Author Topic: Common Cognitive Distortions  (Read 918 times)

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Offline lonely moa

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Re: Common Cognitive Distortions
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2019, 04:59:06 AM »
Is it specific to Americans?

I think not.  I will be ordering th book shortly.  I heard an interview with Jonathan Haidt on RNZ.
"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline fuzzyMarmot

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Re: Common Cognitive Distortions
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2019, 05:33:13 AM »
Is it specific to Americans?

I think not.  I will be ordering th book shortly.  I heard an interview with Jonathan Haidt on RNZ.

Be forewarned: it gives a highly unrepresentative portrait of higher education in the U.S.

Offline DanDanDan

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Re: Common Cognitive Distortions
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2019, 09:23:49 AM »
Using the principal of charity, I can see how the author made an argument for the idea that America is going down the tubes.

Still, IMO, many many many reasons for a positive outlook were left out. For one, we now know to look out for these risk factors.

And two, VR baby! I'm with the panel on the pod when I say that VR has barely begun to change the world, and that the applications in the worlds of medicine and psychotherapy are mind boggling.

Finally, IMO, the doom and gloom attitude brought on by fear mongering like this is a product of over-intillectualizationitude, and that's a problem that I soooooo identify with. Luckily, I've learned a lot about the ways of the don't-Force-it, and the future's so bright yadda yadda yadda.

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Offline superdave

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Re: Common Cognitive Distortions
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2019, 07:48:08 PM »
I finished the book but I am super busy so here is a very short review.

1)  the most persuasive arguments were the ones against helicopter parenting.
2)   the least persuasive, ironically, were the ones that really were the impetus for the book in the first place.  I am not convinced that there is an epidemic of colleges bowing down to the demands of "safe spaces" and microaggressions, though I acknowledge there have a been a pretty terrible individual cases.
3) I think there is a lot of merit to the idea that the internet, especially social media, is damaging to people.  I cite that most of the incidents described in point 2 began with internet based communications
4) The chapter on social justice  really felt out of place though I get what they were trying to say.  When combined with us Vs them thinking and call out culture, social justice can become a negative thing.  But I think they take it too far.  For examples, microagressions.  I don't like the word, but I think the concept makes sense.  Just because people use microagressions in a lazy way doesn't make the concept wrong.
I disavow anyone in the movement involved in any illegal,unethical, sexist, or racist behavior. However, I don't have the energy or time to investigate each person and case, and a lack of individual disavowals for each incident should not be construed as condoning such behavior.

 

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