Skeptics Guide to the Universe Forums

General Discussions => Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine => Topic started by: Quetzalcoatl on May 12, 2019, 04:24:47 PM

Title: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Quetzalcoatl on May 12, 2019, 04:24:47 PM
Recently I tried an alcohol-free beer (several bottles of it). It was surprisingly good actually. I will probably take that more often in the future. Less bad for health, and much cheaper too, so good for my economy too. Not a trace of hangover, and no need to pee all the time either.

However, it is not completely alcohol-free. The law here states that anything with less alcohol that 0.5% can be considered alcohol-free, and this beer has 0.4% alcohol. Does that small percentage of alcohol affect health in any noticeable way? Or is it simply too small to matter?
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: DanDanDan on May 12, 2019, 07:32:22 PM
My guess is that this falls under the umbrella of insignificant toxins. Our immune system and filtration systems are constantly dealing with minute amounts of different toxins, and getting rid of those toxins doesn't seem to have guaranteed benefits.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: daniel1948 on May 12, 2019, 07:57:33 PM
Just my opinion: Non-alcoholic beer (less than 0.5% alcohol) has an insignificant impact on your health, either beneficial or harmful.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Quetzalcoatl on May 14, 2019, 03:03:41 PM
Your replies make sense, thanks. :)
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: random poet on May 14, 2019, 03:15:48 PM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Harry Black on May 14, 2019, 03:23:30 PM
Everytime alcohol has been free, it has significantly impacted my health >:D
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Ah.hell on May 14, 2019, 04:02:41 PM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.
I was going to say something about this.  A large slug of empty calories(carbs even) probably not great for you but almost certainly better for you than actual beer.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: DanDanDan on May 14, 2019, 08:28:19 PM
Everytime alcohol has been free, it has significantly impacted my health >:D
Nice.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Friendly Angel on May 14, 2019, 08:47:06 PM
The law here states that anything with less alcohol that 0.5% can be considered alcohol-free, and this beer has 0.4% alcohol. Does that small percentage of alcohol affect health in any noticeable way? Or is it simply too small to matter?

It's not the percentage that causes the health problems, it's the total consumption.

  500 mL of 0.4% alcohol beer has the same alcohol health effect as
    50 mL of 4.0% alcohol beer.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: jt512 on May 15, 2019, 05:39:48 AM
The law here states that anything with less alcohol that 0.5% can be considered alcohol-free, and this beer has 0.4% alcohol. Does that small percentage of alcohol affect health in any noticeable way? Or is it simply too small to matter?

It's not the percentage that causes the health problems, it's the total consumption.

  500 mL of 0.4% alcohol beer has the same alcohol health effect as
    50 mL of 4.0% alcohol beer.


...which is to say, no health problems at that level of consumption.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: jt512 on May 15, 2019, 05:47:31 AM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.
I was going to say something about this.  A large slug of empty calories(carbs even) probably not great for you but almost certainly better for you than actual beer.


Not entirely empty.  Beer, alcoholic or not, contains micronutrients.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: jt512 on May 15, 2019, 05:51:31 AM
Recently I tried an alcohol-free beer (several bottles of it). It was surprisingly good actually.


I agree.  It is surprisingly good tasting, at least the stuff they have here in Germany. 
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Harry Black on May 15, 2019, 06:20:05 AM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.
I was going to say something about this.  A large slug of empty calories(carbs even) probably not great for you but almost certainly better for you than actual beer.
I suppose it would depend on your calorie budget though?
It would only be a problem if it brought you into a calorific excess?
Maybe not great for your teeth though.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Quetzalcoatl on May 15, 2019, 02:50:47 PM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: random poet on May 15, 2019, 03:02:58 PM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Flavour is irrelevant. It is a carbonated drink with added sugar. That's a softdrink.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: jt512 on May 15, 2019, 04:53:14 PM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Flavour is irrelevant. It is [size=78%]a carbonated drink with added sugar. That's a softdrink.[/size]

What kind of alcohol-free beer are you talking about.  Here in Germany there is no sugar, added or otherwise, in alcohol-free beer.


(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/jeverfun.png)


Partial translation: Brewed as regular beer.  Then the alcohol is removed.  No sugar.  Ingredients: water, malt, hops, fermentation carbonic acid. 


Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: random poet on May 15, 2019, 07:45:28 PM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Flavour is irrelevant. It is [size=78%]a carbonated drink with added sugar. That's a softdrink.[/size]

What kind of alcohol-free beer are you talking about.  Here in Germany there is no sugar, added or otherwise, in alcohol-free beer.


(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/jeverfun.png)


Partial translation: Brewed as regular beer.  Then the alcohol is removed.  No sugar.  Ingredients: water, malt, hops, fermentation carbonic acid.
Sure. This is why I also wrote "always read the labels." Quality will vary.

The one you posted is still 2,1g of sugar. Only 20% of what is in a can of coke. ("Malt" is sugar.)
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: jt512 on May 15, 2019, 07:57:23 PM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Flavour is irrelevant. It is [size=78%]a carbonated drink with added sugar. That's a softdrink.[/size]

What kind of alcohol-free beer are you talking about.  Here in Germany there is no sugar, added or otherwise, in alcohol-free beer.


(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/jeverfun.png)


Partial translation: Brewed as regular beer.  Then the alcohol is removed.  No sugar.  Ingredients: water, malt, hops, fermentation carbonic acid.
Sure. This is why I also wrote "always read the labels." Quality will vary.

The one you posted is still 2,1g of sugar. Only 20% of what is in a can of coke. ("Malt" is sugar.)


The one I posted contains 0 sugar.  Beer, according, to the USDA data base contains 0 sugar.  Malt (which is a grain) is fermented in brewing.  It all becomes alcohol; no sugar remains. 
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on May 15, 2019, 08:35:33 PM
Pointless. Drink beer, don't drink beer, there is no try.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: daniel1948 on May 15, 2019, 08:38:13 PM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Flavour is irrelevant. It is [size=78%]a carbonated drink with added sugar. That's a softdrink.[/size]

What kind of alcohol-free beer are you talking about.  Here in Germany there is no sugar, added or otherwise, in alcohol-free beer.


(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/jeverfun.png)


Partial translation: Brewed as regular beer.  Then the alcohol is removed.  No sugar.  Ingredients: water, malt, hops, fermentation carbonic acid. 

You beat me to it: Malted (i.e. sprouted) grain has sugar. The yeast turns that sugar into alcohol. Then for non-alcoholic beer they distill out most of the alcohol. If there's any sugar remaining, two N/A beers a day does not have enough sugar or alcohol to have an impact on your health.

The only possible health issue would be for someone who has an allergy to one or more of the ingredients.

It's a fizzy flavorful drink.

I need to make a search for the kind I like here.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: daniel1948 on May 15, 2019, 08:40:18 PM
Pointless. Drink beer, don't drink beer, there is no try.

I think you are being intentionally silly, but I'm never entirely sure with these things. I had to try a number of different brands before I found the one I like best.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on May 16, 2019, 12:55:41 AM
Not silly are Yoda quotes, never!
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: random poet on May 16, 2019, 10:16:27 AM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Flavour is irrelevant. It is [size=78%]a carbonated drink with added sugar. That's a softdrink.[/size]

What kind of alcohol-free beer are you talking about.  Here in Germany there is no sugar, added or otherwise, in alcohol-free beer.


(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/jeverfun.png)


Partial translation: Brewed as regular beer.  Then the alcohol is removed.  No sugar.  Ingredients: water, malt, hops, fermentation carbonic acid.
Sure. This is why I also wrote "always read the labels." Quality will vary.

The one you posted is still 2,1g of sugar. Only 20% of what is in a can of coke. ("Malt" is sugar.)


The one I posted contains 0 sugar.  Beer, according, to the USDA data base contains 0 sugar.  Malt (which is a grain) is fermented in brewing.  It all becomes alcohol; no sugar remains.
Sorry, I guess I was not clear. There are 2,1 g of carbs. They come from the malt. The malt is sugar. If the beer contained no sugar, it would have no carbs.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: daniel1948 on May 16, 2019, 11:38:21 AM
Not silly are Yoda quotes, never!

That movie saw never did I. Stupid very opinion was my it in.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: daniel1948 on May 16, 2019, 11:43:18 AM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Flavour is irrelevant. It is [size=78%]a carbonated drink with added sugar. That's a softdrink.[/size]

What kind of alcohol-free beer are you talking about.  Here in Germany there is no sugar, added or otherwise, in alcohol-free beer.


(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/jeverfun.png)


Partial translation: Brewed as regular beer.  Then the alcohol is removed.  No sugar.  Ingredients: water, malt, hops, fermentation carbonic acid.
Sure. This is why I also wrote "always read the labels." Quality will vary.

The one you posted is still 2,1g of sugar. Only 20% of what is in a can of coke. ("Malt" is sugar.)


The one I posted contains 0 sugar.  Beer, according, to the USDA data base contains 0 sugar.  Malt (which is a grain) is fermented in brewing.  It all becomes alcohol; no sugar remains.
Sorry, I guess I was not clear. There are 2,1 g of carbs. They come from the malt. The malt is sugar. If the beer contained no sugar, it would have no carbs.

Not all carbs are sugar. And even if there were two grams of sugar in a N/A beer, that's 1/20 of the sugar in a Coke (non-diet). Nobody by a LCHF extremist would be concerned about two grams of sugar.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: daniel1948 on May 16, 2019, 11:46:17 AM
P.S. There are 9 grams of sugar in a glass of carrot juice and 36 in a glass of grape juice. Beer is looking pretty good now, as far as sugar goes.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Friendly Angel on May 16, 2019, 12:06:33 PM
Beer, according, to the USDA data base contains 0 sugar.  Malt (which is a grain) is fermented in brewing.  It all becomes alcohol; no sugar remains.

Beer yeast converts about 80% of the sugars to alcohol.  Brewers craft their mash recipes to achieve a desired mix of fermentable and unfermentable sugars like dextrines, which apparently the USDA doesn't consider to be a sugar, but still a carb.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Noisy Rhysling on May 16, 2019, 12:19:43 PM
Not silly are Yoda quotes, never!

That movie saw never did I. Stupid very opinion was my it in.
Best kind fun, yes it is!
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Calinthalus on May 16, 2019, 04:45:34 PM

The sugar in beer is maltose, not sucrose.  It's not the same thing to the human body.  Some beer also contains lactose (milk stouts for instance) or other sugars used in the process.  Dextrose from corn, or Sucrose from beets are used in various recipes.

The percentage of yeasties eating sugar will depend on a ton of factors but it could get up to 100% of all sugar in the wort.  If your Original Gravity of your mash is low enough, and your yeast healthy enough, you could burn off all the sugar for a super-dry beer.


Making alcohol-free beer is interesting.  There is some sold that's essentially a beer-flavored concoction of chemicals, so I don't know what kind of sugar level that might have.  You can, however, make any beer alcohol-free (nominally of course) by holding at a specific temperature for a given time that evaporates off the alcohol but not the water (which boils off at a lower temperature) which is to say, distill the alcohol off the beer without actually capturing it.


Don't know if that's the process commercial alcohol-free beer is using or not.

Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: daniel1948 on May 16, 2019, 07:38:21 PM
Quote
... distill the alcohol off the beer without actually capturing it. ...

My guess is they would capture it. Waste not, want not. It's got to have some value for something.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: jt512 on May 16, 2019, 10:53:53 PM
Random Poet was right about one thing: you do have to check the label.  I went out and bought three alcohol-free pilsners (without looking first at the labels): a Jever, a Bitburger and a Krombacher.  Turns out that of the three only the Jever contains no sugar.  The Bitburger label states 7.8g carbohydrate per 100 ml, of which 4.4 g, are sugar.  In contrast, the Jever label, as advertised, states 2.1 g carbohydrate / 100 ml, 0.0 g sugar.  I tried the Bitburger and it tastes very sweet.  The Jever, on the other hand, does not taste sweet at all.  It has only 13 kcal / 100 ml, and tastes quite similar to regular Jever pilsner.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: bachfiend on May 16, 2019, 11:14:15 PM
P.S. There are 9 grams of sugar in a glass of carrot juice and 36 in a glass of grape juice. Beer is looking pretty good now, as far as sugar goes.

I know what I’d prefer to drink.  I haven’t had any carrot juice for almost three weeks, and I’m looking forward to some when I get back to Australia in about three weeks.  I’ll try the Jeveraner when I get to Duisburg (I’m there for 11 nights, which should be long enough to drink a 6-pack).  Assuming I can find it in the supermarket (which I should be able to do - German supermarkets sell a very large assortment of drinks).
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: bachfiend on May 17, 2019, 04:34:41 AM
You are basically drinking a hops-flavoured softdrink. So, the usual consideration about drinking sugary beverages apply. Always check the labels.

It's not really a soft-drink, or at least it doesn't taste like such. It is an alcohol-free (well, 0.4%) IPA, i.e very different taste from Coke, Fanta, etc.
Flavour is irrelevant. It is [size=78%]a carbonated drink with added sugar. That's a softdrink.[/size]

What kind of alcohol-free beer are you talking about.  Here in Germany there is no sugar, added or otherwise, in alcohol-free beer.


(http://jt512.dyndns.org/images/jeverfun.png)


Partial translation: Brewed as regular beer.  Then the alcohol is removed.  No sugar.  Ingredients: water, malt, hops, fermentation carbonic acid.

I tried a bottle this morning.  I noticed that the very small, not very good supermarket I visit in Hamburg sells them singly, along with a lot of other beverages.  I had it at room temperature, which isn’t saying much - it’s colder than I like.  It’s very pleasant, and has a rather tart taste.  I’m glad it’s not available in Australia, as I could become addicted.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Quetzalcoatl on May 25, 2019, 03:15:06 PM
According to what I have read, alcohol-free (well, almost) beer can give a similar effect as alcoholic beer, by the taste (I guess that is through learned association) as well as the environment around. The dopamine in the brain can be increased by it. While we know that alcohol is really a poison, would the similar effect caused by alcohol-free beer as previously described have any adverse health effects?
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: jt512 on May 25, 2019, 07:27:11 PM
According to what I have read, alcohol-free (well, almost) beer can give a similar effect as alcoholic beer...


Bullshit.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: daniel1948 on May 25, 2019, 07:50:11 PM
Personally, I'm not concerned about the very small amount of sugar (or alcohol) in my N/A beer. I enjoy the taste and always have. (My step-father gave me beer when I was a baby, and apparently I loved it. I've certainly liked the taste for as long as I can remember.) I also love fresh carrot juice. Bottled, less so, but I still like it.

The only alcohol I drink is the very small amount in my occasional N/A beer, but the other day I had two of them, and I slept better than I normally do. Fell asleep faster and slept longer. Could be a coincidence. If the bottles are 12 ounces each, then I had the alcohol equivalent of two ounces of beer. And I'm not accustomed to having more than half that, a few times a month.

It would not surprise me if a very small amount of alcohol could affect me.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: Quetzalcoatl on May 26, 2019, 09:04:04 AM
According to what I have read, alcohol-free (well, almost) beer can give a similar effect as alcoholic beer...


Bullshit.

You read the entire post I see...
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: jt512 on May 26, 2019, 09:21:03 AM
According to what I have read, alcohol-free (well, almost) beer can give a similar effect as alcoholic beer...


Bullshit.

You read the entire post I see...


You see correctly.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: CarbShark on May 26, 2019, 11:44:16 AM
Random Poet was right about one thing: you do have to check the label.  I went out and bought three alcohol-free pilsners (without looking first at the labels): a Jever, a Bitburger and a Krombacher.  Turns out that of the three only the Jever contains no sugar.  The Bitburger label states 7.8g carbohydrate per 100 ml, of which 4.4 g, are sugar. In contrast, the Jever label, as advertised, states 2.1 g carbohydrate / 100 ml, 0.0 g sugar.  I tried the Bitburger and it tastes very sweet.  The Jever, on the other hand, does not taste sweet at all.  It has only 13 kcal / 100 ml, and tastes quite similar to regular Jever pilsner.

That's actually a lot of carbs and sugar, per 12 ounces. (Which is the serving size most common in the US).

That's about 28g Carbs and 15g sugar.

A lot more than regular beer (which I stopped drinking 10 years ago):

(https://philly.thedrinknation.com/images/articles/Beer-Nutrition-Fl.jpg)

---Oh, wait, that's not an actual label, but I think the carbs are correct.  I'll double check.


My answer to the question is that alcohol free beer effects health in the same way that any drink, high in fast simple carbs does.

So I avoid it.
Title: Re: Does "alcohol-free" (0.4%) drinks affect health in any way?
Post by: CarbShark on May 26, 2019, 12:13:50 PM
Here's some better information



https://www.millercoors.com/sites/millercoors/files/Web%20Site%20Nutritionals%20Update%20Combined%2005-10-2019.pdf (https://www.millercoors.com/sites/millercoors/files/Web%20Site%20Nutritionals%20Update%20Combined%2005-10-2019.pdf)

Quote
Miller Genuine Draft
Serving size: 12 fl oz.
12.2g carbs
0g sugar
Ingredients: Water, Barley Malt, Corn Syrup (Maltose – not High-Fructose Corn Syrup), Yeast, Hop Extract, Hops