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General Discussions => Tech Talk => Topic started by: Desert Fox on August 13, 2018, 07:54:48 AM

Title: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 13, 2018, 07:54:48 AM
Just thought I would start a general thread on repairs and upgrades of computers

I have a computer I built using an FX-8350 processor. It is probably now something like five years old. The processor is still pretty capable so have no plans to replace anytime soon. Still sits on the High End CPU chart of CPU Benchmarks.

One issue I have been having though is that I bought a cheap set of case fans to augment the one that was already on the case. Including the original on the case, but not the one on the CPU, I am running five case fans. While I have not yet had to replace the original case fan, I have had to replace every single one of those that I bought initially.

Even with one or two dying, it probably would do alright as far as cooling. The problem was that they started getting really noisy.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Captain Video on August 13, 2018, 05:29:21 PM
Best case, best fans, best air cooler, I cant recommend the power supply or the water cooler because I have not tried them out but I'm sure they have the best fans inside.

https://www.bequiet.com/en
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Billzbub on August 14, 2018, 12:08:59 PM
My wife's laptop gets so hot where the power supply plugs into the laptop that the connection becomes intermittent and we have to wiggle the cord just right to get it to charge.  When I pull the connector out of the laptop and touch it, it would burn my finger if I left it on there more than a second.

I'm fixing the problem by trying one of those laptop cooling pads which will arrive tomorrow.  I already took the laptop into a shop and they said the fans are working and it is clean, so I just think it was poorly designed in the first place.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Captain Video on August 14, 2018, 12:59:21 PM
My wife's laptop gets so hot where the power supply plugs into the laptop that the connection becomes intermittent and we have to wiggle the cord just right to get it to charge.  When I pull the connector out of the laptop and touch it, it would burn my finger if I left it on there more than a second.

I'm fixing the problem by trying one of those laptop cooling pads which will arrive tomorrow.  I already took the laptop into a shop and they said the fans are working and it is clean, so I just think it was poorly designed in the first place.

Is there a heat sink on the power input board? Sometimes applying fresh thermal paste will solve that problem.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Billzbub on August 17, 2018, 01:07:33 PM
My wife's laptop gets so hot where the power supply plugs into the laptop that the connection becomes intermittent and we have to wiggle the cord just right to get it to charge.  When I pull the connector out of the laptop and touch it, it would burn my finger if I left it on there more than a second.

I'm fixing the problem by trying one of those laptop cooling pads which will arrive tomorrow.  I already took the laptop into a shop and they said the fans are working and it is clean, so I just think it was poorly designed in the first place.

Is there a heat sink on the power input board? Sometimes applying fresh thermal paste will solve that problem.

When she brought it back from the shop, she said that they applied some kind of thermal paste to something, but I don't know what.  Now we only rarely have the problem.  It is much better than it was, just not totally fixed.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: John Albert on August 18, 2018, 03:47:22 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hNgFNH7zhQ
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on August 24, 2018, 09:24:33 PM
Not exactly a computer, being an analog board, but I spent a couple of hours today tearing apart an Allen & Heath GL 2400 mixer at work.  Fan was extremely noisy.  Tore apart the power supply, removed, disassembled, cleaned and lubricated the fan, then reassembled everything. Significant improvement, but I suspect the bearing is going and the lubrication will be a temporary solution.  Shouldn’t be hard to come by a replacement fan, though, and now that I’ve done it once it’ll be a snap to replace.

Thankfully the fan is not soldered into the PCB in the power supply.  I’m realizing that soldering electronics is a significant gap in my skill set.  I may have to find someone who can teach me.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: brilligtove on August 24, 2018, 10:26:09 PM
Not exactly a computer, being an analog board, but I spent a couple of hours today tearing apart an Allen & Heath GL 2400 mixer at work.  Fan was extremely noisy.  Tore apart the power supply, removed, disassembled, cleaned and lubricated the fan, then reassembled everything. Significant improvement, but I suspect the bearing is going and the lubrication will be a temporary solution.  Shouldn’t be hard to come by a replacement fan, though, and now that I’ve done it once it’ll be a snap to replace.

Thankfully the fan is not soldered into the PCB in the power supply.  I’m realizing that soldering electronics is a significant gap in my skill set.  I may have to find someone who can teach me.

I just inherited a soldering kit (circa 1950). I haven't used one since about 1985, and I was working with tin and sheet steel, not electronics. I'm expecting to kill a few electronics before I save them.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Captain Video on August 24, 2018, 11:07:48 PM
Not exactly a computer, being an analog board, but I spent a couple of hours today tearing apart an Allen & Heath GL 2400 mixer at work.  Fan was extremely noisy.  Tore apart the power supply, removed, disassembled, cleaned and lubricated the fan, then reassembled everything. Significant improvement, but I suspect the bearing is going and the lubrication will be a temporary solution.  Shouldn’t be hard to come by a replacement fan, though, and now that I’ve done it once it’ll be a snap to replace.

Thankfully the fan is not soldered into the PCB in the power supply.  I’m realizing that soldering electronics is a significant gap in my skill set.  I may have to find someone who can teach me.

I just inherited a soldering kit (circa 1950). I haven't used one since about 1985, and I was working with tin and sheet steel, not electronics. I'm expecting to kill a few electronics before I save them.

Get some old boards from practically anything and practice desoldering and resoldering (get a solder sucker it will come in handy). There are lots of helpful vids on youtube.  Then move on to some cheaper project kits, once you get the hang of it its not too hard, making it look pretty can be and mine never are but as long as you can get the hang of it without burning your components or shorting your boards who cares what it looks like.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on August 24, 2018, 11:15:41 PM
That is essentially how I learned to make brake lines. Didn't try to do them on the car and just worked with a peace of line on my kitchen table.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: brilligtove on August 24, 2018, 11:18:22 PM
I am a BIG fan of practicing on cadavers before attempting a live surgery. I have some dead electronics waiting for autopsy.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on November 28, 2018, 11:06:28 PM
I scored a 23 inch 1080p monitor at a thrift store for $10.50.
I like having a decent backup monitor just in case mine ever goes bad.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on November 28, 2018, 11:44:35 PM
I've had to remove one of my two 8Gb RAM cards from my Macbook, it was causing the dreaded three beeps and associated hassles. It wasn't the slot (sometimes the connections are a bit dodgy) as I tested each RAM card in each slot and the same one failed in either slot and the other card worked fine in either slot.

For general use having just the one RAM card is fine but when I run a virtual machine as well it really could use the extra RAM. Bit annoyed as it wasn't old RAM, a year or so sine I bought it but the local shop I bought it from went out of business (think I know why). Replacements are about $120. It can wait for a bit.

My only soldering job of note this year was replacing a rechargeable battery in an SRM Powercontrol V, a special bicycle power meter handlebar mounted computer that records a rider's power output as measured by strain gauges mounted in the crank spider. It's old kit nowadays but they were very well made units and it's still working over a decade later. I thought I had completely botched it up when the display went berko after soldering it in. Turns out is was a dodgy solder and a quick redo and it was all fine and works great.

I had to remove the black and red leads at bottom of this small board, take out the battery under that board (and wrapped in that yellowish film) and wire in a replacement LiPo battery. Cost about $10 and will be good for years to come.

(https://scontent.fsyd7-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.15752-9/33863925_10214728883846989_665449257746038784_n.jpg?_nc_cat=100&_nc_ht=scontent.fsyd7-1.fna&oh=880460d966afed9f8d0ef3bcdae9afa4&oe=5CA37CBC)

(https://scontent.fsyd7-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/36419193_10214950455066131_6689208549005852672_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_ht=scontent.fsyd7-1.fna&oh=14f26faabfcceff0822613d879dfb9d9&oe=5CA0417A)
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: brilligtove on November 29, 2018, 10:34:04 AM
I haven't soldered anything since high school shop class, but I have some power lines to solder into small transformers for some LED lights. Off to YouTube to learn...
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 15, 2019, 01:24:10 PM
As SSDs get cheaper, I wonder when they will replace hard drives completely?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Ah.hell on February 15, 2019, 02:50:12 PM
As SSDs get cheaper, I wonder when they will replace hard drives completely?
Probably not until hard drives stop getting cheaper too. 
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 18, 2019, 12:19:33 AM
The gaming laptop I bought has an issue. HP DV7t-6000.

The day before the issue occurred I was playing a relatively graphic intensive video game although not super high by modern standards. It locked up when I was switching screens. Completely locked. Could not C-A-D my way out. Something similar happened two or three times more that night. I thought it was something with the game however.

It happened again the next night. It rebooted and I played the game some more. Crashed again and I tried to reboot again. Would not go past the Windows 10 screen. Tried to do both a Windows 10 repair and roll back to a previous save point. No luck. I had switched to an SSD but I still had the old hard drive with the OS intact. I replaced the SSD with the hard drive. Acted exactly the same (would not go past the Windows 10 boot screen) although everything happened slower. Tried different RAM as well.

I am thinking it is something video or motherboard related? Thoughts?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on February 18, 2019, 03:02:22 AM
Which safe modes have you tried?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 18, 2019, 05:00:38 AM
I was able to boot it into dos only prompt but I think I tried low graphic mode and it would not run.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 18, 2019, 06:10:55 AM
Going to try to not ask too many questions but I do have another one.

Windows 8.1 machine upgraded to 10 during the free period. If you do a fresh start, does that reset you have to 8.1 or a fresh version of 10?

I tried to do some googling and did not find a real definitive answer. Might be that I am not asking the right question of course.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 18, 2019, 03:17:18 PM
Which safe modes have you tried?

It will boot into safe mode. I just don't understand why if there is nothing wrong with regard to hardware why with a different copy of the OS (original) which worked previously will it still not work? My roommate tried to repair off CD as well.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on February 18, 2019, 05:11:21 PM
How painful is it to install an SSD drive on a PC? I'll start a new thread if we need it.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 18, 2019, 05:52:50 PM
How painful is it to install an SSD drive on a PC? I'll start a new thread if we need it.

Pretty damn easy. I just did one this weekend.
Replaced my 256 GB ssd with a 960 gb.
If you are installing it on a desktop, you will need a mounting bracket.
If you give me details, I can suggest what you need to do.
Are you going with a fresh install or cloning your drive?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on February 18, 2019, 08:11:03 PM
How painful is it to install an SSD drive on a PC? I'll start a new thread if we need it.

Pretty damn easy. I just did one this weekend.
Replaced my 256 GB ssd with a 960 gb.
If you are installing it on a desktop, you will need a mounting bracket.
If you give me details, I can suggest what you need to do.
Are you going with a fresh install or cloning your drive?
Clone. I have a Lenovo :

(https://i.imgur.com/HBt357A.jpg)
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on February 18, 2019, 08:12:37 PM
And I made a recovery disk this weekend.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 18, 2019, 10:21:23 PM
How big is the original and how big is the replacement - How much space on the original are you using?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on February 19, 2019, 08:13:06 AM
How big is the original and how big is the replacement - How much space on the original are you using?
I have plenty of toy money, so I was planning on installing a 1T SSD. The recovery disk needed just under 400 G of space.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 19, 2019, 12:09:47 PM
You will want to use a cloning program - Maybe Macruim Reflect or EASEUS backup.
Should be able to plug in the new drive with an extra sata cable and there shoudl be extra sata power as well

The problem is that you will probably be left with a lot of unformatted and unused space.
There is a small partition on the right that will probably prevent you from expanding the main block.
To move that partition all the way to the right, you will want to use MiniTool Partition Wizard Free or AOMEI Partition Assistant SE.
They should both be pretty intuitive.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on February 19, 2019, 02:18:16 PM
My own advice when it comes to cloning drives is: don't.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Cattus on February 19, 2019, 10:03:51 PM
My wife's laptop gets so hot where the power supply plugs into the laptop that the connection becomes intermittent and we have to wiggle the cord just right to get it to charge.  When I pull the connector out of the laptop and touch it, it would burn my finger if I left it on there more than a second.

I'm fixing the problem by trying one of those laptop cooling pads which will arrive tomorrow.  I already took the laptop into a shop and they said the fans are working and it is clean, so I just think it was poorly designed in the first place.

I realize this response is coming quite a while after you said your problem had been fixed but I thought it might be helpful to others for me to comment.  The way you describe the problem especially the jiggling part I'm wondering whether or not you have a connector problem.  If your jack on the computer is corroded, the additional resistance created by the corrosion could be causing the connection between the jack and your plug to heat up.

You might want to try cleaning the inside of the jack.  This isn't easy to do but a small jewelers screwdriver may allow you to scrape the contact parts of the jack sufficiently.  Also, make sure that the interior of the plug is also corrosion free.  I'm not sure what type of plug you have but hopefully, it's one that allows you to see and or clean the inside contact of the plug.

One last thing to try to do, and this goes for anybody having similar contact problems, is to buy a can of contact cleaner.  Spray it inside and on the jack and then work the jack in and out several times to try and clean any residue or material that might be causing either intermittent or high resistance contact.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on February 21, 2019, 02:00:16 PM
My own advice when it comes to cloning drives is: don't.
Why not? Alternatives?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on February 21, 2019, 09:19:24 PM
Backup your data (which should be in a user directory separate from your OS and applications), install your new drive, install a fresh copy of your OS, copy your data back, and reinstall the apps you need. It takes longer, yes, but I've had too many issues cloning disks to mess with it unless it's necessary.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 23, 2019, 12:05:03 AM
I have had pretty decent luck cloning drives. Might be the software involved?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on February 28, 2019, 10:19:07 PM
An edit on what I wrote previously - I tried to clone the drive of the new gaming laptop onto a larger SSD. After running into issues multiple times, I ended up simply going with a fresh OS.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on March 01, 2019, 07:00:45 AM
I have had pretty decent luck cloning drives. Might be the software involved?
Un does der Zoftware haf a name, ja?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Ron Obvious on March 01, 2019, 08:19:47 AM
I have had pretty decent luck cloning drives. Might be the software involved?
Un does der Zoftware haf a name, ja?

I've had excellent luck with AOMEI partition assistant: https://www.disk-partition.com/free-partition-manager.html (https://www.disk-partition.com/free-partition-manager.html), which comes in a freeware version which will, among other things, clone drives.  The freeware version is exactly what freeware is supposed to be: functional, and not nagware or adware.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on March 01, 2019, 03:25:39 PM
Going to try to not ask too many questions but I do have another one.

Windows 8.1 machine upgraded to 10 during the free period. If you do a fresh start, does that reset you have to 8.1 or a fresh version of 10?

I tried to do some googling and did not find a real definitive answer. Might be that I am not asking the right question of course.

As long as the Windows 10 machine has been online and activated in the past, MS's servers should recognize its "hardware ID" the next time it's back online. I've had to completely blow away Win10 boxes and they auto-activate as soon as 10 is re-installed and its connected to the internet, even after installing a new drive. This should work for upgraded boxes, too. Also, the last time I did an upgrade from Win7 to Win10 was a few months ago, and it still let me do it for free. I'm pretty sure the July 2016 deadline for free upgrades has been quietly extended indefinitely for whatever reason, perhaps to get as many users on Win10 as possible.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on March 01, 2019, 05:24:48 PM
I have had pretty decent luck cloning drives. Might be the software involved?

Un does der Zoftware haf a name, ja?

I'm sure it does, but see Desert Fox's post directly above yours:

An edit on what I wrote previously - I tried to clone the drive of the new gaming laptop onto a larger SSD. After running into issues multiple times, I ended up simply going with a fresh OS.

This is the problem with drive cloning; it's hit or miss.  And, in my experience too much miss to be worth the time when I could just copy over my user data and reinstall a few applications on a fresh OS.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 01, 2019, 08:41:51 PM
Problem with not cloning isn't the OS, it's the various applications which are not transferrable to a new system without purchasing them again.

I'm about to finish off an upgrade of a old desktop I use for my cycling training server. I've already installed a $30 2nd hand graphics card so it can run some video applications as well as generally provide a higher quality picture than the old VGA output could.

I upgraded the RAM to its max of 8Gb with $10 of 2nd hand RAM bought off local FB buy/swap/sell.

And I managed to upgrade to Win10 for free.

A 2nd hand SSD was not such a good idea I figured and I couldn't find anything suitable anyway, so have a brand new 1Tb drive on the way. A Samsung unit and was on special for less than most drives half the capacity. I plan to be storing quite a bit of cycle training video on it, so this will really help.

I'd previously cloned my Macbook Pro HDD to SSD and that worked fine.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 01, 2019, 08:44:35 PM
Also I got another 8Gb ram card for my Macbook and that's now back to the 16Gb it was and is thanking me for it. With just 8Gb it wasn't coping well, particularly as I have to run Windows 10 on it under VMware at times.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 01, 2019, 09:10:28 PM
You will want to use a cloning program - Maybe Macruim Reflect or EASEUS backup.
Should be able to plug in the new drive with an extra sata cable and there shoudl be extra sata power as well

The problem is that you will probably be left with a lot of unformatted and unused space.
There is a small partition on the right that will probably prevent you from expanding the main block.
To move that partition all the way to the right, you will want to use MiniTool Partition Wizard Free or AOMEI Partition Assistant SE.
They should both be pretty intuitive.
Macrium Reflect enables you to easily adjust the partition size of any cloned partition on the destination drive as part of the cloning process making all the space available on the new larger drive.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on March 01, 2019, 09:20:27 PM
I have had pretty decent luck cloning drives. Might be the software involved?
Un does der Zoftware haf a name, ja?

One I used recently was Macrium Reflect. There is also EASEUS

This is the problem with drive cloning; it's hit or miss.  And, in my experience too much miss to be worth the time when I could just copy over my user data and reinstall a few applications on a fresh OS.

Out of of six transfers, only had trouble this time.

I will say that Microsoft's Windows 10 tool is really useful. I used that machine to create an OS restore on a flash drive and restored from there.

Problem with not cloning isn't the OS, it's the various applications which are not transferrable to a new system without purchasing them again.

These days, the only pay software I think I use is Word Perfect.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on March 02, 2019, 06:40:10 AM
As long as the Windows 10 machine has been online and activated in the past, MS's servers should recognize its "hardware ID" the next time it's back online. I've had to completely blow away Win10 boxes and they auto-activate as soon as 10 is re-installed and its connected to the internet, even after installing a new drive. This should work for upgraded boxes, too. Also, the last time I did an upgrade from Win7 to Win10 was a few months ago, and it still let me do it for free. I'm pretty sure the July 2016 deadline for free upgrades has been quietly extended indefinitely for whatever reason, perhaps to get as many users on Win10 as possible.

The previous owner had reset the computer back to a fresh state - As I wrote, I ended up just reformatting the 480 GB drive I had been using on my previous gaming laptop.

Ended up getting an Asus G751JL, about two generations (as far as CPU) newer than the previous one. In fact, its performance is pretty close to my desktop.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on March 02, 2019, 02:29:07 PM
As long as the Windows 10 machine has been online and activated in the past, MS's servers should recognize its "hardware ID" the next time it's back online. I've had to completely blow away Win10 boxes and they auto-activate as soon as 10 is re-installed and its connected to the internet, even after installing a new drive. This should work for upgraded boxes, too. Also, the last time I did an upgrade from Win7 to Win10 was a few months ago, and it still let me do it for free. I'm pretty sure the July 2016 deadline for free upgrades has been quietly extended indefinitely for whatever reason, perhaps to get as many users on Win10 as possible.

The previous owner had reset the computer back to a fresh state - As I wrote, I ended up just reformatting the 480 GB drive I had been using on my previous gaming laptop.

Ended up getting an Asus G751JL, about two generations (as far as CPU) newer than the previous one. In fact, its performance is pretty close to my desktop.

It sounded like you were asking if doing a clean Windows 10 install would negate its activation, if I misinterpreted that I apologize.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on March 02, 2019, 08:15:48 PM
It sounded like you were asking if doing a clean Windows 10 install would negate its activation, if I misinterpreted that I apologize.

Yes and no. I was asking if a reset of the OS (forget the actual term) would bring it back to 8.1 (the original OS). It appears as if the answer is no but instead it loads the latest version of 10 as a fresh install if you are already running 10.  Doesn't really matter that both because the previous owner had already reset it and I ended up essentially doing a fresh install after creating an install media from that computer.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on March 03, 2019, 12:08:49 AM
It sounded like you were asking if doing a clean Windows 10 install would negate its activation, if I misinterpreted that I apologize.

Yes and no. I was asking if a reset of the OS (forget the actual term) would bring it back to 8.1 (the original OS). It appears as if the answer is no but instead it loads the latest version of 10 as a fresh install if you are already running 10.  Doesn't really matter that both because the previous owner had already reset it and I ended up essentially doing a fresh install after creating an install media from that computer.

Sounds like you're good either way. I always hated 8.1 so perhaps my Windows 10 bias snuck in there. I keep trying to find time to replace the 480GB SSD in my Macbook Pro with a new 1TB SSD but unfortunately APFS doesn't let you do a straight clone via Disk Utility anymore. Instead of letting that run overnight I'll need to install the new drive, install Mojave from USB, then all my programs and data. I know there are 3rd party apps out there but at this point if I have to spend more time than I wanted I might as well do it from the ground up. Best of luck to you going forward!
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on March 03, 2019, 12:56:47 AM
It sounded like you were asking if doing a clean Windows 10 install would negate its activation, if I misinterpreted that I apologize.

Yes and no. I was asking if a reset of the OS (forget the actual term) would bring it back to 8.1 (the original OS).

Perhaps the problem here is a communications one.  I still have no idea what you mean by 'a reset of the OS' -- I'm not aware that that term has any technical meaning, which makes it impossible to answer your question. There are things which one might consider a 'reset' that would not restore the OS to a prior version, but there are also things I can imagine someone might call a 'reset' that would.  Beef Wellington made his best guess at what you meant, but I think it's really incumbent upon you when asking such a question to make it clear what you are asking.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on March 03, 2019, 01:20:57 AM
Perhaps the problem here is a communications one.  I still have no idea what you mean by 'a reset of the OS' -- I'm not aware that that term has any technical meaning, which makes it impossible to answer your question. There are things which one might consider a 'reset' that would not restore the OS to a prior version, but there are also things I can imagine someone might call a 'reset' that would.  Beef Wellington made his best guess at what you meant, but I think it's really incumbent upon you when asking such a question to make it clear what you are asking.

Now that I think about it - I think there are two terms
1. Factory Reset - Some box companies have a complete original copy of the OS which they can pull from
2. Fresh Start  - You can tell windows to do a fresh start where it erases all of the other programs and rebuilds windows with the latest version. There is a second where is also  deletes all your files.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 03, 2019, 04:59:25 AM
I keep trying to find time to replace the 480GB SSD in my Macbook Pro with a new 1TB SSD but unfortunately APFS doesn't let you do a straight clone via Disk Utility anymore. Instead of letting that run overnight I'll need to install the new drive, install Mojave from USB, then all my programs and data. I know there are 3rd party apps out there but at this point if I have to spend more time than I wanted I might as well do it from the ground up. Best of luck to you going forward!

I upgraded my 2011 Macbook Pro with a 1TB SSD a couple of years ago. It wasn't hard - just followed the instruction videos for installing and cloning here:
https://www.ramcity.com.au/help-info/installation_videos#mbpssd

This is the cloning software:
https://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 03, 2019, 05:06:54 AM
These days, the only pay software I think I use is Word Perfect.
Unfortunately that's not an option for me.

Typically for me the software is worth more than the hardware. Hence why I try to keep my hardware going for as long as I can.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on March 03, 2019, 09:14:21 AM
How painful is it to install an SSD drive on a PC? I'll start a new thread if we need it.

Pretty damn easy. I just did one this weekend.

It's easy most of the time, but I've run into some issues in the past with AHCI being enabled in windows once I installed the SSD, but not in the BIOS (or was it vice versa?). This can be an issue especially if you're cloning your OS.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on March 03, 2019, 10:05:45 AM
How painful is it to install an SSD drive on a PC? I'll start a new thread if we need it.

Pretty damn easy. I just did one this weekend.

It's easy most of the time, but I've run into some issues in the past with AHCI being enabled in windows once I installed the SSD, but not in the BIOS (or was it vice versa?). This can be an issue especially if you're cloning your OS.

Another reason not to clone one’s OS.

This whole discussion baffles me.  Have I been away from Windows so long that I have forgotten some fundamental difference between the way it and the POSIX OSes I mainly use today work that makes a fresh install particularly burdensome? Because otherwise I cannot understand why people would even want to clone their system drive/partition.  It makes no sense to me.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on March 03, 2019, 10:52:43 AM
How painful is it to install an SSD drive on a PC? I'll start a new thread if we need it.

Pretty damn easy. I just did one this weekend.

It's easy most of the time, but I've run into some issues in the past with AHCI being enabled in windows once I installed the SSD, but not in the BIOS (or was it vice versa?). This can be an issue especially if you're cloning your OS.

Another reason not to clone one’s OS.

This whole discussion baffles me.  Have I been away from Windows so long that I have forgotten some fundamental difference between the way it and the POSIX OSes I mainly use today work that makes a fresh install particularly burdensome? Because otherwise I cannot understand why people would even want to clone their system drive/partition.  It makes no sense to me.

Yeah, probably more trouble than it's worth in the end. Still, I have about 100 programs I use at least some of the time, so reinstalling is a multi-day effort. I'd clone my drive, except that whenever I've tried to do so in the past, I've run into substantial difficulties and I ended up doing a fresh reinstall most of the time anyway.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on March 03, 2019, 10:55:57 AM
Another reason not to clone one’s OS.

This whole discussion baffles me.  Have I been away from Windows so long that I have forgotten some fundamental difference between the way it and the POSIX OSes I mainly use today work that makes a fresh install particularly burdensome? Because otherwise I cannot understand why people would even want to clone their system drive/partition.  It makes no sense to me.

There can be issues that make cloning attractive
1. My Acer Laptop - The wireless network drives are a pain to reinstall for some reason.
2. On my old HP gaming laptop, it didn't like Windows 10 Build 1809 while it was fine with 1709. As such, best to clone the disk with 1709 on it. Might actually have been a sign of the machine failing somewhere though.
3. I didn't want to try to hunt down every program on my desktop including stuff I dodn't use often. In general, that would be the variation on what you want. I want to be able to just change out the hard drive for an SSD and be off and running.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on March 03, 2019, 12:30:46 PM
Also it's a pain going through all the windows settings and turning off all the crap that is enabled by default.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on March 03, 2019, 03:16:18 PM
I keep trying to find time to replace the 480GB SSD in my Macbook Pro with a new 1TB SSD but unfortunately APFS doesn't let you do a straight clone via Disk Utility anymore. Instead of letting that run overnight I'll need to install the new drive, install Mojave from USB, then all my programs and data. I know there are 3rd party apps out there but at this point if I have to spend more time than I wanted I might as well do it from the ground up. Best of luck to you going forward!

I upgraded my 2011 Macbook Pro with a 1TB SSD a couple of years ago. It wasn't hard - just followed the instruction videos for installing and cloning here:
https://www.ramcity.com.au/help-info/installation_videos#mbpssd

This is the cloning software:
https://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html

I'll check the cloning software out, thank you! I've had to re-do my 2012 Macbook Pro a couple of times already, the first being swapping the 500GB HDD for the 480GB SSD and maxing the RAM out. The others were trying diff OS releases trying to get my ultra-wide monitor to go beyond 1920x1080, which apparently is no longer allowed in macOS if you're using HDMI. That part was frustrating because my BootCamp partition on the same MBP, with the same cable and monitor goes full 2560x1080 but as soon as I boot back into macOS it's stuck at 16x9. I was also just able to bring a few older Macs home from work so I've been distracted by making sure those function properly, I doubt I'll get to the MacBook anytime soon...
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 03, 2019, 08:18:11 PM
I'll check the cloning software out, thank you! I've had to re-do my 2012 Macbook Pro a couple of times already, the first being swapping the 500GB HDD for the 480GB SSD and maxing the RAM out. The others were trying diff OS releases trying to get my ultra-wide monitor to go beyond 1920x1080, which apparently is no longer allowed in macOS if you're using HDMI. That part was frustrating because my BootCamp partition on the same MBP, with the same cable and monitor goes full 2560x1080 but as soon as I boot back into macOS it's stuck at 16x9. I was also just able to bring a few older Macs home from work so I've been distracted by making sure those function properly, I doubt I'll get to the MacBook anytime soon...

Aside from the SSD swap in my 2011 Macbook Pro, I upgraded RAM to 16Gb, had to replace one of those RAM cards as it went bad, I've replaced the battery and I picked up a 2nd hand Apple Thunderbolt display (again via FB buy/swap/sell), which is really nice. Not a retina screen as I doubt my Mac would be able to use that anyway but it provides a nice big 27" display @ 2560 x 1440. I also have had the motherboard (I think apple calls them logic boards) replaced a couple of years ago as it had failed.

I just picked up an excess to needs but new Apple magic keyboard with numeric keypad and mouse as one of my old usb keyboards was dying (the 1 key didn't work any more). It's a nice keyboard, I quite like it.

I've pretty much retired my 2012 HP desktop PC as the Mac has VMware with Win10 as well and it's easier to be able to run everything via one computer. The PC is a Win7 machine and cannot be upgraded to Win10 due to incompatible graphics hardware which cannot be changed (it's an all in one PC). It's a bugger as it has an i7 quad core processor, 2TB HDD and 16Gb of RAM. Don't know what I'll do with it.

I have a couple of applications that only run on Windows, so I have VMware to keep access to them. I originally only got the Mac because of a special technical aerodynamics application that would only run on it. I've never been a big fan of it but have grown used to it and adapted.

When I cloned it, it was a smooth transition. I'm not sure I really noticed all that much of a performance improvement. At least not compared with what we are led to believe.

I'm just hoping it'll keep on trucking along for a while yet. Fingers crossed!
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on March 04, 2019, 05:01:03 AM
I'll check the cloning software out, thank you! I've had to re-do my 2012 Macbook Pro a couple of times already, the first being swapping the 500GB HDD for the 480GB SSD and maxing the RAM out. The others were trying diff OS releases trying to get my ultra-wide monitor to go beyond 1920x1080, which apparently is no longer allowed in macOS if you're using HDMI. That part was frustrating because my BootCamp partition on the same MBP, with the same cable and monitor goes full 2560x1080 but as soon as I boot back into macOS it's stuck at 16x9. I was also just able to bring a few older Macs home from work so I've been distracted by making sure those function properly, I doubt I'll get to the MacBook anytime soon...

Aside from the SSD swap in my 2011 Macbook Pro, I upgraded RAM to 16Gb, had to replace one of those RAM cards as it went bad, I've replaced the battery and I picked up a 2nd hand Apple Thunderbolt display (again via FB buy/swap/sell), which is really nice. Not a retina screen as I doubt my Mac would be able to use that anyway but it provides a nice big 27" display @ 2560 x 1440. I also have had the motherboard (I think apple calls them logic boards) replaced a couple of years ago as it had failed.

I just picked up an excess to needs but new Apple magic keyboard with numeric keypad and mouse as one of my old usb keyboards was dying (the 1 key didn't work any more). It's a nice keyboard, I quite like it.

I've pretty much retired my 2012 HP desktop PC as the Mac has VMware with Win10 as well and it's easier to be able to run everything via one computer. The PC is a Win7 machine and cannot be upgraded to Win10 due to incompatible graphics hardware which cannot be changed (it's an all in one PC). It's a bugger as it has an i7 quad core processor, 2TB HDD and 16Gb of RAM. Don't know what I'll do with it.

I have a couple of applications that only run on Windows, so I have VMware to keep access to them. I originally only got the Mac because of a special technical aerodynamics application that would only run on it. I've never been a big fan of it but have grown used to it and adapted.

When I cloned it, it was a smooth transition. I'm not sure I really noticed all that much of a performance improvement. At least not compared with what we are led to believe.

I'm just hoping it'll keep on trucking along for a while yet. Fingers crossed!

The 2011 is a great Macbook Pro, aside from the 15” and 17” GPU issues. I decided to go for a 13” 2012 (couldn't afford anything larger on eBay) but I'm very happy with it. It has the same display, optical drive, Thunderbolt, FireWire800, HDD and RAM options as the 2011, but what really sold me were the USB 3.0 ports. The mid-2012 is also the oldest model that officially runs 10.14 Mojave, so it should be supported until late-2021.

The main reason for swapping the 1TB SSD in is so I can copy my external Mavericks drive to an internal partition and save myself some hassle when importing footage from my old Canon GL2. iMovie '09 is the last version that plays nice with that camera and Mojave will only install the very latest version. As Mavericks is the oldest OS I could make a USB installer for, it seemed like a good fit.

I have a bevy of Windows laptops as well- Vista, 7 and 10, as well as Linux. Each one serves its purpose, though they usually sit in storage until needed. I just recently moved into a house with enough space for desktop machines, so as previously mentioned I'm able to bring home some older/orphaned Macs from work- a 2005 G5 iMac, a 2005 PowerMac G5 and a 2007 Mac Pro. The PowerMac G5 is my absolute favorite Mac ever, and I was lucky enough to save a late-2005 2.5 quad-core liquid-cooled model from the e-cycle pile. The late-2005 G5 was not only the last PowerPC model, but it was the most powerful Mac that Apple had produced before switching to Intel processors. As such, I refer to it as “the last of the V8 interceptors.” It's wildly outdated by now, of course, but it still runs great and it takes me back to my college days.

I just remembered this is an upgrade, not a downgrade, thread, so I should probably stop gushing about my ancient computers. The story of the '87 Macintosh Plus someone at work just found in a closet will have to wait for another thread I guess :P
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 04, 2019, 06:06:29 PM
Now that I'm doing more on my Mac than on the PC, the one thing that irks me most is the version of Excel I have on the Mac. It's not a patch on the Windows version.

I've looked into an upgrade, and I'd be hoping it's much better than the 2011 Excel for Mac I currently have.

If it could run the VB application (a training planning system for cycling) I developed many years ago on the Windows version I'd be pretty happy.

My latest trick was to build a home battery storage simulator. I recently installed solar PV on my house and have a smart meter that captures all of my energy flow data in 5-min intervals. It's great for tracking performance and the financial benefit. A question I wanted to answer was how would a battery (e.g. a Tesla Powerwall 2) perform?

So I built a simulator in Excel using all the battery spec and charge/discharge logic.

It works nicely but would like it to be a little quicker.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on March 04, 2019, 08:42:53 PM
Still, I have about 100 programs I use at least some of the time, so reinstalling is a multi-day effort.

Perhaps this is the difference; on my Mac, I can restore my User and Applications folders over to a fresh install and pretty much everything will work.  And even if I decided to do a fresh install of my apps, installation of most things would be as fast as copying a .app file to my Applications folder.

Quote
I'd clone my drive, except that whenever I've tried to do so in the past, I've run into substantial difficulties and I ended up doing a fresh reinstall most of the time anyway.

Precisely.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: arthwollipot on March 04, 2019, 08:54:08 PM
Yeah, don't use Excel on a Mac if you don't have to. Macs are renowned to be exemplars of the principle that Apple products work very well with other Apple products, and very badly with non-Apple products.

I'd suggest LibreOffice, which is supposed to be fully compatible with Excel, but I've found that there are sometimes some inconsistencies with formatting which can ruin a carefully-set up spreadsheet.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on March 04, 2019, 08:58:23 PM
Now that I'm doing more on my Mac than on the PC, the one thing that irks me most is the version of Excel I have on the Mac. It's not a patch on the Windows version.

I've looked into an upgrade, and I'd be hoping it's much better than the 2011 Excel for Mac I currently have.

Have you tried in OpenOffice Calc?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on March 05, 2019, 08:46:52 AM
I've never had any problems with Excel on my Mac.  Of course I'm not trying to use complicated spreadsheets created by someone else, nor am I trying to use VisualBasic scripts.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: CarbShark on March 05, 2019, 10:17:01 AM
You may have to tweak your VB scripts but they should work. The tweaks would be any calls outside of Office. Same with macros.

If your VB does a lot of interapplication stuff you may need to learn AppleScript to make it work.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 07, 2019, 02:44:23 AM
OK, so my Samsung 1TB SSD arrived as did the 2.5" to 3.5" case to fit it into the drive bay of my old desktop. First thing I find is the PC does not recognise the drive if I am using the 3.5" conversion case. Sees it just fine if plugged in directly to the SSD. Ugh. Not sure on the solution for that just yet.

Undeterred I get on with cloning the old drive to the new as I can plug the sata cable directly into the new drive.

I use Macrium Reflect for the cloning job. Of course I punch through too fast and do the clone only to realise afterwards I needed to set up the cloning a little differently for it to use the entire capacity of the new drive. oops. Start again and this time do the set up right.

Then shut down, unplug the old drive and fire the beast up. It starts Windows 10, I get the blue logo and the spinning dots for a bit but then the screen just goes dark and I've no idea if it hangs, needs a shite load more time or what. My previous experience with clones is they fire up immediately. So I go into troubleshooting mode, Google, Macrium forums and other places. Ugh all too hard.

Someone said they had same problem and used EaseUS instead and that worked for them. Like Macrium it's supposed to have a free version for cloning. SO I go through the process of download and install. But no you get the the critical part of the process and it refuses to continue unless you pay for a license. I've no problem with purchasing software but this was advertised as free, so mildly annoyed I abandon EaseUS.

I go looking for more info. I then discover than Samsung have their own cloning software for just this purpose. So i download that, install and run it. It was easy to use, pretty fast and it worked! The machine sprang to life immediately and it was obviously much quicker, more responsive.

Only issue is the video licenses for the training software I have it seems are tied to a drive's serial ID, so I'll have to talk with the company about transferring those over.

So the machine works fine from a software POV but I still have to solve the drive bay problem. I'll go back to the supplier to see what's going on with that.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on March 07, 2019, 01:01:22 PM
OK, so my Samsung 1TB SSD arrived as did the 2.5" to 3.5" case to fit it into the drive bay of my old desktop. First thing I find is the PC does not recognise the drive if I am using the 3.5" conversion case. Sees it just fine if plugged in directly to the SSD. Ugh. Not sure on the solution for that just yet.

Undeterred I get on with cloning the old drive to the new as I can plug the sata cable directly into the new drive.

I use Macrium Reflect for the cloning job. Of course I punch through too fast and do the clone only to realise afterwards I needed to set up the cloning a little differently for it to use the entire capacity of the new drive. oops. Start again and this time do the set up right.

Then shut down, unplug the old drive and fire the beast up. It starts Windows 10, I get the blue logo and the spinning dots for a bit but then the screen just goes dark and I've no idea if it hangs, needs a shite load more time or what. My previous experience with clones is they fire up immediately. So I go into troubleshooting mode, Google, Macrium forums and other places. Ugh all too hard.

Someone said they had same problem and used EaseUS instead and that worked for them. Like Macrium it's supposed to have a free version for cloning. SO I go through the process of download and install. But no you get the the critical part of the process and it refuses to continue unless you pay for a license. I've no problem with purchasing software but this was advertised as free, so mildly annoyed I abandon EaseUS.

I go looking for more info. I then discover than Samsung have their own cloning software for just this purpose. So i download that, install and run it. It was easy to use, pretty fast and it worked! The machine sprang to life immediately and it was obviously much quicker, more responsive.

Only issue is the video licenses for the training software I have it seems are tied to a drive's serial ID, so I'll have to talk with the company about transferring those over.

So the machine works fine from a software POV but I still have to solve the drive bay problem. I'll go back to the supplier to see what's going on with that.

One upside to SSD's is no moving parts, so you don't even have to secure it like you would a hard drive. As long as it's connected properly, just tape it to whatever is closest and you won't have any problems (just don't block any airflow). That Samsung Data Migration utility rocks. They also use a program called Samsung Magician (Windows only) that does firmware updates, speed tests, S.M.A.R.T. data and manual TRIM on older operating systems (I use it to trim my Samsung 750 EVO in my Vista machine). The last version that I liked was Magician 4.97, ver 5 just looks terrible and I can't find most of the features I use in the older one. It also has a feature called R.A.P.I.D. mode that sets a side a gig or 2 of your system ram as a permanent cache to open commonly used programs faster, but as solid-state is pretty fast on its own I doubt most users will notice a difference. The 1TB SSD I bought for my Macbook is a SanDisk since the price was lower and Magician won't run in macOS, but I highly recommend Magician since you're on Windows.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Captain Video on March 07, 2019, 01:21:56 PM
I Just added 16GB of RAM and cloned a drive to SSD on a friends 2011 macbook. I used Super Duper and cloned externally to a Samsung 250GB SSD using a USB cradle. It went slow because of the older USB and took about an hour. I tested a boot using the cradle with no problems then exchanged the drives. Smooth process start to finish with the clone.

Once I opened it up I "remembered" I needed a Torx screwdriver and didn't have one but I was able to remove the mounting nubbies with a pair of pliers.

The machine now runs much faster

I got him a cradle to replace the dvd dive with another hard drive but he opted to wait.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on March 07, 2019, 02:30:25 PM
On my old Acer, which I am keeping as a backup, I replaced the DVD rom as well with a hard drive. It gets used a hell of a lot more. With my Asus gaming laptop however, it has two bays for hard drives and a separate DVD rom bay. When I get a day off, I plan to replace with a Blu Ray I bought.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 07, 2019, 10:32:52 PM
One upside to SSD's is no moving parts, so you don't even have to secure it like you would a hard drive. As long as it's connected properly, just tape it to whatever is closest and you won't have any problems (just don't block any airflow). That Samsung Data Migration utility rocks. They also use a program called Samsung Magician (Windows only) that does firmware updates, speed tests, S.M.A.R.T. data and manual TRIM on older operating systems (I use it to trim my Samsung 750 EVO in my Vista machine). The last version that I liked was Magician 4.97, ver 5 just looks terrible and I can't find most of the features I use in the older one. It also has a feature called R.A.P.I.D. mode that sets a side a gig or 2 of your system ram as a permanent cache to open commonly used programs faster, but as solid-state is pretty fast on its own I doubt most users will notice a difference. The 1TB SSD I bought for my Macbook is a SanDisk since the price was lower and Magician won't run in macOS, but I highly recommend Magician since you're on Windows.

I used Samsung Magician this morning.

So I spent a fair chunk of the morning in an online chat with the tech support guy at RAM City where I got the drive carrier from. Tried pretty much everything, even an attempt to change my SSD from IDE to AHCI. When I got into my BIOS to make the drive change, I did not have an option for AHCI, only for IDE and RAID. I went with RAID.

Performance was a little quicker than IDE (up from ~250MB/s to 280MB/s) but it still didn't solve the issue with the drive carrier. So I've given up on that. I found an old 3.5" bracket and screwed the SSD into that and it slides into the spare drive bay reasonably snugly and I think it'll be fine. I could pop a bit of velcro sticky tape in there but I don't think it's needed.

It's not a super fast drive but I don't need it to be super fast - the PC is old and it performs like lightening compared to before. Boots up so quickly! :)

The other thing I learned is the SATA connections are numbered, and I needed to swap over the cable plugged into the SATA 0 connection from the old drive to the new one so it would choose the new drive to boot from. All simple and old hat to many I guess but we learn new stuff each time. Mine PC has 3 of them, one was spare, now I have all of them in use as the other one connects the optical drive.

I guess I have a spare driver carrier, no idea if it simply isn't compatible with my PC or it has a circuit board fault. As a $30 experiment, it's not hugely painful. Be nice if it worked though.

All that's left is to see if I can have the training video licenses transferred to the new drive.

I had done the SSD clone swap in my 2011 Macbook Pro a couple of years ago. It was pretty painless.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on March 07, 2019, 11:37:44 PM
My mom has a laptop with a spare drive bay.  I’ve been meaning to buy her an SSD to serve as a boot drive and convert her HDD to storage.  I imagine she’ll be quite amazed by the transformation.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on March 08, 2019, 02:04:04 AM
One upside to SSD's is no moving parts, so you don't even have to secure it like you would a hard drive. As long as it's connected properly, just tape it to whatever is closest and you won't have any problems (just don't block any airflow). That Samsung Data Migration utility rocks. They also use a program called Samsung Magician (Windows only) that does firmware updates, speed tests, S.M.A.R.T. data and manual TRIM on older operating systems (I use it to trim my Samsung 750 EVO in my Vista machine). The last version that I liked was Magician 4.97, ver 5 just looks terrible and I can't find most of the features I use in the older one. It also has a feature called R.A.P.I.D. mode that sets a side a gig or 2 of your system ram as a permanent cache to open commonly used programs faster, but as solid-state is pretty fast on its own I doubt most users will notice a difference. The 1TB SSD I bought for my Macbook is a SanDisk since the price was lower and Magician won't run in macOS, but I highly recommend Magician since you're on Windows.

I used Samsung Magician this morning.

So I spent a fair chunk of the morning in an online chat with the tech support guy at RAM City where I got the drive carrier from. Tried pretty much everything, even an attempt to change my SSD from IDE to AHCI. When I got into my BIOS to make the drive change, I did not have an option for AHCI, only for IDE and RAID. I went with RAID.

Performance was a little quicker than IDE (up from ~250MB/s to 280MB/s) but it still didn't solve the issue with the drive carrier. So I've given up on that. I found an old 3.5" bracket and screwed the SSD into that and it slides into the spare drive bay reasonably snugly and I think it'll be fine. I could pop a bit of velcro sticky tape in there but I don't think it's needed.

It's not a super fast drive but I don't need it to be super fast - the PC is old and it performs like lightening compared to before. Boots up so quickly! :)

The other thing I learned is the SATA connections are numbered, and I needed to swap over the cable plugged into the SATA 0 connection from the old drive to the new one so it would choose the new drive to boot from. All simple and old hat to many I guess but we learn new stuff each time. Mine PC has 3 of them, one was spare, now I have all of them in use as the other one connects the optical drive.

I guess I have a spare driver carrier, no idea if it simply isn't compatible with my PC or it has a circuit board fault. As a $30 experiment, it's not hugely painful. Be nice if it worked though.

All that's left is to see if I can have the training video licenses transferred to the new drive.

I had done the SSD clone swap in my 2011 Macbook Pro a couple of years ago. It was pretty painless.

A few years back I saved another computer from my company's e-cycle pile, this one was an old Core 2 Lenovo. I gave it to a friend who needed a PC for his basement workshop area. I maxed the RAM out for him and he put an SSD in. He couldn't get AHCI to show up in the BIOS until he fiddled with the "legacy" options. I would assume a tech support call that long would mention that, but who knows. RAID is meant for a RAID setup, ie more than one drive in a mirrored or striped config. If it work for you, great, but I would try again to get AHCI enabled. One reason for not getting the full SATA3 500 MB/s is your computer might be old enough to only support SATA2. The Vista machine I mentioned previously only has SATA1 and Magician's speed test rarely breaks 100 MB/s but it's still much faster than the old HDD. Regardless of what the config you ended up with, it sounds like it's better than what you started with :)
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Alex Simmons on March 08, 2019, 05:06:52 AM
A few years back I saved another computer from my company's e-cycle pile, this one was an old Core 2 Lenovo. I gave it to a friend who needed a PC for his basement workshop area. I maxed the RAM out for him and he put an SSD in. He couldn't get AHCI to show up in the BIOS until he fiddled with the "legacy" options.

Not sure what they are but I'll do some research.


I would assume a tech support call that long would mention that, but who knows.

Well I did the BIOS stuff after the call ended so we didn't get to discuss my RAID finding.


RAID is meant for a RAID setup, ie more than one drive in a mirrored or striped config. If it work for you, great, but I would try again to get AHCI enabled. One reason for not getting the full SATA3 500 MB/s is your computer might be old enough to only support SATA2. The Vista machine I mentioned previously only has SATA1 and Magician's speed test rarely breaks 100 MB/s but it's still much faster than the old HDD. Regardless of what the config you ended up with, it sounds like it's better than what you started with :)

This is an old ex-govt department PC I picked up for ~$100 many years ago. I'm pretty sure it had XP on it originally. I'm just crap at throwing such stuff out.

So it's quite possible I can't get AHCI at all. No idea to be honest. I did some looking about on HP forum and found a thread where it seems someone else discovered there was no AHCI option.

No matter, it's working fine.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 04, 2019, 07:21:19 PM
Starting to itch for a major system upgrade. My last one was in 2014. I recently upgraded my projector and bought a UHD BD drive (burner, though I'll use it mostly for movies). But now I'll need a new graphics card to play the content I want to play (my current one doesn't work for VR and can't even really handle 4k video playback), and tbh I'd like something more powerful anyway.

I'm definitely aiming for a great all-round PC setup that can do gaming, VR, data science and neural network computations, and good video and decent audio. I think my first step will be to upgrade my GTX780 video card to this (https://tweakers.net/pricewatch/1247339/asus-rog-strix-geforce-rtx-2080-ti-oc.html) 2080TI. Next I'll replace the motherboard, memory (I'm thinking 64GB DDR4), and CPU, cooler (must be ultra quiet; thinking of going with scythe mugen again or something similar), and then finally I'll buy an M.2 drive, maybe even two, as system drives. Not sure what motherboard to go for, though. As for processor, I think I want to go with an intel i9 but I'm still undecided on whether to go for a socket 2066 or 1151 processor. The 2066 are more powerful but they cost a ton. Still, I'm starting to lean that way. But I do have a large number of peripheral devices, so I'll need plenty of USB lanes. Finally, I have a massive amount of storage devices (10 HDDs, 2 SSDs, and 3 BR readers, though I don't need all of the latter), so I want a large number of SATA or SAS connections. If the mobo doesn't have those I'll have to buy an expansion slot. And one of my big HDD's needs replacing anyway, so I'll upgrade that to a 14TB drive.

So, punching in the approximate numbers, that'll cost me about... wait. No, that can't be right. Carry the two...

Ahem.

*Cough*

Never mind.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 04, 2019, 07:36:42 PM
Getting video cards with that much better performance than the GTX 780 is going to be pretty pricey right there. 
For example, one of the less expensive ones, the RTX 2070 appears to be around $500.
Interestingly, it is actually a lower powered card though than the GTX 780.

Been recently watching video cards a bit an upgrade my HD 7850 for a GTX 970.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: superdave on April 04, 2019, 07:36:54 PM
not sure if this counts but I accidentally dropped my phone in the toilet ... washed it out in rubbing alcohol and kept it in a bag full of rice and other desiccants, and 3 days later it came back to life.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 04, 2019, 08:08:21 PM
Getting video cards with that much better performance than the GTX 780 is going to be pretty pricey right there. 
For example, one of the less expensive ones, the RTX 2070 appears to be around $500.
Interestingly, it is actually a lower powered card though than the GTX 780.

Been recently watching video cards a bit an upgrade my HD 7850 for a GTX 970.

Yeah, but the GPU is something I don't think I want to compromise on. After 5 years I'm finally bumping up against some of the limitations of my 780. Some of it is outdated tech (no chance of VR or HDR on a GTX780), and some is just computational limitations. I really want that 11GB of memory and all them tensor cores for awesome future neural network tech (and maybe some ray traced games), and it needs to be good for another 5 years or so.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 04, 2019, 08:23:56 PM
Yeah, but the GPU is something I don't think I want to compromise on. After 5 years I'm finally bumping up against some of the limitations of my 780. Some of it is outdated tech (no chance of VR or HDR on a GTX780), and some is just computational limitations. I really want that 11GB of memory and all them tensor cores for awesome future neural network tech (and maybe some ray traced games), and it needs to be good for another 5 years or so.

I know but just I suspect the system you want will be in the $2000 to $4000 range, probably closer to the higher end.
My last major system upgrade was also in 2014 (FX 8350) although hoping to get a few more years out of it. I will likely continue to follow the AMD upgrade path however. My old video card was running into issues though where games I looked at could be run on my processor but not the video card.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on April 04, 2019, 08:57:44 PM
not sure if this counts but I accidentally dropped my phone in the toilet ... washed it out in rubbing alcohol and kept it in a bag full of rice and other desiccants, and 3 days later it came back to life.

The ol' bag of rice trick is hogwash. If it worked, you wouldn't have to steam rice before eating :P The "other desiccants" probably played a role, but I suspect the alcohol did most of the work. That's my go-to, though you run the risk of damaging internal components. Helluva lot better than a dead toilet-phone, however.

Speaking of rice, last year I had a user bring me her brand new MacBook Pro that wouldn't turn on. I run through all the questions and troubleshooting, nothing. I ask if it got wet, she says no. I take it back to my shop, turn it over to grab the model number and 2 grains of rice fall out of the vent. We schedule an appointment for her at the Genius Bar, they send it out for repair, and a week later it comes back. Sure enough, the invoice says the moisture sensor had been tripped. Now, I wouldn't recommend dunking a whole Macbook in a tray of alcohol but it might have saved us some time :)
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 04, 2019, 10:31:39 PM
Yeah, but the GPU is something I don't think I want to compromise on. After 5 years I'm finally bumping up against some of the limitations of my 780. Some of it is outdated tech (no chance of VR or HDR on a GTX780), and some is just computational limitations. I really want that 11GB of memory and all them tensor cores for awesome future neural network tech (and maybe some ray traced games), and it needs to be good for another 5 years or so.

I know but just I suspect the system you want will be in the $2000 to $4000 range, probably closer to the higher end.
Probably more. I think altogether it's about €5000,- if I completely max out my upgrades. Which would mean spending about half my savings. So I'll probably hold off a bit on the motherboard/cpu/memory/etc replacement. It'll probably just be the graphics card for now. I'm also curious to see this (https://tweakers.net/pricewatch/1312322/asus-rog-matrix-rtx-2080-ti/specificaties/) one, so I'll probably hold off until that becomes available.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: superdave on April 04, 2019, 10:51:21 PM
not sure if this counts but I accidentally dropped my phone in the toilet ... washed it out in rubbing alcohol and kept it in a bag full of rice and other desiccants, and 3 days later it came back to life.

The ol' bag of rice trick is hogwash. If it worked, you wouldn't have to steam rice before eating :P The "other desiccants" probably played a role, but I suspect the alcohol did most of the work. That's my go-to, though you run the risk of damaging internal components. Helluva lot better than a dead toilet-phone, however.

Speaking of rice, last year I had a user bring me her brand new MacBook Pro that wouldn't turn on. I run through all the questions and troubleshooting, nothing. I ask if it got wet, she says no. I take it back to my shop, turn it over to grab the model number and 2 grains of rice fall out of the vent. We schedule an appointment for her at the Genius Bar, they send it out for repair, and a week later it comes back. Sure enough, the invoice says the moisture sensor had been tripped. Now, I wouldn't recommend dunking a whole Macbook in a tray of alcohol but it might have saved us some time :)

yeah i save those little "do not eat" bags everytime i get one i put it in my collection, mainly for this purpose. 
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on April 05, 2019, 09:00:40 AM
If you're cleaning electronic components with isopropyl alcohol, invest in a 99% solution or at minimum a 91% -- but never 70%. 70% is ideal for antisepsis, but it contains far too much water for cleaning electronics. The alcohol will evaporate quickly, leaving your precious electronics covered in water.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 01:45:16 PM
So today my UHD bluray burner arrived. I pop in three of my legally purchased 4k discs, and of course the drive won't even acknowledge any of them. They're region free discs. Regular blu-rays seem to work. I go online to make sure the drive is capable of reading this type of media and it says "yep". After about 30 minutes of searching, I finally find an obscure forum of video rippers that note that ASUS "patched a hole in the AACS" with firmware upgrade 3.02. My drive is at 3.03. After flashing, it'll read the discs.

This "crippling hardware to prevent copyright infringement at the expense of the people who actually bought our stuff" shit pisses me off so goddamn much. How is this bullshit not illegal?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on April 05, 2019, 02:19:22 PM
How is this bullshit not illegal?

You licensed the software when you bought the hardware, and you use it under the terms of that contract.  Why should it be illegal for you and ASUS to enter into that contract?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 05, 2019, 03:03:31 PM
So today my UHD bluray burner arrived. I pop in three of my legally purchased 4k discs, and of course the drive won't even acknowledge any of them. They're region free discs. Regular blu-rays seem to work. I go online to make sure the drive is capable of reading this type of media and it says "yep". After about 30 minutes of searching, I finally find an obscure forum of video rippers that note that ASUS "patched a hole in the AACS" with firmware upgrade 3.02. My drive is at 3.03. After flashing, it'll read the discs.

This "crippling hardware to prevent copyright infringement at the expense of the people who actually bought our stuff" shit pisses me off so goddamn much. How is this bullshit not illegal?

Do you just watch disks or do you rip them? If you rip them, what software are you using?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 03:07:59 PM
How is this bullshit not illegal?

You licensed the software when you bought the hardware, and you use it under the terms of that contract.  Why should it be illegal for you and ASUS to enter into that contract?

Well, I bought this specifically because it was advertised as reading 4K content on several websites. Which of course it did, until they intentionally crippled it over some misplaced sense of insecurity by the movie industry - who's movies I'm just trying to buy and watch legally after spending a ton of money on hardware. I think that's at the very least rage-inducing. But actually, in fairness, looking at the ASUS website again, they don't explicitly name 4k or UHD, just BDXL, so I guess I should've known better than to trust the internet.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 03:11:22 PM
So today my UHD bluray burner arrived. I pop in three of my legally purchased 4k discs, and of course the drive won't even acknowledge any of them. They're region free discs. Regular blu-rays seem to work. I go online to make sure the drive is capable of reading this type of media and it says "yep". After about 30 minutes of searching, I finally find an obscure forum of video rippers that note that ASUS "patched a hole in the AACS" with firmware upgrade 3.02. My drive is at 3.03. After flashing, it'll read the discs.

This "crippling hardware to prevent copyright infringement at the expense of the people who actually bought our stuff" shit pisses me off so goddamn much. How is this bullshit not illegal?

Do you just watch disks or do you rip them? If you rip them, what software are you using?

I just watch. I used to rip them sometimes in the past when they refuse to play on my BD-rom. Ironically, that usually worked just fine with regular blurays even if they refused to play (which used to be very often, but not anymore now that I have Laewoo and Potplayer installed).
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 05, 2019, 03:58:28 PM
I just watch. I used to rip them sometimes in the past when they refuse to play on my BD-rom. Ironically, that usually worked just fine with regular blurays even if they refused to play (which used to be very often, but not anymore now that I have Laewoo and Potplayer installed).

I like to rip movies because it makes them more portable.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 04:14:17 PM
I just watch. I used to rip them sometimes in the past when they refuse to play on my BD-rom. Ironically, that usually worked just fine with regular blurays even if they refused to play (which used to be very often, but not anymore now that I have Laewoo and Potplayer installed).

I like to rip movies because it makes them more portable.

I used to do that mostly to keep a backup, but nowadays rips from the internet tend to be better quality than my own mp4 rips (I'm too lazy to get good at it) and tbh blurays are too large to keep on my harddrives uncompressed.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 05, 2019, 04:46:04 PM
I rip using MakeMKV to convert them to MKV and then use Handbreak to convert to MP4 format.
Seriously thought about paying for MarkMKV
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 07:22:07 PM
Ripping a UHD disk would take a while though. I just want to watch my movies from the original disk in the original quality, when I feel like it, the way the good lord intended, without having to wait several hours for the ripping process to complete. And preferably without having to sit through 20 minutes of trailers and FBI warnings. Shouldn't be too hard, but it is. Especially now that Slysoft/AnyDVD HD is gone.

But maybe I should go to the tech woes thread instead.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 05, 2019, 07:29:40 PM
With MakeDVD, ripping a DVD takes about 10 minutes and converting it to MP4 using Handbreak, maybe 15 to 20 minutes.
Normal Blu Ray take about 20 minutes to rip but 40 minutes to an hour to convert to MP4
1080 p MP4, which I cannot tell the quality difference between them and the original, can take anywhere from 3 to 8 GB as far as size. Some animated movies may be smaller.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 07:44:21 PM
With MakeDVD, ripping a DVD takes about 10 minutes and converting it to MP4 using Handbreak, maybe 15 to 20 minutes.
Normal Blu Ray take about 20 minutes to rip but 40 minutes to an hour to convert to MP4
1080 p MP4, which I cannot tell the quality difference between them and the original, can take anywhere from 3 to 8 GB as far as size. Some animated movies may be smaller.

It depends on your drive speed and CPU and the codec and settings you're using. I remember just copying a 1080p bluray took about 40 minutes on this computer with one of my old bluray drives. I don't know about the new drive though, since I last did that 3 or 4 years ago. I have a vague recollection that conversion took something like 30 minutes, but don't hold me to that - it might just as well have been 20 or 60. Of course, 4k would also take up quite a lot more space (I have three downloaded 4k mp4 rips on my harddrive now, and they're all over 40GB). But in any case, once I buy a movie, I don't want to have to wait 60 minutes and have it eating up tons of space before I can watch it, when I have a perfectly good copy sitting right there on a perfectly readable storage medium.

Anyway, as a frequent customer of the movie industry, I never feel treated like anything other than either a heinous criminal or a small piece of anal lint.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 05, 2019, 08:01:16 PM
I think ripping the disk is more processor dependent than blu ray drive dependent.  On DVDs, when I switch from a Pentium-D to the FX 8350, the riping speed was night and day different. Was not ripping blue rays at that time.

The original MKV files are usually in the 30+ gig range, why I convert them to MP4 versions. I can watch MP4 movies on my tablet / ultrabook or laptop as well. My laptop have a blu ray rom but can still carry far greater movies.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 08:21:44 PM
I think ripping the disk is more processor dependent than blu ray drive dependent.  On DVDs, when I switch from a Pentium-D to the FX 8350, the riping speed was night and day different. Was not ripping blue rays at that time.

Yeah that used to be true when processors were not all that powerful and having enough RAM was a big issue, but unless your computer is well over 8 years old I think for the copying part nowadays the bottleneck is most likely the drive speed, not the processor or memory. A 1x bluray drive can transfer at 4.5mb/sec, which I guess would place an 8x one at 36 and a 16x at 64mb/sec, meaning that at 8x it would take at least 18 minutes to copy to your HDD, assuming the disc is more or less perfect. It could also possibly be the HDD speed if you have a very slow, dying, or highly fragmented one. I have some big HDDs that won't transfer files at more than 10mb/sec because they're filled to the brim and defragmenting them is no longer really an option. It doesn't matter much as I just use them for storage and they're still fast enough for that purpose.

For the conversion it's probably CPU, though. Although with a slightly badass CPU from the last 4 years or so, it could still be the disk.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Captain Video on April 05, 2019, 08:51:20 PM
I think ripping the disk is more processor dependent than blu ray drive dependent.  On DVDs, when I switch from a Pentium-D to the FX 8350, the riping speed was night and day different. Was not ripping blue rays at that time.

Yeah that used to be true when processors were not all that powerful and having enough RAM was a big issue, but unless your computer is well over 8 years old I think for the copying part nowadays the bottleneck is most likely the drive speed, not the processor or memory. A 1x bluray drive can transfer at 4.5mb/sec, which I guess would place an 8x one at 36 and a 16x at 64mb/sec, meaning that at 8x it would take at least 18 minutes to copy to your HDD, assuming the disc is more or less perfect. It could also possibly be the HDD speed if you have a very slow, dying, or highly fragmented one. I have some big HDDs that won't transfer files at more than 10mb/sec because they're filled to the brim and defragmenting them is no longer really an option. It doesn't matter much as I just use them for storage and they're still fast enough for that purpose.

For the conversion it's probably CPU, though. Although with a slightly badass CPU from the last 4 years or so, it could still be the disk.

Why not purchase them digitally in the first place? Unless your net speed is an issue I guess.

I have never viewed a UHD disk but I wonder if the quality is any different than a UHD stream or download.

Personally I don't like disk media of any kind. Maybe vinyl but I no longer own any.

With MakeDVD, ripping a DVD takes about 10 minutes and converting it to MP4 using Handbreak, maybe 15 to 20 minutes.
Normal Blu Ray take about 20 minutes to rip but 40 minutes to an hour to convert to MP4
1080 p MP4, which I cannot tell the quality difference between them and the original, can take anywhere from 3 to 8 GB as far as size. Some animated movies may be smaller.

With most of the cheaper 4k TVs I see on the market now im sure the average viewer would not know the difference. Which reminds me of a tech woe I should go post.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 05, 2019, 09:09:25 PM
As far as the FX 8350, it is on par with an i7-3770 as far as performance. Even today, it can (with a good video card) handle new games on ultra video setting. Coverting videos from mkv to mp4 was the one task that tends to get the cpu pretty warm.

Now, I also agree with captain video here. Everything I have read indicates that unless you have a huge tv screen and scrunched against the screen, you cannot see difference between 1080 p and 4 k.  The Reality Check podcast did a feature about it.

https://www.cnet.com/news/why-ultra-hd-4k-tvs-are-still-stupid/

(http://i.i.cbsi.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2013/01/27/resolution_chart.jpg)

I do see some websites that state that resolutions matter at further distances but most seem to be trying to sell you a 4k tv.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 09:38:12 PM
I think ripping the disk is more processor dependent than blu ray drive dependent.  On DVDs, when I switch from a Pentium-D to the FX 8350, the riping speed was night and day different. Was not ripping blue rays at that time.

Yeah that used to be true when processors were not all that powerful and having enough RAM was a big issue, but unless your computer is well over 8 years old I think for the copying part nowadays the bottleneck is most likely the drive speed, not the processor or memory. A 1x bluray drive can transfer at 4.5mb/sec, which I guess would place an 8x one at 36 and a 16x at 64mb/sec, meaning that at 8x it would take at least 18 minutes to copy to your HDD, assuming the disc is more or less perfect. It could also possibly be the HDD speed if you have a very slow, dying, or highly fragmented one. I have some big HDDs that won't transfer files at more than 10mb/sec because they're filled to the brim and defragmenting them is no longer really an option. It doesn't matter much as I just use them for storage and they're still fast enough for that purpose.

For the conversion it's probably CPU, though. Although with a slightly badass CPU from the last 4 years or so, it could still be the disk.

Why not purchase them digitally in the first place? Unless your net speed is an issue I guess.

It is. I have bad experiences with streaming. I definitely can't stream 4k. And I don't like to be too reliant on my internet connection. Plus there's just something I like about owning a physical copy of a movie I enjoyed. Otherwise I'd just throw it all on my harddrives, but instead I have a wall of movies. }|:op

Now, I also agree with captain video here. Everything I have read indicates that unless you have a huge tv screen and scrunched against the screen, you cannot see difference between 1080 p and 4 k.  The Reality Check podcast did a feature about it.

https://www.cnet.com/news/why-ultra-hd-4k-tvs-are-still-stupid/

(http://i.i.cbsi.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2013/01/27/resolution_chart.jpg)

I do see some websites that state that resolutions matter at further distances but most seem to be trying to sell you a 4k tv.

That's why I have a projector. }|:o) My screen is about 2m across and at maybe 3m distance, I can see the difference, though just barely because my eyes are not great at a distance. When I put it on 4k, my start menu looks about the same size as on my regular monitor. }|:op
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Captain Video on April 05, 2019, 09:55:18 PM
I think ripping the disk is more processor dependent than blu ray drive dependent.  On DVDs, when I switch from a Pentium-D to the FX 8350, the riping speed was night and day different. Was not ripping blue rays at that time.

Yeah that used to be true when processors were not all that powerful and having enough RAM was a big issue, but unless your computer is well over 8 years old I think for the copying part nowadays the bottleneck is most likely the drive speed, not the processor or memory. A 1x bluray drive can transfer at 4.5mb/sec, which I guess would place an 8x one at 36 and a 16x at 64mb/sec, meaning that at 8x it would take at least 18 minutes to copy to your HDD, assuming the disc is more or less perfect. It could also possibly be the HDD speed if you have a very slow, dying, or highly fragmented one. I have some big HDDs that won't transfer files at more than 10mb/sec because they're filled to the brim and defragmenting them is no longer really an option. It doesn't matter much as I just use them for storage and they're still fast enough for that purpose.

For the conversion it's probably CPU, though. Although with a slightly badass CPU from the last 4 years or so, it could still be the disk.

Why not purchase them digitally in the first place? Unless your net speed is an issue I guess.

It is. I have bad experiences with streaming. I definitely can't stream 4k. And I don't like to be too reliant on my internet connection. Plus there's just something I like about owning a physical copy of a movie I enjoyed. Otherwise I'd just throw it all on my harddrives, but instead I have a wall of movies. }|:op

Now, I also agree with captain video here. Everything I have read indicates that unless you have a huge tv screen and scrunched against the screen, you cannot see difference between 1080 p and 4 k.  The Reality Check podcast did a feature about it.

https://www.cnet.com/news/why-ultra-hd-4k-tvs-are-still-stupid/

(http://i.i.cbsi.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2013/01/27/resolution_chart.jpg)

I do see some websites that state that resolutions matter at further distances but most seem to be trying to sell you a 4k tv.

That's why I have a projector. }|:o) My screen is about 2m across and at maybe 3m distance, I can see the difference, though just barely because my eyes are not great at a distance. When I put it on 4k, my start menu looks about the same size as on my regular monitor. }|:op

Now I am curious about your projector. What do you have?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 05, 2019, 10:21:49 PM
I bought the Optoma UHD50.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bo9CM2WwSqI

It's pretty good for the price. Definitely a big step up from my previous one, an Optoma 300X. Had to fiddle with the colors a bit (the yellow is a bit flat by default), but then I always do that obsessively anyway. }|:op

The problem is, as I mentioned earlier, 4k video is way too choppy with my current graphics card, so I'll need to upgrade that too.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on April 07, 2019, 02:50:47 PM
The problem is, as I mentioned earlier, 4k video is way too choppy with my current graphics card, so I'll need to upgrade that too.

You're going to be in it for quite a bit of money and aggravation in the end to do something with parts that aren't designed for that purpose when a standalone Blu-ray player can handle it with no problems. I just don't get it.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 07, 2019, 04:47:48 PM
The problem is, as I mentioned earlier, 4k video is way too choppy with my current graphics card, so I'll need to upgrade that too.

You're going to be in it for quite a bit of money and aggravation in the end to do

That'd be true if it were an either/or choice, but I want to upgrade my GPU for other reasons (VR, NN computing - I do data science - better gaming, grid computing, and so on), so I'll buy that anyway. The rest of the costs are roughly comparable, if not less.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on April 09, 2019, 09:13:51 AM
I was on the fence about whether this belonged in the DIY thread or this one, since the equipment is technically analog but incorporates a lot of electronics and shares many features with a PC.  In the end I decided for this thread.

The bearings started to go on the fan in the power supply of our mixing console (Allen & Heath GL2400) last year, which resulted in lots of noise all the time, but an especially loud grinding noise on startup.  This past August I had it apart to check it, but, since the fan needed to be replaced an would have to be ordered, I lubricated it and put everything back together.  It was significantly quieter for a couple of months, but of course the noise eventually returned.  So last week I ordered a replacement fan (the same model is still being produced 15 years after the console was manufactured), and yesterday I had it apart again and installed it.  Unfortunately, the new fan came without a connector and I did not have any compatible ones, so I had to disassemble the old one and solder the leads to the old crimp connectors. It wasn't pretty, but it worked.  The board is now silent again and I can't imagine how much I saved by doing it myself.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 12, 2019, 02:47:43 PM
I don't know if Werecow is interested (and if available in their location) but NewEgg  has a good deal on an i9 bundle

https://promotions.newegg.com/NEemail/Apr-0-2019/UnboxSavings_YsC2yw_12/index-landing.html?utm_medium=Email&utm_source=IGNEFL041219&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL041219-_-EMC-041219-Index-_-Header-_-ClickHere&et_cid=49650&et_rid=15002986&et_p1=&email64=a2l0c3VuZUBraXRzdW5lc2Rlbi54eXo=

Just under $700
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 12, 2019, 03:15:32 PM
I don't know if Werecow is interested (and if available in their location) but NewEgg  has a good deal on an i9 bundle

https://promotions.newegg.com/NEemail/Apr-0-2019/UnboxSavings_YsC2yw_12/index-landing.html?utm_medium=Email&utm_source=IGNEFL041219&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL041219-_-EMC-041219-Index-_-Header-_-ClickHere&et_cid=49650&et_rid=15002986&et_p1=&email64=a2l0c3VuZUBraXRzdW5lc2Rlbi54eXo=

Just under $700

Thanks, I appreciate it. However due to an error at the bank I have yet to receive last month's paycheck, and between that, my recent €1500 projector upgrade and the €2000 tax bill I got recently I'm kind of low on gadget funds atm. }|:os Luckily the matter with the bank should be resolved soon, and it looks like I should have about €3000 heading my way for a different tax-related matter in a month or two.

Also tbh the GPU is more important to most of my work and personal projects, and will be a huge overall improvement for my current system, so I'll probably save up for that first and buy the rest over the course of the year.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on April 12, 2019, 08:07:59 PM
Pretty minor tech question but still bugs me

I have a Dell Venue that uses a USB charger but it is non standard
It is 24 watts - 19.5v at 1.2 amps
Over the years I have had a lot of USB cables break.

Would I have to get a special USB cable for it?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Belgarath on April 12, 2019, 08:09:09 PM
Pretty minor tech question but still bugs me

I have a Dell Venue that uses a USB charger but it is non standard
It is 24 watts - 19.5v at 1.2 amps
Over the years I have had a lot of USB cables break.

Would I have to get a special USB cable for it?

No, the amps are the key.  1.2 isn't that much. I think most of them are rated at 2 amps now.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 25, 2019, 01:38:36 PM
Ordered this (https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_RTX_2080_Ti_Strix_OC/) monster today on amazon. Should arrive Monday. I almost went for the Matrix (https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_RTX_2080_Ti_Matrix/) because it's the fastest 2080Ti that I've heard of, but after reading a bit more, I decided against it mainly because it's €500,- more expensive, almost twice as noisy as my current 780 DCII (whereas the Strix has a quiet mode in which the fans are off when idle and it's one of the quietest cards around), and while the Matrix one comes with a big out-of-the-box overclock, the actual PCB is the same and the maximum OC is roughly equal.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Captain Video on April 25, 2019, 01:46:28 PM
Ordered this (https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_RTX_2080_Ti_Strix_OC/) monster today on amazon. Should arrive Monday. I almost went for the Matrix (https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_RTX_2080_Ti_Matrix/) because it's the fastest 2080Ti that I've heard of, but after reading a bit more, I decided against it mainly because it's €500,- more expensive, almost twice as noisy as my current 780 DCII (whereas the Strix has a quiet mode in which the fans are off when idle and it's one of the quietest cards around), and while the Matrix one comes with a big out-of-the-box overclock, the actual PCB is the same and the maximum OC is roughly equal.

why not 2?

LOL, that will certainly get the job done
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on April 25, 2019, 01:56:22 PM
Ordered this (https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_RTX_2080_Ti_Strix_OC/) monster today on amazon. Should arrive Monday. I almost went for the Matrix (https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_RTX_2080_Ti_Matrix/) because it's the fastest 2080Ti that I've heard of, but after reading a bit more, I decided against it mainly because it's €500,- more expensive, almost twice as noisy as my current 780 DCII (whereas the Strix has a quiet mode in which the fans are off when idle and it's one of the quietest cards around), and while the Matrix one comes with a big out-of-the-box overclock, the actual PCB is the same and the maximum OC is roughly equal.

why not 2?

LOL, that will certainly get the job done

I think one will do... for now. }|;op
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: BAWRFRS on April 27, 2019, 08:34:53 AM

The ol' bag of rice trick is hogwash. If it worked, you wouldn't have to steam rice before eating :P The "other desiccants" probably played a role, but I suspect the alcohol did most of the work. That's my go-to, though you run the risk of damaging internal components. Helluva lot better than a dead toilet-phone, however.


After the bag of rice trick failed on a toilet-phone, I set the phone aside until I could figure out where to recycle it. It was in a side-table drawer for about 6 months and when I finally remembered where I put it, and was ready to take it in for recycling, I decided to charge it up one last time just out of curiosity. It worked! By then the phone had been deactivated and was relatively old anyway, but it did work (e.g., as a non-phone PDA) for some time after.

In a similar accident my ipod shuffle went through the wash. I disassembled it carefully and dried it out well. It worked again too, but the battery life was half of what it had been pre-wash.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on April 27, 2019, 11:42:52 AM
My experience with such things is that, even after they have been successfully 'dried' to the point that they work, the damage often occurs over time from corrosion once current starts flowing.  I had a keyboard that I thought I had successfully cleaned and dried but, when it failed week later, I found many of the traces on the PCB corroded to the point of shorting. I think trace minerals left behind, combined with the current, caused rapid corrosion.

Many phones now have nano-coatings inside that protect their components from corrosion, of course, which has improved the survivability of such disasters significantly.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Beef Wellington on April 28, 2019, 02:43:37 AM
I checked my work email this afternoon and saw that a user had spilled a cup of water on their Surface Book. The ticket was submitted the next day, of course, so my opportunity to take action has long since passed. I save desiccant packets when we get new equipment and luckily there was a huge one that came with a new printer the other week. Here's hoping it helps, cuz something tells me opening up a Surface Book is a really bad idea. I wish it had been an old ThinkPad...
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 05, 2019, 01:46:04 PM
So, I should be getting a payout soon from my previous employer and I want to use it to finish my upgrade.  I want a great all-round system for gaming and VR, data science stuff, and maybe some 3D modelling, and I have a ton of peripheral devices (10 HDDs, 2 bluray drives, an SSD, and a swathe of USB devices including 3D vision, a printer, 3D printer, webcam, a VR headset, a 3D webcam for computer vision stuff, a USB microscope, ...). It should last me at least 4 years.

I have the memory, M.2 drive (in the mail), and cooler picked. My current motherboard has a built in LSI SAS controller and I have a small SATA expansion card, but the motherboards that look the most appealing to me have 4 fewer SATA ports, so I've ordered a new PCIe 8x SAS RAID controller that I'll flash to work in IT mode, which can handle up to 8 SATA devices. That should give me enough room to maneuver storage wise.

But I have complete choice paralysis on the CPU. I probably want to go with Intel because it has a few features that I want for data science work and much better single core performance than AMD (even Threadripper, and most applications I run outside of some parts of my data science work are still single core). I've picked out two neat (actually, pretty extreme) boards that are roughly comparable in their number of features, except that one is HEDT/socket 2066 (and as such has more PCIe lanes, faster WLAN, more memory slots, and USB lanes), and the other is consumer grade/socket 1151. Give the number of peripheral devices (I don't mind if my storage drives are slightly sluggish, but I want my GPU and M.2 drive to work at full speed), I'm considering going with a 2066 motherboard, but all of the HEDT CPUs have poorer single thread performance than the 9900K, which would be my 1151 CPU of choice. But the 1151 CPUs all have 16 PCIe lanes versus 44 for the 2066 ones (I may want to upgrade to having a second GPU in the near-ish future, depending on how my career goes, and have an extra M.2 drive for a dual boot with linux and win10), less RAM bandwidth (dual versus quad), support less memory (which might become relevant for the data science stuff), and generally have poorer multi-core performance. If I go with the 2066 I'll probably go for the 9800X, though, which is roughly comparable in price, has the same number of cores as the 9900K, and is clocked at a slightly higher multi-core speed but lower single core speed. The price difference between the two is about 10%, and as such not really an obstacle for me. I keep flip-flopping between the two.

Oh, first world problems. Life would be so much easier if there was just one all-round best CPU. }|:op
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 10, 2019, 08:46:17 AM
Finally made up my mind and decided not to go the HEDT route as the performance would gain a moderate boost in things like 3D modelling/rendering and non-GPU machine learning (sklearn), but actually suffer in the areas in which I use the computer the most. Decided to order it now that my "phantom unit" money has arrived. In the end my complete upgrade looks like this:

Memory: G.Skill Trident Z RGB 64 GB DDR4 4000 MHz
Processor: Intel Core i9-9900K
Motherboard: ASUS ROG MAXIMUS XI EXTREME
Cooler: Scythe Mugen 5 PCGH Edition
Controller for extra SATA drives: Dell Perc H310
GPU: ASUS GeForce RTX 2080Ti ROG Strix OC 11 GB GDDR6
SSD: Samsung 970 Evo Plus M.2
HDD: Toshiba 14TB drive
UHD-friendly BDEX bluray drive: Asus BW-12B1ST
Webcam: Logitech BRIO STREAM
Projector: Optoma UHD50 + new 10m Ultra High Speed HDMI cable + Hi-Shock DLP active 3D glasses
VR: Dell Visor (+ controllers)


(Already have a great case and PSU)

I admit, I went a little overboard, but I am an enthusiast, so I do like having them shiny hardware things. Cost a fortune, but other than storage (I am a massive data hoarder) I think I'll be good for at least 5 years.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 10, 2019, 04:18:29 PM
I thought about getting a 4 TB internal drive for my gaming laptop as its storage drive. I currently have a 2 TB in there. Problem is that only Seagate makes one and it is a 15 mm height drive and will not fit in the bay. There is a 4 TB SSD but it is still expensive as hell.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 10, 2019, 06:03:42 PM
I suspect the problem will be the number of platters and heads you need to achieve 4TB of storage in a 2.5'' drive... The slimmest 2TB ones are 7mm tall as far as I can see. It's just not gonna fit in under 15mm with current technology.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 10, 2019, 06:20:16 PM
My thoughts were actually similar but doesn't stop me from wishing. It is also that 15 mm high 2.5 drives are generally of not much use if they do not fit in a drive bay. 
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 12, 2019, 06:47:46 AM
I bought a Dell Tablet / Ultra-Book a couple of months ago

Started getting an error Friday "dbgcore.dll is either not designed to run on Windows or it contains an error. (error code 0xc000020)." Seems to control a lot of core functions. Some programs would also simply not even run.

Tried some command level fixes as well as an OS level fix. Finally, decided to start fresh with the OS and they failed. One was starting from Windows 10 and the other from the boot stage. The second one was halfway but still did not fix the machine.

I called Square Trade because I had purchased an extended warranty. They simply found an excuse not to honor their warranty - Basically eBay will sell up to 60 days out while they will only accept out to 30 days - Got my money back for the warranty but I suspect that all they really do is find excuses not to honor them.

I was tired as hell after fighting with it with no sleep. Asked my roommate to do a reinstall of the OS using a flash drive - I actually bought a bunch of 32 GB flash drives for just this purpose. He was able to remove the partitions on the hard drive (64 GB SSD) and able to reload the OS.

At the end, at least we got it working with no errors. A bunch of devices in the device manager were unknown however. This included the wireless unfortunately. Tried getting the wireless adapter from the Dell website, which kept giving us a "Bad Package" error. Connected through a USB to CAT connector. Did the update drives but some, including the wireless, still gave problems. Began downloading drivers from Dell and installing them one at a time until we got down to three.

The wireless was still giving problems. Looked up discussions on the problem. Had to download the wireless driver, use 7-Zip to unpack the executable, and then pull the file from there. That allowed me to install the wireless and blue tooth adapters, leaving just one.

Looked up my model and "Unknown Device" and found a suggestion. Installed that device and all drivers are installed. Need to reload a number of programs but that can be done even if a pain.

Still, this whole thing took many hours.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 12, 2019, 07:05:58 AM
I bought a Dell Tablet / Ultra-Book a couple of months ago

Started getting an error Friday "dbgcore.dll is either not designed to run on Windows or it contains an error.

I'm guessing the latter; it's apparently "Windows Core Debugging Helpers" (https://windows10dll.nirsoft.net/dbgcore_dll.html). Isn't it wonderful to have help debugging your OS? }|:op

From what I'm reading, it might be caused by that dll getting corrupted or misconfigured in some way. Would run a full drive scan to make sure you don't have bad sectors.

Anyway, I feel your pain.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 17, 2019, 03:53:16 AM
After the problems I had, I had ordered a new tablet / ultra-book.

The one I had been using was the Dell Venue 5130. I purchased the Dell Venue 7140 at the time. Maybe I could have cancelled the order but decided to keep it.

One reason is that there a program I use that is single thread and the 5130 is pretty bad at single thread.
The new machine also is much faster, a 64 bit machine, has 8 GB of ram vs 2 GB, and was listed with a 128 GB SSD vs a 64 GB SSD.

Received it though and windows was not registered. Was able to register it but there was another annoying issue. That was that windows gave all of its information in Spanish. Not being a Spanish speaker, more than a few words, that can be an issue. Tried to change the language in various places but nothing seemed to help. There was also a slew of drivers missing.

I got most of the drivers installed but still stuck in Spanish mode. Finally, I did a complete refresh where I reinstalled the OS. During the install, I was finally able to get Spanish out as the default language. As well, I was able to afterward finally get all the drivers updated.

Of interest, while it was listed with a 128 GB SSD, it actually has a 256 GB one. That actually helps quite a bit because my "working files" is about 30 GB, I have about 30 GB of PDF files, and about 30 GB of music. I would have likely needed to leave some of them off with the 128 GB SSD - The 64 of the Venue 5130 made me have to store files on a micro SD card.

As a side note, looks like Windows Defender is far better than in the past
https://www.tomsguide.com/us/windows-defender,review-2209.html

Edit: Now that I have been using the Dell Venue 7140 for a few days, there is not comparison in the performance between them. The  Atom Z3770 processor is anemic and the 5130 also only has 2 Gb of ram
On the other hand, while the Core M-5Y71 uses slightly greater power (4.5 vs 4 watts), its performance is far better and if fact better than my backup laptop. It also has 8 vs 2 GB of ram and is running Windows 64 vs 32.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 17, 2019, 03:02:30 PM
As a side note, looks like Windows Defender is far better than in the past
https://www.tomsguide.com/us/windows-defender,review-2209.html

Probably true, but it still gives me so many false positives that I've completely disabled it in order to preserve my sanity.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on May 17, 2019, 03:09:42 PM
My wife spilled a vase of water on my old MacBook.  And of course rather than coming to get me right away, she opened it up to see if it worked...and likely fried the thing. If I had been able to remove the battery, I might have been able to save it with a quick drying response.

She's the primary user of that machine, now, though. I think if it is truly dead that I will recommend she get a ChromeBook to replace it.  She primarily uses it for web browsing and E-mail anyway, so a ChromeBook will work quite well for her, I think.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: brilligtove on May 17, 2019, 04:36:29 PM
As a side note, looks like Windows Defender is far better than in the past
https://www.tomsguide.com/us/windows-defender,review-2209.html

Probably true, but it still gives me so many false positives that I've completely disabled it in order to preserve my sanity.

My goodness, what are you doing to get false positives? I think I've only ever had one from some utility.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 17, 2019, 04:59:40 PM
Well, I don't remember all of the details, but it blocked a couple of programs like Tor and DVDFab (which seems to be the only program that will allow me to rip some of the UHD discs I bought), it didn't seem to like some of the drivers I got from the ASRock website for my motherboard (or was it the CD that came with it?), and it really (https://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,51079.msg9612471.html#msg9612471) didn't like it when the windows activation service didn't work and I decided to use a 3rd party activator/boot loader (which I ran through 3 different online anti virus services and spybot first). That last one makes sense since it's specifically designed to function a lot like a root kit, but I got tired of repeatedly telling it to remember my choice to allow the program to run only to have it block it again two seconds later.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on May 17, 2019, 11:58:46 PM
I think, werecow, that you need to accept that the things you do with your computer are not things it is intended to do, and that you cannot expect tools intended to protect the general public from themselves to work for you.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 18, 2019, 01:26:21 AM
I think, werecow, that you need to accept that the things you do with your computer are not things it is intended to do, and that you cannot expect tools intended to protect the general public from themselves to work for you.

I use a community developed character generator for pathfinder - It sets off Windows Defender when I download it - Scanned with avast and others. Not that it has anything dangerous but not listed as an official program in microsoft's database. Some fan patches on some games are similar.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 18, 2019, 06:07:18 AM
I think, werecow, that you need to accept that the things you do with your computer are not things it is intended to do, and that you cannot expect tools intended to protect the general public from themselves to work for you.

I'm not supposed to install drivers and a web browser?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: brilligtove on May 18, 2019, 01:29:59 PM
I think, werecow, that you need to accept that the things you do with your computer are not things it is intended to do, and that you cannot expect tools intended to protect the general public from themselves to work for you.

I'm not supposed to install drivers and a web browser?

Is that what happened here?

Well, I don't remember all of the details, but it blocked a couple of programs like Tor and DVDFab (which seems to be the only program that will allow me to rip some of the UHD discs I bought), it didn't seem to like some of the drivers I got from the ASRock website for my motherboard (or was it the CD that came with it?), and it really (https://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,51079.msg9612471.html#msg9612471) didn't like it when the windows activation service didn't work and I decided to use a 3rd party activator/boot loader (which I ran through 3 different online anti virus services and spybot first). That last one makes sense since it's specifically designed to function a lot like a root kit, but I got tired of repeatedly telling it to remember my choice to allow the program to run only to have it block it again two seconds later.

I mean drivers, sure. You described hacking windows activation and building your PC from parts... those are not things most users do. Even ripping discs is relatively uncommon.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 18, 2019, 01:49:17 PM
I had to "hack" windows activation because it wasn't working in the first place, and the drivers and programs work fine now. It's defender that kept blocking them from running and/or installing that irks me. But I guess we're setting the bar for what constitutes a reasonable operating system that low now.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on May 18, 2019, 03:41:13 PM
I think, werecow, that you need to accept that the things you do with your computer are not things it is intended to do, and that you cannot expect tools intended to protect the general public from themselves to work for you.

I'm not supposed to install drivers and a web browser?

I do not think that is an accurate summary of what you said you were doing. Nor did I say that you were not “supposed” to do anything.  You can do whatever the fuck you want.  You described breaking BluRay encryption, using Tor to modify your computer's routing behavior, and bypassing Windows activation and none of them things Windows was designed to do (and in some cases they are things that your OS or hardware have been specifically designed not to do).  Nor can they really be considered typical usage.

As for your main board drivers, when you are installing software that operates at such a low level it’s usually best to disable any antivirus software.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on May 18, 2019, 05:49:59 PM
Umm, I rip Blu Rays and having nothing like these issues - I use Make MKV and then use Handbreak to convert MKV to MP4 files.
That does not seem to be a major problem.

Not had any major problems with windows activation either. I have recently rebuilt the OS of a laptop and two tablets (both windows) and not had any issues with them. 
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on May 18, 2019, 06:34:42 PM
Again, the problem isn't the software. That actually runs fine now that I've disabled defender (though in fairness, Tor took disabling my LAN as well because it was using the wrong ethernet connection - now that I think about it I speculate that that may have been the issue with the activation service as well). It's that it is false flagged as malware by windows defender, and that telling defender to remember to allow it to install (or, in the case of Tor or DVDfab, run) does not actually work properly. If that did work, there would be no problem.

EDIT: It's also not just me. It's common enough that it's a meme:

(https://www.memecreator.org/static/images/memes/3695112.jpg)

(https://pics.me.me/downloads-spotify-desktop-windows-defender-wait-thats-illegal-windows-defender-42945928.png)

(https://pics.me.me/me-deactivates-windows-defender-to-install-office-abc-am-i-37368855.png)

(https://pics.awwmemes.com/when-windows-defender-blocks-something-even-though-you-spent-a-34389205.png)

(https://pics.me.me/computer-can-you-where-are-you-buddyr-install-this-program-45448952.png)
(http://)
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: John Albert on June 09, 2019, 12:05:34 PM
Where are you downloading your drivers from?

One of those commercial hardware driver "management" services?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on June 09, 2019, 02:05:06 PM
The manufacturer's website. ASUS.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on June 09, 2019, 03:52:24 PM
The manufacturer's website. ASUS.

Asus appears better than average from what I have seen in regards to support
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on June 09, 2019, 04:18:04 PM
The manufacturer's website. ASUS.

Asus appears better than average from what I have seen in regards to support

As noted, the problem is not with ASUS or the drivers. It's Defender and, in some cases, User Account Control ("an administrator has blocked"... etc). Disabling defender and the built in administrator account solved the problem.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: John Albert on June 10, 2019, 03:45:24 PM
The manufacturer's website. ASUS.

Asus appears better than average from what I have seen in regards to support

As noted, the problem is not with ASUS or the drivers. It's Defender and, in some cases, User Account Control ("an administrator has blocked"... etc). Disabling defender and the built in administrator account solved the problem.

Yeah, ASUS is a trustworthy and reliable company.

The reason I asked is because some Windows users download questionable 3rd party software packages to manage their hardware. These programs sometimes appear at the top of Google search results for drivers, so people tend to assume they're OK.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on June 10, 2019, 05:39:14 PM
The only issue I have is that my Asus motherboard is super picky about ram - I would like to increase it to 16 but I would have to replace both DDR3 chips - Figured best to wait until it is time to go to a new CPU/MB combination because DDR4 is now the standard.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 10, 2019, 07:36:31 PM
The only issue I have is that my Asus motherboard is super picky about ram - I would like to increase it to 16 but I would have to replace both DDR3 chips - Figured best to wait until it is time to go to a new CPU/MB combination because DDR4 is now the standard.

DDR5 will be out later this year, they say.

What does the pickiness of your MB have to do with having replace the RAM in matched pairs?  If you’ve currently got 2x4, you’re going to have to replace both anyway to get to 16, regardless of MB manufacturer, right?
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on June 10, 2019, 07:55:17 PM
I have a single 8 GB which works fine - I tried a different brand of 8 GB DDR3 (I believe different speed as well) .
It only saw a single 8 GB. Bought a second one of the same brand as the second one I bought and still only saw 8 GB.
It appears as if only certain brands / types that it will accept in pairs.   
Yes, I updated my bios as well.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 10, 2019, 08:12:45 PM
I have a single 8 GB which works fine - I tried a different brand of 8 GB DDR3 (I believe different speed as well) .
It only saw a single 8 GB. Bought a second one of the same brand as the second one I bought and still only saw 8 GB.
It appears as if only certain brands / types that it will accept in pairs.   
Yes, I updated my bios as well.

What kind of processor do you have?  Older Intel processors used to have a problem supporting certain chip configurations in DDR3 DIMMs.

Also be aware that even for the same capacity and manufacturer components can change over time.  If you can find the same model from about the same time you might have more luck.  I had good luck matching old SO-DIMMs by buying reclaimed ones on eBay.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: Desert Fox on June 10, 2019, 08:36:08 PM
Cannot remember the exact model of the motherboard but the processor is an Fx-8350. Depending on who is arguing, it is an i5 / i7 equivalent.

Crucial listed RAM that is suppose to work but I think it would be better to  wait a couple more years and upgrade to a Ryzen, new motherboard, and new DDR4/DDR5 ram.     
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: werecow on June 10, 2019, 09:42:17 PM
The manufacturer's website. ASUS.

Asus appears better than average from what I have seen in regards to support

As noted, the problem is not with ASUS or the drivers. It's Defender and, in some cases, User Account Control ("an administrator has blocked"... etc). Disabling defender and the built in administrator account solved the problem.

Yeah, ASUS is a trustworthy and reliable company.

The reason I asked is because some Windows users download questionable 3rd party software packages to manage their hardware. These programs sometimes appear at the top of Google search results for drivers, so people tend to assume they're OK.

Nah, I always go to the hardware vendor's site, unless I run into specific driver problems that a 3rd party driver may fix. I actually tried to install them from the USB drive that came with my mobo first, with the same issue.

I have a single 8 GB which works fine - I tried a different brand of 8 GB DDR3 (I believe different speed as well) .
It only saw a single 8 GB. Bought a second one of the same brand as the second one I bought and still only saw 8 GB.
It appears as if only certain brands / types that it will accept in pairs.   
Yes, I updated my bios as well.

You may want to check if your memory slots are paired/dual channel and which order they should be populated in. You can usually vary the modules between unpaired slots without too many problems, but it might cause problems between paired slots (particularly if the modules have different latency or clock speeds). Usually one would just end up being downclocked to the speed of the slowest module, but I think I read something about it sometimes causing instability. So, for example, on this mobo:

(https://i.stack.imgur.com/RYLH4.jpg)

you should use the same types of modules in the similarly colored slots, because they are paired and when both slots are populated they will be used in dual channel mode (which should give higher bandwidth), but you may vary the memory types between the differently colored slots. Although I've never had issues myself, tbh. I guess some mobos are more prone to issues than others.
Title: Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
Post by: The Latinist on June 11, 2019, 12:08:06 AM
Cannot remember the exact model of the motherboard but the processor is an Fx-8350. Depending on who is arguing, it is an i5 / i7 equivalent.

AMD processors do not have the issue I mentioned; they have always supported all chip configurations supported in the standard.