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General Discussions => General Discussion => Topic started by: Tatyana on August 16, 2019, 01:06:22 PM

Title: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 16, 2019, 01:06:22 PM
I think it may be safe to say that my main passion in life is traveling.

Please tell me your travel plans, desires, favourite place or traveling stories.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Morvis13 on August 16, 2019, 02:26:37 PM
Next week I'm off to Japan for 2 weeks. Going to be an awesome time as it is a group trip with 200 friends. Saying in Naha Shi on the Island of Okinawa.

I use to travel a lot. So much so that I've met myself. Or at least a guy with the same name and travel itinerary. This is how you know you've gone too far. 
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 16, 2019, 03:22:17 PM
200 friends, were they uni or military buddies?

Japan is one of my top three counties.

I wanted to move there to teach ESL and take a 1-2 year sabbatical to do so.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Morvis13 on August 16, 2019, 03:27:35 PM
200 friends, were they uni or military buddies?

I haven't done either of these things. :)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Soldier of FORTRAN on August 16, 2019, 03:44:38 PM
Next week I'm off to Japan for 2 weeks. Going to be an awesome time as it is a group trip with 200 friends. Saying in Naha Shi on the Island of Okinawa.

I use to travel a lot. So much so that I've met myself. Or at least a guy with the same name and travel itinerary. This is how you know you've gone too far.

Nice!

Btw, if you like sharing travel photos then feel free to image dump!  I love travel photos, especially concerning food and geography. 
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 16, 2019, 04:37:48 PM
For 25 years living in rural North Dakota I was so content where I was that I had no interest in travel. I'd hear the whistle of a train on the tracks 1/4 mile away and think "I'm glad I'm not on that train."

Then things changed and I started to travel. Four years abroad (Mexico and Spain to learn Spanish). Two trips to Kenya while I was living in Spain. Snorkeling/diving in the Caribbean. Hiking in Scotland, Mexico, Canada, Arizona. Gallery-hopping in Santa Fe, NM. Then I discovered kayaking in Maui and that became one of my regular trips. For about 15 years I took 3 or 4 trips a year, in addition to spending the summer hiking in Canada.

When I decided that I was no longer able to hike safely (poor balance, mostly) I moved to Maui, where I am now. I belong to two canoe clubs and I can paddle nearly every day, year 'round.

And now I have no further need to travel. When you live in paradise and you can go out paddling in an outrigger canoe just about every day of the year, travel seems pointless: All the expense and hassle and delays and missed connections and lost luggage, just to get to a place that's not as nice as where you are.

Except that last fall I went to Tahiti to swim with the humpback whales, and that was so special that I may have to go back. Probably not this year because it would conflict with the Paddle for Life, a journey by canoe from Maui to Lana'i and back the next day, as a fund-raiser for the Pacific Cancer Foundation. I'm happy to support the PCF, but I'm really doing it for the paddling.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: The Latinist on August 16, 2019, 04:40:28 PM
It's sad that when I see 'traveling' I think first of sovereign citizens / freemen on the land.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 17, 2019, 03:58:28 AM
I guess that is a bit like travellers in the UK. They don't travel as much anymore and seem to have a lot of static caravan sites.

We are in Berlin right now for my partner's 40th. I think we might spend the first day wandering around and taking in the feel of the city, there are loads of museums but as we travel quite a bit, we are museum, mosque, church and templed'd out.

The Hermitage and Smithsonian are the only one on my list outside of London right now.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 17, 2019, 03:59:44 AM
200 friends, were they uni or military buddies?

I haven't done either of these things. :)

LARPing?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 17, 2019, 04:07:39 AM
For 25 years living in rural North Dakota I was so content where I was that I had no interest in travel. I'd hear the whistle of a train on the tracks 1/4 mile away and think "I'm glad I'm not on that train."

Then things changed and I started to travel. Four years abroad (Mexico and Spain to learn Spanish). Two trips to Kenya while I was living in Spain. Snorkeling/diving in the Caribbean. Hiking in Scotland, Mexico, Canada, Arizona. Gallery-hopping in Santa Fe, NM. Then I discovered kayaking in Maui and that became one of my regular trips. For about 15 years I took 3 or 4 trips a year, in addition to spending the summer hiking in Canada.

When I decided that I was no longer able to hike safely (poor balance, mostly) I moved to Maui, where I am now. I belong to two canoe clubs and I can paddle nearly every day, year 'round.

And now I have no further need to travel. When you live in paradise and you can go out paddling in an outrigger canoe just about every day of the year, travel seems pointless: All the expense and hassle and delays and missed connections and lost luggage, just to get to a place that's not as nice as where you are.

Except that last fall I went to Tahiti to swim with the humpback whales, and that was so special that I may have to go back. Probably not this year because it would conflict with the Paddle for Life, a journey by canoe from Maui to Lana'i and back the next day, as a fund-raiser for the Pacific Cancer Foundation. I'm happy to support the PCF, but I'm really doing it for the paddling.

I am going to be in Moose Jaw next month. I am familiar with rural mid west. There is something really romantic about the vast emptiness, but now that I have lived half my life in Canada and half in Europe (Nederland and England), I feel more settled in England, sort of like you and Maui.

Mind you, that might all change with Brexit. I almost wish I had immigrated again when we had open borders, but the partner was a more recent immigrant to the UK and didn't want to move.

At least we have two countries, potentially four, we can bolt to if things are really terrible.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 17, 2019, 07:04:01 AM
I think it may be safe to say that my main passion in life is traveling.

Please tell me your travel plans, desires, favourite place or traveling stories.


I just returned from a 12-month trip to Europe, during which I visited Ireland, England, the Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany.  After returing home for one week, I went to Telluride, Colorado for 3 weeks.  I am now home for 2 weeks after which I go to San Diego for a week and then Israel for a week.  After that, I think I'll actually be home for a while.


In the mountains of Telluride:
(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/telluride2019-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 17, 2019, 10:41:29 AM
In the mountains of Telluride:
(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/telluride2019-1.jpg)

I think Telluride is famous for skiing, but that picture looks like a place I'd love to go hiking. Except that I'm done hiking. And I won't get any more capable as I get older. There's hiking here, but the trails are either just walking paths, or are far too rustic for my ability. I can handle steep and long, but I need good footing. There are some waterfalls you can walk to on short paths (a mile or two round-trip) but the real hiking is on unmaintained trails with difficult footing, and often wet and slippery. Where I used to hike in Canada, the trails were good even in the rain. And I hiked in Sedona in the dry season.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on August 17, 2019, 11:26:47 AM
Less than 24 hours after I graduated from high school I was at boot camp. Fuck Indiana. A few month later I landed in Hong Kong and then moved on south. During twenty years in the USN I slept in 72 countries (kept a journal from Day One) and passed through a few more. I loved being in new places.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: brilligtove on August 17, 2019, 12:39:52 PM
Next week I'm off to Japan for 2 weeks. Going to be an awesome time as it is a group trip with 200 friends. Saying in Naha Shi on the Island of Okinawa.

I use to travel a lot. So much so that I've met myself. Or at least a guy with the same name and travel itinerary. This is how you know you've gone too far.

I didn't realize you were part of a cult.

ETA: You're very good at keeping it to yourself though, so no foul. :)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: bachfiend on August 17, 2019, 07:13:59 PM
I’m going off the idea of traveling for travel’s sake.  Nowadays, I need a reason to travel, whether it’s to Duisburg for a Ring Cycle or Chile for the total solar eclipse.  Next year I’m doing a cruise in the Arctic hoping to see the Northern Lights.  Perth to Europe, or North or South America are such a very long way, taking around 24 hours in flight time, which is a major physical and mental torture.  I travel business class dlespite it being much more expensive than economy, meaning I can’t travel as much.  But it’s much more comfortable, and almost tolerable.

When I travel, I want to go to a limited number of cities, and spend many days in each, so I don’t have to frequently repack and travel to a new city.  The highlight of my last Europe trip was the 11 nights I spent in Duisburg.  I basically did in Duisburg what I do at home.  The cruise next year in the Arctic will be similarish in that I won’t have to repack frequently for the 11 days of the cruise.  And I don’t think I’ll be doing much before or after the cruise.

Home is the best place in the world.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 17, 2019, 07:57:45 PM
I’m going off the idea of traveling for travel’s sake.  Nowadays, I need a reason to travel, whether it’s to Duisburg for a Ring Cycle or Chile for the total solar eclipse.  Next year I’m doing a cruise in the Arctic hoping to see the Northern Lights.  Perth to Europe, or North or South America are such a very long way, taking around 24 hours in flight time, which is a major physical and mental torture.  I travel business class dlespite it being much more expensive than economy, meaning I can’t travel as much.  But it’s much more comfortable, and almost tolerable.

When I travel, I want to go to a limited number of cities, and spend many days in each, so I don’t have to frequently repack and travel to a new city.  The highlight of my last Europe trip was the 11 nights I spent in Duisburg.  I basically did in Duisburg what I do at home.  The cruise next year in the Arctic will be similarish in that I won’t have to repack frequently for the 11 days of the cruise.  And I don’t think I’ll be doing much before or after the cruise.

Home is the best place in the world.

I feel pretty much the same. When I traveled I liked to stay two or three weeks in one place rather than trying to see a lot of different places. Except that I finally decided to move to a place where I would not have to travel any more because no place is as much fun as here.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: The Latinist on August 17, 2019, 11:03:00 PM
I think it may be safe to say that my main passion in life is traveling.

Please tell me your travel plans, desires, favourite place or traveling stories.


I just returned from a 12-month trip to Europe, during which I visited Ireland, England, the Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany.  After returing home for one week, I went to Telluride, Colorado for 3 weeks.  I am now home for 2 weeks after which I go to San Diego for a week and then Israel for a week.  After that, I think I'll actually be home for a while.


In the mountains of Telluride:
(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/telluride2019-1.jpg)

I’m not sure what to make of this post.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 18, 2019, 12:41:00 AM
I think it may be safe to say that my main passion in life is traveling.

Please tell me your travel plans, desires, favourite place or traveling stories.


I just returned from a 12-month trip to Europe, during which I visited Ireland, England, the Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany.  After returing home for one week, I went to Telluride, Colorado for 3 weeks.  I am now home for 2 weeks after which I go to San Diego for a week and then Israel for a week.  After that, I think I'll actually be home for a while.


In the mountains of Telluride:
(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/telluride2019-1.jpg)

I’m not sure what to make of this post.


What is unclear?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 18, 2019, 03:33:35 AM
I think it may be safe to say that my main passion in life is traveling.

Please tell me your travel plans, desires, favourite place or traveling stories.


I just returned from a 12-month trip to Europe, during which I visited Ireland, England, the Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany.  After returing home for one week, I went to Telluride, Colorado for 3 weeks.  I am now home for 2 weeks after which I go to San Diego for a week and then Israel for a week.  After that, I think I'll actually be home for a while.


In the mountains of Telluride:
(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/telluride2019-1.jpg)

Sabbatical?

That is impressive traveling. How did you decide where to go and how long to spend in each country?

The longest we have travelled was 10 weeks in SE Asia, and as our budget was only £ 40/day, there was a fatigue factor by the end of it.

I did travel for about 6 months in Mexico and Central America in my early 20s, but that sort of young travelling really isn't the same.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 18, 2019, 04:33:09 AM
I think it may be safe to say that my main passion in life is traveling.

Please tell me your travel plans, desires, favourite place or traveling stories.


I just returned from a 12-month trip to Europe, during which I visited Ireland, England, the Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany.  After returing home for one week, I went to Telluride, Colorado for 3 weeks.  I am now home for 2 weeks after which I go to San Diego for a week and then Israel for a week.  After that, I think I'll actually be home for a while.


In the mountains of Telluride:
(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/telluride2019-1.jpg)

Sabbatical?


Yes!  My girlfriend's.  I was just along for the ride.


Quote
That is impressive traveling. How did you decide where to go and how long to spend in each country?


My girlfriend is a theorectical chemist and physicist.  She applied for, and received, funding to visit various research institutions in Germany, Spain, and the Netherlands for agreed-upon periods of time.  Thus we spent 6 months in Hamburg; 2 months in Mainz, Germany; 2 months in the Netherlands; and 1 month in San Sebastián, Spain; with shorter trips to Ireland, England, Italy, and France for scientific conferences.  So the where and the how-long were determined by her research interests and funding.


The trips to Telluride, San Diego, and Israel are also for conferences.  However, my girlfriend was one of the organizers of the Telluride conference and consequenctly there was plenty of time in the schedule for hiking.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Soldier of FORTRAN on August 18, 2019, 04:34:50 AM
Ooooooh
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: 2397 on August 18, 2019, 07:45:31 AM
Quote from: Tatyana
How did you decide where to go and how long to spend in each country?
My girlfriend is a theorectical chemist and physicist.

I was hoping for complex equations after this. Or that you were traveling by some kind of self-energizing mecha.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on August 18, 2019, 08:10:59 AM
I’m going off the idea of traveling for travel’s sake.  Nowadays, I need a reason to travel, whether it’s to Duisburg for a Ring Cycle or Chile for the total solar eclipse.  Next year I’m doing a cruise in the Arctic hoping to see the Northern Lights.  Perth to Europe, or North or South America are such a very long way, taking around 24 hours in flight time, which is a major physical and mental torture.  I travel business class dlespite it being much more expensive than economy, meaning I can’t travel as much.  But it’s much more comfortable, and almost tolerable.

When I travel, I want to go to a limited number of cities, and spend many days in each, so I don’t have to frequently repack and travel to a new city.  The highlight of my last Europe trip was the 11 nights I spent in Duisburg.  I basically did in Duisburg what I do at home.  The cruise next year in the Arctic will be similarish in that I won’t have to repack frequently for the 11 days of the cruise.  And I don’t think I’ll be doing much before or after the cruise.

Home is the best place in the world.
You should put a whale watching cruise up the Canadian Pacific coast to your list. Awesome squared.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 18, 2019, 11:27:18 AM
I’m going off the idea of traveling for travel’s sake.  Nowadays, I need a reason to travel, whether it’s to Duisburg for a Ring Cycle or Chile for the total solar eclipse.  Next year I’m doing a cruise in the Arctic hoping to see the Northern Lights.  Perth to Europe, or North or South America are such a very long way, taking around 24 hours in flight time, which is a major physical and mental torture.  I travel business class dlespite it being much more expensive than economy, meaning I can’t travel as much.  But it’s much more comfortable, and almost tolerable.

When I travel, I want to go to a limited number of cities, and spend many days in each, so I don’t have to frequently repack and travel to a new city.  The highlight of my last Europe trip was the 11 nights I spent in Duisburg.  I basically did in Duisburg what I do at home.  The cruise next year in the Arctic will be similarish in that I won’t have to repack frequently for the 11 days of the cruise.  And I don’t think I’ll be doing much before or after the cruise.

Home is the best place in the world.
You should put a whale watching cruise up the Canadian Pacific coast to your list. Awesome squared.

Forget whale-watching from a big boat! Come to Maui in winter and come out whale watching in a kayak or an outrigger canoe. There's only one way to observe whales that's better than in a self-powered tiny boat at water level, and that's...

Go to Tahiti where you can swim with them! A small outboard motorboat will drop you off 100 meters away from the whale (often a mom and calf or a mom, calf, and male escort, or occasionally a male singer) and you'll swim to the whales in snorkel gear. Wetsuit recommended, and Kwells if you get seasick. That's beyond awesome squared.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: bachfiend on August 18, 2019, 05:48:08 PM
I’m going off the idea of traveling for travel’s sake.  Nowadays, I need a reason to travel, whether it’s to Duisburg for a Ring Cycle or Chile for the total solar eclipse.  Next year I’m doing a cruise in the Arctic hoping to see the Northern Lights.  Perth to Europe, or North or South America are such a very long way, taking around 24 hours in flight time, which is a major physical and mental torture.  I travel business class dlespite it being much more expensive than economy, meaning I can’t travel as much.  But it’s much more comfortable, and almost tolerable.

When I travel, I want to go to a limited number of cities, and spend many days in each, so I don’t have to frequently repack and travel to a new city.  The highlight of my last Europe trip was the 11 nights I spent in Duisburg.  I basically did in Duisburg what I do at home.  The cruise next year in the Arctic will be similarish in that I won’t have to repack frequently for the 11 days of the cruise.  And I don’t think I’ll be doing much before or after the cruise.

Home is the best place in the world.
You should put a whale watching cruise up the Canadian Pacific coast to your list. Awesome squared.

Forget whale-watching from a big boat! Come to Maui in winter and come out whale watching in a kayak or an outrigger canoe. There's only one way to observe whales that's better than in a self-powered tiny boat at water level, and that's...

Go to Tahiti where you can swim with them! A small outboard motorboat will drop you off 100 meters away from the whale (often a mom and calf or a mom, calf, and male escort, or occasionally a male singer) and you'll swim to the whales in snorkel gear. Wetsuit recommended, and Kwells if you get seasick. That's beyond awesome squared.

I’ve seen humpbacks from an inflatable in the Antarctic.  The best way of observing whales is on a DVD in the comfort of your own home (I’m thinking of the David Attenborough documentaries in particular).  I once spent hours in the Galápagos Islands trying to get the perfect photo of a blue-footed booby diving for its food, but failed.  But then I found a documentary showing not just one booby diving, but many.

The trouble with travel is that the memories soon fade.  But DVDs last forever, or almost so.  A few years ago, I went to Berlin and attended a performance of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, one of the world’s best, which was a highlight.  I can’t remember whether they performed the Shostakovich 6 or the Bruckner 6.  I can listen to both anytime I want at home.


Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 18, 2019, 07:38:25 PM
I wish I could afford to travel. Right now, I can't see any way of ever leaving my country again.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: The Latinist on August 18, 2019, 11:52:35 PM
I think it may be safe to say that my main passion in life is traveling.

Please tell me your travel plans, desires, favourite place or traveling stories.


I just returned from a 12-month trip to Europe, during which I visited Ireland, England, the Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany.  After returing home for one week, I went to Telluride, Colorado for 3 weeks.  I am now home for 2 weeks after which I go to San Diego for a week and then Israel for a week.  After that, I think I'll actually be home for a while.


In the mountains of Telluride:
(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/telluride2019-1.jpg)

I’m not sure what to make of this post.

What is unclear?

Your words were perfectly clear as words, they simply describe a series of events which is so outside of my experience of the world as to be incomprehensible without significantly more explanation.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 19, 2019, 12:03:33 AM
I think it may be safe to say that my main passion in life is traveling.

Please tell me your travel plans, desires, favourite place or traveling stories.


I just returned from a 12-month trip to Europe, during which I visited Ireland, England, the Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany.  After returing home for one week, I went to Telluride, Colorado for 3 weeks.  I am now home for 2 weeks after which I go to San Diego for a week and then Israel for a week.  After that, I think I'll actually be home for a while.


In the mountains of Telluride:
(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/telluride2019-1.jpg)

I’m not sure what to make of this post.

What is unclear?

Your words were perfectly clear as words, they simply describe a series of events which is so outside of my experience of the world as to be incomprehensible without significantly more explanation.


Really? I'd be happy to explain more if you have any questions.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: The Latinist on August 19, 2019, 12:11:05 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 19, 2019, 12:13:53 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Seriously?  What the hell did I write that was arrogant or condescending?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Soldier of FORTRAN on August 19, 2019, 12:16:48 AM
[REDACTED FOR ENVY]

Please do not begrudge others their good fortune.

In fact, some people even get a vicarious kick out of other people's exploits and just generally like seeing other people do well, too, and travel threads are great for that.  (https://i.imgur.com/5Ehqrvg.gif)


(The lives of others are real and should be good)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 19, 2019, 02:43:56 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Is this sort of comment really necessary?

What intention did you have in making it?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 19, 2019, 02:45:55 AM
I wish I could afford to travel. Right now, I can't see any way of ever leaving my country again.

You live in an amazing country. I feel your angst as it does seem like a right of passage for the people of Autralia and New Zealand to 'see the world's.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 19, 2019, 02:56:56 AM
It is our last day in Berlin, and the situation with the Berlin Wall was absolutely sureal, except it is real.

We have travelled through quite a few former Eastern Bloc countries in the last two years, and I am quite keen on seeing St. Petersburg.

As amazing, interesting and stunningly beautiful these countries are (Google Cesny Krumlov, Hvar, Plitvice Lakes to name a few), the tragic recent history of Soviet occupation and former Yugoslavian wars is still present and very disturbing.

It makes me very nervous about Vladamir Putin's current sabre rattling.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Rai on August 19, 2019, 03:03:46 AM
Having recently moved to Kenya, I am keen to start travelling again, but I still need to settle down first. Before I used to go to Northeastern Brazil quite a lot, which is fantastic but those days are gone now.

I had one trip to Mogadishu, but that wasn't for pleasure, and I'll need to go around the whole of Somalia  for work.

I am planning to go around the country first, then pop over to Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Ethiopia in the neighborhood. Namibia, Mozambique, South Africa and Egypt are also on the list.

I just wish I could start going around already.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 19, 2019, 12:04:25 PM
I’ve seen humpbacks from an inflatable in the Antarctic.  The best way of observing whales is on a DVD in the comfort of your own home ...

I agree that I'd much rather see whales on a DVD at home than from an inflatable in the Antarctic. But even better than a DVD at home is from a kayak or a canoe in the warm, flat water off of south or west Maui. I don't do well at all on rough or cold water. But seeing whales close up, when you've actually worked your own muscles to get there, and you're at their level at the surface of the water, and it's 80 degrees F., and the water and the sun are so warm that being wet is a pleasure rather than a pain, this is an experience far more emotional and inspiring, than just watching a DVD at home while sitting on a couch.

And if you're lucky enough to see one breach close to your boat (maybe once in 100 outings you may see a breach really close up) this is an experince you can never get just from watching a screen.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: amysrevenge on August 19, 2019, 12:08:12 PM
Moose Jaw is an awesome fun town (or at least it was 20 years ago, it doesn't feel like it was that long ago......)

I don't like travelling, but I do like to be stationary in a variety of different places.  Haha
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on August 19, 2019, 12:35:57 PM
Forget whale-watching from a big boat! Come to Maui in winter and come out whale watching in a kayak or an outrigger canoe. There's only one way to observe whales that's better than in a self-powered tiny boat at water level, and that's...
The cruise ships have kayaks. I was lifted out the water by two whales. They carried me to the shore.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 19, 2019, 12:37:26 PM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.

Wow. Where's this coming from? And what have you done with The Latinist?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 19, 2019, 12:50:15 PM
Forget whale-watching from a big boat! Come to Maui in winter and come out whale watching in a kayak or an outrigger canoe. There's only one way to observe whales that's better than in a self-powered tiny boat at water level, and that's...
The cruise ships have kayaks. I was lifted out the water by two whales. They carried me to the shore.

I am confused by this post. I suspect some kind of a joke, but jokes often go right over my head. (And then other times I find something unbearably funny and other people can't figure out why I'm laughing.)

I've got nothing against cruise ships. I just would never want to go on one. So much easier to paddle out from shore. If the cruise ship allows you to take a kayak out when there are whales around, that's great. Do they allow this? I don't think the cruise ships that come to Maui have their own kayaks. They'll book you an outing with a local kayak outfitter or whale-watch boat, and probably charge you twice what you'd pay to the outfitter directly. And it's a crap shoot whether they'll book you with one of the better outfitters or just with the cheapest one.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: CarbShark on August 19, 2019, 04:20:59 PM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.
Wow, this nice little thread took a dark turn
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 19, 2019, 07:58:50 PM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.

Wow, this nice little thread took a dark turn

Check your formatting, please. The comment I assume to be yours comes out as a quote from me.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 21, 2019, 10:53:33 PM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Hey, Latinist, I just booked a two-week trip to Australia in December.  I wanted you to be the first to know.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Soldier of FORTRAN on August 21, 2019, 11:10:24 PM
Relevant:
(https://i.redd.it/5inl1oru5zb21.jpg)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: bachfiend on August 21, 2019, 11:55:04 PM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Hey, Latinist, I just booked a two-week trip to Australia in December.  I wanted you to be the first to know.

Where are you going?  December in Australia can be very hot, ruling out Northern Australia, which is also the cyclone season.

Haven’t you traveled yourself out yet?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 22, 2019, 12:03:24 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Hey, Latinist, I just booked a two-week trip to Australia in December.  I wanted you to be the first to know.

Where are you going?  December in Australia can be very hot, ruling out Northern Australia, which is also the cyclone season.



Melbourne and Sydney.  We were thinking about doing some hiking in the Blue Mountains.  Will it be too hot there then?


Quote
Haven’t you traveled yourself out yet?


Not really.  Even though we were away for a year, it was more like we were living in Europe than traveling.  Plus, the more time I spend in actual civilized countries, the less I like being in the U.S.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: bachfiend on August 22, 2019, 12:31:17 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Hey, Latinist, I just booked a two-week trip to Australia in December.  I wanted you to be the first to know.

Where are you going?  December in Australia can be very hot, ruling out Northern Australia, which is also the cyclone season.



Melbourne and Sydney.  We were thinking about doing some hiking in the Blue Mountains.  Will it be too hot there then?


Quote
Haven’t you traveled yourself out yet?


Not really.  Even though we were away for a year, it was more like we were living in Europe than traveling.  Plus, the more time I spend in actual civilized countries, the less I like being in the U.S.


Both Sydney and Melbourne can be very hot in December.  I don’t know whether I’d want to go hiking in the bush in December.  This morning I got an offer to take part in a trek in Tasmania, which is considerably more southern than Melbourne, in April 2020, which would be a better time.  Perhaps you should read Bill Bryson’s book ‘Downunder’ for ideas?  (reminds me, he’s doing an Australian tour next month, I think to publicise his latest book).  He recounted how once he visited Perth in summer, and got a very nasty case of sunburn (to the extent he was asked for a long time afterwards whether he realised he’d been sunburned).  Take a lot of sunscreen.  The Earth is very close to the sun in December.

I agree with you regarding living in Europe versus travelling in Europe.  The highlight of my last trip was the 11 nights I spent in Duisburg, during which time I basically did what I do at home.  I enjoyed Hamburg too, and imagined I could have happily spent several months there (but not in winter).

Actually, thinking about it, can’t you go at a better time?  Spring or autumn would be better seasons generally.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Captain Video on August 22, 2019, 01:02:16 AM
I have often wondered what it would be like to live in Europe where you can drive for a few hours and be in a completely different country with a different language and different customs. Its mostly about the food for me. We have a little of that here but not to the extremes I like to imagine people have there. Or am I being naive? 

When you cross from one country into another is it obvious (other than signs or flags) Is it like Epcot where you cross a line then the architecture, language and food changes? LOL  Obviously not that extreme but you get what I am asking.

The only thing that really lets you know you just crossed into another state here in the US other than signs is some crappy roadside store selling you something you could not purchase in the previous state. (fireworks, porn, stronger beer, liquor, marijuana, abortions, etc)   >:D
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 22, 2019, 01:10:26 AM
I'd love to do a food tour of Europe. Although I think I'd get stuck in Italy.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Captain Video on August 22, 2019, 01:40:46 AM
I'd love to do a food tour of Europe. Although I think I'd get stuck in Italy.

Yea I would get stuck in Italy, probably Parma but I could just a easily say that about a few places in Spain or France like Alsace.

Alsace is a good example of what I was asking about above, In my experience here at a local restaurant this French food has a heavy German influence (or maybe other way around)  I wonder if that is the norm in areas near the borders.  Is it a culinary gradient when traveling from France to Italy or is it ciabatta on one side and baguette's on the other?  LOL I really wonder if you actually have to drive to Italy to get "good Italian food" if you live near the border in France.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 22, 2019, 02:06:07 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Hey, Latinist, I just booked a two-week trip to Australia in December.  I wanted you to be the first to know.

Where are you going?  December in Australia can be very hot, ruling out Northern Australia, which is also the cyclone season.



Melbourne and Sydney.  We were thinking about doing some hiking in the Blue Mountains.  Will it be too hot there then?


Quote
Haven’t you traveled yourself out yet?


Not really.  Even though we were away for a year, it was more like we were living in Europe than traveling.  Plus, the more time I spend in actual civilized countries, the less I like being in the U.S.


Both Sydney and Melbourne can be very hot in December.  I don’t know whether I’d want to go hiking in the bush in December.  This morning I got an offer to take part in a trek in Tasmania, which is considerably more southern than Melbourne, in April 2020, which would be a better time.  Perhaps you should read Bill Bryson’s book ‘Downunder’ for ideas?  (reminds me, he’s doing an Australian tour next month, I think to publicise his latest book).  He recounted how once he visited Perth in summer, and got a very nasty case of sunburn (to the extent he was asked for a long time afterwards whether he realised he’d been sunburned).  Take a lot of sunscreen.  The Earth is very close to the sun in December.


Thanks for the heads-up.  I'll look more closely at the weather.

Quote
I agree with you regarding living in Europe versus travelling in Europe.  The highlight of my last trip was the 11 nights I spent in Duisburg, during which time I basically did what I do at home.  I enjoyed Hamburg too, and imagined I could have happily spent several months there (but not in winter).


Well, I was in Hamburg from November till April, arguably the worst 6 months of the year.  But I didn't mind the weather too much.  December and January were pretty harsh and the days awfully short, but the rest of the time wasn't so bad.  Plus the unpleasantness of the winter was offset by the many Weinachtsmärkte, where I discoverred Glühwein (spiced hot red wine) and Feuerzangenbowle (high-octane Glühwein). Besides, you get breaks in the weather, even in the middle of winter:

(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/hamburg.jpg)

Quote
Actually, thinking about it, can’t you go at a better time?  Spring or autumn would be better seasons generally.

Alas, no.  As usual, the trip will be in conjunction with lectures that my hotshot-scientist girlfriend has been invited to give. 
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 22, 2019, 02:09:14 AM
I'd love to do a food tour of Europe. Although I think I'd get stuck in Italy.


For me it would be a toss-up between Italy and San Sebastián, Spain.  However, it would not be France, in spite of their opinion of their overrated cuisine.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 22, 2019, 02:09:51 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Hey, Latinist, I just booked a two-week trip to Australia in December.  I wanted you to be the first to know.

Four weeks in New Zealand, at least a week on Great Barrier Island. It is mostly to see family, we will be meeting some babies/nephews for the first time.

The cheapest flights are with China Southern right now, has anyone town with them?

We would be stopping in Beijing or another major Chinese city both ways.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 22, 2019, 02:13:00 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Hey, Latinist, I just booked a two-week trip to Australia in December.  I wanted you to be the first to know.

Where are you going?  December in Australia can be very hot, ruling out Northern Australia, which is also the cyclone season.



Melbourne and Sydney.  We were thinking about doing some hiking in the Blue Mountains.  Will it be too hot there then?


Quote
Haven’t you traveled yourself out yet?


Not really.  Even though we were away for a year, it was more like we were living in Europe than traveling.  Plus, the more time I spend in actual civilized countries, the less I like being in the U.S.


And the airports are quite terrible for the most part.

It is too bad, air New Zealand is great, but now you have to transit through LAX, which I will avoid.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 22, 2019, 02:16:12 AM
To be honest, I mostly just want to call you an arrogant, condescending prick and tell you to fuck off.


Hey, Latinist, I just booked a two-week trip to Australia in December.  I wanted you to be the first to know.

Where are you going?  December in Australia can be very hot, ruling out Northern Australia, which is also the cyclone season.



Melbourne and Sydney.  We were thinking about doing some hiking in the Blue Mountains.  Will it be too hot there then?


Quote
Haven’t you traveled yourself out yet?


Not really.  Even though we were away for a year, it was more like we were living in Europe than traveling.  Plus, the more time I spend in actual civilized countries, the less I like being in the U.S.


And the airports are quite terrible for the most part.


Yes, compared with major European airports.  I think I could actually live in Frankfurt airport.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 22, 2019, 02:21:27 AM
The cheapest flights are with China Southern right now, has anyone [fl]own with them?


I'm sure people have.  How many have flown with them a second time would be of interest.  :)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 22, 2019, 02:21:52 AM
Thanks for the heads-up.  I'll look more closely at the weather.

Just remember to carry LOTS of water with you. More than you think you'll need. And don't go off the paths. Spring and summer is snake season.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 22, 2019, 02:23:35 AM
Thanks for the heads-up.  I'll look more closely at the weather.

Just remember to carry LOTS of water with you. More than you think you'll need. And don't go off the paths. Spring and summer is snake season.


Okay, thanks.  I'll look into the snake situation, too.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: bachfiend on August 22, 2019, 02:35:29 AM
The cheapest flights are with China Southern right now, has anyone [fl]own with them?


I'm sure people have.  How many have flown with them a second time would be of interest.  :)

I flew with them around 12 years ago, Hong Kong to Beijing.  They were fine, even economy (though nowadays, unless I fly business class, I don’t fly).
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: jt512 on August 22, 2019, 02:41:11 AM
I have often wondered what it would be like to live in Europe where you can drive for a few hours and be in a completely different country with a different language and different customs. Its mostly about the food for me. We have a little of that here but not to the extremes I like to imagine people have there. Or am I being naive?


No, you are not being naive.  It's fucking great.

Quote
When you cross from one country into another is it obvious (other than signs or flags) Is it like Epcot where you cross a line then the architecture, language and food changes? LOL  Obviously not that extreme but you get what I am asking.


As long as you are traveling within the Schengen area (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Area), which approximately corresponds to the EU, then crossing national borders resembles crossing state borders in the US: There's a sign on the highway: "Welcome to ...".  Of course, the cultural heritage, and hence the architecture, changes.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 22, 2019, 02:43:09 AM
I have often wondered what it would be like to live in Europe where you can drive for a few hours and be in a completely different country with a different language and different customs. Its mostly about the food for me. We have a little of that here but not to the extremes I like to imagine people have there. Or am I being naive? 

When you cross from one country into another is it obvious (other than signs or flags) Is it like Epcot where you cross a line then the architecture, language and food changes? LOL  Obviously not that extreme but you get what I am asking.

The only thing that really lets you know you just crossed into another state here in the US other than signs is some crappy roadside store selling you something you could not purchase in the previous state. (fireworks, porn, stronger beer, liquor, marijuana, abortions, etc)   >:D

There is a certain look to the city centres in European cities as far as I can tell, although I am not extensively travelled in Europe, I have gaping holes like Spain and Portugal.

For example, there are a lot of Victorian Era Neo-Classical building everywhere in Europe.

Paris is overrated but probably the prettiest big city in Europe, Rome is one of the best cities in the world, London is always interesting, Amsterdam is a fun toytown, and Budapest is enchanting and a much better place to visit than Paris (PS Rai, I loved Hungary but couldn't link the right wing politics to anyone we met there, is it more of an issue in smaller cities).

European cities often have multiple 'centres', like loads of little villages squished together as people walk or catch public transport to a greater extent.





It is far more obvious when you look at the residential areas,
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Rai on August 22, 2019, 03:19:01 AM

I have often wondered what it would be like to live in Europe where you can drive for a few hours and be in a completely different country with a different language and different customs. Its mostly about the food for me. We have a little of that here but not to the extremes I like to imagine people have there. Or am I being naive? 

When you cross from one country into another is it obvious (other than signs or flags) Is it like Epcot where you cross a line then the architecture, language and food changes? LOL  Obviously not that extreme but you get what I am asking.

As everywhere, borders in Europe are completely arbitrary and there is almost no culture shock-value of crossing one. Usually, people living next to the border would speak the same language and have a similar culture. There are subtle changes, but the transition is usually very smooth.

However, going between capitals and major cities can be a huge shift as they are markedly different. There are architectural similarities, especially within cultural blocks (Francophones, post-Habsburgs, Northern Slavs, Scandinavians, Southern Balkans, the Western and Eastern Mediterranean, etc.), but they are all quite different.

The only shocking thing is the technological/wealth differences between some parts of the East and West.


and Budapest is enchanting and a much better place to visit than Paris (PS Rai, I loved Hungary but couldn't link the right wing politics to anyone we met there, is it more of an issue in smaller cities).

Budapest is still great to visit, but it is very depressing to live there.

Tatyana, when were you there? Things have been getting exponentially worse in the past 10 years or so. The politics are everywhere, but you aren't really going to encounter it as a foreign visitor. Hungarians don't like to talk politics in general, and those who speak decent English are generally not fascist supporters, though this is also changing.

Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 22, 2019, 11:22:00 AM
... Perhaps you should read Bill Bryson’s book ‘Downunder’ ...

After I read his book "In a Sunburned Country" it seemed to me there were too many scary critters there and I decided not to go there. Then while planning a trip to New Zealand, and not finding a month-long tour (the length of time I wanted to stay) I ended up booking two weeks in NZ and  two weeks in Australia. It was literally right after hanging up the phone, after giving my credit card for the tour, that I remembered I was scared to go. I ended up having a wonderful time and didn't get killed by any of the scary critters. Though we did see some we thought were probably venomous. The highlight was three days on the Great Barrier Reef, where I snorkeled because I was not yet a diver. But the whole thing was great.

I was in France in 1966, give or take a year. It was not a friendly place. Nor was Germany where a total stranger threatened to beat up my friend for being an American. (Too soon after WWII?) Rome was filthy. Scandinavia and the Benelux countries were wonderful. Didn't visit Spain on that trip because of Franco, but I was there for a year and a half, starting in 1999. I liked Spain except that nearly everyone smoked nearly everywhere. And after 4 1/2 years in Mexico, the food in Span was decidedly bland. But by then I was eating seafood, which is very good there.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: bachfiend on August 22, 2019, 02:24:31 PM
... Perhaps you should read Bill Bryson’s book ‘Downunder’ ...

After I read his book "In a Sunburned Country" it seemed to me there were too many scary critters there and I decided not to go there. Then while planning a trip to New Zealand, and not finding a month-long tour (the length of time I wanted to stay) I ended up booking two weeks in NZ and  two weeks in Australia. It was literally right after hanging up the phone, after giving my credit card for the tour, that I remembered I was scared to go. I ended up having a wonderful time and didn't get killed by any of the scary critters. Though we did see some we thought were probably venomous. The highlight was three days on the Great Barrier Reef, where I snorkeled because I was not yet a diver. But the whole thing was great.

I was in France in 1966, give or take a year. It was not a friendly place. Nor was Germany where a total stranger threatened to beat up my friend for being an American. (Too soon after WWII?) Rome was filthy. Scandinavia and the Benelux countries were wonderful. Didn't visit Spain on that trip because of Franco, but I was there for a year and a half, starting in 1999. I liked Spain except that nearly everyone smoked nearly everywhere. And after 4 1/2 years in Mexico, the food in Span was decidedly bland. But by then I was eating seafood, which is very good there.

In Australia, more people are killed by horses than by sharks or crocodiles.  More people are killed by bees, than are killed by snakes.  Australian snakes have an ill deserved bad reputation.  Deaths from snake bites are very, very rare, owing to the ready availability of antivenin.  Australian snakes aren’t aggressive, and will get out of your way if you give them the opportunity.  And their venom is largely anticoagulant and neurotoxic, meaning you’ve got time to get the antivenin, unlike other snakes which have venom which causes direct tissue destruction at the bite site.

Personally, I find Germany very friendly.  Of course, it depends where you go.  There are some places in Australia I’d never think of going owing to feeling of personal danger, although they’re few.  The same applies to all other countries.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 22, 2019, 03:39:01 PM
... Perhaps you should read Bill Bryson’s book ‘Downunder’ ...

After I read his book "In a Sunburned Country" it seemed to me there were too many scary critters there and I decided not to go there. Then while planning a trip to New Zealand, and not finding a month-long tour (the length of time I wanted to stay) I ended up booking two weeks in NZ and  two weeks in Australia. It was literally right after hanging up the phone, after giving my credit card for the tour, that I remembered I was scared to go. I ended up having a wonderful time and didn't get killed by any of the scary critters. Though we did see some we thought were probably venomous. The highlight was three days on the Great Barrier Reef, where I snorkeled because I was not yet a diver. But the whole thing was great.

I was in France in 1966, give or take a year. It was not a friendly place. Nor was Germany where a total stranger threatened to beat up my friend for being an American. (Too soon after WWII?) Rome was filthy. Scandinavia and the Benelux countries were wonderful. Didn't visit Spain on that trip because of Franco, but I was there for a year and a half, starting in 1999. I liked Spain except that nearly everyone smoked nearly everywhere. And after 4 1/2 years in Mexico, the food in Span was decidedly bland. But by then I was eating seafood, which is very good there.

In Australia, more people are killed by horses than by sharks or crocodiles.  More people are killed by bees, than are killed by snakes.  Australian snakes have an ill deserved bad reputation.  Deaths from snake bites are very, very rare, owing to the ready availability of antivenin.  Australian snakes aren’t aggressive, and will get out of your way if you give them the opportunity.  And their venom is largely anticoagulant and neurotoxic, meaning you’ve got time to get the antivenin, unlike other snakes which have venom which causes direct tissue destruction at the bite site.

Personally, I find Germany very friendly.  Of course, it depends where you go.  There are some places in Australia I’d never think of going owing to feeling of personal danger, although they’re few.  The same applies to all other countries.

More people are killed by mosquitos than by any other animal, but a charging rhino is scarier than a buzzing mosquito. In Australia one of our stops was at a working cattle ranch. We were given the opportunity to go horseback riding, which I declined, because I knew a girl who was paraplegic after being thrown by a horse. The alternative was 4-wheeling, which I also declined. It wasn't the best part of that trip.

Most fears are not rational, and we are, irrationally, not scared of some really dangerous things, like riding in a car. The book scared me with its stories of venomous bugs and snakes, and the story of a woman who was dragged into a pool of water by a crocodile and (IIRC) all they ever found were her shoes. Okay, I'm probably remembering the story wrong, but still... Bryson loves Australia but the book seems designed to scare people away.

Germany might well be very different now than it was in 1966. The friend I was there with spoke a bit of German, but we couldn't even get anyone to give us directions. People would pretend they didn't even see you. In contrast, in the Netherlands, if you put your bag down for a moment the first person to pass would offer to help with directions or whatever you needed. I retained a strong prejudice against Germany and Germans until I met a family of Swiss and German descent in Canada who are wonderful people. (Of course, they're Canadian.) I retained a dislike of the French (who were not friendly when I was there) until France told GWB to go soak his head when he wanted their support of his invasion of Iraq.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 22, 2019, 07:50:26 PM
After I read his book "In a Sunburned Country" it seemed to me there were too many scary critters there and I decided not to go there. Then while planning a trip to New Zealand, and not finding a month-long tour (the length of time I wanted to stay) I ended up booking two weeks in NZ and  two weeks in Australia. It was literally right after hanging up the phone, after giving my credit card for the tour, that I remembered I was scared to go. I ended up having a wonderful time and didn't get killed by any of the scary critters. Though we did see some we thought were probably venomous. The highlight was three days on the Great Barrier Reef, where I snorkeled because I was not yet a diver. But the whole thing was great.

You did the right thing. Australia is great (biased here, but still) and not at all as dangerous as it is sometimes made out to be. And yes, Australians do sometimes like to play up the danger for dramatic effect. That is a thing that we do.

More people are killed by mosquitos than by any other animal, but a charging rhino is scarier than a buzzing mosquito. In Australia one of our stops was at a working cattle ranch. We were given the opportunity to go horseback riding, which I declined, because I knew a girl who was paraplegic after being thrown by a horse. The alternative was 4-wheeling, which I also declined. It wasn't the best part of that trip.

It is absolutely your decision to make and I 100% respect your decision, but I'd like to point out that the places that offer horseriding treks have the most docile, boring horses ever. You're more likely to fall asleep while riding one of these horses than get thrown. In fact, the horse is too. They are trained to follow the horse in front and they do nothing else. The feistier horses are ridden by the instructors and people who indicate that they have equestrian experience.

Most fears are not rational, and we are, irrationally, not scared of some really dangerous things, like riding in a car. The book scared me with its stories of venomous bugs and snakes, and the story of a woman who was dragged into a pool of water by a crocodile and (IIRC) all they ever found were her shoes. Okay, I'm probably remembering the story wrong, but still... Bryson loves Australia but the book seems designed to scare people away.

The book is designed to sell books. You know how that works.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 22, 2019, 08:52:09 PM
Again, fears are not rational. I like horses. But I feel no particular need to sit on one. I'd have preferred hiking, if that had been offered. I once cared for a horse for 3 or 4 days during a North Dakota winter. I was living in rural ND, across the road from my landlord. When he and his wife took a winter vacation he asked me to look after his wife's horse. I had to feed it, shovel out its stall, and break the ice on its water trough, twice a day. I also brushed it, though that was not required. I probably did a piss poor job of brushing but I like to think the horse enjoyed it. They had no livestock other than this one riding horse.

I imagine you're right about the horses in Australia. But this was too soon after meeting the paraplegic girl. Thinking back, and considering your post above, the horse that threw her was a race horse. Her job was exercising race horses. Not running them hard, but I suppose they would have been high-spirited horses. This didn't occur to me in Australia, but I still would not have ridden one. Plus, it didn't seem kind, to sit on an animal. (I don't eat them either.) And it was very rough terrain. Hell, the horse could get spooked by seeing one of those inoffensive snakes.  8)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 22, 2019, 09:28:43 PM
Again, fears are not rational. I like horses. But I feel no particular need to sit on one. I'd have preferred hiking, if that had been offered. I once cared for a horse for 3 or 4 days during a North Dakota winter. I was living in rural ND, across the road from my landlord. When he and his wife took a winter vacation he asked me to look after his wife's horse. I had to feed it, shovel out its stall, and break the ice on its water trough, twice a day. I also brushed it, though that was not required. I probably did a piss poor job of brushing but I like to think the horse enjoyed it. They had no livestock other than this one riding horse.

I imagine you're right about the horses in Australia. But this was too soon after meeting the paraplegic girl. Thinking back, and considering your post above, the horse that threw her was a race horse. Her job was exercising race horses. Not running them hard, but I suppose they would have been high-spirited horses. This didn't occur to me in Australia, but I still would not have ridden one. Plus, it didn't seem kind, to sit on an animal. (I don't eat them either.) And it was very rough terrain. Hell, the horse could get spooked by seeing one of those inoffensive snakes.  8)

Right, and as I said, I absolutely support your decision not to do it for any reason, or for no reason. Horses have been bred to be good at carrying people for many centuries, and riding can be a lot of fun if you're good at it. Personally I haven't been on a horse for over 20 years, but I'm sure muscle memory would kick in if I did get on horseback again. :)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: CarbShark on August 22, 2019, 11:29:12 PM
Personally I haven't been on a horse for over 20 years, but I'm sure muscle memory would kick in if I did get on horseback again. :)

Yeah, it's just like riding a bicycle, except, the horse does all the work.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 22, 2019, 11:49:04 PM
Personally I haven't been on a horse for over 20 years, but I'm sure muscle memory would kick in if I did get on horseback again. :)

Yeah, it's just like riding a bicycle, except, the horse does all the work.

Not all of it. The boring docile ones, yeah, but as soon as you start getting into some advanced riding, it starts to become very physical.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 23, 2019, 12:13:02 PM
I'd probably fall off the horse if it hiccuped. I can't ride a bike, either. I also have misgivings about the whole idea of "breaking" a horse for riding. I.e., breaking its spirit so that it won't object to being used that way. If they really are being bred to be that docile, I have a problem with that. But then, I have a different attitude about animals than most people do. If you're okay with eating animals, breaking their spirit probably seems like a small thing. And I actually enjoy providing my own motive power. Hiking or paddling. And I'm sure I'd enjoy cycling if I could do it.

I fear the above sounds judgmental. My apologies if that is the case. I do more than my share of bad stuff and I have plenty of hypocrisies. I'm just trying to explain why horseback riding does not interest me.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 23, 2019, 06:21:28 PM

I have often wondered what it would be like to live in Europe where you can drive for a few hours and be in a completely different country with a different language and different customs. Its mostly about the food for me. We have a little of that here but not to the extremes I like to imagine people have there. Or am I being naive? 

When you cross from one country into another is it obvious (other than signs or flags) Is it like Epcot where you cross a line then the architecture, language and food changes? LOL  Obviously not that extreme but you get what I am asking.

As everywhere, borders in Europe are completely arbitrary and there is almost no culture shock-value of crossing one. Usually, people living next to the border would speak the same language and have a similar culture. There are subtle changes, but the transition is usually very smooth.

However, going between capitals and major cities can be a huge shift as they are markedly different. There are architectural similarities, especially within cultural blocks (Francophones, post-Habsburgs, Northern Slavs, Scandinavians, Southern Balkans, the Western and Eastern Mediterranean, etc.), but they are all quite different.

The only shocking thing is the technological/wealth differences between some parts of the East and West.


and Budapest is enchanting and a much better place to visit than Paris (PS Rai, I loved Hungary but couldn't link the right wing politics to anyone we met there, is it more of an issue in smaller cities).

Budapest is still great to visit, but it is very depressing to live there.

Tatyana, when were you there? Things have been getting exponentially worse in the past 10 years or so. The politics are everywhere, but you aren't really going to encounter it as a foreign visitor. Hungarians don't like to talk politics in general, and those who speak decent English are generally not fascist supporters, though this is also changing.

May 2018. We took the train in from Bratislava, Slovakia and went to Lake Balaton and Budapest.

I must admit the outskirts of Budapest looked a bit depressing, as did the tube/train station to travel to Lake Balaton.

That lake is fabulous, and again, we loved Budapest, and we stayed outside the centre.

As well, two of the best engineers I have met were from Hungary. One has since gone back, and Sandor might go to Sweden, but I think language is an issue.....

Anyway, it is hard for my brain to resolve the politics in Hungary with the Hungarians I have met and those that I know.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: bachfiend on August 23, 2019, 06:43:16 PM

I have often wondered what it would be like to live in Europe where you can drive for a few hours and be in a completely different country with a different language and different customs. Its mostly about the food for me. We have a little of that here but not to the extremes I like to imagine people have there. Or am I being naive? 

When you cross from one country into another is it obvious (other than signs or flags) Is it like Epcot where you cross a line then the architecture, language and food changes? LOL  Obviously not that extreme but you get what I am asking.

As everywhere, borders in Europe are completely arbitrary and there is almost no culture shock-value of crossing one. Usually, people living next to the border would speak the same language and have a similar culture. There are subtle changes, but the transition is usually very smooth.

However, going between capitals and major cities can be a huge shift as they are markedly different. There are architectural similarities, especially within cultural blocks (Francophones, post-Habsburgs, Northern Slavs, Scandinavians, Southern Balkans, the Western and Eastern Mediterranean, etc.), but they are all quite different.

The only shocking thing is the technological/wealth differences between some parts of the East and West.


and Budapest is enchanting and a much better place to visit than Paris (PS Rai, I loved Hungary but couldn't link the right wing politics to anyone we met there, is it more of an issue in smaller cities).

Viktor Orban is the Hungarian Donald Trump.  Hungary is dying, owing to demographic factors.  The fertility rate is far below replacement rates, just like Japan’s.  But he’s opposed to immigration, preferring very weak financial incentives to increase births, which have never worked anywhere.

Whether the population of Hungary should drop (along with the rest of the world) is another question (global warming might be less with a smaller global population, unless it’s accompanied with a higher standard of living, which historically has been associated with higher energy consumption, usually from fossil fuels), but it’s a question that’s going to be answered in the coming decades.


Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 25, 2019, 09:16:11 PM
I'd probably fall off the horse if it hiccuped. I can't ride a bike, either. I also have misgivings about the whole idea of "breaking" a horse for riding. I.e., breaking its spirit so that it won't object to being used that way. If they really are being bred to be that docile, I have a problem with that. But then, I have a different attitude about animals than most people do. If you're okay with eating animals, breaking their spirit probably seems like a small thing. And I actually enjoy providing my own motive power. Hiking or paddling. And I'm sure I'd enjoy cycling if I could do it.

That's not quite what "breaking" a horse means any more. There was a time when it was true, and the term is still used, but it's more like training a dog. Horses are intelligent and wilful, but they can be trained using rewards for good behaviour like a dog can.

That said, there are still people who train horses in inhumane ways. There are people who treat dogs in inhumane ways too.

I fear the above sounds judgmental. My apologies if that is the case. I do more than my share of bad stuff and I have plenty of hypocrisies. I'm just trying to explain why horseback riding does not interest me.

And like I said, it's entirely your choice and I respect that. I'd just hate for you to have done so based on misinformation. :)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on August 26, 2019, 05:23:02 AM
Forget whale-watching from a big boat! Come to Maui in winter and come out whale watching in a kayak or an outrigger canoe. There's only one way to observe whales that's better than in a self-powered tiny boat at water level, and that's...
The cruise ships have kayaks. I was lifted out the water by two whales. They carried me to the shore.

I am confused by this post. I suspect some kind of a joke, but jokes often go right over my head. (And then other times I find something unbearably funny and other people can't figure out why I'm laughing.)

I've got nothing against cruise ships. I just would never want to go on one. So much easier to paddle out from shore. If the cruise ship allows you to take a kayak out when there are whales around, that's great. Do they allow this? I don't think the cruise ships that come to Maui have their own kayaks. They'll book you an outing with a local kayak outfitter or whale-watch boat, and probably charge you twice what you'd pay to the outfitter directly. And it's a crap shoot whether they'll book you with one of the better outfitters or just with the cheapest one.
The ship I was on was self-contained. They were ready to get you close to the whale wherever they were encountered. They had two and three person kayaks for novices to be assisted if needed.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 27, 2019, 02:31:00 AM
Who had been to Calgary, Edmonton and the Canadian Rockies (Banff, Jasper) recently?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 27, 2019, 10:43:11 AM
Who had been to Calgary, Edmonton and the Canadian Rockies (Banff, Jasper) recently?

I think it's been about 15 years since I was in Calgary. The first time I went hiking up in B.C., Canada I drove from Fargo, ND, to Winnipeg, Manitoba, and flew to Castlegar, BC, with a 5-hour layover in Calgary, which I used to visit the zoo. On that trip I learned that Castlegar is sometimes called Cancelgar because of how often flights in and out have to be cancelled due to cloud cover. The next summer I took the train to Spokane and a shuttle from there instead. And by the following summer I had moved to Spokane and from then on drove up, so never went to Calgary again.

I've never been to Edmonton.

I've been to both Banff and Jasper, but not recently. I was in the Canadian Rockies last summer and the summer before that. Last summer at a hiking lodge near Golden, BC, and the summer before at Lake Louise. I've also been to Waterton and Yoho. In Yoho I visited the Burgess Shale.

The Selkirk mountains sometimes informally get lumped together with the Rockies, but are not the Rockies properly speaking. I went there nearly every summer for ten or twelve years. And the Rockies almost as often.

So I guess this is a very long-winded way of answering your question "Not me." Unless you meant to say "or" rather than "and," since I've never been to Edmonton.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: amysrevenge on August 27, 2019, 10:49:02 AM
Who had been to Calgary, Edmonton and the Canadian Rockies (Banff, Jasper) recently?

Me.  Last week and again next week.  Well, not to Banff at this time.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 27, 2019, 05:04:36 PM
Who had been to Calgary, Edmonton and the Canadian Rockies (Banff, Jasper) recently?

Me.  Last week and again next week.  Well, not to Banff at this time.

Maybe a clarification is in order: Was the question who has been to all of these places recently, or who has been to any of them recently?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: amysrevenge on August 27, 2019, 05:39:43 PM
It's actually been a long time since I was to Jasper.  My wife and child are in Banff today.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 27, 2019, 07:35:05 PM
Did you teleport to Banff?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: amysrevenge on August 27, 2019, 08:02:11 PM
Did you teleport to Banff?

I wish.  I'm not there.  Would love to be.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: wastrel on August 27, 2019, 08:31:01 PM
Did you teleport to Banff?

 :rimshot:
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 28, 2019, 02:13:17 AM
We are doing a quick tour, landing in Calgary, hotel in Canmore for two nights, then up to Jasper, then Edmonton and then off to Saskatchewn.

I am also hoping to stop at the Royal Tyrell Museum on the way back (we also fly out of Calgary).

 I would like some travel advice and 'must see' sights please.

Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 28, 2019, 11:09:34 AM
Tatyana: Is there a reason for going to Edmonton? I've never been there but I cannot imagine any reason for going there. Unless maybe you're visiting relatives there.

If it were me I'd skip Edmonton and Saskatchewan (the prairie is beautiful, but there's not much there) and go to Lake Louise or Banff instead of the much more distant Jasper, and spend as much time as possible hiking. From Calgary it's a short drive to Banff, and not too much farther to Lake Louise. Jasper is many hours farther away and not actually any better. Just get an early start for hiking or the parking lots are full and you might not get in.

The drive up to Jasper is beautiful, but I'd rather spend that time hiking. The rest of it, you're describing a trip of many, many hours driving through prairie, which is beautiful in its way, but extremely monotonous.

Hmmm. I just realized that it's nearly the end of August. Hiking can be good in early September, or the weather can be nasty. My above recommendations apply to a trip from about mid-July to late August. After the small-grain harvest, the prairie will be pretty barren.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: seamas on August 28, 2019, 11:23:59 AM
Did you teleport to Banff?

Interesting as "Banff" it the actual sound that occurs when I teleport.


*BANFF!*

Now I am over here, see!
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: amysrevenge on August 28, 2019, 11:57:56 AM
We are doing a quick tour, landing in Calgary, hotel in Canmore for two nights, then up to Jasper, then Edmonton and then off to Saskatchewn.

I am also hoping to stop at the Royal Tyrell Museum on the way back (we also fly out of Calgary).

 I would like some travel advice and 'must see' sights please.

You already got the must see, in Drumheller.  It's like driving to Mars or something, plus dinosaurs.

No travel advice other than to day-of confirm that there aren't rockslide closures on your highway of choice in the mountains.

Oh, also have something in mind to break the monotony of driving in the prairies.  It is duuuuuulllllllll.  (Saskatchewan is like North Dakota, only without all those people.)  Get an audiobook or podcasts or music or something.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 28, 2019, 07:56:33 PM
Did you teleport to Banff?

Interesting as "Banff" it the actual sound that occurs when I teleport.


*BANFF!*

Now I am over here, see!

(https://media.giphy.com/media/xT9IgHCTfp8CRshfQk/giphy.gif)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 28, 2019, 08:46:22 PM
We are doing a quick tour, landing in Calgary, hotel in Canmore for two nights, then up to Jasper, then Edmonton and then off to Saskatchewn.

I am also hoping to stop at the Royal Tyrell Museum on the way back (we also fly out of Calgary).

 I would like some travel advice and 'must see' sights please.

You already got the must see, in Drumheller.  It's like driving to Mars or something, plus dinosaurs.

No travel advice other than to day-of confirm that there aren't rockslide closures on your highway of choice in the mountains.

Yes! Very good advice!

Oh, also have something in mind to break the monotony of driving in the prairies.  It is duuuuuulllllllll.  (Saskatchewan is like North Dakota, only without all those people.)  Get an audiobook or podcasts or music or something.

Yes again! More good advice!
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 29, 2019, 01:34:54 AM
Tatyana: Is there a reason for going to Edmonton? I've never been there but I cannot imagine any reason for going there. Unless maybe you're visiting relatives there.

If it were me I'd skip Edmonton and Saskatchewan (the prairie is beautiful, but there's not much there) and go to Lake Louise or Banff instead of the much more distant Jasper, and spend as much time as possible hiking. From Calgary it's a short drive to Banff, and not too much farther to Lake Louise. Jasper is many hours farther away and not actually any better. Just get an early start for hiking or the parking lots are full and you might not get in.

The drive up to Jasper is beautiful, but I'd rather spend that time hiking. The rest of it, you're describing a trip of many, many hours driving through prairie, which is beautiful in its way, but extremely monotonous.

Hmmm. I just realized that it's nearly the end of August. Hiking can be good in early September, or the weather can be nasty. My above recommendations apply to a trip from about mid-July to late August. After the small-grain harvest, the prairie will be pretty barren.

I am taking my Kiwi 'hisband' to Canada.for the first time, and we are going to Saskatoon and Moose Jaw to see family.

We might go on a few small hikes but we really don't have loads of proper gear and it isn't the focus this trip.

It might be surprising to a person from a small island (the UK and NZ are the same size), to see all the space, I have seen a few people freak out at the space in the prairies. 🙂
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: seamas on August 29, 2019, 10:30:58 AM
Did you teleport to Banff?

Interesting as "Banff" it the actual sound that occurs when I teleport.


*BANFF!*

Now I am over here, see!

(https://media.giphy.com/media/xT9IgHCTfp8CRshfQk/giphy.gif)

It's a good one.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: daniel1948 on August 29, 2019, 11:02:10 AM
Tatyana: Is there a reason for going to Edmonton? I've never been there but I cannot imagine any reason for going there. Unless maybe you're visiting relatives there.

If it were me I'd skip Edmonton and Saskatchewan (the prairie is beautiful, but there's not much there) and go to Lake Louise or Banff instead of the much more distant Jasper, and spend as much time as possible hiking. From Calgary it's a short drive to Banff, and not too much farther to Lake Louise. Jasper is many hours farther away and not actually any better. Just get an early start for hiking or the parking lots are full and you might not get in.

The drive up to Jasper is beautiful, but I'd rather spend that time hiking. The rest of it, you're describing a trip of many, many hours driving through prairie, which is beautiful in its way, but extremely monotonous.

Hmmm. I just realized that it's nearly the end of August. Hiking can be good in early September, or the weather can be nasty. My above recommendations apply to a trip from about mid-July to late August. After the small-grain harvest, the prairie will be pretty barren.

I am taking my Kiwi 'hisband' to Canada.for the first time, and we are going to Saskatoon and Moose Jaw to see family.

We might go on a few small hikes but we really don't have loads of proper gear and it isn't the focus this trip.

It might be surprising to a person from a small island (the UK and NZ are the same size), to see all the space, I have seen a few people freak out at the space in the prairies. 🙂

Gotcha. Well, enjoy. The prairies are beautiful, if monotonous. I was in Saskatoon around 30 years ago, more or less. I had a few experiences there that made me really like the town. I have no idea if it has changed since then. There was a Chinese restaurant with an entire half of the menu being all vegetarian, at a time when in North Dakota no restaurant had even one vegetarian main-course item. There was a grocery store where the produce manager gave us two cases of bananas for $1, just because they were ripe and he preferred to give them away than throw them away. And the drivers all through Saskatchewan always pulled over to let us pass when there were no other passing opportunities, something that never happened in Manitoba or North Dakota. It gets awfully cold in winter, though.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: arthwollipot on August 29, 2019, 08:32:02 PM
It's a good one.

Honestly I didn't even know whether it would land.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Morvis13 on August 31, 2019, 11:51:11 AM
me and my cult in Okinawa Japan.
(https://i.postimg.cc/kGdVFNfy/Shuri.jpg)
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: brilligtove on August 31, 2019, 01:04:21 PM
Looks like you're having fun!
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: Tatyana on August 31, 2019, 05:10:10 PM
Where is the best place to get a temporary pay as you go SIM card in Canada?
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: mobyfubar on September 03, 2019, 01:26:36 PM
Honestly I didn't even know whether it would land.
Yeah, that's a problem with teleportation.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: amysrevenge on September 03, 2019, 05:37:35 PM
Oh hey, regarding Calgary.  I forgot to mention.

If you want to get the best representative Calgary/Alberta dining experience without the sort of hipster flair that everything nice seems to have these days, go for steaks at the Cattle Baron restaurant http://www.cattlebaroncalgary.com/ .  Best beef in town without the cooler-than-thou pretense.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: brilligtove on September 03, 2019, 05:50:36 PM
Where is the best place to get a temporary pay as you go SIM card in Canada?
I've never had to buy one... where will you be? Any major chain like bestbuy should have them, but that may be overkill for where you are.
Title: Re: Traveling
Post by: amysrevenge on September 03, 2019, 06:24:39 PM
Where is the best place to get a temporary pay as you go SIM card in Canada?
I've never had to buy one... where will you be? Any major chain like bestbuy should have them, but that may be overkill for where you are.

7-Eleven maybe?