting IMO.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: John Albert on April 05, 2018, 07:39:14 PM
They are nice but its not a magic bullet. You still have to research the codes and then figure out what is wrong. They are worth getting IMO.

Right. I'd just be using it as a preliminary measure.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 05, 2018, 10:52:50 PM
I have found mine to be pretty useful.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: BilLumberg on April 06, 2018, 11:04:56 AM
There are bluetooth ones that work with a smartphone that can be found for around $10. There are several apps available for the interface. There are free ones that allow you to read and clear codes and even have some live data.
It is important to research what it takes to set any codes you may find. Just because you have a code for lets say a vehicle speed sensor (VSS) in the powertrain control module (PCM). It may or may not be the sensor depending on how the system works. For example, on a mid '90s ford truck it is very common to have a code for the VSS in the PCM but not the anti-lock brake system (ABS). The signal goes from the VSS on the rear differential to the speedometer head (PSOM). The PSOM then sends VSS signal to the ABS and the PCM, but it modifies the signal to the PCM. The part of the PSOM that modifies the signal fails and now you have a code in the PCM for no VSS, but the sensor is perfectly fine.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on April 07, 2018, 06:48:21 PM
I'm considering buying one of these OBD-II port readers. Anybody have experience with them?

We spent quite a bit of time on this upthread, starting with this post (https://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,49064.msg9544320.html#msg9544320).  I linked to the code reader I use there.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 16, 2018, 12:02:44 PM
Having an issue with the Jeep, my backup vehicle overheating. There are suppose to be three temperature sensors on my jeep
Found this post on a forum
The 4.0L's have 3 temperature sensors. One on the block for the computer, one at the rear of the cylinder head for the gage, one on the thermostat housing for the cooling fan.
I can find the front one easily but cannot find the others
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: BilLumberg on April 16, 2018, 12:42:05 PM
What year and model is the jeep? If the fan is not running it could be the relay. Quite often they are the same as other systems, usually all together in the underhood fuse center. Easy to swap it with one for the horn or something else to test.

Here is a link for a site that has free wiring diagrams and TSBs. You just need to fill out the form for access.

http://www.bbbind.com/tsb-wiring-diagrams/
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 16, 2018, 12:51:19 PM
Thanks. I will check it out. 1994 Jeep Cherokee Sport.

Going to at least try replacing the sensor I know where it is. I believe it talks to the computer from the description of the part. The fan has been coming on however. I believe I heard water flowing noises as well so probably not the  pump or thermostat. I think I bought a "fail safe" thermostat anyway.

The think that is funny is that I just stopped the jeep and maybe ten minutes afterwards my roommate, against my arguments , opened the radiator. I am wondering if it overheating at all.

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 30, 2018, 07:09:47 PM
Been a while. Have been working on a convertible 1991 Ford Mustang as a backup car.  Bought it in January for $900. My mechanic, who did much of the work on the car, stated that it was still a good car.

Convertible top was a pain in the butt to replace. It was trashed so had to be replaced. Didn't get it perfect but seems to at least work and hopefully will at least last me a few years. Could not afford to pay a professional to do it.

Drivers side window stopped working but I tapped on the motor with a rubber hammer (suggestion from my mechanic) and now works. In the long run I will probably have to replace the motor. Passenger side could be opened from the drivers but not passenger side. Just had to splice a wire in that case however. 

I also replaced the stereo system/ Had a high wattage system with an amplifier from hell. The person who put it in also cut into the original wiring harness and wanted to restore that. New stereo system has blue tooth which lets me listen to my cell phone.

Redid the wiring to the alternator because not wired the best. When the previous owner had the stereo system put in, put in a higher amp alternator.

One of the vent covers was missing. Could get used ones online through eBay but they wanted something like $45. Had to be in  a town some distance away from home that has a junk yard specializing in Mustangs and trucks. Able to find one that match and able to pull them and repair that problem. Replaced the passenger side mirror as well.

Replaced the drives seat bracket but I have had that issue with that type of Mustang in the past. Got some cheap seat covers to cover the seat. Actually they are really nice seat covers that came from a bargain outlet.

Replaced the original cigarette lighter and ash tray with a twin accessory outlet and twin USB outlet.  The twin outlet was actually designed for marine use but works well.

There are a number of minor issues I have had to work on. They have not been major although they take time. There a few other minor issues that I had to still do. Still, I have driven it to work a few times. Worst job was the convertible top.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on May 31, 2018, 08:46:30 PM
My key fob for my truck stopped working (ford 3 button). This just opens the door. I changed the battery still no luck. Bought 2 new ones on ebay for 5 dollars. Went to reprogram the 2 new ones and just for grins reprogram the old one too. Now they all work.  Not sure why the original one stopped working.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: DonA on June 01, 2018, 06:42:21 AM
My key fob for my truck stopped working (ford 3 button). This just opens the door. I changed the battery still no luck. Bought 2 new ones on ebay for 5 dollars. Went to reprogram the 2 new ones and just for grins reprogram the old one too. Now they all work.  Not sure why the original one stopped working.

When the battery in a fob gets "low", it can sometimes mess with the programming. 


This weekend I need to do some troubleshooting on my Jeep.  The left tail light (running light) isn't working when I turn on the lighting system.  Brake light and turn signals are working fine (all same light-bulb).  I swapped out the bulb the other day, just to confirm is wasn't the bulb.  Some work on Google U suggests that I check the fuses 1st. So that's where I'll start.  Hoping that will fix it.  I don't want to get in to trying to find a wiring issue.

Next on the list will be new tires.   
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on June 01, 2018, 08:08:49 AM
My key fob for my truck stopped working (ford 3 button). This just opens the door. I changed the battery still no luck. Bought 2 new ones on ebay for 5 dollars. Went to reprogram the 2 new ones and just for grins reprogram the old one too. Now they all work.  Not sure why the original one stopped working.

When the battery in a fob gets "low", it can sometimes mess with the programming.   

I did not know that
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 08, 2018, 01:00:28 PM
Need to take my car in for some suspension work.  Fortunately, I had the whole suspension replaced with a lifetime warranty, so I should be good.

I need to replace my cat as well. I should be able to do that myself, as it’s bolt-on.  But they aren’t cheap.

And now an airbag light is on, which probably means diagnostics that can only be done at the dealership.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on June 08, 2018, 01:28:19 PM
Need to take my car in for some suspension work.  Fortunately, I had the whole suspension replaced with a lifetime warranty, so I should be good.

I need to replace my cat as well. I should be able to do that myself, as it’s bolt-on.  But they aren’t cheap.

And now an airbag light is on, which probably means diagnostics that can only be done at the dealership.

I would check some websites because they give what the flashing codes for airbags are for many cars and what solutions are.
My experience with dealers and airbags is that the charge money while not doing crap.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on June 08, 2018, 01:29:19 PM
Need to take my car in for some suspension work.  Fortunately, I had the whole suspension replaced with a lifetime warranty, so I should be good.

I need to replace my cat as well. I should be able to do that myself, as it’s bolt-on.  But they aren’t cheap.

And now an airbag light is on, which probably means diagnostics that can only be done at the dealership.

Cat? Catalytic converter?

Or maybe get a dog?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on June 20, 2018, 06:12:54 PM
I went to Walmart today to get two new front tires for the 1991 Mustang.
They were badly dry rotted.
The previous owner put 195/55R15 on the front and 235/55R15 on the rear.

One of the recommended sizes was 205/65R15.
Was going to do the front this week and wait a few weeks to do the rears.
They would not just change the front, claiming safety issue.
Not finding any real support for that.

Ended up going to a used tire shop where I got 195/65R15 all around.
Four used tires was about the same as two new but they only had one 205/65R15.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on July 11, 2018, 12:50:04 AM
The old give the headlights a quick spuce up with toothpaste trick....

Before
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/wXjGKB90Khin3E10LL_LpSa9vOGrAaAzA7DOk1xY9EYRpeP1fKnOvwmCtBzmh5MQ6Tpqid0csdtVzm_jCSdd3V18Pcnim0NrhxTelOjd3z6CK7WbjoaEN3xLdZh9cTApikpRisoywI9b4zIZefvkcaomSbgU2kVohosSHn2GTxnGtnNYjqmtMGUYuGcYqwF8z0CDxQKHoEAXpHgRTz3_GsFHNQKdt1HyifCdkRiIF494RubUwktCleaCjhlUJ5y_ib9N4jEMPuc6woxX09QOJX1mOaEq6PCDjAmbaK7WqvP8bsRT1SLvfFTV3rCUFZoiu9t0UAzH-fnzy_GuV4CuHX8AmdwBt792DnIThuWwrdEXC0iyVp4xVBJ34Fshm2iCQ92ZGUp0CvvbHS64m1fLMSvdvGyfQtZbdEnoFC-Dq1dXor5u_B-HZ38fWDVIJmzVIl6bVEdYQ1PLaC7bfE9qOxSeNp0vymwAbBetE73GN0kRT1k4QnoBeKrkuyYituW26gLO_qrTgz1vYPKfXmI9bGGgAc9WV_1DcCNDdJKBS0a60VM8RFfOpUf8NfIE_3OG33r5Lt6iNgxEk8xgYYYSMrgbw7wY5rVuLPO8qVQ=w1284-h964-no)

After
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/TMqyZhF9nF3vr-hLZZ2GxuXyEAksKF6jr56m1QPIFoo0pUmqY5nVDbimkgK1Q0g_LLKxmzs1pCSMiPwZ2f1vNC3QjkhHuMItpDhT0ZzhBdkLAsjg8C1hr1wNlshMjuowQDerwEKLuLf8CR1PP9URnogSOOocDPOh0uQHF_2Xhyp0-dfqZoyiIJD-zYytMzO879DIuSS9z4YpyB_QKo1rMsEcgMm3-g91Itw4UdbpKPEfaXCMU6cayxaZL6YMtDJd9HRmecmKtcUP_x5v_9bh4v6V_YUD57aEs3nKt1-n6aaQnSmzJjnQvCVbPXxvXQwvpqs2mq-qSdumLqGLUtAIKr0nNAmX8X607q6KaKLAYee7ne-Guf0hrEE0Uh7550UqNuNZw--AtdcAVl9KW2CufP0q2gTGLdijLCKBFk9pQAalM_H9QC9v1dnX6oV3woafuY4Iy-du_Y0ocFlwc3osfJkjB6VINRRYPXZz0PmfJpl_dC3sayf6nmrxM6A5nhF9_G8WiX76RfbNPfnuLrag2UBDtJv-e01yiMRTmUZoE9wL2olZn3HJGOOuhe3TXrpTReINrSOTsibf4FNyfXEkBJLZIeHNYmxRG8JunQ0=w1284-h964-no)

Could probably use another going over but they look way better now. Put a little wax on after I was done.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on July 11, 2018, 01:30:22 AM
Looks good Alex
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on July 11, 2018, 09:23:11 AM
Can’t see your photo, Alex.  What’s your technique with the toothpaste?  I’ve tried special buffing compound before but found it hasn’t really fixed my issue.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on July 11, 2018, 04:36:23 PM
Can’t see your photo, Alex.  What’s your technique with the toothpaste?  I’ve tried special buffing compound before but found it hasn’t really fixed my issue.
Photos appear on my feed OK.

Nothing special "technique" wise.

Wash the lamps
Smear toothpaste over lamp surface
Stick micro fibre cloth onto random orbital sander (holds fast onto sander's velcro like base)
Run sander over the lights
Wash the lamps and dry
Bit of wax and buff. I only have a spray on wax, think I'd prefer a regular tin of car wax.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on July 11, 2018, 04:43:53 PM
Can’t see your photo, Alex.  What’s your technique with the toothpaste?  I’ve tried special buffing compound before but found it hasn’t really fixed my issue.
Here's alternative links:

Before:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/6EAujTaBvMXXwoxR7

After:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/rtgv3XNHWGWNNqBr5
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Friendly Angel on July 11, 2018, 05:15:22 PM
I once had a car with a headlamp chamber that would collect rainwater - somehow the water would get in there and get up to about half way up the lens - it was really weird - and only on one side.  I couldn't figure out how it got in there, so I didn't know how to stop it.  But I wound up just drilling a little weep hole in the bottom to let it run out.

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on July 11, 2018, 05:26:26 PM
In my experience, when the problem is hotlink protection the poster often doesn’t know because the images are in his cache.

I don’t have an orbital sander, but I do have an oscillating multitool that would probably work as well.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on July 11, 2018, 08:21:16 PM
TIL about the "Italian Tune-Up". I have doing basically only urban driving for the past four months, and was having sluggishness and misfire codes. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_tuneup)

I also learned about "gear pulls", and that my Kia redlines in 1st at ~45 MPH and can go 75 MPH in 2nd...
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on July 12, 2018, 07:13:13 PM
In my experience, when the problem is hotlink protection the poster often doesn’t know because the images are in his cache.
I was confused as another had viewed them OK. The google photo links are ridiculously long though.

I don’t have an orbital sander, but I do have an oscillating multitool that would probably work as well.
I saw one video where they used a Dremel with a soft buffing attachment. They did say to make sure it was on a low speed setting.
Others simply used a toothbrush.

There are UV protection coatings you can get to apply.

Some differences probably in what you should do depending if lights are glass or plastic. Mine are glass. I saw a plastic lens treatment where they used varying and increasing grades of wet & dry paper to clean and then smooth the lens and then apply a UV clear coat spray on.

Don't know how long it will last. It was what i call a quick and dirty lazy man's approach. I had a professional treatment done about 4 years ago and they looked really good then but eventually it yellowed up again.

New replacement lights are $250 on ebay plus fitting which may not be something I can do, not sure.
$1 of toothpaste and tools I already had seemed a reasonable interim measure.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on July 12, 2018, 07:37:42 PM
I believe my lenses are polycarbonate.  I used a commercial paste and microfiber cloths with some success a while back.

The worry with an oscillating multitool is that its vibration pattern is fixed in an arc, as opposed to the random movement of an orbital sander.  It therefore has the danger of leaving scratches in an arc-shaped pattern.  I might give it a try in a concealed corner of the lens first.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on July 13, 2018, 03:00:30 PM
One of my vehicles is a 1994 Jeep Cherokee (4x4 - 4.0 liter engine(
It is my work / carry vehicle and use it to carry my kayak.

Have been having an overheating issue. Doesn't overheat quickly but overheats slowly over time.
Replaced the radiator a few years ago.
Replaced the sensor, thermostat, clutch fan, electric fan, fan housing, and flushed the system. 
I have a new radiator that I am going to see if the one I have got clogged. When the new radiator was #50, less than getting the old one checked.

Newest problem is that I took it out to go kayaking - On way home brake light came on. Looked under and saw that the bake line to the rear driver side was rusted out. Replaced it with no leaks - in bleeding it could not get the bleed valve out with the rear drum cylinder, replaced it, and bled three out of four sides - bleed valve in the from driver caliper broke off. Still getting a brake light though. Disconnected the sensor under the master brake cylinder which is suppose to detect an imbalance in the system  and went off. Not sure if I should try to tap out the old bleed value or replace the left front caliper - It is 20+20 core.

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on July 17, 2018, 06:51:02 PM
I believe my lenses are polycarbonate.  I used a commercial paste and microfiber cloths with some success a while back.

The worry with an oscillating multitool is that its vibration pattern is fixed in an arc, as opposed to the random movement of an orbital sander.  It therefore has the danger of leaving scratches in an arc-shaped pattern.  I might give it a try in a concealed corner of the lens first.
Just an update. Last couple of nights I've driven and first real chance to see if I notice a difference with my headlights. The answer is yes, the road ahead does appear somewhat brighter than it had before. Whiter.

Conscious that I don't have any objective evidence or measures and perhaps I believe it to be better because i did something to my lights but it definitely seemed brighter last night. I live in regional/rural area so the road between my home and town is unlit. Even if it isn't objectively brighter, at least the car looks better! It's getting a clean today, heading off on a road trip tomorrow.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on July 20, 2018, 06:08:39 PM
I replaced the passenger side caliper and bled the brakes.
Finally got the brake light to go out.
Probably want to replace the driver side next time I replace the pads.

Still having an issue with the temperature however.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on August 04, 2018, 12:37:25 PM
I changed the spark plugs & ignition coils. No more misfire codes; throttle response is much smoother.

(https://i.imgur.com/Dk9F6Tx.jpg)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 04, 2018, 01:27:45 PM
I’ve ordered a cat as well as an oil pan gasket, and will be using my father-in-law’s lift on Tuesday to install.  It should go on easily enough; my only worry is getting the old one off without breaking the bolts that haven’t been touched in 12 years.  Oil change at the same time as the gasket change, obviously. Hopefully with the new cat it will pass my overdue emissions test.

In small engine news, I bought a carb rebuild kit on Amazon for about $6 and yesterday rebuilt the carburetor on my defunct power trimmer.  It now starts and idles, but I’m having trouble keeping it running under throttle.  I’m going to ask my father-in-law for help troubleshooting it.  I suspect that it’s the gas tank vent that’s the issue.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 04, 2018, 04:28:43 PM
Had new brake disks and pads fitted last week and a few months ago replaced the intake manifold. Not remotely something I'd ever attempt myself (like most things with the car).

On my road trip a couple of weeks back I was visiting a much colder climate and the battery died (it was a -8C overnight and I had been thinking the battery seemed like it was heading that way before leaving as I'd noticed a slight hesitation when starting), so my brother & I did swap in a new one. He's way more mechanically minded with cars and stuff than I ever was/am. Not that a battery change is complicated but we needed a youtube vid to work out how to remove the battery, there was no obvious visible clamp and things are pretty tightly packed in today's engine bays. Once we saw what to do we got there (needed to remove an air intake pipe first)!

I'm planning to get another car say in 18-24 months. By then mine will have well over 200,000km. The question is whether or not to keep it as well. The diesel engine will probably last at least double that. The DSG gearbox will be due a service next year.

It's in very sound condition, I'm the only owner and have kept it well serviced and had any mechanical issues attended to. It drives amazingly well and goes like a rocket. It's brilliant on the highway. Late last year I had the engine management system retuned and it was an amazing transformation in power with little impact on economy. An astonishing improvement really.

If I was to keep it I'd like the internal upholstery redone as that's beginning to come away in places. If I were really thinking of keeping it I might also change the centre radio console for a modern screen system with mapping, bluetooth and reversing camera.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 04, 2018, 07:37:37 PM
I really don't like having a car payment so I want to keep my vehicles as long as possible.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 05, 2018, 03:07:31 AM
I really don't like having a car payment so I want to keep my vehicles as long as possible.
It's a matter of whether the newer car payment is less than the cost of keeping an old vehicle running.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2018, 08:15:56 AM
I really don't like having a car payment so I want to keep my vehicles as long as possible.
It's a matter of whether the newer car payment is less than the cost of keeping an old vehicle running.

I don't know if I have seen cases where repairs on a car will run more than a new car.
Granted, you get a lot of better features with a new car.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 05, 2018, 01:30:39 PM
Was riding my motorcycle to work and smelled fuel. I looked down and my bike was leaking fuel on the ground. I got to work and when I had a chance looked it over and I couldn't find a leak. Drove home no leak. That weekend I started it up and sure enough there was the leak again. Tore it apart and no leak.
I have a BMW 1150R so it has fuel injection.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 05, 2018, 01:48:29 PM
I really don't like having a car payment so I want to keep my vehicles as long as possible.
It's a matter of whether the newer car payment is less than the cost of keeping an old vehicle running.

I don't know if I have seen cases where repairs on a car will run more than a new car.
Granted, you get a lot of better features with a new car.

You can spend a lot of money repairing a car before you match the cost of a new one.  Sure, if the engine or transmission goes it could cost more than the car is worth in asking le shot and might not make sense to do the repair.  But especially if you can do some work yourself it’s hard to beat a payment-free car.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2018, 02:33:31 PM
You can spend a lot of money repairing a car before you match the cost of a new one.  Sure, if the engine or transmission goes it could cost more than the car is worth in asking le shot and might not make sense to do the repair.  But especially if you can do some work yourself it’s hard to beat a payment-free car.

My 1987 mustang went zero compression. It would have cost me around $2000 for a new engine.
Got a 2001 mustang for $1800. In most cases, this is not the case though.

Edit: Friday got side swiped. More scratches than anything else but hoping to get his insurance to pay for it. I was in my lane and he changed lanes into me.


Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 05, 2018, 05:47:15 PM
I really don't like having a car payment so I want to keep my vehicles as long as possible.
It's a matter of whether the newer car payment is less than the cost of keeping an old vehicle running.

I don't know if I have seen cases where repairs on a car will run more than a new car.
Granted, you get a lot of better features with a new car.
Just to be clear, I'm talking about total costs of owning/running a vehicle. e.g. other running costs such as registration and insurance. Many new cars have lower insurance premiums than old ones.

So there is more than repair costs to consider but even so some things can get pretty pricey and major items tend to fail after a certain age. I estimate my car will need about $2-3k per year in servicing costs (allowing for the sort of stuff old cars need, last year it was engine management and fuel systems, this year new brakes, intake manifold, battery, tyres and CV boot replacement, and I suspect I'll need to consider suspension/steering elements next year, and the interior which is degrading), where a newer vehicle might be more like $300-500/yr since all it requires is basic servicing over the same period. Plus the inconvenience of extra time in the shop.

I like my car and keep it in great condition but it's beginning to cost more and more to keep it that way.

A newer car (not necessarily brand new) will obviously cost a fair bit to start with but it would definitely be cheaper to run and maintain.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2018, 05:56:43 PM
Much of that work you should be able to do yourself and could save considerable money.
Except new engine and transmission, you should not be spending $2000 a year.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 05, 2018, 07:41:08 PM
Much of that work you should be able to do yourself and could save considerable money.
Except new engine and transmission, you should not be spending $2000 a year.
I disagree that I personally could do much of that work. Minor stuff yes but I do not have the workshop set up or the tools nor the expertise to change disk brakes or an inlet manifold or to make adjustments to the engine management system. I could not put a new tyre on a wheel, nor balance the wheels nor say do a wheel alignment. Then there is the skill, experience, tools and technology required to know what might be going wrong in the first place or to identify a problem is coming your way in the first place.

The tools alone to perform such tasks would cost more than the car is worth. Heck even doing an oil change would be a struggle unless I had access to a hydraulic car lift. I also have a physical impairment which makes doing some things very awkward or requires additional risk to perform. Anything that requires me to get down and horizontal on the ground is a complete PITA.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 05, 2018, 07:47:05 PM
As an example - the battery change the other week. It was fortunate that I was at my brother's place when it died. We installed the new one ourselves but it required several special tools he happened to have in order to remove/replace various items in order to access the battery for removal.

So had I been at home when it happened then even something as simple as a new battery I would not have been able to do cheaper than getting in a professional in because the tools needed cost more than the differential cost of buying a battery from the local auto goods store and what the mobile battery guy costs to come and do the install for you.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2018, 07:48:20 PM
Ouch, I understand if you have physical issues.
Front disk brakes you generally don't need many tools though and you can barrow the one for the rear from an auto part store.
I have cleaned my manifold however.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: DevoutCatalyst on August 05, 2018, 08:23:35 PM
I spent as much on an oil pump pulley puller and parts as the repair itself done by a local mechanic. There was value in the experience but never did used that puller again.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 05, 2018, 08:48:52 PM
I am lucky that my father-in-law has a lift, air wrench, and a good set of tools.  I have enough tools to do things like changing a battery or cleaning the intake, etc., but I wouldn’t be able to undertake a lot of other maintenance without his kit.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: wastrel on August 05, 2018, 11:31:56 PM
you can barrow the one for the rear from an auto part store.

Is this universally true? Will any auto parts store lend tools?  Any tool, or just some?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 06, 2018, 12:01:34 AM
you can barrow the one for the rear from an auto part store.

Is this universally true? Will any auto parts store lend tools?  Any tool, or just some?

Autozone, O'Relly's, and Advance all will loan tools.
That includes pulley pullers.
It is mostly the special tools that are not in a normal tool box.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 06, 2018, 07:01:33 AM
I am lucky that my father-in-law has a lift, air wrench, and a good set of tools.  I have enough tools to do things like changing a battery or cleaning the intake, etc., but I wouldn’t be able to undertake a lot of other maintenance without his kit.

That alone is gold and I'm am envious. I in fact would consider that to be an enticement for marrage.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on August 06, 2018, 06:34:58 PM
As an example - the battery change the other week. It was fortunate that I was at my brother's place when it died. We installed the new one ourselves but it required several special tools he happened to have in order to remove/replace various items in order to access the battery for removal.

So had I been at home when it happened then even something as simple as a new battery I would not have been able to do cheaper than getting in a professional in because the tools needed cost more than the differential cost of buying a battery from the local auto goods store and what the mobile battery guy costs to come and do the install for you.

As Desert Fox indicated, in the US most franchise auto parts stores will help with tools to test and or swap a battery.

Related story: I had to replace the clamp on my battery yhat was crumbling. Only clamp size they had in store did not matxh metric size on my car. Ended up getting a dremel and drilling the battery cable plate to fit the clamp.

Damn, imagine the fun of dealing with a 1-2 cylinder misfire and loose connection causing engine to run only from alternator. Yet somehow the battery managed to stay charged as the engine (L4 1.8L 16-valve DOHC) says in the manual it has a 900W starter motor...
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 06, 2018, 06:59:38 PM
Anybody know a simple fix to this. I have kayak racks on my jeep. On one of them, the padding is coming off.
You can't just slide a piece of rubber or something due to location.
Any suggestions on what I might be able to rap it with and will not come off?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 06, 2018, 07:54:24 PM
As Desert Fox indicated, in the US most franchise auto parts stores will help with tools to test and or swap a battery.
Must be a US thing. Never heard of an auto shop loaning tools here.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 06, 2018, 07:56:32 PM
Anybody know a simple fix to this. I have kayak racks on my jeep. On one of them, the padding is coming off.
You can't just slide a piece of rubber or something due to location.
Any suggestions on what I might be able to rap it with and will not come off?
A picture might be helpful
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 06, 2018, 08:22:14 PM
Anybody know a simple fix to this. I have kayak racks on my jeep. On one of them, the padding is coming off.
You can't just slide a piece of rubber or something due to location.
Any suggestions on what I might be able to rap it with and will not come off?
A picture might be helpful

Have to wait until tomorrow
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 06, 2018, 10:14:30 PM
Anybody know a simple fix to this. I have kayak racks on my jeep. On one of them, the padding is coming off.
You can't just slide a piece of rubber or something due to location.
Any suggestions on what I might be able to rap it with and will not come off?

Gaffer’s tape.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 07, 2018, 04:27:33 PM
Today was car repair day.  Removed and cleaned the oil pan, scraped off the RTV silicone, and installed new gasket with RTV.  The previous installation used no gasket, but only RTV.  Changed filter and oil (Mobile 1 40W-0 European Formulation—expensive stuff, but I only change it once in a blue moon).

Unfortunately, as I feared, the nuts on the flange between the cat and manifold are rusted solid, and we didn’t think we could remove them without breaking them. Maybe if we’d had a hotter torch we could’ve done it.  So I called the guy who does all of the work on my employer’s vehicles and asked if he would install it for me (since I can’t return it).  I’m going to leave it with him while I’m on vacation so he can do it at his convenience. Hopefully it won’t take too much labor to remove the bolts; the actual installation wouldn’t take more than maybe half an hour.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 09, 2018, 05:21:28 AM
2 new front tyres and a wheel alignment today. The inside edges of my front tyres were very worn, which reduced their useful life. I should have picked that up earlier I think so it could be attended to but it hasn't happened to me before.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 09, 2018, 03:58:00 PM
Got side swiped last Friday. The other insurance company just accepted responsibility so hopefully everything works out well. It was really just minor cosmetic damage however.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on August 09, 2018, 10:53:59 PM
Today was car repair day.  Removed and cleaned the oil pan, scraped off the RTV silicone, and installed new gasket with RTV.  The previous installation used no gasket, but only RTV.  Changed filter and oil (Mobile 1 40W-0 European Formulation—expensive stuff, but I only change it once in a blue moon).

Unfortunately, as I feared, the nuts on the flange between the cat and manifold are rusted solid, and we didn’t think we could remove them without breaking them. Maybe if we’d had a hotter torch we could’ve done it.  So I called the guy who does all of the work on my employer’s vehicles and asked if he would install it for me (since I can’t return it).  I’m going to leave it with him while I’m on vacation so he can do it at his convenience. Hopefully it won’t take too much labor to remove the bolts; the actual installation wouldn’t take more than maybe half an hour.

I thought of you.

(https://i.imgur.com/9C8VjNq.png)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 12, 2018, 12:26:18 PM
I noticed last night before leaving work than one of my tail lights was out. It was after 11 pm, so no auto part places were open and had to be back at work in the morning.

Went to Walmart and they were out of the standard bulbs. They had the LED bulbs but they are listed "for offroad use only." From looking at LED bulbs, it looks like all Syvania LED tail light bulbs have that listing.

I bough t them because I considered it less likely to be pulled over because they are slightly dimmer than having an out tail light. Philips makes street legal LED tail light bulbs but I have only found them online. None of the local auto parts places sell the Philips. They also tend to be about $5 more expensive ($20 vs $15).

Why are they even sold (The Sylvania "for offroad use only" bulbs)?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 13, 2018, 02:32:07 PM
Fuck me.  On vacation in Maine.  Before we left my wife had an oil change and brake inspection.  8mm on the rear pads which my father-in-law replaces last November, more on the front pads that we installed together in a March.  Left rear started scraping on the highway on the way to Maine. I don’t know what the fuck happened, but the outside pad on the left rear is worn to the metal and scraped the 10-month old rotor to hell.  So now I’m in the waiting room at a Subaru dealership while they do a $400 brake job I could’ve done myself for $150 if I weren’t in Vacationland.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on August 13, 2018, 03:25:27 PM
Wow. What kind of mechanical failure could do that? Or could it be a bad inspection?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 13, 2018, 04:15:35 PM
Well, fuck me some more.  They took the car out for a test drive and destroyed the tire running over something.  They’re going to replace the tire and, they say, shave the new one down to match the 1/3 worn ones.  Has anyone ever heard of such a thing?  And of course they can’t get the tire until tomorrow.

Wow. What kind of mechanical failure could do that? Or could it be a bad inspection?

A stuck caliper could do it, but that would have affected both pads.  Maybe if the pad got caught on the hanger somehow?  I don’t know.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on August 13, 2018, 04:18:04 PM
Sorry, man.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: wastrel on August 13, 2018, 05:11:58 PM
They’re going to replace the tire and, they say, shave the new one down to match the 1/3 worn ones.  Has anyone ever heard of such a thing?

What? In my mind, they should be replacing both front or both rear tires to match (wherever the flat was), not shaving down a brand new tire.  WTF?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 13, 2018, 06:06:56 PM
They’re going to replace the tire and, they say, shave the new one down to match the 1/3 worn ones.  Has anyone ever heard of such a thing?

What? In my mind, they should be replacing both front or both rear tires to match (wherever the flat was), not shaving down a brand new tire.  WTF?

It’s AWD, so changing two is apparently not an option.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Friendly Angel on August 13, 2018, 06:34:32 PM
They’re going to replace the tire and, they say, shave the new one down to match the 1/3 worn ones.  Has anyone ever heard of such a thing? 

Shaving a replacement tire on AWD vehicles is pretty standard, and it's probably what any tire shop would suggest even if you ran over the whatever thing yourself.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 14, 2018, 08:38:53 PM
This kind of sucks .

As I posted previously, I was side swiped and the other person's insurance accepted fault. They had me go to a repair shop and they told me that the cost to repair will be more than the value of the car. This is even though it has only minor cosmetic damage on the passenger side.

It means that the other insurance will likely total my car out. I can keep the car but get a little less money. What bugs me is that, depending on how insurance companies talk to each other, my vehicle becomes effectively worthless. If there is another accident, might get $250 or so, maybe a bit more if I let them keep the car.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 14, 2018, 10:13:10 PM
Driving home from work today.  Truck (ranger) started fine ran for about 3 miles then lost power. Thought it was bad gas or something.  It would run very sluggish.  Got about 1/2 of a mile more and then would not start. Had to have it towed. I sent it to a local shop I use once in awhile. I don't have time to mess with it now. Wife has hip surgery tomorrow and still remodeling the master bath. It's going to piss me off if it turns out to be something easy. I'm thinking fuel pump.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 21, 2018, 04:40:52 PM
So the mechanic got the nuts and studs off and replaced them, but he couldn’t put the cat on because the prongs for the hanger bracket wouldn’t fit without modification.  He went above and beyond, ordering two other cats, neither of which fit.  The OEM part sells for $1300. He charged me just $50 for all his work.  I tipped.

So I got the car back with my old cat re-installed.  Today my father-in-law and I installed it.  We used a carbide cutoff wheel to shorten the prongs on the hanger and it went into place without a hitch.  Reset the MIL.  Will let you know whether it stays out after I get it up to temperature (you won’t get a cat efficiency code until the cat has reached full operating temperature).

Assuming all is well, I can finally pass emissions.  Of course I’ve also got a late emissions test fine to pay off by now.  But it’ll be good to get this over and done with.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 21, 2018, 06:07:39 PM
Driving home from work today.  Truck (ranger) started fine ran for about 3 miles then lost power. Thought it was bad gas or something.  It would run very sluggish.  Got about 1/2 of a mile more and then would not start. Had to have it towed. I sent it to a local shop I use once in awhile. I don't have time to mess with it now. Wife has hip surgery tomorrow and still remodeling the master bath. It's going to piss me off if it turns out to be something easy. I'm thinking fuel pump.

Fuel pump it was. If I had the time I would have done it myself.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 21, 2018, 08:26:32 PM
Still no sign of the MIL after a thirty-mile drive today (although the OBD does not indicate that it went through a warmup cycle, so I may have to take it for a drive on the highway to be sure).
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 23, 2018, 01:39:05 AM
The cat seems to be purring along, and after another couple of 45-minute drives today with no sign of an MIL, I’m ready to get my emissions tested tomorrow. Total cost for the repair was around $450, including what I paid to the guy who removed and replaced the rusted-on studs. 

Next on the agenda is the rattle in my front end.  Fortunately, I had the whole suspension replaced a couple of years ago, with a lifetime warranty.  If it’s another cracked strut mount as I suspect, it should be covered.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 23, 2018, 06:12:59 PM
Got a quote for fitting a tow bar the other day. ~A$950. I want to do it but priorities....
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 23, 2018, 06:57:02 PM
Last year my AC went out.  I went to a shop and they said that my R134a levels were fine and that I was getting no power to the compressor.

Went to another shop just today for another issue. That actually turned out actually to be a lesser issue but need a part which I will not get until Saturday.

I asked him to look at my AC. Turns out that the AC was low on coolant. Added coolant and the AC kicked on.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 31, 2018, 08:55:24 PM
Question - For a normal truck, how much difference between low cost and mid cost shocks?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on September 02, 2018, 05:43:59 PM
Have been off running my cycling tour for past 4 days.

After the first day I leave our dinner, hop in the car to head home and noticed something wasn't right when I started to drive. Pulled up to have a look and front left tyre was flat. Ugh.

So out with the space saver spare and the kit to remove/replace. The culprit was a screw that had punctured the tyre. Fortunately the next day was a weekday and I was able to drop the wheel into a tyre shop for repair in the morning, picked it up later that day and changed it back that evening. Glad it was repairable as it it was a new tyre.

As always with these things, getting to the spare and jack and wheel nut lever meant removing all the stuff in the back of the car I was carrying for the tour, and that was when I discovered the 20 litre water container had moved and knocked out the tap and dumped all the water into my boot, which of course was all sitting in the well where the spare tyre sits. So I pull it all out and start the process of mopping out the water with a towel. This is of course all done in the dark....
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 17, 2018, 06:44:59 PM
Did a couple of repairs today.
The 1999 Ranger I just bought, the drivers side door handle got broken.
The only major problem was the the window handle (crank) is held on by a T-20 screw.
I have a screw bit for it but was not long enough.
Had to get a longer one.

In addition, the jeep had its passenger side floor mat wet.
It has happened a number of times and I am worried about the floor rotting out.
Looking online, there is a rubber plug where wiring goes through the side wall.
It often comes loose. Removed the inside trim and it was loose.
Siliconed it in and hopefully it will hold and stop leaking.   
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 19, 2018, 04:58:36 PM
Do you ever have bolts left over when you put something back together?

I had to take the dash of the Ranger apart to replace the dash lights.
Almost all of them had burned out.
When I put it back together, I missed putting some of the bolts back in.
Feels like too much trouble to take everything back apart to put them in.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 19, 2018, 05:03:25 PM
Do you ever have bolts left over when you put something back together?

I had to take the dash of the Ranger apart to replace the dash lights.
Almost all of them had burned out.
When I put it back together, I missed putting some of the bolts back in.
Feels like too much trouble to take everything back apart to put them in.

This is why I now take photos at every step of disassembly.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: DonA on September 20, 2018, 03:04:35 PM
Do you ever have bolts left over when you put something back together?

I had to take the dash of the Ranger apart to replace the dash lights.
Almost all of them had burned out.
When I put it back together, I missed putting some of the bolts back in.
Feels like too much trouble to take everything back apart to put them in.

This is why I now take photos at every step of disassembly.

This and I also have a notebook that I will detail certain things for when I put it back together (e.g. id-ing where different sized bolts/screws have come from).
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 21, 2018, 12:18:49 AM
I actually watched a video twice on taking the dash apart. One bolt would not go back in (plastic on plastic and a clip broke)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 21, 2018, 12:47:50 AM
So I have an issue with my central locking.  It started with the driver’s door not locking properly even though the alarm would be set.  Now the remote doesn’t work at all and even with the key it’s hit-or-miss whether the door will lock. By unlocking twice and then lockijgbIbcan fairly consistently get it to lock all four doors and set the alarm.  Oddly, the buttons on the door work perfectly to lock all four doors.

I’m not even sure where where to start diagnosing the problem.  One site I read suggested that a bad locking mechanism in the driver’s door could cause these symptoms.  Another suggested a disconnected wire at the door hinge.  Any suggestions?

Also, today I fixed the fold-out cup holder mechanism in the rear center console.  My son had stepped on it.  Took quite a bit to figure out how all the pieces fit, and then some finesse and a lot of luck to get it back into place.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 21, 2018, 01:31:13 AM
Between the seats of the Ranger is a divider which when folded down acts as arm rest with a storage compartment. When folded up, effective becomes a bench. The lid was missing when I bought the truck. Bought a used one on eBay and took me a while to figure out how to replace.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on September 21, 2018, 07:12:06 AM
Between the seats of the Ranger is a divider which when folded down acts as arm rest with a storage compartment. When folded up, effective becomes a bench. The lid was missing when I bought the truck. Bought a used one on eBay and took me a while to figure out how to replace.

I replaced my center arm rest last spring(ranger). It had popped out of the swivel and had cracked the hinge so every time I would lean on it a bit it would snap off. Got a replacement hinge at Rock auto. This one is made of metal and the other one was made of plastic. Works great now.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on September 22, 2018, 11:35:10 AM
Lat, it sounds like you might have more than one issue. You might want to try changing the battery on the key fob to see if that changes the behaviour. That doesn't address the doors doing different things, but it may be part of it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 22, 2018, 11:49:44 AM
Oh, I've changed the battery.  I've also tested it with an RF meter (it's transmitting) and followed the factory reprogramming procedure (which, I admit, may be affected by the door not locking/unlocking as its supposed to).
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on September 22, 2018, 08:45:53 PM
Well, that pretty much covers my troubleshooting ideas to narrow it down. Good luck, sir!
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on September 22, 2018, 09:25:28 PM
Well, that pretty much covers my troubleshooting ideas to narrow it down. Good luck, sir!

How does it behave if you try to lock it with the driver's door not closed all the way?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on September 30, 2018, 06:22:34 PM
I am curious if anybody has had an issue where you are begin or in front fo a vehicle making unusual sounds and you are concerned that it is your vehicle?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on October 10, 2018, 07:34:20 PM
I got a set of Husky mats for the new truck. They were so nice that I ordered a second set for the Mustang
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 08, 2018, 09:11:57 PM
Have a question, I have a passenger who is not careful with seat belts and has managed to twist one to where I had to get a junkyard one to replace it. Just recently the person almost did it again on another vehicle. Is there any solution to this that anyone has seen?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on November 08, 2018, 10:58:01 PM
There are seatbelt cushions that will keep them straight (though they may have the effect of preventing them fully retracting, which, depending on the design of the tensioner may be an issue).
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on November 09, 2018, 04:08:11 PM
Have a question, I have a passenger who is not careful with seat belts and has managed to twist one to where I had to get a junkyard one to replace it. Just recently the person almost did it again on another vehicle. Is there any solution to this that anyone has seen?
You mean apart from yelling at them?  :D
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 09, 2018, 06:55:34 PM
Have a question, I have a passenger who is not careful with seat belts and has managed to twist one to where I had to get a junkyard one to replace it. Just recently the person almost did it again on another vehicle. Is there any solution to this that anyone has seen?
You mean apart from yelling at them?  :D

Tries to blame the seat belts
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on November 10, 2018, 03:39:13 PM
Have a question, I have a passenger who is not careful with seat belts and has managed to twist one to where I had to get a junkyard one to replace it. Just recently the person almost did it again on another vehicle. Is there any solution to this that anyone has seen?

This morning I was once again teaching my 8 year old how to pull and buckle as seatbelt. No, don't pull an extra metre out. No, don't wrap it around your arm. No, don't... You know what, just stop everything and try pulling the part that goes in the latch. That's it. Nothing else. Wait, no tangles? No fighting to get the click? It's almost as if the things were designed to be fairly easy to use. WeIrD hOw NaTuRe DoEs ThAt.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 10, 2018, 04:58:04 PM
I always pull with one hand while carefully guiding it with the other.
You just don't yank but shoudl be a smooth motion.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on November 10, 2018, 05:04:44 PM
At least in my car, if you pull the seatbelt out too far, it will lock until it retracts fully.  You then can’t lean forward, and it just keeps getting tighter until unfasten it and allow it to retract fully.  It certainly teaches you good seatbelt fastening technique.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Friendly Angel on November 12, 2018, 08:24:06 PM
4 new tires for minivan: $115@, $460 list price.

Out the door cost with balance, alignment, assorted fees, and coupon:  $790.

List plus $350 for future estimates.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 12, 2018, 08:50:59 PM
They raked you over the coals. . .I could probably get 4 tires with everything for under 300 easy.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on November 12, 2018, 10:05:22 PM
They raked you over the coals. . .I could probably get 4 tires with everything for under 300 easy.

What size?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 12, 2018, 10:20:17 PM
They raked you over the coals. . .I could probably get 4 tires with everything for under 300 easy.

What size?

Friendly Angel wrote Minivan and they usually take normal car tires.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Friendly Angel on November 13, 2018, 12:34:57 AM
They raked you over the coals. . .I could probably get 4 tires with everything for under 300 easy.

Well I picked the tires from reviews and brand experience - so maybe you'd pick cheaper ones - and I probably should've noticed and refused that tire protection plan thing.  Otherwise... what would your invoice look like?

(https://i.imgur.com/Wrt83Gj.png)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 13, 2018, 02:50:22 PM
I do tend to buy a less expressive tire but I am not really go after that.
The mounting and balancing looks like it is too much - Should be maybe $12 per tire.
The all wheel alignment is likely a lie - I had a mechanic shop try to sell me an all wheel alignment when only my front wheels can be aligned. Also, what your car acting like it needed an alignment?
Many years ago I bought a tire protection plan - They try to find ways as to not honor it as well as they deductible fees make you almost pay the cost of a new tire anyway.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Friendly Angel on November 13, 2018, 04:40:12 PM
I do tend to buy a less expressive tire but I am not really go after that.
The mounting and balancing looks like it is too much - Should be maybe $12 per tire.
The all wheel alignment is likely a lie - I had a mechanic shop try to sell me an all wheel alignment when only my front wheels can be aligned. Also, what your car acting like it needed an alignment?
Many years ago I bought a tire protection plan - They try to find ways as to not honor it as well as they deductible fees make you almost pay the cost of a new tire anyway.

Alignment:  They gave me a readout of before and after measurements with specified values of toe, camber, etc.  All four wheels.  A few were out of spec and adjusted.  I don't know that it was causing any problems - maybe uneven wear, no noticeable driving issue.  Also said I can come back in 6-months for a free re-check... that might be interesting.

I'm kicking myself for not noticing the "protection plan"... but other than that I think I did OK.  The dealer has a neat calculator to determine total price - they charge more per tire and include the service/flat plan.  $580 plus tax installed - same tires, no mention of alignment or other fees.

Anyway, I feel better informed for future tire purchases... which won't be for a really long time.  These guys make it so damned hard to compare.  Maybe I can help someone else before they buy.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on November 14, 2018, 05:10:27 PM
My tire dealer includes an alignment free with the purchase of four tires. Mounting and balancing is $12/tire (with free lifetime rotation).  Taxes and the disposal fee are standard and unavoidable.

But merely changing the tires does not create a need for an alignment; if your car is tracking okay and tire wear is even, there’s no real reason to suspect alignment is needed. 
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 14, 2018, 08:57:13 PM
A small note is that there is almost certainly videos online on how to replace the battery in your fob and batteries should be like $3 each, assuming it is one of those CR series batteries.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on November 14, 2018, 09:20:12 PM
A small note is that there is almost certainly videos online on how to replace the battery in your fob and batteries should be like $3 each, assuming it is one of those CR series batteries.

Sure, but $10-15 is not an unusual fee for replacing such a battery for those who are not comfortable doing it themselves. Jewelers usually charge about that for changing watch batteries.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 14, 2018, 09:24:18 PM
A small note is that there is almost certainly videos online on how to replace the battery in your fob and batteries should be like $3 each, assuming it is one of those CR series batteries.

Sure, but $10-15 is not an unusual fee for replacing such a battery for those who are not comfortable doing it themselves. Jewelers usually charge about that for changing watch batteries.

That is why it is a small note, something to remember for the future

Biggest things I see they got Angel with is the alignment and the tire protection package - Never found the tire package really worth it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Friendly Angel on November 14, 2018, 10:46:28 PM
A small note is that there is almost certainly videos online on how to replace the battery in your fob and batteries should be like $3 each, assuming it is one of those CR series batteries.

I was assuming it needed to be programmed and required manufacturer's software
.. nope, just a button cell.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on November 15, 2018, 09:43:52 AM
I ordered 2 key fobs from ebay for like 10 dollars. Looked on line on how to program them. It was real easy. Just an FYI for next time.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Friendly Angel on November 15, 2018, 11:22:23 AM
I ordered 2 key fobs from ebay for like 10 dollars. Looked on line on how to program them. It was real easy. Just an FYI for next time.

Proximity keys or just remote locking keys?

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on November 15, 2018, 01:17:46 PM
I ordered 2 key fobs from ebay for like 10 dollars. Looked on line on how to program them. It was real easy. Just an FYI for next time.

Proximity keys or just remote locking keys?

Sorry I wrote key fobs but ment a remote locking key. Not sure if you can code those on your own.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 15, 2018, 10:17:01 PM
For some cars, you need one remote to be able to program another.
Mine, a 2001 Mustang, you can do it just with the car.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on November 15, 2018, 10:34:56 PM
Pair of Firestone 14" tires for my car, rated for 65k miles, about $175. No alignment or anything extra. They told me it's an unusual and nigh-deprecated tire size.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 16, 2018, 12:17:20 AM
Pair of Firestone 14" tires for my car, rated for 65k miles, about $175. No alignment or anything extra. They told me it's an unusual and nigh-deprecated tire size.

Somewhere around that range is what I pay for mine as well.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 23, 2018, 03:09:10 PM
I got back the white 1991 Mustang and replaced the fuel filter.
Seems to be running fine except when I first start it.
Seems to bog down if I try to drive but within a quarter mile acts fine.
Wondering if I should replace its O2 sensor?

Otherwise, I also order a set of Husky mats for it as well.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on November 23, 2018, 03:34:16 PM
I pay more than that for tires because they are relatively low profile and because I get Nokian WR G3’s — H-rated all seasons with a M+S certificate. I can run them with confidence year round and get the handling I expect on dry roads. They run about $570 for four tires mounted and balanced, with a free alignment.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 01, 2018, 06:26:28 PM
Question with auto parts. . .

What is your breaking point of a part as far as lifetime replacement?

For example, I could go to Autozone and get a coil pack for $60 with limited lifetime.
Online though I could get a pair of coil packs with 1 year for $32.

Something like brakes is a little different because I expect that every few years I will need to replace them.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on December 02, 2018, 02:48:37 PM
Is a coil pack something that’s likely ever to need replacement again?  Mine are twelve years old and have never had an issue; I’d be surprised if a replacement failed before my car does.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 02, 2018, 04:09:03 PM
Is a coil pack something that’s likely ever to need replacement again?  Mine are twelve years old and have never had an issue; I’d be surprised if a replacement failed before my car does.

I think they are a once in a car's lifetime replacement, maybe.

Speaking abut the car that I am talking about, I wrote this up telling a friend. Only first names so I don't see any issues posting it

Last April / May, I bought a 1997 Ford Escort that I thought only had minor problems.  It was suppose to be a backup car. After having thrown some money toward  s getting it repaired, I decided that it was not worth it.

There is a mechanic I trust named Jeff who had a friend who had a 1991 Mustang that he was thinking of selling. It was a convertible that needed to have its convertible top replaced. Selling it for 900 but seemed to run well. As well, Jeff had done most of the major work on it so it was well maintained.

This spring, with my roommates help, I replaced the convertible top. It is almost like working upholstery and took several weeks to get done due to my busy schedule. Had to patch a wire into the alternator but once everything got done, it is a fun car.

For car repairs, minor stuff I can do myself, but do need a mechanic for most major jobs. Jeff has been quite reliable but after I moved, he lives 60 miles way. He is an older guy in him early to mid sixties and is extremely knowledgeable.

S.o I looked for a mechanic closer. I had a guy named Travis recommended to me by a coworker. My regular car, a 2001 Mustang (I like Mustangs)  AC went out in 2016. I went to a shop and they said that my Freon level was fine but the compressor was not kicking on. I trusted them . When I asked Travis about it, found out that the Freon levels were just low. Added Freon and the AC kicked on. They lied and Travis seemed to be trustworthy based on that. I still think he is trustworthy, just less knowledgeable than I first though.

In August, although might have been late July, I was driving down the interstate when a car tried to merge into my car. Did more damage really to his car than it did to mine. I made an insurance claim as much to make sure he did not blame me for the accident than anything else.  His insurance company found him at fault.  They had me take it to a shop and the long and the short is that they found it too expensive to fix. The damage though is basically minor cosmetic and I elected to keep my car.

I decided to keep the car and use the money they payed me to get a light truck. Most of the sellers on Craigslist are a ways away from where I live. I took the 1991 Convertible to look at one being sold 60 miles away from where I live. Got there and the owner was not there. Never called me either. On my way home, the 1991 Mustang suddenly started running rough. It conked out adn I got it towed to Travis's shop. He has a shop in his back yard.

He said that he needed to do a tune up and replace the valve cover gasket. After I had called him, he said that there were problems with the vacuum lines.  That era of ford vehicles relied a lot on vacuum lines and seen something almost similar with a previous vehicle. As such, I can believe that a bad vacuum lines  Still, I would call him once a twice a week and get essentially a run around.

Eventually after 2.5 months, I got the car towed home. I spoke to Jeff, my old mechanic, and he suggested I try a few minor things and let him know how things go. One was to replace fuel filter. Did so and the car would be able to be driven but for the first 1/4 miles had no acceleration. After that it was fine though.

I would drive it once a week to work. Last week I drove it to work Wednesday and it pretty much operated normally. It was cold outside and decided to warm it up for ten minutes. When I got back from my last patrol, it had cut off. Tried to restart it and would not start. It would turn over however. Ended up getting it towed home and called my trusted mechanic an asking him to come up to check on it. I noted that there was anti-freeze on the group when I got it lifted and there was also anti-freeze on the bed of the tow truck. Even though it still turned over, I thought it likely that I destroyed the engine.    Still I wanted Jeff's opinion.

Jeff came up Saturday, yesterday, and started checking things. It is a four cylinder engine but has eight spark plugs. He found out that one of the coil packs was not firing. Still, he pulled the timing belt cover, adjusted the timing, and the car did fire over. The water pump was shot though and had me get a new one. He was really mad that Travis was under the hood and as a mechanic should have noticed the problem with the water pump.  Still, he replaced the pump and the car is not overheating and seems to be running mostly fine.

Now, it only running on  one coil pack and I have one on order online.  I can get a single coil pack locally for $60 or get a pair online for $32.  As long as you do coil packs one wire at a time, there should be no issues. It is guaranteed delivery Friday but hoping to get it Thursday.

Should also add that Travis actually screwed up the vacuum lines and I will need to redo a few myself.

Just wanted to get the whole situation off my chest I guess.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on December 19, 2018, 05:59:26 PM
I replaced the Idle Air Control valve on my 2001 Mustang. When I first put it on, the car would sometimes jump a little bit in its idle but now seems to have settled down. The mechanic I usually can trust told me that the computer and idle air need to talk to each other in order to get the settings right.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on March 12, 2019, 05:40:47 AM
I just wanted to post this as a suggestion if you ever have to work on a hood release cable.

This weekend I replaced by hood release cable but I was concerned with feeding the new cable back through the firewall. While I have not seen anybody do this on a video, what I did was tie a piece of twine to the old one so that the new one could be pulled through using the twine. Could use string or fishing line as well.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 12, 2019, 05:47:05 AM
I just wanted to post this as a suggestion if you ever have to work on a hood release cable.

This weekend I replaced by hood release cable but I was concerned with feeding the new cable back through the firewall. While I have not seen anybody do this on a video, what I did was tie a piece of twine to the old one so that the new one could be pulled through using the twine. Could use string or fishing line as well.
Similar to pulling electrical or communications cable through conduit.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on May 18, 2019, 06:41:58 PM
Started to change the spark plugs in my ford ranger. Got all done except the  2 back ones on the right side. What a pain in the ass. The old plugs were getting bad so hopefully these new ones will help with milage a bit.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on May 19, 2019, 01:56:25 AM
The old give the headlights a quick spuce up with toothpaste trick....

Before
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/wXjGKB90Khin3E10LL_LpSa9vOGrAaAzA7DOk1xY9EYRpeP1fKnOvwmCtBzmh5MQ6Tpqid0csdtVzm_jCSdd3V18Pcnim0NrhxTelOjd3z6CK7WbjoaEN3xLdZh9cTApikpRisoywI9b4zIZefvkcaomSbgU2kVohosSHn2GTxnGtnNYjqmtMGUYuGcYqwF8z0CDxQKHoEAXpHgRTz3_GsFHNQKdt1HyifCdkRiIF494RubUwktCleaCjhlUJ5y_ib9N4jEMPuc6woxX09QOJX1mOaEq6PCDjAmbaK7WqvP8bsRT1SLvfFTV3rCUFZoiu9t0UAzH-fnzy_GuV4CuHX8AmdwBt792DnIThuWwrdEXC0iyVp4xVBJ34Fshm2iCQ92ZGUp0CvvbHS64m1fLMSvdvGyfQtZbdEnoFC-Dq1dXor5u_B-HZ38fWDVIJmzVIl6bVEdYQ1PLaC7bfE9qOxSeNp0vymwAbBetE73GN0kRT1k4QnoBeKrkuyYituW26gLO_qrTgz1vYPKfXmI9bGGgAc9WV_1DcCNDdJKBS0a60VM8RFfOpUf8NfIE_3OG33r5Lt6iNgxEk8xgYYYSMrgbw7wY5rVuLPO8qVQ=w1284-h964-no)

After
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/TMqyZhF9nF3vr-hLZZ2GxuXyEAksKF6jr56m1QPIFoo0pUmqY5nVDbimkgK1Q0g_LLKxmzs1pCSMiPwZ2f1vNC3QjkhHuMItpDhT0ZzhBdkLAsjg8C1hr1wNlshMjuowQDerwEKLuLf8CR1PP9URnogSOOocDPOh0uQHF_2Xhyp0-dfqZoyiIJD-zYytMzO879DIuSS9z4YpyB_QKo1rMsEcgMm3-g91Itw4UdbpKPEfaXCMU6cayxaZL6YMtDJd9HRmecmKtcUP_x5v_9bh4v6V_YUD57aEs3nKt1-n6aaQnSmzJjnQvCVbPXxvXQwvpqs2mq-qSdumLqGLUtAIKr0nNAmX8X607q6KaKLAYee7ne-Guf0hrEE0Uh7550UqNuNZw--AtdcAVl9KW2CufP0q2gTGLdijLCKBFk9pQAalM_H9QC9v1dnX6oV3woafuY4Iy-du_Y0ocFlwc3osfJkjB6VINRRYPXZz0PmfJpl_dC3sayf6nmrxM6A5nhF9_G8WiX76RfbNPfnuLrag2UBDtJv-e01yiMRTmUZoE9wL2olZn3HJGOOuhe3TXrpTReINrSOTsibf4FNyfXEkBJLZIeHNYmxRG8JunQ0=w1284-h964-no)

Could probably use another going over but they look way better now. Put a little wax on after I was done.

Lights have deteriorated a bit again since I did this. Might try a little wax again to see if that helps.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on May 19, 2019, 07:57:44 AM
Started to change the spark plugs in my ford ranger. Got all done except the  2 back ones on the right side. What a pain in the ass. The old plugs were getting bad so hopefully these new ones will help with milage a bit.

So I had a little time and changed one of the remaining plugs. Had to get a different ratchet. There is just not a nought room to work. So I have just the back plug to do. I have about an inch between the spark plug and the cabin fan motor. I'm not sure if I can get a swivel in there or I might have to pull the fan motor to get to it. That would be a bigger pain in the ass.
After that plug wires.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on May 19, 2019, 10:01:39 AM
How old is this Ranger? Were you actually getting misfires?  Spark plugs are almost indestructible these days; my 2006 Rabbit has its original platinum plugs and has never registered a misfire.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 19, 2019, 11:37:10 AM
They do eventually tend to get gunked up - Probably want to replace spark plugs every three or four years at most
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on May 19, 2019, 11:40:39 AM
They do eventually tend to get gunked up - Probably want to replace spark plugs every three or four years at most

Why?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 19, 2019, 11:48:04 AM
They do eventually tend to get gunked up - Probably want to replace spark plugs every three or four years at most

Why?

I know that with my 2001 Mustang, and I believe I use a platinum spark plug, that after three or four years I started getting misfires.  The problem was that some of the spark plugs were corroded, gunked up, and otherwise not firing right. Now, I have an aluminum head and you can easily strip out the head if you are not careful. As such, I had my mechanic replace them.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on May 19, 2019, 12:07:19 PM
They do eventually tend to get gunked up - Probably want to replace spark plugs every three or four years at most

Why?

I know that with my 2001 Mustang, and I believe I use a platinum spark plug, that after three or four years I started getting misfires.  The problem was that some of the spark plugs were corroded, gunked up, and otherwise not firing right. Now, I have an aluminum head and you can easily strip out the head if you are not careful. As such, I had my mechanic replace them.

But that’s not the question.  The question is why one should replace plugs if one is not getting any misfires.  I’ve got 13 years and 150k miles on my plugs and it has never once registered a misfire.  Fuel economy is unchanged, it idles fine.  Is there any reason to replace plugs in such circumstances? I can’t think of one other than that it’s what the plug manufacturer tells you to do.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 19, 2019, 12:13:30 PM
They do eventually tend to get gunked up - Probably want to replace spark plugs every three or four years at most

Why?

I know that with my 2001 Mustang, and I believe I use a platinum spark plug, that after three or four years I started getting misfires.  The problem was that some of the spark plugs were corroded, gunked up, and otherwise not firing right. Now, I have an aluminum head and you can easily strip out the head if you are not careful. As such, I had my mechanic replace them.

But that’s not the question.  The question is why one should replace plugs if one is not getting any misfires.  I’ve got 13 years and 150k miles on my plugs and it has never once registered a misfire.  Fuel economy is unchanged, it idles fine.  Is there any reason to replace plugs in such circumstances? I can’t think of one other than that it’s what the plug manufacturer tells you to do.

Well, my mechanic did tell me I likely should not have waited as long as I had. He does think I should have replaced them before I had problems.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on May 19, 2019, 12:16:01 PM
The old give the headlights a quick spuce up with toothpaste trick....

Before

After

Could probably use another going over but they look way better now. Put a little wax on after I was done.

Lights have deteriorated a bit again since I did this. Might try a little wax again to see if that helps.

The images are not showing up from the googleusercontent link, but I'm glad it worked.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on May 19, 2019, 12:48:57 PM
How old is this Ranger? Were you actually getting misfires?  Spark plugs are almost indestructible these days; my 2006 Rabbit has its original platinum plugs and has never registered a misfire.

No misfires just what the manual said to do for maintenance.  It is a 2011 with 70k on it. When I looked at the plug the center electrode it was worn down, so the gap on the plug was twice as much (I'm guessing didn't measure it) as the spec in the owners manual. I was getting a weird ticking sound at times that I haven't heard again. I will see if this really fixed it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on May 19, 2019, 05:01:57 PM
The images are not showing up from the googleusercontent link, but I'm glad it worked.

Weird. They show on my feed.

In any case, the solution only worked for a while (same when I had them recoated professionally). Haven't tried waxing them again yet, maybe later today. I'm not expecting it to help much. It's sun damage and the car is parked outside. May eventually need new headlights.

I also intend to get the lining replaced in my car roof and front doors. It's coming away and looks a bit untidy. Not a job I can do, one for a pro upholsterer.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on June 19, 2019, 04:58:42 PM
The images are not showing up from the googleusercontent link, but I'm glad it worked.

Weird. They show on my feed.

In any case, the solution only worked for a while (same when I had them recoated professionally). Haven't tried waxing them again yet, maybe later today. I'm not expecting it to help much. It's sun damage and the car is parked outside. May eventually need new headlights.

I also intend to get the lining replaced in my car roof and front doors. It's coming away and looks a bit untidy. Not a job I can do, one for a pro upholsterer.

Well the interior roof lining all came sagging down last week, so today I'm taking it to a local auto upholstery guy to have it replaced. I'm getting the cloth inserts in the front doors done as well as the centre console. May as well spruce it up a bit.

On Friday the car gets its 200,000km service (just a regular service + DSG gearbox service) and I did decide to get new headlights. I have spent a little more and gone for an aftermarket LED lighting technology upgrade, which replicates the sort of lights available on modern vehicles. I'm planning several long interstate trips in the next 8 months and they will involve some night highway driving. I've never been overly happy with the current lighting capacity of the car these last few years. OK for short trips but not really that great for longer drives or on the highway.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on June 22, 2019, 07:12:15 AM
The new roof lining looks good. The upholsterer ended up re-glueing the existing door panel cloth and not touching the centre console. Instead I got some fabric cleaning foam and gave the console, seats and other areas a good clean. I was quite surprised how good a job the cleaning foam did. Got a bit carried away and gave the interior a really good clean.

New headlights are not fitted yet, that'll be week after next. On my car it's a bit of a job - requires removal of the front bumper and panel assembly with some awkward screw access points.

Some other jobs will need doing:

Need a new CV boot.

My shock absorbers will need replacing some time this year, one is leaking a little and they are the original units. I suspect they are part of the reason why even with correct wheel alignment I'm getting more rapid and uneven wear on the tyres.

Also I have clear coat coming away on parts of the bonnet, so that'll need attention before rust gets in there.

I asked the upholsterer about re-padding the front seats to improve the support and he said that's not problem.

I've also decided to install an aftermarket double DIN screen stereo unit with reversing camera and Apple Carplay. My better half has just got her driving leaner's permit and she's keen to have the rear camera option to help her out. The Sony XAV-AX5000 is what I have in mind.

Other than that I really could use a tow bar for a trailer. So many times I wish I could just move stuff with a trailer, e.g. stuff to the recycling centre or go get some garden stuff, hire equipment etc.

I wouldn't normally bother spending this much on a car of this age but have decided to keep it going for a while yet rather than getting a new(er) car. It's just such a good car and runs extremely well. Perhaps by the time we're ready to look at an upgrade there will be more suitable EVs to choose from than the limited options we have here at present.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 22, 2019, 11:02:40 PM
Flat tire in the way home tonight.  Upon examination, the rear tires—which from the outside appear to be in fair shape with about 5 mm tread remaining...are worn through to the belts on the inside shoulders. Wtf?

I assume that means my rear suspension must be seriously fucked up.  Fortunately I replaced that a few years ago and it should have a lifetime warranty on it.  Unfortunately, that means I must replace all four tires when I had been hoping to replace only the front tires this fall.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on June 22, 2019, 11:49:13 PM
I had something similar happen on my front tires before I got an alignment
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 23, 2019, 12:59:18 AM
I had something similar happen on my front tires before I got an alignment

It sucks because My car is approaching it’s end-of-life, and I am starting to have to make calculations about every little thing and consider whether it’s worth doing.  If any suspension issues can be fixed under warranty, it will make sense to buy new tires; but if I’m looking at replacing the whole suspension at my expense it becomes harder to justify.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on June 23, 2019, 02:49:53 AM
I had something similar happen on my front tires before I got an alignment

It sucks because My car is approaching it’s end-of-life, and I am starting to have to make calculations about every little thing and consider whether it’s worth doing.  If any suspension issues can be fixed under warranty, it will make sense to buy new tires; but if I’m looking at replacing the whole suspension at my expense it becomes harder to justify.

You live in New England where salt is an issue?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 23, 2019, 02:05:13 PM
Salt is an issue, yes.  I had corrosion repaired under warranty.

I purchased my car thirteen years ago next Sunday.  I have ~170k on it.  The suspension has been replaced, I’ve replaced the brakes three times.  I’ve replaced all of the wheel bearings.  If replaced the left half axle twice. I’ve replaced the cat and a couple of oxygen sensors.

I’ve got several issues that need to be addressed:

Now: Suspension, tires

Soon-ish: Cabin air blower (bearings going), oil pan gasket, cv boot or half-axle

Before July 2020 (next emissions test): vacuum leak, catback

Probably won’t fix: central locking
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 24, 2019, 12:30:48 PM
I’m getting my tires replaced.  Asked my tire guy to recommend an inexpensive H-rated all-season for a car I wasn’t sure I’d keep too long.  He recommended the Chinese-made Milestar Weatherguard AW365 as a cheaper alternative to my usual Nokia WR’s. They’re H-rated and M+S-rated with a 40k mile warranty.  I expect they’ll be a little louder, a little less grippy, and will wear faster; but I’m probably only going to run them for about two years before replacing my car. Free alignment with tire purchase, as always.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on June 24, 2019, 04:53:23 PM
a cheaper alternative to my usual Nokia WR’s.
Think I've spotted your problem. You're putting old mobile phones on your wheels instead of tyres!  :D
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 24, 2019, 07:49:04 PM
Wow.  My phone autocorrects Nokian to Nokia. I’d be surprised if people write Nokia more than Nokian these days.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 25, 2019, 10:32:19 AM
So apparently the cam and toe bolts on my rear suspension are all seized, so they can’t be adjusted.  It can’t be heated to get them loose because it would burn out the bushings.  Otherwise the parts look fine and it’s safe to drive, but I’ve got significant toe in the rear that was the cause of my tire wear and can’t be fixed without replacing control arms and bolts.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on July 01, 2019, 12:09:08 AM
When my wife had her oil changed at the dealership they told her her brakes needed replacing soon.  And when I had my tires replaced last week they told me that my left rear pads were wearing significantly faster than the right and were 'almost metal to metal.'  So today we went to my father-in-law's house to use his lift.  Put my wife's car up, removed the tires, and inspected all of the pads.  They all had at least 6 mm left.

Mine were a different story: my left rear pad was down to about 3 mm, while my right one was at 9-10mm.  I have no idea what could be causing this difference in wear.  As far as I can tell, nothing is hung up. I replaced that caliper last summer (when I replaced the pads).  The e-brake is working fine.  There doesn't seem to be any reason for my left pads to be wearing three times as fast as my right ones.

Anyway, I replaced the pads with some mid-range ones since I'm not sure how long I'll keep the car.  My plan is not to replace the suspension, but to rotate the tires frequently to try to make them last as long as possible while I figure out what I'm going to do next.

Meanwhile, my jury-rigged exhaust is holding up.  I can live without central locking working. My AC noise (probably caused by vacuum leak, not blower as I initially thought) is annoying but not affecting function, and I've got another 16 months on the emissions before I have to figure out what's causing that -- and hopefully I'll have traded it before that.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on July 01, 2019, 12:58:39 AM
Got my new headlamps fitted today, along with front driver side CV boot replacement.

Have to wait until tonight before getting a chance to try the lights out, but they look great.

Found someone who can respray the bonnet for a reasonable price. I have clear coat coming away and I just want to nip that issue in the bud.

I'll be thinking about shock absorber replacement at some stage too.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: CarbShark on July 01, 2019, 02:17:25 PM
Had to change a burnt out headlamp in a Prius.  Took over two hours. Could not get my hand into the tiny space. The only option seemed to be to remove the entire headlight assembly which meant loosening and taking apart a good part of the bumper and the plastic engine shielding underneath. This shouldn't be so difficult.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on July 01, 2019, 06:34:21 PM
The water pump on my 1999 Ford Ranger broke yesterday and worked on replacing it today.  I really hate removing the original hose clamps - I don't have the special tool but instead used needle  nose pliers. Replaced them with the ones that tighten with a screw type set where you use a screwdriver or 8 mm socket to tighten.  Everything otherwise  seems to come apart relatively easily and was able to get everything back together reasonable well as well. Luckily, I watched  YouTube video that showed the best way to get a pipe that goes into the water pump relatively easily. 
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on July 01, 2019, 07:27:46 PM
Latinist I would bleed the brakes. Maybe you have a little bit of air on the one side. Its just a guess but it can't hurt.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on July 01, 2019, 07:44:51 PM
Hmm.  Worth a try, I guess.  I bled the left one when I changed the caliper, but I haven’t touched the right.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on July 01, 2019, 10:22:12 PM
Hmm.  Worth a try, I guess.  I bled the left one when I changed the caliper, but I haven’t touched the right.

Might as well do the whole system to make sure.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on July 01, 2019, 11:47:40 PM
Last year, I had to replace a rear brake line in a jeep I have.
Was able to drain driver side front and both rear brakes.
The nipple to the front passenger side broke however.
Could not get the brake light to go off.
Ended up replacing that caliper and was able to get the brake light off.   
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on July 02, 2019, 01:45:26 AM
The new headlights are amazing. The difference in illumination is substantial.

Bonnet respray tomorrow. Clear coat coming away, no doubt due to years of stone damage.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on July 28, 2019, 11:17:48 PM
I got my car's engine (https://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,30901.msg9623344.html#msg9623344) scanned. Turns out the scanner I bought online couldn't read it. But I found a shop with one. Sure enough, the check engine light isn't active and OBD-II works, but it's 90s dialect.

I also got my first refill after I first got it. I was driving it somewhere between lead foot and Italian tune-up, and somehow managed to get almost 24 MPG. I'm guessing that means coasting makes a difference, I was still being cateful since its a heavier vehicle than I'm used to, not so much revving the engine.

Still need new tires. Found out the car has 215/70R15 even though 205 is the stock size. Tire shop says 215 is preferable, due to being more common.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 03, 2019, 10:11:47 PM
Unfortunately one of the wheel bearing on my car seem to be bad. Drove my backup car to work for the moment. Ordered new ones from online because they are half the cost of those at Autozone but going to be a few days. Looks like it is going to relatively straight forward after watching a video on replacing them.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 03, 2019, 11:13:59 PM
Do you need a special tool to replace those?  Mine are pressed in.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 04, 2019, 08:28:10 AM
Do you need a special tool to replace those?  Mine are pressed in.

What car do you have? I've never seen wheel bearings pressed in.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 04, 2019, 12:43:59 PM
Do you need a special tool to replace those?  Mine are pressed in.

A once use lock nut that needs to be tightened to 221 ft-lbs
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 04, 2019, 02:16:31 PM
Volkswagen. 
Do you need a special tool to replace those?  Mine are pressed in.

What car do you have? I've never seen wheel bearings pressed in.

Volkswagen Mk. V Golf / Rabbit.  VW’s have had pressed-in bearings as long as I can remember.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 04, 2019, 03:01:17 PM
Volkswagen. 
Do you need a special tool to replace those?  Mine are pressed in.

What car do you have? I've never seen wheel bearings pressed in.

Volkswagen Mk. V Golf / Rabbit.  VW’s have had pressed-in bearings as long as I can remember.

This is what I need. . . .I can get a pair of them online for less than teh cost of one locally.
https://www.autozone.com/suspension-steering-tire-and-wheel/wheel-bearing-hub-assembly-front/duralast-wheel-bearing-hub-assembly-dl513115/972619_934173_22589
Also replacing my rotors at the same time and ordering them as well from online
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 04, 2019, 03:31:36 PM
Volkswagen. 
Do you need a special tool to replace those?  Mine are pressed in.

What car do you have? I've never seen wheel bearings pressed in.

Volkswagen Mk. V Golf / Rabbit.  VW’s have had pressed-in bearings as long as I can remember.

Ahh I never pulled a VW apart before. I own a Jetta so something to keep in mind. Thanks
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 04, 2019, 07:19:20 PM
No problem.  I understand you can get a special tool to press it out/in, though I've never tried myself.  There's also an internal snap ring on the outside, so you'll need some snap-ring pliers as well.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2019, 02:25:29 PM
Never rains, it pours

My roommate got the Ranger I bought last year inspected.  All four ball joints have to be replaced. Watched about four YouTube videos and looks doable. I will likely need a hand and of course my roommate doesn't really want to help me and wants to call a mechanic that will want to charge several hundred in labor.

Agin, the parts are $70 on eBay and $200+ at Autozone.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: superdave on August 05, 2019, 05:47:23 PM
so apparently a tiny stepper motor in my A/C is dying.  It costs like 15$ to replace but is in such an annoying area that my mechanic says it's a 2 day fix.  This is causing flakey response to the vent controls.  It works sometimes, sometimes not.

I googled and this seems to be both a common problem in my model and also the 2 day fix estimate seems legit based on what i read on various forums. 

But even when it doesnt work, the front defroster and side vents seem to work, which is good enough, so I am probably just never going to fix it. 
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 05, 2019, 06:07:53 PM
How much is he saying for labor?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: superdave on August 05, 2019, 07:05:41 PM
How much is he saying for labor?

about 950 was the estimate.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 05, 2019, 07:26:41 PM
Yeah, I’ve got a similar issue in my vents; noisy and not shifting between modes properly. The whole dash would have to come out to fix it, and as it’s mostly working even with the noise, I’m going to ignore it.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 05, 2019, 11:03:17 PM
This is not a car repair but I was looking to get my motorcycle a tune up, it will take about 4hrs at $110 hr shop rate plus parts. So I'm looking at $440 at least. This will include carb sync, brake fluid change and valve adjustment etc. I have done the valve adjustment before but, the brake fluid change I have never done and can get involved. The carb sync I can borrow a vacuum gauge from a friend. It will take me all day to do this I'm just debating if I want to spend the money or just do it myself. I don't really have the time now and I don't want to spend the money. The bike is a BMW R1150R. 2001.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: BAWRFRS on August 06, 2019, 05:14:44 PM
This is not a car repair but I was looking to get my motorcycle a tune up, it will take about 4hrs at $110 hr shop rate plus parts. So I'm looking at $440 at least. This will include carb sync, brake fluid change and valve adjustment etc. I have done the valve adjustment before but, the brake fluid change I have never done and can get involved. The carb sync I can borrow a vacuum gauge from a friend. It will take me all day to do this I'm just debating if I want to spend the money or just do it myself. I don't really have the time now and I don't want to spend the money. The bike is a BMW R1150R. 2001.

My motorcycling years are now behind me but I have some sympathy for you! I had five bikes over those years, and although my greatest excitement and adventures were early on with my "starter bike", my last bike was EFI and I cannot count the number of headaches and frustrations that solved.

Obviously the "worth it" element has to do with your financial resources and how you feel about spending your free time. Several of my fellow riders would view working on the bike as a form of recreation, horizon-expanding, and so forth.

Balancing the carbs - I remember building a tool to help me do that on my Ninja 500r. Involved tubing and some gatorade bottles, something like that. But I think I backed off from doing it because I read how easily some very thin gasket could be dislodged or pinched in the process, so it was a high-risk, low-reward sort of thing. I think I also read that if the carbs are truly unbalanced, you'd know it - there would be symptoms at idle or something like that. I forget the specifics. Point is, I justified to myself skipping it, or at least, not doing it myself.

Brake fluid change I never did myself (had the shop do it), but a friend of mine did, and as I recall, you can acquire a helpful brake bleeder tool if you have to do it yourself. Ideally though, find a friend to lend a hand, so you can concentrate on pouring in fresh fluid and having the friend pump it through the system until the dirty stuff is all gone.

Lastly, the one time I checked valves, they were still in tolerance after maybe 10k miles. So I didn't actually have to get into the screw and locknut dance. On my bike, it was pretty easy to check them. YMMV. Do you have shim under bucket?

If you have a BMW, I think you should expect maintenance to be comprehensive and expensive. $110/hr doesn't seem that outrageous to me ... several years ago my local HD dealer was charging about that, IIRC. If there was anything at which to raise an eyebrow, it's the number of hours they estimate to do it. Seems high for just those 3 things, but it could be a value they just enter as default.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on August 08, 2019, 12:19:33 PM
My motorcycling years are now behind me but I have some sympathy for you! I had five bikes over those years, and although my greatest excitement and adventures were early on with my "starter bike", my last bike was EFI and I cannot count the number of headaches and frustrations that solved.

Maybe it's because I was born in the 90's, but I do not ever want to deal with a carburetor engine, and I'm glad I don't have to.

I was parked in the public street parking that's frequented by RV's & travelers. And one morning, there was this guy that was in a really old RV. Meaning, old enough to have a carb'd engine. And he had to sit there and fast idle it at just the right throttle for like fifteen minutes for it to warm it up so he could drive it. I figured I was going to hear him kill the battery, considering how many times he had to restart the engine. I know that thing was out of state, because it wasn't going to pass an emissions test.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 08, 2019, 01:01:49 PM

My motorcycling years are now behind me but I have some sympathy for you! I had five bikes over those years, and although my greatest excitement and adventures were early on with my "starter bike", my last bike was EFI and I cannot count the number of headaches and frustrations that solved.
Me too. Fuel injection is the best. I owned a Honda Saber a few years back and if I hadn't started it in a month I needed starter fluid to get it going.

Balancing the carbs - I remember building a tool to help me do that on my Ninja 500r. Involved tubing and some gatorade bottles, something like that

I used to have a vacuumed gauge set up just for that. It worked pretty good. I haven't used it in years and I don't know where it is. On twin carb bikes I used to just go by feel with my hand on the exhaust. If it felt the same I was ok with it.

Brake fluid change I never did myself (had the shop do it), but a friend of mine did, and as I recall, you can acquire a helpful brake bleeder tool if you have to do it yourself. Ideally though, find a friend to lend a hand, so you can concentrate on pouring in fresh fluid and having the friend pump it through the system until the dirty stuff is all gone.

I have changed brake fluid on cars all the time. I have never done a bike before. It just seemed to cumbersome. I know my BMW with anti lock brakes is a bit involved. It's not just bleeding it through the reservoir.  That is going to take some research.


Lastly, the one time I checked valves, they were still in tolerance after maybe 10k miles. So I didn't actually have to get into the screw and locknut dance. On my bike, it was pretty easy to check them. YMMV. Do you have shim under bucket?

I have done the valves on the bike a lot. Once you do them it's not that big of deal. The R1150R is very sensitive to valve adjustment. So I try to get them exact and at least once or twice a year depending on how many miles I do. No shims just a feeler gauge and a wrench to adjust the gap.

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 08, 2019, 05:48:21 PM
I finished the bearings of my 2001 Mustang. Ended up getting all the parts online. Replaced the rotors and brakes as well. Took about 3.5 hours to do two of them. Getting brake pads back on is almost more of an art than a science. Need to work on the 1999  Ranger ball joints tomorrow. After that, check the transmission of the 1991 Mustang which is suppose to be my backup car. I am hoping that I can just replace the filter and put Transmission Honey to allow her to shift.  Suddenly doesn't like shifting until the transmission has warmed up. Other option is getting a used one from the junk yard or rebuilding it.

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: BilLumberg on August 08, 2019, 06:59:07 PM
I can try and help with the '91 mustang transmission problem. What engine does it have? 4cyl and V8 use different transmissions.

How long does it need to run before it starts shifting?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 08, 2019, 07:28:20 PM
2.3 liter (4 cyl)

It is more a case that if I drive it for a while, a few miles, that it starts shifting properly.
It will shift while cold but will tend to jump in its shifting, not smooth shifting.

Wish I knew how to rebuild transmissions
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: BilLumberg on August 08, 2019, 08:33:47 PM
The 4cyl should have a A4LD transmission. There is a vacuum modulator on the passenger side of the case that can fail. Easiest way to check is to pull off the vacuum line at the modulator. If there is any fluid in the vacuum line the diaphragm inside the modulator has ruptured. This can cause erratic shifting. The modulator is what controls the line pressure on the transmission. If the engine is running rough it can also cause the transmission to shift rough because of the low vacuum signal. If the engine is running well, and the modulator checks out, the next most likely cause would be a sticky valve. Next step would be to pull the pan. Some fine metal on the magnet is normal, but look for brassy colored metal particles on the bottom of the pan and in the fluid. That is normally from a failing thrust washer. A little is OK, but large deposits are a bad sign. If the pan does not look too bad, a new filter and fluid is worth trying. There are two styles of filters A4LD use. A metal screen or a Dacron media style in a plastic body. The dacron would be what you want to use. They are a much better filter and will capture much more than the screen type. If you want to try a additive, I would recommend lubeguard brand. The basic red bottle is the one you would need. The A4LD is not picky about fluid so any universal ATF will work fine. Get it back together and warmed up and go drive it some. The idea on the drive is to really make it shift. Up and down, up and down. Automatically and manually. What you are trying to do is stroke the valves and flush out any metal that could be causing them to stick when cold.

If there still are issues there is not much else you can do short of rebuilding or replacing. I can send you a rebuild manual in pdf format if you want it, but this is really not the best unit for a beginner.

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 08, 2019, 09:08:12 PM
Slightly off-topic, but I didn’t want to start another thread for us car guys.So I’ve been looking at new vehicles for about a month now, and I came to the conclusion that I couldn’t be happy buying American or Japanese under 30K.  I had just about settled on getting a new Golf with a 1.4L turbocharged engine; it wouldn’t have driven like my 2006 2.5L naturally-aspirated inline-5 Rabbit (I’ve yet to find any car in my price range that’s even approaching as fun to drive), but I was going to at least give one a thorough test-drive.

But it turns out that the 2019 Golf are out of stock and VW probably isn’t going to offer the Golf in North America next year.  So I took stock again and realized that what I really want to drive for the next 15 years is one of the numerous AWD electric vehicles with tons of torque that I expect to come out in the next 2-3 years.

So this is my new plan.  My wife has a 2011 Subaru Forester that has almost as many miles on it as mine but is in better shape because it’s five years newer.  She drives many more miles a year than I do, too, because of her commute.  So I’m proposing that we buy her a new Forester next Spring/Summer and I take hers and drive it for another 5 years or so. By then There will hopefully be a plethora of electric vehicles, one of which I will fall in love with.

I will have to make a few changes to her car, of course.  The head unit will have to be replaced with a CarPlay-compatible aftermarket model.  It will need some higher-rated tires than it’s got in it now.  I’ll have to wrap the steering wheel.  I know it won’t be a pleasure to drive, but it will get me where I’m going safely, and will hopefully hold me over until I find something truly special.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on August 08, 2019, 09:51:40 PM
I like your plan
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 08, 2019, 11:12:03 PM
I'm toying with the next car and when question as well.

My 2007 2.0 TDI Golf has 200,000+ km on the dial but goes like a rocket. I had the engine management retuned (180hp / 400Nm) a while back and it performs so well. Needs shocks replaced though.

I just can't see suitable EVs being available here that are affordable for quite a few years.

As I'm now living rural and not city, an SUV AWD style vehicle with towing capability is more of interest. Considering Skoda Kodiak, VW Tiguan, maybe 2nd hand VW Toureg. Other possible option is new Toyota RAV4, the hybrid version looks pretty interesting. Subaru Forester perhaps. Don't like Mazda's options or the Hondas and detest the Jeeps.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 09, 2019, 12:20:21 AM
The 4cyl should have a A4LD transmission. There is a vacuum modulator on the passenger side of the case that can fail. Easiest way to check is to pull off the vacuum line at the modulator. If there is any fluid in the vacuum line the diaphragm inside the modulator has ruptured. This can cause erratic shifting. The modulator is what controls the line pressure on the transmission. If the engine is running rough it can also cause the transmission to shift rough because of the low vacuum signal. If the engine is running well, and the modulator checks out, the next most likely cause would be a sticky valve. Next step would be to pull the pan. Some fine metal on the magnet is normal, but look for brassy colored metal particles on the bottom of the pan and in the fluid. That is normally from a failing thrust washer. A little is OK, but large deposits are a bad sign. If the pan does not look too bad, a new filter and fluid is worth trying. There are two styles of filters A4LD use. A metal screen or a Dacron media style in a plastic body. The dacron would be what you want to use. They are a much better filter and will capture much more than the screen type. If you want to try a additive, I would recommend lubeguard brand. The basic red bottle is the one you would need. The A4LD is not picky about fluid so any universal ATF will work fine. Get it back together and warmed up and go drive it some. The idea on the drive is to really make it shift. Up and down, up and down. Automatically and manually. What you are trying to do is stroke the valves and flush out any metal that could be causing them to stick when cold.

If there still are issues there is not much else you can do short of rebuilding or replacing. I can send you a rebuild manual in pdf format if you want it, but this is really not the best unit for a beginner.

You hit one of the rubs with repairing the car. It had a problem that I had trouble diagnosing. I brought it to a backyard mechanic (has a shop at his home). He is younger though and does not have much skill with older cars. Decided to try to replace vacuum lines but sis not do the "Remove One / Replace One" and he may have screwed up the vacuum line to the transmission. She sometimes was having trouble shifting since he worked on her but only for a few minutes.  I had to restore the vacuum line to the environmental controls because he screwed it up.

Edit: Can I just run a new line from the main vacuum line to the transmission?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: BilLumberg on August 09, 2019, 12:01:04 PM


Edit: Can I just run a new line from the main vacuum line to the transmission?

Sure, As long as it is getting direct manifold vacuum it will work fine. There can't be any check valves between the engine and the transmission. When the throttle is opened the vacuum signal needs to drop in order for the transmission to react properly to the increased load.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 09, 2019, 04:35:02 PM
This is a decidedly non-DIY story.  So we’re on vacation in Vermont. Stop to visit a historic site. Get back in the car and take off only to hear a rattle from the right front wheel. Stop, listen to it rolling.  Pull the wheel cover and out rolls a lug nut with broken stud. Fuck. Fortunately, we’re about 4 miles from a Subaru dealership. Although it’s already after 2:30, they fit us in. Estimate $160. If I was at home, I could do it for next to nothing, but so be it.

So we walk across the street to get a sandwich. While we’re eating we get a call: the ball joint on that side is loose. They don’t pressure us to let them replace it, but in two days we’ve got a 300-mile drive home. Double fuck.

I could have done this work for about $50 in parts, but we’ll be paying $360 for it. C’est la vie.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 10, 2019, 02:31:32 AM


Edit: Can I just run a new line from the main vacuum line to the transmission?

Sure, As long as it is getting direct manifold vacuum it will work fine. There can't be any check valves between the engine and the transmission. When the throttle is opened the vacuum signal needs to drop in order for the transmission to react properly to the increased load.

Still working on Ball Joints of the Ranger but when I crawl under, I will see if I can trace a vacuum line at least.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 10, 2019, 06:35:08 PM
By the way, the same day that we had the broken lug and ball joint issue, we got our windshield ruined by a flying stone.  Safelite will be replacing it on Monday.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 11, 2019, 01:27:20 AM
Ball Joints can be a bear though - Was using a ball joint separator attached to a long piece of pipe  and still took all my effeort to get them apart.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 11, 2019, 12:53:53 PM
So we were all set to leave this morning, but I had to run a quick errand.  Pulled back in ready to load the car up and *rattle rattle* there’s another broken stud on the other fucking wheel. What the hell?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on August 11, 2019, 12:56:41 PM
Have you checked for Gremlins?
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 11, 2019, 01:16:02 PM
Have you checked for Gremlins?

Come to think of it, my mother has been feeding the children after midnight.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: brilligtove on August 11, 2019, 01:17:11 PM
"There's yer problem right there."
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 11, 2019, 05:40:50 PM
Drive my uncle’s 1999 BMW z3 today: 2.8L i6 5 speed.  It’s amazing how similarly it drives and handles to my 2006 Rabbit 2.5L i5 5-speed. German cars, man.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 12, 2019, 03:54:33 PM
So I drove down to a garage first think this morning. I knew that the owner knew my father, which gave me an in. He said he thought it would be okay to drive with four, but I mentioned that we’d had one on the other side break just last week, so he decided to check the torque on the remaining lugs on that wheel.  One of the remaining four twisted right off with hardly any force at all.  Guess we’d have to fix it after all.

He quickly ordered two studs, then said he’d check to see if he had anything else that would work.  Seems that when they replace wheel bearings the kits come with aftermarket hubs that they don’t use. Sure enough, they had them. He popped a couple of those out and replaced the ones in my hub.  I was out of there in 45 minutes, and the guy charged me just $50 (I paid cash and gave him a generous tip).  By contrast, at the dealer on Friday we paid $160 to replace one.

Guy said he works on a lot of Subaru’s and he’s never seen any with this issue. He’s as much at a loss to explain it as anyone else I’ve talked to. I think when I get back to CT I’ll order new ones for all four wheels and replace them all.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 14, 2019, 03:45:47 PM

Edit: Can I just run a new line from the main vacuum line to the transmission?

Sure, As long as it is getting direct manifold vacuum it will work fine. There can't be any check valves between the engine and the transmission. When the throttle is opened the vacuum signal needs to drop in order for the transmission to react properly to the increased load.

A few things
1. No leakage from the modulator.
2. The vacuum line seems intact and goes all the way to the vacuum tree.
3. I cannot find what appears to be a plastic framed dacron filter
4. Talked to my mechanic and he said that I need to be concerned when I remove the filter that a valve could come out? Do you know if there is a valve held up by the filter?
5. I found a wide range of costs for rebuilding transmissions - On the high side, a women said 2500 to 5000. A local one said 1500 if I pull it and 2000 if they pull it. Finally, I found someone who said he would tear down the transmission for $50 and would rebuild for $450 + cost of parts if he can. Used I can get one from a Junkyard for $500.

Let you know more once I get the filter replaced. 
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: BilLumberg on August 14, 2019, 08:15:07 PM
This is what the later filters look like. Try a 1996 two wheel drive ranger as an application (engine won't matter), that is the only option on the later units. Nothing will come out with the filter, it just unbolts. Just make sure the O-rings are on the new filter. C4s did have a check valve under the filter on older cars. We get about $2200-$2500 to do these installed.

(https://www.cascadetransmissionparts.com/images/products/detail/56011hr.1.jpg)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 14, 2019, 08:58:19 PM
According to O'Reilly, it will not fit.

https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/wix-5291/filters-16470/at-filter-kit-12765/925595400f55/wix-automatic-transmission-filter-kit/58841/4836658/1991/ford/mustang

Are you sure it will fit?

Edit: Found this one that looks like it will fit
https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/wix-5291/engine-parts---mounts-16774/transmission---transaxle-16780/transmission-parts-16520/at-filter-kit-12765/bb09564dbca0/wix-automatic-transmission-filter-kit/58840/4836657/1991/ford/mustang?q=transmission+filter&pos=2
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: BilLumberg on August 15, 2019, 10:41:23 AM
The first one is for a 4X4. If you look closely there is a tube around the suction hole for the deeper pan. The second one (part #58840) will fit. Here is the wix detail page where it shows '89-'11 2WD, with a better picture. Pre-'89 had a different pan so they wont fit those, but it should fit your car. The only way it won't work is if someone changed the pan to the older style for some reason. These are a much better filter than the older screen design.

http://www.wixfilters.com/Lookup/PartDetails.aspx?Part=105684

Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 15, 2019, 02:48:35 PM
The 58840 is the one you linked to on the Wix website and the same one I ordered from O'Reilly. 
It is a little more expensive but from what I have read Wix filters are suppose to be good filters.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 16, 2019, 11:30:38 PM
Alright, finally got a chance to remove the transmission pan. Damn, I hate being covered in transmission fluid. Even got some in my hair. Wish they just put drain plugs in transmissions.

It is good news. When all done and I drove the car, shifted fine. Even brought it up to 70 mph and did good up to that speed. Wanted to make sure that the overdrive did not have any issues.

When I removed the pan, I did not find any metal flakes in the pan but it was very dark, indicating it was pretty old.  Swirled it around to try to make sure I did not see any metal flakes. With the amount of fluid that I had in the drain pan when all done, I also wonder if it was not low. Still, I had checked it on the transmission dipstick hot as per the instructions on the stick and seems to be at the right level.

Used the new Wix filter and very cautiously tightened the pan bolts so that they would not pinch the seal. Did not want to have to replace the seal and lose all the fluid. I went with Slick 50 for transmissions.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on August 17, 2019, 10:16:38 AM
When I removed the pan, I did not find any metal flakes in the pan but it was very dark, indicating it was pretty old.  Swirled it around to try to make sure I did not see any metal flakes. With the amount of fluid that I had in the drain pan when all done, I also wonder if it was not low. Still, I had checked it on the transmission dipstick hot as per the instructions on the stick and seems to be at the right level.

There are probably lab tests for the fluid, similar to engine oil. I guess the metal grit, if it were there, would be microscopic. More like it would just make the fluid oddly shiny.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 17, 2019, 06:06:15 PM
I've decided it's time to upgrade the car. There's still a chance we'll keep the old one, not sure just yet.

Old one (2007 Mark V Golf TDI) probably could use a shock absorber replacement but otherwise it's in fine condition considering it's got over 200,000km on the dial. It eats highways for breakfast.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 17, 2019, 06:11:56 PM
Old one (2007 Mark V Golf TDI) probably could use a shock absorber replacement but otherwise it's in fine condition considering it's got over 200,000km on the dial. It eats highways for breakfast.

I don’t think people who’ve never driven a Mk.V have any idea just what a fabulous car it is. If I could buy a new Mk V today, I totally would.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on August 17, 2019, 11:07:29 PM
Old one (2007 Mark V Golf TDI) probably could use a shock absorber replacement but otherwise it's in fine condition considering it's got over 200,000km on the dial. It eats highways for breakfast.

I don’t think people who’ve never driven a Mk.V have any idea just what a fabulous car it is. If I could buy a new Mk V today, I totally would.

Since I had the ECU chip retuned, it's performance has been amazing. Keeping it is an option although I may need to take what I can get for it as a trade in to help bring the price down a bit (and not have the extra registration, insurance and upkeep costs). I doubt I'd get much as a trade.

I'm in the test driving options mode. Due to various reasons it'll be an 4WD SUV style of car. Not my first preferred style of car if it was me only but I'm balancing requirements of my new life (wife + rural living + need to be able to tow trailer up steepish gravel drive). So I figure if I'm not getting say a sports wagon, then I'll make it an more premium model.

Yesterday I drove a VW Tiguan.  I have to say, the performance was rather underwhelming (it was the 132kW model, not the 162kW model). My old Golf has far better pick up.

I've been considering the Touareg as well, that would need to be a late model low km second hand as the new version is well out of price range. Not got to drive one of those yet.

I drove the Skoda Kodiaq a month or so back. I really liked it but they only have the 7 seater model (pop up 3rd row of seats) and not the 5 seat version here, and for me that rules it out. I have absolutely no need to have that space robbed by those seats.

On Friday I drive a Mercedes GLC250, and that was a nice car. A late model low km version of that with some bells and whistles is currently the front runner.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on August 29, 2019, 12:38:51 PM
I have a question regarding evaporative emission control or "gas tank" in general. I'm used to vehicles where there is no pressurized vapor that comes out when you open the filler port. AFAIK, that doesn't mean the gas isn't under pressure in the tank, but that there is a one-way valve or something. The reason I ask is because my vehicle (late 90's Honda) is the kind that does release pressurized vapor when you open it, it even says to expect it on the filler cap, but it also says in the manual that it has evaporation emissions control (charcoal canister).

So, I can understand it takes some amount of pressure to force the gasoline vapor into the charcoal, so there is still a residue when you open it. The actual pressure of the vapor seems limited, even in cases where I refilled a half-tank on a hot day, which means its going into the vapor can where its supposed to. So, I guess it's fine? I am just confused because I thought the two went together. Also, I have heard that such systems sometimes do not last for the life of the vehicle.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 29, 2019, 06:21:44 PM
I’m not really sure what you’re asking.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on August 30, 2019, 10:13:02 AM
On my '94 Honda Civic there is an audible 'hiss" when you unscrew the gas cap.  That's the way it's always been since I bought it new. While the whole EEC system is pretty passive it can cause a check engine light if something is not working as expected. but if it's the "hiss" that you hear, that you have concerns about? That's normal on my car, I just open the cap slow, stop when it hisses and then open it the rest of the way when it stops one sec later. 
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on August 30, 2019, 10:31:17 AM
No MIL (malfunction indicator lamp) or error codes. It just seems like a contradiction, that it has EEC, except gas vapor comes out when you open it. Basically, I am wondering I don't think more than a certain amount of vapor should come out, if the EEC system is working.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 30, 2019, 11:52:56 AM
Are you sure that's gas vapor coming out and not vacuum pressure releasing?  You will still smell a an odor of gas when you unscrew your cap regardless.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 30, 2019, 01:08:38 PM
On my '94 Honda Civic there is an audible 'hiss" when you unscrew the gas cap.  That's the way it's always been since I bought it new. While the whole EEC system is pretty passive it can cause a check engine light if something is not working as expected. but if it's the "hiss" that you hear, that you have concerns about? That's normal on my car, I just open the cap slow, stop when it hisses and then open it the rest of the way when it stops one sec later.

My 2001 Mustang threw codes for this and found out that the gas fill line rusted out.
Did not out what the problem until I had to replace the fuel pump.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on August 30, 2019, 01:41:30 PM
Are you sure that's gas vapor coming out and not vacuum pressure releasing?  You will still smell a an odor of gas when you unscrew your cap regardless.

That's a good point. The only time I unscrew the cap is at a gas station, so there's always a slight smell of gasoline in the air.  :)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on September 16, 2019, 06:38:10 PM
1996 Honda Civic Hatchback Brought Back to Life (https://honda-tech.com/articles/civic-hatchback-brought-back-life/)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on September 16, 2019, 11:44:07 PM
The remote door lock no longer unlocks my front driver side door. It locks OK but doesn't unlock with the key remote. It unlocks OK using the key in the door. I've watched videos on this repair but it's beyond me, so my trusty service centre will get one last job to do.

I say one last job as it's time to move on. I love this old Golf but it's just no longer suitable for our needs and it's time for updating to a bit of luxury.

So I'll be shopping for a (near) new car soon. It'll be an SUV as we are located rural now, I bought the Golf when I was living in the city. Next car will be 4WD to cope with towing a trailer up our steeper section of gravel drive. SUV because the wife is learning to drive and she prefers to be sitting a bit higher up from the ground, so I'm compromising a little. Else I'd get a nice performance wagon.

Been testing various cars and so far the Mercedes Benz GLC250 is my current fave.

The Golf I hope can go to a good home. It's a great car and runs really well.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: drwfishesman on September 17, 2019, 07:57:41 AM
If your brakelights stay on after you turn off the car, remove the proper fuse, then inspect under steering column to make sure the brake switch is not loose. The spring loaded push button of the brake switch should sit in a recess on the brake pedal arm. When the brakes are pushed the button releases and turns on the brake lights, when your foot is off the brake the plate should press the button and turn off the brake lights. Easy fix for a common problem.

That is all.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: superdave on September 17, 2019, 12:48:02 PM
so do those little caps on the tire valve actually do anything?  I noticed mine was missing and the tire pressure in that tire was low.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on September 17, 2019, 01:40:37 PM
so do those little caps on the tire valve actually do anything?  I noticed mine was missing and the tire pressure in that tire was low.

I think you answered your question in the second sentence.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on September 17, 2019, 03:49:30 PM
so do those little caps on the tire valve actually do anything?  I noticed mine was missing and the tire pressure in that tire was low.

I think you answered your question in the second sentence.

A valve cap's job is to keep dust/dirt/grime out of the valve end so that when you are inflating the tyre you don't blow that crud inside the tyre and foul the inside of the valve mechanism (which can then result in the valve not sealing properly and leaking). Else they make no difference to whether a tyre maintains air pressure.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: superdave on September 17, 2019, 09:27:02 PM
so do those little caps on the tire valve actually do anything?  I noticed mine was missing and the tire pressure in that tire was low.

I think you answered your question in the second sentence.

I cannot disconfirm the role of the cap in losing air pressure but the nail the mechanic found probably played a larger role.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on September 17, 2019, 09:31:05 PM
so do those little caps on the tire valve actually do anything?  I noticed mine was missing and the tire pressure in that tire was low.

I think you answered your question in the second sentence.

Those caps do not keep air in the tire; their purpose is to protect the valve and perhaps to prevent accidentally pressing it and releasing air.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: xenu on September 17, 2019, 10:08:07 PM
so do those little caps on the tire valve actually do anything?  I noticed mine was missing and the tire pressure in that tire was low.

I think you answered your question in the second sentence.

Those caps do not keep air in the tire; their purpose is to protect the valve and perhaps to prevent accidentally pressing it and releasing air.

If there is a rubber lining in the cap it should keep the air in. I was taking the tire pressure on a 767 and took the cap off and the tire started leaking from the stem. The valve core had backed out and just needed to be screwed back in. If the cap wasn't there the tire would have been really low.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: stands2reason on October 10, 2019, 09:13:21 PM
(https://i.imgur.com/MeqMuOU.jpg)
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on October 14, 2019, 11:38:15 AM
If your brakelights stay on after you turn off the car, remove the proper fuse, then inspect under steering column to make sure the brake switch is not loose. The spring loaded push button of the brake switch should sit in a recess on the brake pedal arm. When the brakes are pushed the button releases and turns on the brake lights, when your foot is off the brake the plate should press the button and turn off the brake lights. Easy fix for a common problem.

That is all.

This happened to me yesterday afternoon, except it wasn't the switch that was loose, but the little plastic insert in the brake arm has finally given up the ghost and cracked and fallen out, leaving a hole in the break arm just big enough for the switch to fit through, hence leaving the lights on. it's a quick fix, just go get a new little plastic thing and pop it back in the hole.

What I don't get is why was it engendered that way? why not put something more substantial in the hole or not have a hole at all?

I think the same thing happened to the safety for the clutch a couple months back, even with the clutch engaged it wouldn't start. it ended up in the shop for two days while they tried to figure that one out. couldn't they have been proactive enough to replace the one on the brake at the same time? getting under the dashboard in the foot well is no easy task for a man of my stature.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on October 14, 2019, 04:08:13 PM
Large crack in windscreen the other week, so had the mobile car window service come and replace it. Then a day or so later when driving in the rain I noticed one of the windscreen wiper blades was not returning to its proper resting position, it was sitting up too high. Normally it tucks in down below the bonnet. I completed my customer survey form and mentioned the problem and the company rang me pretty soon to discuss - they are sending someone out to sort it when they next come through my town.

Need to get two new tyres. Better call the tyre place today for that, as I have a lot of highway miles to do next week (might be shopping for my next car on that trip if a duck or two falls into line by then).

And the automatic door lock mechanism is failing on the driver's door. That's a pain. It still works fine when you put the key in the door lock but ugh, who does that anymore?! Still need to work out if it's worth fixing. If I ever want to sell the thing, it most likely will be.
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: HighPockets on October 15, 2019, 12:33:19 PM
And the automatic door lock mechanism is failing on the driver's door. That's a pain. It still works fine when you put the key in the door lock but ugh, who does that anymore?!

I do (when I bother to lock the door at all.)

And as a follow up, turns out the "easy fix" for replacing that break stop is only easy if the petal has enough travel to actually get the piece in where it goes. 
Title: Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
Post by: The Latinist on October 15, 2019, 12:59:46 PM
Wife’a Forester needs full catback.  The fucker’s not stainless, and both mufflers have perforated.  My car’s twice as old and the mufflers are fine (the pipes not so much, but those are easily and cheaply replaced).